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The Roman Rite
Roman Rite
(Ritus Romanus)[1] is the most widespread liturgical rite in the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and is one of the Latin rites used in the Western or Latin Church. The Roman Rite
Roman Rite
gradually became the predominant rite used by the Western Church. Many local variants, not amounting to distinctive Rites, existed in the medieval manuscripts, but have been progressively reduced since the invention of printing, most notably since the reform of liturgical law in the 16th century at the behest of the Council of Trent
Council of Trent
(1545–63) and more recently following the Second Vatican Council
Second Vatican Council
(1962–65). The Roman Rite
Roman Rite
has been adapted over the centuries and the history of its Eucharistic liturgy can be divided into three stages: the Pre-Tridentine Mass, Tridentine Mass
Tridentine Mass
and Mass of Paul VI. The Mass of Paul VI is the current form of the Mass in the Catholic Church, first promulgated in the 1969 edition of the Roman Missal. It is considered the ordinary form of the mass, intended for most contexts. The Tridentine Mass, as promulgated in the 1962 Roman Missal, may be used as an extraordinary form of the Roman Rite, according to norms set in the 2007 papal document Summorum Pontificum.

Contents

1 Comparison with Eastern rites 2 Antiquity of the Roman Mass 3 Liturgy and traditions

3.1 Roman Missal 3.2 Arrangement of churches 3.3 Chant

4 Roman Rite
Roman Rite
of Mass

4.1 Introductory rites 4.2 Liturgy of the Word 4.3 Liturgy of the Eucharist 4.4 Communion rite 4.5 Concluding rite

5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External links

Comparison with Eastern rites[edit] The Roman Rite
Roman Rite
is noted for its sobriety of expression.[2] In its Tridentine form, it was noted also for its formality: the Tridentine Missal
Missal
minutely prescribed every movement, to the extent of laying down that the priest should put his right arm into the right sleeve of the alb before putting his left arm into the left sleeve (Ritus servandus in celebratione Missae, I, 3). Concentration on the exact moment of change of the bread and wine into the Body and Blood of Christ
Christ
has led, in the Roman Rite, to the consecrated Host and the chalice being shown to the people immediately after the Words of Institution. If, as was once most common, the priest offers Mass while facing ad apsidem (towards the apse), ad orientem (towards the east) if the apse is at the east end of the church, he shows them to the people, who are behind him, by elevating them above his head. As each is shown, a bell (once called "the sacring bell") is rung and, if incense is used, the host and chalice are incensed (General Instruction of the Roman Missal, 100). Sometimes the external bells of the church are rung as well. Other characteristics that distinguish the Roman Rite
Roman Rite
from the rites of the Eastern Catholic Churches
Eastern Catholic Churches
are frequent genuflections, kneeling for long periods, and keeping both hands joined together. Antiquity of the Roman Mass[edit] In his 1912 book on the Roman Mass, Adrian Fortescue wrote: "Essentially the Missal
Missal
of Pius V
Pius V
is the Gregorian Sacramentary; that again is formed from the Gelasian book, which depends on the Leonine collection. We find the prayers of our Canon in the treatise de Sacramentis and allusions to it in the 4th century. So our Mass goes back, without essential change, to the age when it first developed out of the oldest liturgy of all. It is still redolent of that liturgy, of the days when Caesar ruled the world and thought he could stamp out the faith of Christ, when our fathers met together before dawn and sang a hymn to Christ
Christ
as to a God. The final result of our inquiry is that, in spite of unsolved problems, in spite of later changes, there is not in Christendom another rite so venerable as ours." In a footnote he added: "The prejudice that imagines that everything Eastern must be old is a mistake. Eastern rites have been modified later too; some of them quite late. No Eastern Rite now used is as archaic as the Roman Mass."[3] In the same book, Fortescue acknowledged that the Roman Rite
Roman Rite
underwent profound changes in the course of its development. His ideas are summarized in the article on the "Liturgy of the Mass" that he wrote for the Catholic Encyclopedia
Catholic Encyclopedia
(published between 1907 and 1914) in which he pointed out that the earliest form of the Roman Mass, as witnessed in Justin Martyr's 2nd-century account, is of Eastern type, while the Leonine and Gelasian Sacramentaries, of about the 6th century, "show us what is practically our present Roman Mass". In the interval, there was what Fortescue called "a radical change". He quoted the theory of A. Baumstark that the Hanc Igitur, Quam oblationem, Supra quæ and Supplices, and the list of saints in the Nobis quoque were added to the Roman Canon of the Mass
Canon of the Mass
under "a mixed influence of Antioch and Alexandria", and that "St. Leo, I began to make these changes; Gregory I finished the process and finally recast the Canon in the form it still has."[4] Fortescue himself concluded:

