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Salé
Salé
(Arabic: سلا‎ Sala, Berber ⵙⵍⴰ Sla) is a city in north-western Morocco, on the right bank of the Bou Regreg
Bou Regreg
river, opposite the national capital Rabat, for which it serves as a commuter town. Founded in about 1030 by Arabic-speaking Berbers, the Banu Ifran,[3] it later became a haven for pirates in the 17th century as an independent republic before being incorporated into Alaouite Morocco. The city's name is sometimes transliterated as Salli or Sallee. The National Route 6 connects it to Fez and Meknes
Meknes
in the east and the N1 to Kénitra
Kénitra
in the north-east. It recorded a population of 890,403 in the 2014 Moroccan census.[2]

Contents

1 History

1.1 Republic of Salé 1.2 20th-century socio-political development 1.3 Culture

2 Subdivisions 3 Climate 4 Modern city

4.1 Sports

5 Transport

5.1 Air 5.2 Trains 5.3 Tram

6 In popular culture 7 Notable residents 8 Partner cities 9 See also 10 References 11 External links

History[edit]

Great Mosque
Mosque
of Salé

Map of downtown Salé

Battlements of Salé

The Phoenicians established a settlement called Sala,[4][5] later the site of a Roman colony, Sala Colonia, on the south side of the Bou Regreg estuary.[6] It is sometimes confused with Salé, on the opposite north bank. Salé was founded in about 1030 by Arabic-speaking Berbers[7] who apparently cultivated the legend that the name was derived from that of Salah, son of Ham, son of Noah.[8] The Banu Ifran
Banu Ifran
Berber dynasty began construction of a mosque about the time the city was founded.[9] The present-day Great Mosque
Mosque
of Salé was built during the 12th-century reign of the Almohad sultan Abu Yaqub Yusuf,[10] although not completed until 1196.[11] During the 17th century, Rabat
Rabat
was known as New Salé, or Salé
Salé
la neuve (in French), as it expanded beyond the ancient city walls to include the Chellah, which had become a fortified royal necropolis under the rule of Abu Yaqub Yusuf's son, Abu Yusuf Yaqub al-Mansur.[12] In September 1260, Salé
Salé
was raided and occupied by warriors sent in a fleet of ships by King Alfonso X of Castile.[13][14] After the victory of the Marinid dynasty, the historic Bab el-Mrissa
Bab el-Mrissa
was constructed by the Sultan Abu Yusuf Yaqub ibn Abd Al-Haqq
Abu Yusuf Yaqub ibn Abd Al-Haqq
which remains as a landmark of the city.[15] Republic of Salé[edit] Main article: Republic of Salé In the 17th century, Salé
Salé
became a haven for Barbary pirates, among them Moriscos turned corsair, who formed an independent Republic of Salé.[16] Salé
Salé
pirates (the well-known " Salé
Salé
Rovers")[17] roamed the seas, and cruised the shipping routes between Atlantic colonial ports and Europe, seizing ships from the Americas and Europe for goods and captives.[18] They sold their crews and sometimes passengers into slavery in the Arabic world.[19] Despite the legendary reputation of the Salé
Salé
corsairs, their ships were based across the river in Rabat, called "New Salé" by the English.[20][21] The European powers took action to try to subdue the threat from the Barbary Coast. On 20 July 1629, the city of Salé
Salé
was bombarded by French Admiral Isaac de Razilly
Isaac de Razilly
with a fleet composed of the ships Licorne, Saint-Louis, Griffon, Catherine, Hambourg, Sainte-Anne, Saint-Jean; his forces destroyed three corsair ships.[22][23] 20th-century socio-political development[edit] During the decades preceding the independence of Morocco, Salé
Salé
was the stronghold of some "national movement" activists. The reading of the "Latif" (a politically charged prayer to God, read in mosques in loud unison) was launched in Salé
Salé
and became popular in some cities of Morocco. In 1851, Salé
Salé
was bombarded in retaliation for piracy being practiced by Moroccan ships against European traders.[24] A petition against the so-called "Berber Dahir" (a decree that allowed some Berber-speaking areas of Morocco
Morocco
to continue using Berber Law, as opposed to Sharia Law) was given to Sultan Mohamed V and the Resident General of France. The petition and the "Latif" prayer led to the withdrawal and adjustment of the so-called "Berber Decree" of May 1930. The activists who opposed the "Berber Decree" apparently feared that the explicit recognition of the Berber Customary Law (a very secular-minded Berber tradition) would threaten the position of Islam and its Sharia law system. Others believed that opposing the French-engineered "Berber Decree" was a means to turn the table against the French occupation of Morocco. The widespread storm that was created by the "Berber Dahir" controversy created a somewhat popular Moroccan nationalist elite based in Salé
Salé
and Fez; it had strong anti-Berber, anti-West, anti-secular, and pro Arab-Islamic inclinations. This period helped develop the political awareness and activism that would lead fourteen years later to the signing of the Manifest of Independence of Morocco on 11 January 1944 by many "Slawi" activists and leaders. Salé
Salé
has been deemed to have been the stronghold of the Moroccan left for many decades, where many leaders have resided. Culture[edit] Salé
Salé
has played a rich and important part in Moroccan history. The first demonstrations for independence against the French, for example, began in Salé. Numerous government officials, decision makers, and royal advisers of Morocco
Morocco
have been from Salé. Salé
Salé
people, the Slawis, have always had a "tribal" sense of belonging, a sense of pride that developed into a feeling of superiority towards the "berranis", i.e. Outsiders.[citation needed] Subdivisions[edit] The prefecture is divided administratively into the following:[25]

