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Lucia of Syracuse (283–304), also known as Saint
Saint
Lucy or Saint
Saint
Lucia (Latin: Sancta Lucia), was a Christian martyr who died during the Diocletianic Persecution. She is venerated as a saint by the Roman Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran, and Orthodox Churches. She is one of eight women along with the Blessed Virgin Mary who are commemorated by name in the Canon of the Mass. Her feast day, known as Saint
Saint
Lucy's Day, is celebrated in the West on 13 December. St. Lucia
St. Lucia
of Syracuse was honored in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and remained a well-known saint in early modern England.[3]

Contents

1 Sources 2 Life 3 Veneration

3.1 Relics

4 Patronage 5 Iconography 6 In literature

6.1 Dante 6.2 Donne

7 Popular celebration 8 List of dedications to Saint
Saint
Lucy

8.1 Churches 8.2 Places 8.3 Schools 8.4 Other

9 See also 10 References 11 External links

Sources[edit]

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The oldest record of her story comes from the fifth-century Acts of the Martyrs.[4] The single fact upon which various accounts agree is that a disappointed suitor accused Lucy of being a Christian, and she was executed in Syracuse, Sicily, in the year 304 during the Diocletianic Persecution.[5] Her veneration spread to Rome, and by the 6th century to the whole Church. The oldest archaeological evidence comes from the Greek inscriptions from the catacombs of St. John in Syracuse. Jacobus de Voragine's Legenda Aurea was the most widely read version of the Lucy legend in the Middle Ages. In medieval accounts, Saint
Saint
Lucy's eyes are gouged out prior to her execution. Life[edit] All the details of her life are the conventional ones associated with female martyrs of the early 4th century. John Henry Blunt views her story as a Christian romance similar to the Acts of other virgin martyrs.[6] According to the traditional story, Lucy was born of rich and noble parents about the year 283. Her father was of Roman origin,[1] but died when she was five years old,[7] leaving Lucy and her mother without a protective guardian. Her mother's name Eutychia seems to indicate that she came of Greek stock.[1] Like many of the early martyrs, Lucy had consecrated her virginity to God, and she hoped to distribute her dowry to the poor.[1] However, Eutychia, not knowing of Lucy's promise, and suffering from a bleeding disorder, feared for Lucy's future. She arranged Lucy's marriage to a young man of a wealthy pagan family.

Eutychia and Lucy at the Tomb of Saint
Saint
Agatha, by Jacobello del Fiore

Saint
Saint
Agatha had been martyred fifty-two years before during the Decian persecution. Her shrine at Catania, less than fifty miles from Syracuse attracted a number of pilgrims; many miracles were reported to have happened through her intercession. Eutychia was persuaded to make a pilgrimage to Catania, in hopes of a cure. While there, St. Agatha came to Lucy in a dream and told her that because of her faith her mother would be cured and that Lucy would be the glory of Syracuse, as she was of Catania. With her mother cured, Lucy took the opportunity to persuade her mother to allow her to distribute a great part of her riches among the poor.[1] Eutychia suggested that the sums would make a good bequest, but Lucy countered, "...whatever you give away at death for the Lord's sake you give because you cannot take it with you. Give now to the true Savior, while you are healthy, whatever you intended to give away at your death."[8] News that the patrimony and jewels were being distributed came to Lucy's betrothed, who denounced her to Paschasius, the Governor of Syracuse. Paschasius ordered her to burn a sacrifice to the emperor's image. When she refused Paschasius sentenced her to be defiled in a brothel. The Christian tradition states that when the guards came to take her away, they could not move her even when they hitched her to a team of oxen. Bundles of wood were then heaped about her and set on fire, but would not burn. Finally, she met her death by the sword.[1]

Lucy Before the Judge, by Lorenzo Lotto, 1523–32

Absent in the early narratives and traditions, at least until the 15th century, is the story of Lucia tortured by eye-gouging. According to later accounts, before she died she foretold the punishment of Paschasius and the speedy end of the persecution, adding that Diocletian would reign no more, and Maximian would meet his end.[1] This so angered Paschasius that he ordered the guards to remove her eyes. Another version has Lucy taking her own eyes out in order to discourage a persistent suitor who admired them. When her body was prepared for burial in the family mausoleum it was discovered that her eyes had been miraculously restored.[7] Veneration[edit]

Saint
Saint
Lucy by Domenico Beccafumi, 1521, a High Renaissance recasting of a Gothic iconic image (Pinacoteca Nazionale, Siena)