We have then as the conclusion of this paragraph that at Rome
Rome
the Eucharistic prayer was fundamentally changed and recast at some uncertain period between the fourth and the sixth and seventh centuries. During the same time the prayers of the faithful before the Offertory
Offertory
disappeared, the kiss of peace was transferred to after the Consecration, and the Epiklesis was omitted or mutilated into our "Supplices" prayer. Of the various theories suggested to account for this it seems reasonable to say with Rauschen: "Although the question is by no means decided, nevertheless there is so much in favour of Drews's theory that for the present it must be considered the right one. We must then admit that between the years 400 and 500 a great transformation was made in the Roman Canon" (Euch. u. Busssakr., 86).

In the same article Fortescue went on to speak of the many alterations that the Roman Rite
Roman Rite
of Mass underwent from the 7th century on (see Pre-Tridentine Mass), in particular through the infusion of Gallican elements, noticeable chiefly in the variations for the course of the year. This infusion Fortescue called the "last change since Gregory the Great" (who died in 604). The Eucharistic Prayer
Prayer
normally used in the Byzantine Rite
Byzantine Rite
is attributed to Saint John Chrysostom, who died in 404, exactly two centuries before Pope
Pope
Gregory the Great. The East Syrian Eucharistic Prayer
Prayer
of Addai and Mari, which is still in use, is certainly much older. Liturgy and traditions[edit] Roman Missal[edit] Main article: Roman Missal