Name Geographic code Type Households Population (2014) Foreign population Moroccan population Notes

Bab Lamrissa 441.01.03. Arrondissement 44636 174936 668 174266

Bettana 441.01.05. Arrondissement 22360 95291 386 94905

Hssaine 441.01.06. Arrondissement 51858 214540 470 214070

Layayda 441.01.07. Arrondissement 33522 153361 163 153198

Sidi Bouknadel 441.01.08. Municipality 4955 25255 9 25246

Tabriquet 441.01.09. Arrondissement 61101 252277 629 251648

Shoul 441.03.01. Rural commune 3925 19915 6 19909 in the Salé
Salé
Suburbs Circle

Ameur 441.03.05. Rural commune 8983 46590 16 46574 in the Salé
Salé
Suburbs Circle

Climate[edit] Salé
Salé
features a Mediterranean climate
Mediterranean climate
(Csa) with warm to hot dry summers and mild damp winters. Located along the Atlantic Ocean, Salé has a mild, temperate climate, shifting from cool in winter to warm days in the summer months. The nights are always cool (or cold in winter, it can reach Sub 0 °C (32 °F) sometimes), with daytime temperatures generally rising about +7/8 C° (+15/18 F°). The winter highs typically reach only 17.2 °C (63.0 °F) in December–February. Summer daytime highs usually hover around 25 °C (77.0 °F), but may occasionally exceed 30 °C (86.0 °F), especially during heat waves. Summer nights are usually pleasant and cool, ranging between 11 °C (51.8 °F) and 19 °C (66.2 °F) and rarely exceeding 20 °C (68.0 °F). Rabat
Rabat
belongs to the sub-humid bioclimatic zone with an average annual precipitation of 560 mm. Salé's climate resembles the southwest coast of the Iberian Peninsula and the coast of SoCal.