By the 6th century, her story was sufficiently widespread that she appears in the Sacramentary of Pope
Pope
Gregory I.[6] She is also commemorated in the ancient Roman Martyrology.[1] St. Aldhelm (English, died in 709) and later the Venerable Bede
Bede
(English, died in 735) attest that her popularity had already spread to England, where her festival was kept in England until the Protestant Reformation, as a holy day of the second rank, in which no work but tillage or the like was allowed.[7] Sigebert of Gembloux
Sigebert of Gembloux
wrote a mid-eleventh century passio, to support a local cult of Lucy at Metz.[9] The General Roman Calendar
General Roman Calendar
formerly had a commemoration of Saints Lucy and Geminianus
Geminianus
on 16 September. This was removed in 1969, as a duplication of the feast of her dies natalis on 13 December and because the Geminianus
Geminianus
in question, mentioned in the Passio
Passio
of Saint Lucy, seems to be a fictitious figure,[2] unrelated to the Geminianus whose feast is on 31 January. Relics[edit] Sigebert (1030–1112), a monk of Gembloux, in his sermo de Sancta Lucia, chronicled that her body lay undisturbed in Sicily
Sicily
for 400 years, before Faroald II, Duke of Spoleto, captured the island and transferred the body to Corfinium in the Abruzzo, Italy. From there it was removed by the Emperor Otho I in 972 to Metz
Metz
and deposited in the church of St. Vincent. It was from this shrine that an arm of the saint was taken to the monastery of Luitburg in the Diocese of Speyer – an incident celebrated by Sigebert in verse.[1] The subsequent history of the relics is not clear.[1] According to Umberto Benigni, Stephen II (768) sent the relics of St. Lucy to Constantinople
Constantinople
for safety against the Saracen incursions.[10] On their capture of Constantinople
Constantinople
in 1204, the French found some relics attributed to Saint
Saint
Lucy in the city, and Enrico Dandolo, Doge of Venice, secured them for the monastery of St. George at Venice.[11] In 1513 the Venetians presented to Louis XII of France
Louis XII of France
the saint's head, which he deposited in the cathedral church of Bourges. Another account, however, states that the head was brought to Bourges
Bourges
from Rome, where it had been transferred during the time when the relics rested in Corfinium.[1] The remainder of the relics remain in Venice: they were transferred to the church of San Geremia
San Geremia
when the church of Santa Lucia was demolished in 1861 to make way for the new railway terminus. A century later, on 7 November 1981, thieves stole all her bones, except her head. Police recovered them five weeks later, on her feast day. Other parts of the corpse have found their way to Rome, Naples, Verona, Lisbon, Milan, as well as Germany, France and Sweden.[11] Patronage[edit] Lucy's Latin name Lucia shares a root (luc-) with the Latin word for light, lux. A number of traditions incorporate symbolic meaning of St. Lucy as the bearer of light in the darkness of winter, her feast day being December 13. Because some versions of her story relate that her eyes were removed, either by herself or by her persecutors, she is the patron saint of the blind.[4] She is also the patron saint of authors, cutlers, glaziers, laborers, martyrs, peasants, Perugia, Italy; saddlers, salesmen, stained glass workers, and writers. She is invoked against hemorraghes, dysentery, diseases of the eye, and throat infections.[12] St. Lucy is also the patroness of Syracuse in Sicily, Italy.[12] At the Piazza Duomo in Syracuse, the church of Santa Lucia alla Badia houses the painting "Burial of St. Lucy (Caravaggio)". She is also the patron saint of the coastal town of Olón, Ecuador, which celebrates with a week-long festival culminating on the feast day December 13th. Saint
Saint
Lucy is also the patron saint of the Caribbean
Caribbean
island of Saint Lucia, one of the Windward Islands in the Lesser Antilles.[citation needed] Iconography[edit]

Saint
Saint
Lucy, by Francesco del Cossa
Francesco del Cossa
(c. 1430 – c. 1477)