2002 edition of the Missale Romanum

The Roman Missal
Roman Missal
(Latin: Missale Romanum) is the liturgical book that contains the texts and rubrics for the celebration of the Mass in the Roman Rite
Roman Rite
of the Catholic Church. Before the high Middle Ages, several books were used at Mass: a Sacramentary
Sacramentary
with the prayers, one or more books for the Scriptural readings, and one or more books for the antiphons and other chants. Gradually, manuscripts came into being that incorporated parts of more than one of these books, leading finally to versions that were complete in themselves. Such a book was referred to as a Missale Plenum (English: "Full Missal"). In response to reforms called for in the Council of Trent, Pope
Pope
Pius V
Pius V
promulgated, in the Apostolic Constitution Quo primum
Quo primum
of 14 July 1570, an edition of the Roman Missal
Missal
that was to be in obligatory use throughout the Latin Church except where there was a traditional liturgical rite that could be proved to be of at least two centuries’ antiquity. The version of the Mass in the 1570s edition became known as the Tridentine Mass. Various relatively minor revision were made in the centuries following, culminating in the 1962 edition promulgated by Pope
Pope
John XXIII. Pope John XXIII
Pope John XXIII
opened the Second Vatican Council
Second Vatican Council
that same year, whose participating bishops ultimately called for renewal and reform of the liturgy. The 1969 edition of the Roman Missal
Roman Missal
was promulgated by Pope
Pope
Paul VI, issued in response to the council, introduced several major revisions, including simplifying the rituals and permitting translations into local vernacular languages. The version of the Mass in this missal, known colloquially as the Mass of Paul VI, is currently in use throughout the world. Arrangement of churches[edit] The Roman Rite
Roman Rite
no longer has the pulpitum, or rood screen, a dividing wall characteristic of certain medieval cathedrals in northern Europe, or the iconostasis or curtain that heavily influences the ritual of some other rites. In large churches of the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and early Renaissance
Renaissance
the area near the main altar, reserved for the clergy, was separated from the nave (the area for the laity) by means of a rood screen extending from the floor to the beam that supported the great cross (the rood) of the church and sometimes topped by a loft or singing gallery. However, by about 1800 the Roman Rite
Roman Rite
had quite abandoned rood screens, although some fine examples survive. Chant[edit] Western ears find the traditional chant of the Roman Rite, known as Gregorian chant, less ornate than that of the Eastern rites: except in such pieces as the graduals and alleluias; it eschews the lengthy melismata of Coptic Christianity, and, being entirely monophonic, it has nothing of the dense harmonies of present-day chanting in the Russian and Georgian churches. However, when Western Europe adopted polyphony, the music of the Roman Rite
Roman Rite
did become very elaborate and lengthy. While the choir sang one part of the Mass, the priest said that part quickly and quietly to himself and continued with other parts; or he was directed by the rubrics to sit and wait for the conclusion of the choir's singing. It thus became normal in the Tridentine form of the Roman Rite
Roman Rite
for the priest to sing no part of the Mass, merely speaking the words, except on special occasions and in the principal Mass in monasteries and cathedrals. Roman Rite
Roman Rite
of Mass[edit] Main article: Mass in the Catholic Church See also: Eucharist
Eucharist
in the Catholic Church The Catholic Church
Catholic Church
sees the Mass or Eucharist
Eucharist
as "the source and summit of the Christian life", to which the other sacraments are oriented.[5] The Catholic Church
Catholic Church
believes that the Mass is exactly the same sacrifice that Jesus
Jesus
Christ
Christ
offered on the Cross at Calvary. The term "Mass" is generally used only in the Latin Church, while the Byzantine Rite
Byzantine Rite
Eastern Catholic Churches
Eastern Catholic Churches
use the analogous term "Divine Liturgy" and other Eastern Catholic Churches
Eastern Catholic Churches
have terms such as Holy Qurbana. Although similar in outward appearance to the Anglican Mass or Lutheran Mass,[6][7] the Catholic Church distinguishes between its own Mass and theirs on the basis of what it views as the validity of the orders of their clergy, and as a result, does not ordinarily permit intercommunion between members of these Churches.[8][9] However, in the Decree on Ecumenism, produced by Vatican II in 1964, the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
also notes its understanding that when other faith groups (such as Lutherans, Anglicans, and Presbyterians) "commemorate His death and resurrection in the Lord's Supper, they profess that it signifies life in communion with Christ and look forward to His coming in glory."[9] Within the fixed structure outlined below, which is specific to the Ordinary Form of the Roman Rite, the Scripture readings, the antiphons sung or recited during the entrance procession or communion, and certain other prayers vary each day according to the liturgical calendar. For more information regarding the structure and history of the approved Extraordinary Form of the Mass in the Roman Rite, see Mass in the Catholic Church. Introductory rites[edit]

A priest offering the Mass at the St Mary's Basilica, Bangalore

The priest enters, with a deacon, if there is one, and altar servers (who may act as crucifer, torch-bearers and thurifer). After making the sign of the cross and greeting the people liturgically, he begins the Act of Penitence. This concludes with the priest's prayer of absolution, "which, however, lacks the efficacy of the Sacrament of Penance".[10] The Kyrie, eleison (Lord, have mercy), is sung or said,[11] followed by the Gloria in excelsis Deo
Gloria in excelsis Deo
(Glory to God in the highest), an ancient praise, if appropriate for the liturgical season.[12] The Introductory Rites are brought to a close by the Collect
Collect
Prayer. Liturgy of the Word[edit] On Sundays and solemnities, three Scripture readings are given. On other days there are only two. If there are three readings, the first is from the Old Testament
Old Testament
(a term wider than "Hebrew Scriptures", since it includes the Deuterocanonical Books), or the Acts of the Apostles
Apostles
during Eastertide. The first reading is followed by a psalm, either sung responsorially or recited. The second reading is from the New Testament, typically from one of the Pauline epistles. A Gospel Acclamation is then sung as the Book
Book
of the Gospels is processed, sometimes with incense and candles, to the ambo. The final reading and high point of the Liturgy of the Word
Liturgy of the Word
is the proclamation of the Gospel
Gospel
by the deacon or priest. At least on Sundays and Holy Days of Obligation, a homily, a sermon that draws upon some aspect of the readings or the liturgy of the day, is then given.[13] Finally, the Creed is professed on Sundays and solemnities,[14] and it is desirable that in Masses celebrated with the people the Universal Prayer
Prayer
or Prayer
Prayer
of the Faithful should usually follow.[15] Liturgy of the Eucharist[edit]

The Elevation of the host. This takes place immediately after the Consecration
Consecration
in both the Tridentine and the Ordinary-Form Mass.