Climate data for Salé
Salé
(Rabat– Salé
Salé
Airport) 1961–1990, extremes 1943–present

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year

Record high °C (°F) 30.0 (86) 31.0 (87.8) 35.8 (96.4) 37.6 (99.7) 43.0 (109.4) 43.7 (110.7) 47.2 (117) 45.8 (114.4) 42.3 (108.1) 38.0 (100.4) 35.1 (95.2) 30.0 (86) 47.2 (117)

Average high °C (°F) 17.2 (63) 17.7 (63.9) 19.2 (66.6) 20.0 (68) 22.1 (71.8) 24.1 (75.4) 26.8 (80.2) 27.1 (80.8) 26.4 (79.5) 24.0 (75.2) 20.6 (69.1) 17.7 (63.9) 21.9 (71.4)

Daily mean °C (°F) 12.6 (54.7) 13.1 (55.6) 14.2 (57.6) 15.2 (59.4) 17.4 (63.3) 19.8 (67.6) 22.2 (72) 22.4 (72.3) 21.5 (70.7) 19.0 (66.2) 15.9 (60.6) 13.2 (55.8) 17.2 (63)

Average low °C (°F) 8.0 (46.4) 8.6 (47.5) 9.2 (48.6) 10.4 (50.7) 12.7 (54.9) 15.4 (59.7) 17.6 (63.7) 17.7 (63.9) 16.7 (62.1) 14.1 (57.4) 11.1 (52) 8.7 (47.7) 12.5 (54.5)

Record low °C (°F) −3.2 (26.2) −2.6 (27.3) −0.4 (31.3) 3.8 (38.8) 5.3 (41.5) 9.0 (48.2) 10.0 (50) 11.0 (51.8) 10.0 (50) 7.0 (44.6) 0.0 (32) 0.3 (32.5) −3.2 (26.2)

Average precipitation mm (inches) 77.2 (3.039) 74.1 (2.917) 60.9 (2.398) 62.0 (2.441) 25.3 (0.996) 6.7 (0.264) 0.5 (0.02) 1.3 (0.051) 5.7 (0.224) 43.6 (1.717) 96.7 (3.807) 100.9 (3.972) 554.9 (21.846)

Average precipitation days 9.9 9.8 9.0 8.7 5.7 2.4 0.3 0.4 2.4 6.4 10.2 10.4 75.6

Average relative humidity (%) 82 82 80 78 77 78 78 79 80 79 80 83 80

Mean monthly sunshine hours 179.9 182.3 232.0 254.5 290.5 287.6 314.7 307.0 261.1 235.1 190.5 180.9 2,916.1

Source #1: NOAA[26]

Source #2: Deutscher Wetterdienst
Deutscher Wetterdienst
(humidity, 1973–1993),[27] Meteo Climat (record highs and lows)[28]

Modern city[edit]

Bouregreg Marina

Recent developments, including the new bridge connecting to Rabat, the new Rabat- Salé
Salé
tramway, marina and coastal development demonstrate government investment. Private development companies such as Emaar Properties are also investing in the area. High unemployment used to be a serious issue to the Salé
Salé
area, with the numerous textile factories located in this area being the only real source of work, this is recently diversing into other areas such as international call centres, electronics and recently[when?] a new "techno park" was opened, which was modeled on the Casablanca
Casablanca
techno centre success. Water supply
Water supply
and wastewater collection in Salé
Salé
was[when?] irregular, with poorer and illegal housing units suffering the highest costs and most acute scarcities.[29] Much of the city used to rely upon communal standpipes, which were often shut down, depriving some neighbourhoods of safe drinking water[29] for indefinite periods of time. Nevertheless, Salé
Salé
fared better than inland Moroccan locations, where water scarcity was even more acute.[29] Improvements from the government, local businesses and the water distribution companies of Regie de distribution d'Eau & d'Electricite de Rabat- Salé
Salé
(REDAL) as of 2010[update] have meant that this situation has improved drastically.[30] Sports[edit] In December 2017, AS Salé
Salé
became Africa's basketball club Champion. It was the first continental crown in the club's history.[31] The A.S.S. is the football club of the city, and the president is Abderrahmane Chokri.[citation needed] Transport[edit] Air[edit]

Rabat- Salé
Salé
Airport

Salé's main airport is Rabat–Salé Airport
Rabat–Salé Airport
, it's located in Salé also serving Rabat
Rabat
the capital city of Morocco Trains[edit] Salé
Salé
is served by two principal railway stations run by the national rail service, the ONCF. Salé-Ville is the main inter-city station, from which trains run south to Rabat, Casablanca, Marrakech
Marrakech
and El Jadida, north to Tanger, or east to Meknes, Fes, Taza and Oujda. Tram[edit]

