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The CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF ST. JOHN THE EVANGELIST, usually known as SALFORD CATHEDRAL, is a Roman Catholic cathedral in the City of Salford in Greater Manchester , England
England
. Located on Chapel Street, Salford, not far from Manchester city centre , it is the seat of the Bishop
Bishop
of Salford and mother church of the Diocese of Salford . The architectural style is decorated neo-Gothic , and the Cathedral
Cathedral
is a Grade II* listed building .

CONTENTS

* 1 History * 2 Organ * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links

HISTORY

St. John's Church, Salford, was built between 1844 and 1848 to designs of Matthew Ellison Hadfield
Matthew Ellison Hadfield
(1812–1885) of Weightman and Hadfield of Sheffield, by Benjamin Hollins of Manchester. Hadfield's design for St. John's, the first cruciform Catholic church to be built in England
England
since the Reformation, was closely modelled on a number of noted medieval churches. The "west" (actually south) front and nave are copied on a reduced scale from Howden Minster in the East Riding of Yorkshire; the choir and sanctuary are closely modelled on those of Selby Abbey
Selby Abbey
in North Yorkshire; the decorations of the groined vault are copied from the church of St Jacques in Liege , Belgium; the tower and spire, the latter the tallest in Lancashire at the time of building, are derived from the church of St Mary Magdalene, Newark-on-Trent , Nottinghamshire.

Two local businessmen, Daniel Lee (d. 1858) and John Leeming (d. 1877), each donated £1,000 towards the cost of the church and furnishings; both benefactors are commemorated in chantries at the liturgical east end of the choir. The Cathedral's "east" window of 1856, by William Wailes of Newcastle, depicts the history of Catholic Christianity in England, from the conversion of Ethelbert by St. Augustine in 597, to the restoration of the Catholic hierarchy in 1850. The total cost of building the Cathedral
Cathedral
was £18,000.

The foundation stone was laid in 1844 by Bishop
Bishop
James Sharples , coadjutor to Bishop
Bishop
George Brown , Vicar Apostolic of the Lancashire District . The church was opened on 9 August 1848: Bishop
Bishop
Brown celebrated a Solemn High Mass in the presence of the Bishops of the other Vicariates of England
England
and Wales. St. John's was elevated to cathedral status in 1852 following the erection in September 1850 of the Diocese of Salford, becoming one of the first four Catholic cathedrals in England
England
and Wales since the English Reformation . On 25 July 1851 William Turner was consecrated the first Bishop
Bishop
of Salford in St. John's. In the same ceremony the Rector of St. John's, George Errington was consecrated first Bishop
Bishop
of Plymouth .

Thirty years later in October 1881 a violent storm caused serious damage to the Cathedral's 240-foot (73.2 m) spire. Canon Beesley, then the administrator, succeeded in raising funds for repairs to the spire and generally refurbishing the fabric of the building. He also oversaw the furnishing of the new chapel of the blessed sacrament in the 'south' transept in 1884, to designs of Peter Paul Pugin , third son of A.W.N. Pugin .

By early 1890 the last £1,000 was paid to settle the original debt for the building of the Cathedral, which led to the consecration of the Cathedral
Cathedral
in the same year by the second Bishop
Bishop
of Salford, Herbert Vaughan