The Liturgy of the Eucharist
Liturgy of the Eucharist
begins with the preparation of the altar and gifts,[16] after which the congregation stands, as the priest gives the exhortation to pray, "Pray, brethren, that my sacrifice and yours may be acceptable to God, the almighty Father." The congregation responds: "May the Lord accept the sacrifice at your hands, for the praise and glory of his name, for our good, and the good of all his holy Church." The priest then pronounces the variable prayer over the gifts. The Anaphora, also commonly called "the Eucharistic Prayer", "the centre and high point of the entire celebration",[17] then begins with a dialogue between priest and people. The oldest of the anaphoras of the Roman Rite
Roman Rite
is called the Roman Canon. The priest continues with one of many Eucharistic Prayer
Prayer
thanksgiving prefaces, which lead to the reciting of the Sanctus
Sanctus
acclamation. The Eucharistic Prayer includes the epiclesis, a prayer that the gifts offered may by the power of the Holy Spirit
Holy Spirit
become the body and blood of Christ.[18] The central part is the Institution Narrative and Consecration, recalling the words and actions of Jesus
Jesus
at his Last Supper, which he told his disciples to do in remembrance of him.[19] Immediately after the Consecration
Consecration
and the display to the people of the consecrated elements, the priest says: "The mystery of faith", and the people pronounce the acclamation, using one of the three prescribed formulae.[20] It concludes with a doxology, with the priest lifting up the paten with the host and the deacon (if there is one) the chalice, and the singing or recitation of the Amen
Amen
by the people. Communion rite[edit]

Father Murphy administers Communion during Mass in a Dutch field in the front line, October 1944

All together recite or sing the "Lord's Prayer" ("Pater Noster" or "Our Father"). The priest introduces it with a short phrase and follows it up with a prayer called the embolism and the people respond with the doxology. The sign of peace is exchanged and then the "Lamb of God" ("Agnus Dei" in Latin) litany is sung or recited, while the priest breaks the host and places a piece in the main chalice; this is known as the rite of fraction and commingling. The priest then presents the transubstantiated elements to the congregation, saying: "Behold the Lamb of God, behold him who takes away the sins of the world. Blessed are those called to the supper of the Lamb." Then all repeat: "Lord, I am not worthy that you should enter under my roof, but only say the word and my soul shall be healed." The priest then receives Communion and, with the help, if necessary, of extraordinary ministers, distributes Communion to the people, who usually approach in procession and receives standing.[21] Singing by all the faithful during the Communion procession is encouraged, to highlight the communitarian nature of the Communion bread.[22] Silence is called for following the Communion procession. A Prayer
Prayer
After Communion is then proclaimed by the priest while all stand. Concluding rite[edit] The priest imparts a simple blessing or a solemn blessing to those present. The deacon or, in his absence, the priest himself then dismisses the people, choosing one of four formulas, of which the first is "Ite, missa est" in Latin or its equivalent in other languages. The congregation responds: "Thanks be to God." The priest and other ministers then leave, often to the accompaniment of a recessional hymn.

Example in art; Out of Mass, Joan Ferrer Miró

See also[edit]

Latin liturgical rites List of Catholic rites and churches Liturgical books of the Roman rite Pre-Tridentine Mass Mass of Paul VI Mass (liturgy) Tridentine Mass

References[edit]