Rabat- Salé
Salé
tramway

The Rabat-Salé tramway
Rabat-Salé tramway
is a tram system which was put into service on May 23, 2011 in the Moroccan cities of Rabat
Rabat
and Salé. The network has two lines for a total length of 19 km (12 miles) and 31 stops. It is operated by Veolia Transdev with Alstom Citadis trams. In popular culture[edit] The film Black Hawk Down was partially filmed in Salé, in particular the wide angle aerial shots with helicopters flying down the coastline. The character Robinson Crusoe, in Daniel Defoe's novel by the same name, spends time in captivity of the local pirates, the Salé
Salé
Rovers, and at last sails off to liberty from the mouth of the Salé
Salé
river. Notable residents[edit]

Abu Zakariya Yahya al-Wattasi, governor of Salé
Salé
for the Marinids Saad Hassar, politician Amina Benkhadra, politician Mohamed Amine Sbihi, politician Abdelwahed Radi, politician Raphael Ankawa, Chief Rabbi of Morocco
Morocco
and a noted commentator, talmudist, posek, and author. Houcine Slaoui, musician Hajj Ali Zniber, writer Abdellah Taϊa, writer Mohammed Zniber, writer and historian Ahmad ibn Khalid al-Nasiri, historian Ahmed al-Salawi, writer Reda Rhalimi, basketball player Amine Laâlou, athlete Merouane Zemmama, footballer El Mehdi Malki, judoka Hayat Lambarki, athlete

Partner cities[edit]

Tlaxcala, Mexico Sochi, Russia

See also[edit]

Bouknadel Le Bouregreg

References[edit]