The emblem of eyes on a cup or plate apparently reflects popular devotion to her as protector of sight, because of her name, Lucia (from the Latin word "lux" which means "light").[13][14] In paintings St. Lucy is frequently shown holding her eyes on a golden plate. Lucy was represented in Gothic art holding a dish with two eyes on it. She also holds the palm branch, symbol of martyrdom and victory over evil.[7] Other symbolic images include a lamp, dagger, or two oxen.[12] In literature[edit] Dante[edit] Lucia appears in Dante's Inferno Canto II as the messenger sent to Beatrice from "The blessed Dame" (the Virgin Mary), to rouse Beatrice to send Virgil to Dante's aid. Henry Fanshawe Tozer
Henry Fanshawe Tozer
identifies Lucia as representing "illuminative grace".[15] According to Robert Harrison, Professor in Italian Literature at Stanford University, and Rachel Jacoff, Professor of Italian Studies at Wellesley, Lucia's appearance in this intermediary role is to reinforce the scene in which Virgil tries to fortify Dante's courage to begin the journey through the Inferno.[citation needed] In the Purgatorio
Purgatorio
IX:52–63, Lucy carries the sleeping Dante
Dante
to the entrance to Purgatory. Then in Paradiso XXXII Dante
Dante
places her opposite Adam
Adam
within the Mystic Rose in Canto XXXII of the Paradiso. Lucy may also be seen as a figure of Illuminating Grace or Mercy or even Justice.[16] Donne[edit] Her feast day was commonly described as the shortest day of the year, as it is in John Donne's poem, "A Nocturnal upon St. Lucie's Day, being the shortest day" (1627). The poem begins with: "'Tis the year's midnight, and it is the day's".[17] Lucia is also the protagonist of a Swedish novel: "Ett ljus i mörkret" ("A light in the darkness") by Agneta Sjödin. Popular celebration[edit]

Saint
Saint
Lucia procession in Sweden.

Popular devotional image.

Main article: Saint
Saint
Lucy's Day Lucy's feast is on 13 December, in Advent. Her feast once coincided with the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year, before calendar reforms, so her feastday has become a festival of light.[7] This is particularly seen in Scandinavian countries, with their long dark winters. There, a young girl dressed in a white dress and a red sash (as the symbol of martyrdom) carries palms and wears a crown or wreath of candles on her head. In both Norway and Sweden, girls dressed as Lucy carry rolls and cookies in procession as songs are sung. It is said that to vividly celebrate St. Lucy's Day will help one live the long winter days with enough light. A special devotion to St. Lucy is practiced in the Italian regions of Lombardy, Emilia-Romagna, Veneto, Friuli Venezia Giulia, Trentino-Alto Adige, in the North of the country, and Sicily
Sicily
and Calabria, in the South, as well as in Croatian coastal region of Dalmatia. The feast is a Catholic-celebrated holiday with roots that can be traced to Sicily. On 13th of every December it is celebrated with large traditional feasts of home made pasta and various other Italian dishes, with a special dessert of wheat in hot chocolate milk. The large grains of soft wheat are representative of her eyes and are a treat only to be indulged in once a year. In the North of Italy Saint
Saint
Lucy brings gift to kids between the 12th and 13th of December. Traditionally a bouquet of hay is put outside of the house for Lucy's Donkey and food in the house for Lucy to refresh them after the long night bringing gifts to every kid. In small towns, a parade with Saint
Saint
Lucy is held the evening of the 12th when she goes through the main streets of the town munching sweets and candy from her cart, always together with her donkey. A Hungarian custom is to plant wheat in a small pot on St. Lucy's feast. By Christmas green sprouts appear, signs of life coming from death. The wheat is then carried to the manger scene as the symbol of Christ in the Eucharist. In the Philippines, villagers from Barangay
Barangay
Sta. Lucia in Magarao, Camarines Sur, hold a novena to St. Lucy nine days before her feast. A procession of the saint's image is held every morning at the poblacion or village centre during the nine days leading up to St. Lucy's Day, attracting devotees from other parts of the Bicol Region. Hymns to the saint, known as the Gozos, as well as the Spanish version of the Ave Maria are chanted during the dawn procession, which is followed by a Mass. List of dedications to Saint
Saint
Lucy[edit] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. Churches[edit]