^ Lott, J. Bert (2012-08-30). Death and Dynasty in Early Imperial Rome: Key Sources, with Text, Translation, and Commentary. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9781139560306.  ^ "Bishop succinctly characterizes the 'genius of the Roman rite' as being 'marked by simplicity, practicality, a great sobriety and self-control, gravity and dignity'" (James Norman, Handbook to the Christian Liturgy - Regional Rites V). ^ Fr. Adrian Fortescue, The Mass: A Study of the Roman Liturgy, s.l., 1912, p. 213 ^ New Advent
Advent
website. ^ Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1324 ^ Bahr, Ann Marie B. (1 January 2009). Christianity. Infobase Publishing. p. 66. ISBN 9781438106397. Anglicans worship with a service that may be called either Holy Eucharist
Eucharist
or the Mass. Like the Lutheran Eucharist, it is very similar to the Catholic Mass.  ^ Herl, Joseph (1 July 2004). Worship Wars in Early Lutheranism. Oxford University Press. p. 35. ISBN 9780195348309. There is evidence that the late sixteenth-century Catholic mass as held in Germany was quite similar in outward appearance to the Lutheran mass  ^ Dimock, Giles (2006). 101 Questions and Answers on the Eucharist. Paulist Press. p. 79. ISBN 9780809143658. Thus Anglican Eucharist
Eucharist
is not the same as Catholic Mass or the Divine Liturgy celebrated by Eastern Catholics or Eastern Orthodox. Therefore Catholics may not receive at an Anglican Eucharist.  ^ a b "Unitatis Redintegratio (Decree on Ecumenism), Section 22". Vatican. Retrieved 8 March 2013. Though the ecclesial Communities which are separated from us lack the fullness of unity with us flowing from Baptism, and though we believe they have not retained the proper reality of the eucharistic mystery in its fullness, especially because of the absence of the sacrament of Orders, nevertheless when they commemorate His death and resurrection in the Lord's Supper, they profess that it signifies life in communion with Christ
Christ
and look forward to His coming in glory. Therefore the teaching concerning the Lord's Supper, the other sacraments, worship, the ministry of the Church, must be the subject of the dialogue.  ^ GIRM, paragraph 51 ^ GIRM, paragraph 52 ^ GIRM, paragraph 53 ^ GIRM, paragraph 66 ^ GIRM, paragraph 68 ^ GIRM, paragraph 69 ^ GIRM, paragraph 73 ^ GIRM, paragraph 78 ^ GIRM, paragraph 79c ^ Luke 22:19; 1 Corinthians 11:24-25 ^ GIRM, paragraph 151 ^ GIRM, paragraph 160 ^ GIRM, paragraph 86

Further reading[edit]

Baldovin, SJ., John F., (2008). Reforming the Liturgy: A Response to the Critics. The Liturgical Press. Bugnini, Annibale, (1990). The Reform of the Liturgy 1948-1975. The Liturgical Press. A Short History of the Roman Mass. By Michael Davies, said to be based on Adrian Fortescue's The Mass: A Study of the Roman Liturgy Metzger, Marcel. History of the Liturgy: The Major Stages. Beaumont, Madeleine M. (trans.). The Liturgical Press.  Morrill,SJ, Bruce T., contributing editor. Bodies of Worship: Explorations in Theory and Practice. The Liturgical Press. Marini, Piero (Archbishop), (2007). A Challenging Reform: Realizing the Vision of the Liturgical Renewal. The Liturgical Press. Johnson, Lawrence, J. (2009). Worship in the Early Church: An Anthology of Historical Sources. The Liturgical Press. Foley, Edward; Mitchell, Nathan D.; and Pierce, Joanne M.; A Commentary on the General Instruction of the Roman Missal. The Liturgical Press.

External links[edit]

The Roman Rite
Roman Rite
(Catholic Encyclopedia) Australian site, mainly on present form of the Roman Rite

v t e

Structure of the Mass of the Roman Rite
Roman Rite
of the Catholic Church

Forms

Pre-Tridentine Mass Tridentine Mass

Extraordinary form

Mass of Paul VI

Types

Low Mass Missa Cantata Solemn Mass Pontifical High Mass Papal Mass Ritual Masses

Blue Mass Chapter and Conventual Mass Coronation Mass Nuptial Mass Red Mass Requiem
Requiem
Mass

sine populo Votive Mass

Order of Mass

Pre-Mass

Vesting prayers in the sacristy Asperges
Asperges
me

Vidi aquam in Eastertide

Liturgy of the Word

Sign of the Cross Psalm 43 Entrance Antiphon Penitential Rite

Confiteor
Confiteor
/ Kyrie

Gloria Dominus vobiscum Collect

Oremus

First Reading Responsorial Psalm or Gradual Epistle Alleluia

Gospel
Gospel
verse / sequence

Gospel Homily Credo

Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed
Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed
or Apostles' Creed