^ Le Président de la commune urbaine de Salé(in French) ^ a b c d "Note de présentation des premiers résultats du Recensement Général de la Population et de l'Habitat 2014" (in French). High Commission for Planning. 20 March 2015. p. 8. Retrieved 9 October 2017.  ^ J. D. Fage (1 February 1979). The Cambridge History of Africa. Cambridge University Press. p. 663. ISBN 978-0-521-21592-3.  ^ Glenn Markoe (2000). Phoenicians. University of California Press. p. 188. ISBN 978-0-520-22614-2.  ^ Anna Gallina Zevi; Rita Turchetti (2004). Méditerranée occidentale antique: les échanges. Atti del seminario (Marsiglia, 14-15 maggio 2004). Ediz. francese, italiana e spagnola. Rubbettino Editore. p. 224. ISBN 978-88-498-1116-2.  ^ Kenneth L. Brown (1 January 1976). People of Salé: Tradition and Change in a Moroccan City, 1830-1930. Manchester University Press. p. 1. ISBN 978-0-7190-0623-4.  ^ M. Elfasi; Ivan Hrbek; Unesco. International Scientific Committee for the Drafting of a General History of Africa (1988). Africa from the Seventh to the Eleventh Century. UNESCO. p. 339. ISBN 978-92-3-101709-4.  ^ Jāmiʻat Muḥammad al-Khāmis. Kullīyat al-Ādāb wa-al-ʻUlūm al-Insānīyah; Kullīyat al-Ādāb wa-al-ʻUlūm al-Insānīyah (1969). Hespéris tamuda. 10–13. Editions techniques nord-africaines. p. 92.  ^ "وزارة الأوقاف و الشؤون الإسلامية". Islam-maroc.gov.ma (in Arabic). Archived from the original on 2008.  ^ Trudy Ring; Noelle Watson; Paul Schellinger (5 March 2014). Middle East and Africa: International Dictionary of Historic Places. Routledge. p. 617. ISBN 978-1-134-25986-1.  ^ Janet L. Abu-Lughod (14 July 2014). Rabat: Urban Apartheid in Morocco. Princeton University Press. p. 57. ISBN 978-1-4008-5303-8.  ^ Jonathan Bloom; Sheila Blair (14 May 2009). Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art & Architecture: Three-Volume Set. OUP USA. p. 143. ISBN 978-0-19-530991-1.  ^ Dufourcq, Charles-Emmanuel (1966). Un projet castillan du XIIIe siècle : la croisade d'Afrique (in French). Faculty of Arts. p. 28.  ^ Joseph F. O'Callaghan (31 August 1983). A History of Medieval Spain. Cornell University Press. p. 364. ISBN 0-8014-9264-5.  ^ أنا باب المريسة وهذه حكايتي. El Mghriby. Retrieved January 27, 2018. ^ Alan G. Jamieson (15 February 2013). Lords of the Sea: A History of the Barbary Corsairs. Reaktion Books. p. 106. ISBN 978-1-86189-946-0.  ^ Adrian Tinniswood (11 November 2010). Pirates of Barbary: Corsairs, Conquests and Captivity in the Seventeenth-Century Mediterranean. Penguin Publishing Group. p. 133. ISBN 978-1-101-44531-0.  ^ Alex Ritsema (March 2008). Pirates and Privateers from the Low Countries, C.1500-C.1810. Lulu.com. p. 49. ISBN 978-1-4092-0171-7.  ^ D'Maris Coffman; Adrian Leonard; William O'Reilly (5 December 2014). The Atlantic World. Routledge. p. 178. ISBN 978-1-317-57605-1.  ^ Roger Coindreau (2006). Les corsaires de Salé. Eddif. pp. 45–46. ISBN 978-9981-896-76-5.  ^ Alan G. Jamieson (15 February 2013). Lords of the Sea: A History of the Barbary Corsairs. Reaktion Books. p. 104. ISBN 978-1-86189-946-0.  ^ Coindreau 2006. p. 192 ^ Jamieson 2013, p. 109 ^ "'Abd ar-Rasham". Encyclopædia Britannica. I: A-Ak - Bayes (15th ed.). Chicago, Illinois: Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. 2010. p. 17. ISBN 978-1-59339-837-8.  ^ 2014 Morocco
Morocco
Population Census(in Arabic) ^ " Rabat
Rabat
Climate Normals 1961–1990". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved October 14, 2016.  ^ "Klimatafel von Rabat- Salé
Salé
(Int. Flugh.) / Marokko" (PDF). Baseline climate means (1961–1990) from stations all over the world (in German). Deutscher Wetterdienst. Retrieved October 14, 2016.  ^ "Station Rabat" (PDF) (in French). Météo Climat. Retrieved October 14, 2016.  ^ a b c Guillaume Benoit and Aline Comeau, A Sustainable Future for the Mediterranean (2005) 640 pages ^ Richard N. Palmer (2010). World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2010: Challenges of Change. ASCE Publications. p. 826. ISBN 978-0-7844-7352-8.  ^ Basketball : L’AS Salé
Salé
champion d’Afrique, La Vie éco, 21 December 2017. Retrieved 27 December 2017 (in French)

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Salé.

Salé
Salé
entry in LexicOrient Le portail de la ville de Salé  "Sallee". New International Encyclopedia. 1905. 

v t e

Rabat-Salé-Kénitra
Rabat-Salé-Kénitra
region

Capital: Rabat

Provinces and Prefectures

Kénitra
Kénitra
Province Khémisset Province Sidi Kacem
Sidi Kacem
Province Sidi Slimane Province Rabat
Rabat
Prefecture Salé
Salé
Prefecture Skhirate- Témara
Témara
Prefecture

