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Spiraeeae

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Maleae

   

Gillenieae

     

Spiraeeae

Gillenieae

    Spiraeeae

      Kerrieae

   

Exochordeae

        Exochordeae

    Amygdaleae

   

Neillieae

        Neillieae

    Lyonothamneae

    Dryadoideae

Dryadeae

        outgroup

   

The sister relationship between Amygdaloideae and Dryadoideae is supported by the following shared biochemical characters not found in R

The sister relationship between Amygdaloideae and Dryadoideae is supported by the following shared biochemical characters not found in Rosoideae: production of cyanogenic glycosides and production of sorbitol.[17]

Characteristics

The leaves are generally arranged spirally, but have an opposite arrangement in some species. They can be simple or pinnately compound (either odd- or even-pinnate). Compound leaves appear in around 30 genera. The leaf margin is most often serrate. Paired stipules are generally present, and are a primitive feature within the family, independently lost in many groups of Amygdaloideae (previously called Spiraeoideae).[24] The stipules are sometimes adnate (attached surface to surface)[28] to the petiole. Glands or extrafloral nectaries may be present on leaf margins or petioles. Spines may be present on the midrib of leaflets and the rachis of compound leaves.

FlowersFlowers of plants in the rose family are generally described as "showy".[29] They are radially symmetrical, and almost always hermaphroditic. Rosaceae generally have five sepals, five petals, and many spirally arranged stamens. The bases of the sepals, petals, and stamens are fused together to form a characteristic cup-like structure called a hypanthium. They can be arranged in spikes, or heads. Solitary flowers are rare.

Fruits and seeds

Rosoideae: Traditionally composed of those genera bearing aggregate fruits that are made up of small achenes or drupelets, and often the fleshy part of the fruit (e.g. strawberry) is the [31] and includes apples, pears, quinces, medlars, loquats, almonds, peaches, apricots, plums, cherries, strawberries, blackberries, raspberries, sloes, and roses among the crop plants belonging to the family.

Many genera are also highly valued ornamental plants. These include trees and shrubs (Cotoneaster, Chaenomeles, Crataegus, Dasiphora, Exochorda, Kerria, Photinia, Physocarpus, Prunus, Pyracantha, Rhodotypos, Rosa, Sorbus, Spiraea), herbaceous perennials (Alchemilla, Aruncus, Filipendula, Geum, Potentilla, Sanguisorba), alpine plants (Dryas, Geum, Potentilla) and climbers (Rosa).[7]

However, several genera are also introduced noxious weeds in some parts of the world, costing money to be controlled. These invasive plants can have negative impacts on the diversity of local ecosystems once established. Such naturalised pests include Acaena, Cotoneaster, Crataegus, Pyracantha, and Rosa.[7]

Gallery

The family Rosaceae covers a wide range of trees, bushes and plants.

  • Shrubby cinquefoil (Dasiphora fruticosa)

  • Shrubby cinquefoil (Dasiphora fruticosa)

  • Mountain avens (Dryas octopetala)

  • Pearlbu

    Pearlbush (Exochorda racemosa)

  • Musk strawberry (Fragaria moschata) valued for its intense aroma

  • Musk strawberry (Fragaria moschata) valued for its intense aroma

  • Old man's whiskers (Geum triflorum)

  • Kerria j

    Kerria japonica

  • Apple tree blossom

    Apple tree blossoms (Malus pumila)