General Intercessions

Liturgy of the Eucharist

Offertory

Orate fratres / prayer over the gifts

Preface

Sursum corda / Sanctus
Sanctus
/ Hosanna

Eucharistic Prayer/Canon of the Mass

oblation / epiclesis / Words of Institution
Words of Institution
/ elevation / anamnesis texts and rubrics Roman Canon

history

Eucharistic Prayer
Prayer
II

Memorial Acclamation Lord's Prayer

embolism / doxology

Pax Sign of peace Agnus Dei Fraction Holy Communion

Communion antiphon

Ablutions Postcommunion Dismissal

Ite, missa est
Ite, missa est
/ Benedicamus Domino

Last Gospel

Post-Mass

Leonine Prayers Recessional hymn

Participants

Acolyte Altar server

female

Bishop Boat boy Cantor Choir Crucifer Deacon Extraordinary minister of Holy Communion Laity

Eucharistic Congress

Lector Priest Subdeacon Usher

Parts of the Sanctuary / Altar

Altar crucifix Altar rails Ambo Communion bench Credence table Kneeler Lavabo Misericord Piscina Tabernacle

Altar cloths

Altar linens Antependium Burse Chalice
Chalice
veil Corporal Lavabo
Lavabo
towel Pall Purificator

Candles and lamps

Altar candle Altar candlestick Paschal candle Sanctuary lamp Triple candlestick Votive candle

Liturgical objects

Altar bell Aspergillum Censer Chalice Ciborium Collection basket Cruet Flabellum Funghellino Holy water Incense

use

Manuterge Paten Processional cross Pyx Sacramental bread

wafer

Sacramental wine
Sacramental wine
(or must) Thurible Water

Liturgical books of the Roman Rite

Ceremonial of Bishops Evangeliary

Gospel
Gospel
Book

Graduale Lectionary Roman Missal

Vestments

Alb Amice Chasuble Dalmatic Episcopal sandals Liturgical colours Headcover Humeral veil Pallium Pontifical Stole Surplice Tunicle Vimpa

Liturgical year (Roman Calendar)

Advent Christmastide Ordinary Time Septuagesima Lent Passiontide Holy Week

Paschal Triduum

Eastertide Ascensiontide

Eucharistic discipline

Abstemius Anima Christi Concelebration Church etiquette Closed communion Communion and the developmentally disabled Communion under both kinds Denial of Communion

Canon 915

Eucharistic fast First Communion Frequent Communion Genuflection Host desecration Infant communion Intinction Reserved sacrament Thanksgiving after Communion Viaticum

Eucharistic theology

Body and Blood of Christ Corpus Christi (feast) Crucifixion of Jesus
Crucifixion of Jesus
and substitutionary atonement Epiousios Grace ex opere operato In persona Christi Historical roots of Catholic Eucharistic theology Koinonia Last Supper Mirae caritatis Mysterium fidei (encyclical) Origin of the Eucharist Real presence Transubstantiation Year of the Eucharist Stercoranism

Regulations and concepts

Ad orientem
Ad orientem
and versus populum Calendar of saints Canon law Code of Rubrics Commemoration Ecclesiastical Latin General Instruction of the Roman Missal Holy day of obligation Intercession of saints Ordinary and propers Pro multis Sunday

Lord's Day

Vernacular

Related

Agape feast Catholic liturgy Christian prayer

effects of prayer

Congregation for Divine Worship Council of Trent Ecclesia de Eucharistia Eucharistic adoration
Eucharistic adoration
and benediction

Dominicae Cenae
Dominicae Cenae
/ Holy Hour

Eucharistic miracle Fermentum Fourth Council of the Lateran Gelineau psalmody Gregorian chant History of the Roman Canon Lex orandi, lex credendi Liturgical Movement Liturgical reforms of Pope
Pope
Pius XII Mediator Dei Missale Romanum (apostolic constitution) Pope
Pope
Paul VI Catholic theology Sacraments of the Catholic Church Second Vatican Council

Sacrosanctum Concilium

Summorum Pontificum Tra le sollecitudini

Catholicism portal

v t e

History of the Roman Rite
Roman Rite
Mass

Forms

Pre-Tridentine Mass Tridentine Mass
Tridentine Mass
(Extraordinary form) Mass of Paul VI
Mass of Paul VI
(Ordinary form)