Cities

Khemisset Sidi Taibi Dar Gueddari Had Kourt Jorf El Melha Kenitra Khnichet Lalla Mimouna Mechra Bel Ksiri Mehdya Moulay Bousselham Ouazzane Oulad Slama Rabat Salé Sidi Allal Tazi Sidi Kacem Sidi Slimane Sidi Yahya El Gharb Skhirat Souk El Arbaa Témara Tiflet

v t e

Prefectures and provinces of Morocco

Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima

Prefectures

Tangier-Assilah M'diq-Fnideq

Provinces

Fahs-Anjra Tétouan Al Hoceïma Larache Chefchaouen Ouezzane

Oriental

Prefecture

Oujda-Angad

Provinces

Berkane Taourirt Jerada Figuig Nador Driouch Guercif

Fès-Meknès

Prefectures

Fès Meknès

Provinces

Boulemane Sefrou Moulay Yacoub El Hajeb Ifrane Taounate Taza

Rabat-Salé-Kénitra

Prefectures

Rabat Salé Skhirate-Témara

Provinces

Kénitra Khémisset Sidi Kacem Sidi Slimane

Béni Mellal-Khénifra

Provinces

Béni-Mellal Khouribga Khénifra Azilal Fquih Ben Salah

Casablanca-Settat

Prefectures

Casablanca Mohammedia

Provinces

Settat Berrechid Benslimane Sidi Bennour Nouaceur Médiouna El Jadida

Marrakesh-Safi

Prefecture

Marrakesh

Provinces

Al Haouz Chichaoua El Kelâa des Sraghna Essaouira Safi Rehamna Youssoufia

Drâa-Tafilalet

Provinces

Errachidia Zagora Midelt Ouarzazate Tinghir

Souss-Massa

Prefectures

Agadir-Ida Ou Tanane Inezgane-Aït Melloul

Provinces

Taroudant Tiznit Chtouka Aït Baha Tata

Guelmim-Oued Noun

Provinces

Assa-Zag Guelmim Tan-Tan Sidi Ifni

Laâyoune-Sakia El Hamra

Provinces

Laâyoune Tarfaya Boujdour Es Semara

Dakhla-Oued Ed-Dahab

Provinces

Aousserd Oued Ed-Dahab

v t e

Piracy

Periods

Ancient Mediterranean Golden Age

Republic of Pirates Libertatia

21st century

Types of pirate

Privateers Buccaneers Corsairs Sindhi corsairs Timber pirate River pirate Brethren of the Coast Barbary pirates Moro pirates Wōkòu Vikings Ushkuiniks Narentines Cilician pirates Confederate privateer Baltic Slavic pirates Uskoks Cossack pirates Sea Beggars Sea Dogs Fillibusters

Areas

Caribbean Lake Nicaragua British Virgin Islands Strait of Malacca Somali Coast Sulu Sea Falcon Lake South China Coast Anglo-Turkish piracy Port Royal Tortuga Saint-Malo Barbary Coast Lundy Lagos Salé Spanish Main Gulf of Guinea Indonesia Barataria Bay Persian Gulf

Noted pirates

Mansel Alcantra Chui A-poo Louis-Michel Aury Joseph Baker Hayreddin Barbarossa Joseph Barss Samuel Bellamy Charlotte de Berry Black Caesar Blackbeard Eli Boggs Stede Bonnet Anne Bonny Hippolyte Bouchard Abshir Boyah Roche Braziliano Henri Caesar Roberto Cofresí William Dampier Liang Daoming Diabolito Peter Easton Henry Every Alexandre Exquemelin Vincenzo Gambi Charles Gibbs Pedro Gilbert Nathaniel Gordon Laurens de Graaf Michel de Grammont Calico Jack Rahmah ibn Jabir al-Jalahimah Zheng Jing Jørgen Jørgensen Shirahama Kenki William Kidd Fūma Kotarō Jean Lafitte Limahong Samuel Hall Lord John Hawkins Bully Hayes Piet Pieterszoon Hein Moses Cohen Henriques Albert W. Hicks Nicholas van Hoorn Benjamin Hornigold Pierre Lafitte Olivier Levasseur Edward Low Hendrick Lucifer John Newland Maffitt Samuel Mason Henry Morgan Shap Ng-tsai Gan Ning François l'Olonnais Samuel Pallache Lawrence Prince Cai Qian Redbeard Bartholomew Roberts Lai Choi San Dan Seavey Ching Shih Benito de Soto Klaus Störtebeker Henry Strangways Cheung Po Tsai Dominique You Wang Zhi Zheng Zhilong