Saint
Saint
Lucy's chapel, cathedral, Syracuse, Sicily, Italy Saint
Saint
Lucy's Church, Methuen, Massachusetts Church of Saint
Saint
Lucia (Iglesia de Santa Lucía), Mérida, Mexico St. Lucia
St. Lucia
church, Puthoor, India. St. Lucia
St. Lucia
church, Erayumanthurai, India. St. Lucia's Cathedral, Kotahena, Sri Lanka Church of San Geremia
San Geremia
and the grave of Saint
Saint
Lucy, Venice, Italy Church of St. Lucia
St. Lucia
at the Tomb[18] (Church of St. Lucia
St. Lucia
Outside the Walls), Syracuse, Sicily, Italy Chiesa di Santa Lucia alla Badia, also Syracuse, Sicily. St. Lucy Catholic Church, Highland Beach, FL. United States Église Sainte-Lucie de Vallières, Metz, Moselle, France St. Lucy's National Shrine
Shrine
at Micoud, Saint
Saint
Lucia St. Lucy, Virgin and Martyr Parish, Capalonga, Camarines Norte, Philippines Sta. Lucia Parish, Barangay
Barangay
Sta. Lucia, Sasmuan, Pampanga, Philippines Sta. Lucia Parish, Barangay
Barangay
Manggahan, Pasig City, Philippines Santa Lucia in San Jose Recoletos Parish Church, Cebu City, Philippines Sta. Lucia Chapel, Barangay
Barangay
Sta. Lucia, Magarao, Camarines Sur, Philippines Sta. Lucia Chapel, Barangay
Barangay
Sta. Lucia, Samal, Bataan Sta. Lucia Chapel, Barangay
Barangay
Sta. Lucia, San Miguel, Bulacan Sta. Lucia Chapel, Barangay
Barangay
Sta. Lucia, San Juan City, Metro Manila, Philippines Sta. Lucia Chapel, Barangay
Barangay
Sta. Lucia, Lubao, Pampanga, Philippines Sta. Lucia Chapel, Barangay
Barangay
Sta. Lucia, Masantol, Pampanga, Philippines Sta. Lucia Chapel, Barangay
Barangay
Sta. Lucia, Sta. Ana, Pampanga, Philippines
Philippines
- CPC rj simbillo Sta. Lucia Cupang, Chapel. Arayat pampanga. Sta. Lucia Chapel, Barangay
Barangay
Pinulot, Dinalupihan, Bataan Sta. Lucia Chapel, Barangay
Barangay
Sucad, Apalit, Pampanga, Philippines Sta. Lucia Chapel, Valenzuela, Metro Manila, Philippines Sta. Lucia Mini-Parish, De Castro Subd., Barangay
Barangay
Sta. Lucia, Pasig City, Philippines Namayan Chapel, Barangay
Barangay
Namayan, City of Malolos, Bulacan St. Lucy's Church (Manhattan)
St. Lucy's Church (Manhattan)
(parish established 1900; present church built 1915) St. Lucy's Church, Bronx, New York, U.S.A. (established in 1927)[19] Sta. Lucia Catholic Church, El Paso, TX St. Lucy's Church, Newark, New Jersey Church of St. Lucija, Santa Luċija, Gozo, Malta St. Lucy's Chapel, St Lucy Street, Naxxar, Malta Medieval Chapel of St. Lucy, limits of Mtarfa
Mtarfa
Malta[20] New Church of St. Lucy, Mtarfa, Malta Medieval Chapel of Saint
Saint
Lucija Gudja Malta St. Lucia's Cathedral, Sri Lanka St. Lucia
St. Lucia
Church, Poonapity, Kaddaikadu, Puttlam, Sri Lanka Santa Luzia Church, Viana Do Castelo, Portugal St. Lucy's Church, North Lanarkshire, Scotland Cerkev Svete Lucije, Skaručna, Slovenia Iglesia de Sta. Lucia, Maracaibo, Venezuela St. Lucy's Church, Syracuse, New York St. Lucy Catholic Church, Houma, Louisiana Saint
Saint
Lucia Church, Ruiru Membley, Kiambu Kenya Chapel of Saint
Saint
Lucy, Barcelona Cathedral Parroquia Santa Lucía, Paraná, Entre Ríos, Argentina. Sta. Lucia Parish Church, Sta. Lucia, Asturias, Cebu, Philippines St. Lucy's Church, Jurandvor, Baška, Croatia St. Lucy's Church, Pazin, Croatia St. Lucy's Church, Kostrena, Croatia St. Lucy's crypt, inside of Cathedral of Saint
Saint
Domnius, Split, Croatia

Places[edit]

Santa Lucia, Ilocos Sur, Philippines Santa Lucía, La Rioja, Argentina Santa Lucia, Magarao, Camarines Sur, Philippines Sta. Lucia Village Phase 4, Punturin, Valenzuela City, Metro Manila Philippines Saint
Saint
Lucie County, Florida Barangay
Barangay
Sta. Lucia, Novaliches, Quezon City, Metro Manila
Metro Manila
Philippines Barangay
Barangay
Sta. Lucia, Pasig City, Metro Manila
Metro Manila
Philippines St. Lucia
St. Lucia
Estuary, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa St. Lucia, Caribbean St Lucia, Queensland, Australia Santa Luċija, Gozo Santa Lucia, Malta Saint
Saint
Lucy, Barbados, Caribbean Port Saint
Saint
Lucie, Florida USA Santa Lucia Mountains, California, USA Sta. Lucia, Asturias, Cebu, Philippines

Schools[edit]