Calendars

Tridentine Calendar General Roman Calendar
General Roman Calendar
of 1954 General Roman Calendar
General Roman Calendar
of Pope
Pope
Pius XII General Roman Calendar
General Roman Calendar
of 1960 General Roman Calendar
General Roman Calendar
(current)

Catholicism portal

v t e

Tridentine Mass
Tridentine Mass
of the Catholic Church

Including the extraordinary form of the Roman Rite
Roman Rite
(1962)

Types

Chapter and conventual Dialogue Mass Low (Missa Cantata) and High Mass (Solemn) Missa Sicca Pontifical

Papal

Ritual Masses

Coronation (Papal) Missa pro Defunctis Nuptial

sine populo Votive

Red

Order

Pre-Mass Vesting prayers Asperges
Asperges
me

Vidi aquam in Eastertide

Processional hymn

Mass of the Catechumens Iudica me Confiteor

mea culpa

Introit Kyrie Gloria in excelsis Deo Collect Lection Gradual Alleluia or Tract Sequentia Gospel Homily

Mass of the Faithful Credo

Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed

Offertory

Lavabo Orate fratres Secret

Preface

Sursum corda Sanctus Hosanna

Roman Canon

oblation epiclesis Words of Institution anamnesis elevation doxology

Pater Noster

embolism doxology

Pax Agnus Dei

Dona nobis pacem

Fraction Holy Communion

Communion antiphon

Ablutions Postcommunio Dismissal

Ite, missa est
Ite, missa est
or Benedicamus Domino

Last Gospel

Post-Mass Leonine prayers Recessional hymn

For funeral Mass Dies irae

Pie Iesu

Libera Me Requiescant in pace Absolution of the dead In paradisum De profundis

Participants

Acolyte

altar server

Bishop Boat boy Cantor or schola Crucifer Deacon Laity Lector Master of ceremonies Porter Priest Subdeacon

Altar

Altar cards Altar crucifix Altar rails Ambo Antependium Credence table Kneeler Lavabo Misericord Piscina Sacristy Tabernacle

Altar cloths

Altar linens Antependium Burse Chalice
Chalice
veil Corporal Pall Purificator

Illumination

Altar candle Altar candlestick Paschal candle Sanctuary lamp Triple candlestick

Liturgical objects

Altar bell Aspergillum Chalice Ciborium Collection basket Cruet Flabellum Funghellino Holy water Incense

use

Manuterge Paten Processional cross Pyx Sacramental bread

wafer

Sacramental wine
Sacramental wine
(or must) Thurible Water

Literature

Cæremoniale Episcoporum Missale Romanum Pontificale Romanum Rituale Romanum

Vestments (Pontifical/Papal)

Alb Amice Chasuble Cincture Cope Crosier Dalmatic Episcopal gloves Ecclesiastical ring Episcopal sandals Falda Humeral veil Liturgical colours Mitre Pallium Papal fanon Papal tiara Pectoral cross Stole Sub-cinctorium Superhumerale Surplice Tunicle Vimpa

Music

Antiphon Graduale Romanum Gregorian chant Hymn Kyriale
Kyriale
Romanum Liber Usualis Music for the Requiem
Requiem
Mass Organ

voluntary

Organum Polyphony Reciting tone

Accentus Recto tono

Tra le sollecitudini Tonary

Gregorian Antiphonary

Liturgical year Calendar (1954/1955/1960)

Advent Christmastide Epiphanytide Septuagesima Lent Passiontide Holy Week

Paschal Triduum

Eastertide Ascensiontide After Pentecost

Calendar of saints Holy day of obligation Moveable feast Octaves

Ranking of liturgical days: Solemnity Memorial Commemoration Feria

Discipline

Church etiquette Closed communion Communion and the developmentally disabled Communion under both kinds Denial of Communion

Canon 915

Eucharistic fast First Communion Genuflection Headcover Host desecration Infant communion Reserved sacrament Sign of the Cross Thanksgiving after Communion Viaticum

Theology

Blessed Sacrament Body and Blood of Christ Corpus Christi (feast) Crucifixion of Jesus
Crucifixion of Jesus
and substitutionary atonement Epiousios Eucharistic miracle Grace ex opere operato In persona Christi History of Catholic eucharistic theology Koinonia Last Supper Origin of the Eucharist Priesthood of Melchizedek Pro multis Real presence Transubstantiation