Categories

Piracy Pirates By nationality Barbary pirates Female pirates Years in piracy Fictional pirates

Pirate ships

Adventure Galley Fancy Ganj-i-Sawai Queen Anne's Revenge Quedagh Merchant Saladin Whydah Gally Marquis of Havana Ambrose Light York

Pirate hunters

Pedro Menéndez de Avilés Angelo Emo Richard Avery Hornsby Jose Campuzano-Polanco Robert Maynard Chaloner Ogle Pompey Woodes Rogers David Porter James Brooke Miguel Enríquez (privateer)

Pirate battles and incidents

Jiajing wokou raids Turkish Abductions Chepo Expedition Battle of Mandab Strait Battle of Pianosa Blockade of Charleston Battle of Cape Fear River Battle of Ocracoke Inlet Capture of the William Sack of Campeche Attack on Veracruz Raid on Cartagena Battle of Cape Lopez Capture of the Fancy Persian Gulf Campaign Battle of New Orleans Anti- Piracy
Piracy
in the Aegean Anti-piracy in the West Indies Capture of the Bravo Action of 9 November 1822 Capture of the El Mosquito Battle of Doro Passage Falklands Expedition Great Lakes Patrol Pirate attacks in Borneo Balanguingui Expedition Battle of Tysami Battle of Tonkin River Battle of Nam Quan Battle of Ty-ho Bay Battle of the Leotung Antelope incident North Star affair Battle off Mukah Salvador Pirates Battle of Boca Teacapan Capture of the Ambrose Light Irene incident 1985 Lahad Datu ambush Operation Enduring Freedom – HOA Action of 18 March 2006 Action of 3 June 2007 Action of 28 October 2007 Dai Hong Dan incident Operation Atalanta Carré d'As IV incident Action of 11 November 2008 Action of 9 April 2009 Maersk Alabama hijacking Operation Ocean Shield Action of 23 March 2010 Action of 1 April 2010 Action of 30 March 2010 Action of 5 April 2010 MV Moscow University hijacking Operation Dawn of Gulf of Aden Operation Dawn 8: Gulf of Aden Beluga Nomination incident Battle off Minicoy Island Quest incident MT Zafirah hijacking MT Orkim Harmony hijacking

Slave trade

African slave trade Atlantic slave trade Arab slave trade Barbary slave trade Blockade of Africa African Slave Trade Patrol Capture of the Providentia Capture of the Presidente Capture of the El Almirante Capture of the Marinerito Capture of the Veloz Passagera Capture of the Brillante Amistad Incident Capture of the Emanuela

Fictional pirates

Tom Ayrton Barbe Rouge Hector Barbossa Captain Blood Captain Crook Captain Flint José Gaspar Captain Hook Don Karnage Monkey D. Luffy Captain Nemo One Piece Captain Pugwash Red Rackham Captain Sabertooth Sandokan Long John Silver Jack Sparrow Captain Stingaree Roronoa Zoro

Miscellaneous

Truce of Ratisbon Piracy
Piracy
Act 1698 Piracy
Piracy
Act 1717 Piracy
Piracy
Act 1837 Paris Declaration Respecting Maritime Law Child pirate Golden Age of Piracy Jolly Roger Walking the plank Treasure
Treasure
map Buried treasure Pirate booty No purchase, no pay Marooning Pirate code Pirate utopia Victual Brothers Pirate Round Libertatia Sack of Baltimore A General History of the Pyrates Mutiny Pegleg Eyepatch Letter of marque Davy Jones' Locker Air pirate Space pirate

Lists

Pirates Privateers Timeline of piracy Pirate films Women in piracy Fictional pirates Pirates in popular culture List of ships attacked by Somali pirates

Literature

Treasure
Treasure
Island Facing the Flag On Stranger Tides Castaways of the Flying Dutchman The Angel's Command Voyage of Slaves Pirate Latitudes

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 127610980 GND: 4118282-0

Coordinates: 34°02′N 6°48′W / 34.033°N 6.800°W / 34

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