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The Sandhills (or Carolina Sandhills) is a 15-60 km wide physiographic region within the U.S. Atlantic Coastal Plain
Atlantic Coastal Plain
province, along the updip (inland) margin of this province in the States of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. The extent of the Carolina Sandhills is shown clearly in maps of the ecoregions of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia.[1][2] Sand Hills cottage architecture is a style that developed in this area in the early- to mid-1800s; it is a modified form of Greek Revival architecture.

Contents

1 Geology 2 Soils 3 Vegetation 4 Wildlife 5 Preservation 6 References 7 External links

Geology[edit] The unconsolidated sand of the Carolina Sandhills is mapped as the Quaternary
Quaternary
Pinehurst Formation, and is interpreted as eolian (wind-blown) sand sheets and dunes that were mobilized episodically from approximately 75,000 to 6,000 years ago. Most of the published luminescence ages from the sand are coincident with the last glaciation, a time when the southeastern United States was characterized by colder air temperatures and stronger winds.[3] The Carolina Sandhills region also contains outcrops of Cretaceous-age (~100 million years old) strata of sand, sandstone, and clay. These Cretaceous
Cretaceous
strata are thought to be the source of the sand of the Pinehurst Formation. Soils[edit] The soils of the Carolina Sandhills are, in fact, very sandy seeing as they are moist, are quite spectacular hills made of sand. [clarification needed] The soil is also used to maintain its nutrients and relative position as prey and comfortable living for the animals whom are trained to hunt and survive with the benefits of soil. [clarification needed] According to soil surveys of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, many soils of the Carolina Sandhills are mapped as the Alpin sand or Candor sand.[4] Vegetation[edit] The Carolina Sandhills region is characterized by xeric sand community vegetation dominated by pine trees.[5][6][7] Much of the Carolina Sandhills is known for an ecosystem of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) and wiregrass (Aristida stricta). This ecosystem is maintained by frequent low-intensity fires that facilitate the reproduction of the trees, wiregrass, and associated plants. This ecosystem once formed one of the more extensive ecosystems in North America, and longleaf pine was once the dominant tree that covered ~60% of the Atlantic Coastal Plain
Atlantic Coastal Plain
and Gulf of Mexico Coastal Plain. Today, however, only about 1% of this region supports longleaf pine.[8][page needed] Wildlife[edit] More than 30 plant and animal species associated with the longleaf pine ecosystem are listed as threatened or endangered, and many of these species require interactions with the longleaf pine and with frequent low-intensity fires. The most famous endangered species of the Carolina Sandhills is probably the red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis), which prefers to excavate nesting and roosting cavities in living trees of longleaf pine that are 80–120 years old.[9] Preservation[edit] The Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge
Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge
in northeastern South Carolina attempts to preserve a fraction of the original Sandhills longleaf pine ecosystem. The refuge is located in Chesterfield County near McBee. References[edit]

^ Griffith, G.E., Omernik, J.M., Comstock, J.A., Schafale, M.P., McNab, W.H., Lenat, D.R., MacPherson, T.F., Glover, J.B., Shelburne, V.B., 2002. Ecoregions of North Carolina
North Carolina
and South Carolina. U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, 1:1,500,000 scale map, 1 sheet. ^ Griffith, G.E., Omernik, J.M., Comstock, J.A., Lawrence, S., Martin, G., Goddard, A., Hulcher, V.J., Foster, T., 2001. Ecoregions of Alabama and Georgia. U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, 1:1,700,000 scale map, 1 sheet. ^ Swezey, C.S., Fitzwater, B.A., Whittecar, G.R., Mahan, S.A., Garrity, C.P., Aleman Gonzalez, W.B., and Dobbs, K.M., 2016, "The Carolina Sandhills: Quaternary
Quaternary
eolian sand sheets and dunes along the updip margin of the Atlantic Coastal Plain
Atlantic Coastal Plain
province, southeastern United States": Quaternary
Quaternary
Research, v. 86, p. 271-286; www.cambridge.org/core/journals/quaternary-research ^ Swezey, C.S., Fitzwater, B.A., Whittecar, G.R., Mahan, S.A., Garrity, C.P., Aleman Gonzalez, W.B., and Dobbs, K.M., 2016, The Carolina Sandhills: Quaternary
Quaternary
eolian sand sheets and dunes along the updip margin of the Atlantic Coastal Plain
Atlantic Coastal Plain
province, southeastern United States: Quaternary
Quaternary
Research, v. 86, p. 271-286; www.cambridge.org/core/journals/quaternary-research ^ Christensen, N.L., 2000. "Vegetation of the southeastern Coastal Plain". In: Barbour, M.G., Billings, W.D. (Eds.), North American Terrestrial Vegetation, second ed. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, p. 397-448. ^ Earley, L.S., 2004. Looking for Longleaf: The Fall and Rise of an American Forest. The University of North Carolina
North Carolina
Press, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 336p. ^ Sorrie, B.A., 2011. A Field Guide to Wildflowers of the Sandhills Region: North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia. University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. ^ Earley, 2004. Looking for Longleaf ^ Askins, A.H., 2010, Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan: U.S. Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service–Southeast Region, 234p.

External links[edit]

Aspects of NC Climate--Carolina Sandhills—accessed 19 March 2007 Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge—accessed 19 March 2007 Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge
Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge
(Brochure)—accessed 19 March 2007 Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge--fire management—accessed 19 March 2007 Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge--flora and fauna—accessed 19 March 2007 South Carolina
South Carolina
Naturally—accessed 19 March 2007 Sandhills--Nature Conservancy—accessed 19 March 2007 Sandhills Fact Sheet—Savannah River Ecology Laboratory—accessed 19 March 2007 South Carolina
South Carolina
Department of Environmental Resources—Sandhills Ecoregion
Ecoregion
Terrestrial Habitat—accessed 19 March 2007.

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