Sta. Lucia Elementary School, Bagong Sirang, Sta. Lucia, Magarao, Camarines Sur, Philippines Sta. Lucia Elementary School, Masantol, Pampanga, Philippines Sta. Lucia Elementary School, De Castro Subd., Barangay
Barangay
Sta. Lucia, Pasig City, Philippines St. Lucia's School, Kotahena, Colombo, Sri Lanka St. Lucy Catholic Elementary School, Brampton, Ontario, Canada Sta. Lucia High School Novaliches, Quezon City, Metro Manila Philippines Santa Lucia Catholic School, Chicago, Illinois, USA St. Lucy's Priory High School, Glendora, California, USA St. Lucy Day School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. St. Lucy's School of Archdiocese of Pampanga, Sasmuan, Pampanga, Philippines St. Lucy's School, Bronx, New York, U.S.A. (dedicated in 1955)[21]

Other[edit]

The Order of St. Lucy, a religious order in Dallas, Texas[22] Saint
Saint
Lucy Hill, otherwise known as Cerro Huelen, Santiago, Chile. Venezia Santa Lucia railway station, Venice, Italy Sta. Lucia East Grand Mall, Cainta, Rizal, Philippines

See also[edit]

Saints portal

List of Eastern Orthodox saints List of Roman Catholic saints Saint
Saint
Paraskevi, a female, Eastern saint frequently displayed with eyes on a plate. Saint
Saint
Odile, another saint of the blind.

References[edit]

^ a b c d e f g h i j k  One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Bridge, James (1910). "St. Lucy". In Herbermann, Charles. Catholic Encyclopedia. 9. New York: Robert Appleton.  ^ a b Calendarium Romanum (Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 1969), p. 139 ^ Findlay, Allison. Women in Shakespeare: A Dictionary 2010 p. 234 "(b) The play's setting in Ephesus and its links to Syracuse suggest that, in addition to its associations with light, Luciana's name might invoke memories of St Lucia of Syracuse, who remained a well-known saint in early modern England..." ^ a b "About St. Lucy", St. Lucy Catholic Parish, Campbell, California ^ Miller OFM, Don. " Saint
Saint
Lucy", Franciscan Media ^ a b Blunt, John Henry Blunt. The Annotated Book of Common Prayer, London, 1885:176 ^ a b c d e "SAINT LUCY'S CHURCH: The Mother Italian Church of The Diocese of Scranton. Home to All! Ministered to by Saint
Saint
Frances Xavier Cabrini".  ^ "Ælfric's Lives of Saints". Walter W. Skeat, ed., Early English Text Society, original series, vols. 76, 82, 94, 114 [London, 1881–1900], revised). Retrieved 24 October 2013.  ^ Sigibert von Gembloux, Acta Sanctae Luciae. Ed. Tino Licht. (Editiones Heidelbergenses, vol. 34.) Heidelberg: Winter, 2007. ^ Benigni, Umberto. "Syracuse". Catholic Encyclopedia.  ^ a b INM. "Santa Lucia of the gondoliers brought home to Sicily
Sicily
after a millennium". Archived from the original on 24 November 2009.  ^ a b c "Memorial of St. Lucy, virgin and martyr", Catholic Culture ^ Paul, Tessa. 'The Illustrated World Encyclopedia of Saints.' ^ Butler, Alban. 'Lives of the Saints' ^ Tozer, Henry Fanshawe. Dante: La Divina Commedia, Clarendon Press, 1902, p. 14 n97 ^ See David
David
H. Higgins' commentary in Dante, The Divine Comedy, trans. C.H. Sisson. NY: Oxford University Press, 1993. ISBN 0-19-920960-X. P. 506. ^ Pinsky, Robert. "Struggling Against the Dark", Slate, December 11, 2012 ^ it:Chiesa di Santa Lucia al Sepolcro ^ "Parish Info".  ^ Thomas Gatt - TG Development. "Santa Lucija (Kappella l-Qadima) - Chapel - Mtarfa, Malta".  ^ http://stlucys.org/ ^ "The Order of St. Lucy". 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Saint
Saint
Lucy.

Wikisource
Wikisource
has original text related to this article: Saint
Saint
Lucy

Jacobus de Voragine, Legenda Aurea: St. Lucy (e-text, in English) "Cara Santa Lucia..." (in Italian) Representations of Saint
Saint
Lucy Colonnade Statue St Peter's Square

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WorldCat Identities VIAF: 5727687 LCCN: no2002086865 ISNI: 0000 0000 8339 0016 GND: 118819623 SELIBR: 264794 SUDOC: 028187

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