Concepts

Ad orientem Canon law Code of Rubrics Concelebration Dominus vobiscum Ecclesiastical Latin Good Friday prayer for the Jews Intercession of saints Ordinary & propers (common) Oremus Sunday

Lord's Day

Text and rubrics of the Roman Canon Vulgate
Vulgate
(Sixto-Clementine)

Latin Psalters

Related

Agape feast Alternatim Anaphora Anima Christi Aspersion Catholic liturgy Coetus Internationalis Patrum Communities using the Tridentine Mass

Indult Catholic traditionalist Catholic

Congregation for Divine Worship Council of Trent Deutsche Singmesse Divine Office

Canonical hours Choir
Choir
dress Roman Breviary

Eucharistic adoration
Eucharistic adoration
& benediction

Holy Hour Forty Hours' Devotion

Fourth Council of the Lateran French Organ Mass Gospel
Gospel
Book History of the Roman Canon Latin liturgical rites Latin Mass Lex orandi, lex credendi Litany Liturgical Movement Liturgical reforms of Pope
Pope
Pius XII Mass of Paul VI Missal Plenary indulgence Pontifical Commission Ecclesia Dei Pope
Pope
Pius V Preces Pre-Tridentine Mass Quattuor abhinc annos Quo primum Catholic theology Sacramentary Sacraments of the Catholic Church Spoon (liturgy) Summorum Pontificum Tra le sollecitudini Western Rite Orthodoxy

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Gregorian chants of the Roman mass of the Catholic Church

Ordinary

Kyrie Gloria Credo Sanctus Agnus Dei Ite, missa est Benedicamus Domino Requiescant in pace

Proper

Introit Gradual Alleluia or Tract Sequence Offertory Communion

Accentus

Collect Epistle Gospel Secret Preface Canon Postcommunion

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Sacraments, rites, and liturgies of the Catholic Church

Sacraments

Baptism Confirmation Eucharist Penance Anointing of the Sick Holy Orders Matrimony

Mass

Low Mass Missa Cantata Solemn Mass Pontifical High Mass Papal Mass

Canonical liturgical hours

Matins (nighttime) Lauds (early morning) Prime (first hour of daylight) Terce (third hour) Sext (noon) Nones (ninth hour) Vespers
Vespers
(sunset evening) Compline (end of the day)

Other liturgical services

Asperges Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament Exorcism Funeral

Requiem

Liturgy of the Hours

Liturgical literature

Antiphonary Book
Book
of hours Breviary Gospel
Gospel
Book Gradual Lectionary Martyrology Psalter Roman Missal Roman Ritual Sacramentary

Liturgical rites

Latin

Ambrosian Rite Rite of Braga Mozarabic Rite Roman Rite

Mass of Paul VI Extraordinary form Anglican Use Zaire Use

Eastern

Alexandrian Rite Armenian Rite Antiochene Rite Byzantine Rite East Syriac Rite West Syriac Rite: Malankara Rite

Orders

Benedictine Rite Carmelite Rite Carthusian Rite Cistercian Rite Dominican Rite Norbertine Rite

Defunct rites and liturgies

African Rite Aquileian Rite Celtic Rite Durham Rite Gallican Rite Use of Hereford Missa Nautica Missa Sicca Missa Venatoria Pre-Tridentine Mass Use of York Sarum Rite

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Catholic Church

Index Outline

History (Timeline)

Jesus Holy Family

Mary Joseph

Apostles Early Christianity History of the papacy Ecumenical councils Missions Great Schism of East Crusades Great Schism of West Age of Discovery Protestant Reformation Council of Trent Counter-Reformation Catholic Church
Catholic Church
by country Vatican City

index outline

Second Vatican Council

Hierarchy (Precedence)

Pope
Pope
(List)

Pope
Pope
Francis (2013–present)

conclave inauguration theology canonizations visits

Pope
Pope
Emeritus Benedict XVI (2005–2013)

Roman Curia College of Cardinals

Cardinal List

Patriarchate Episcopal conference Patriarch Major archbishop Primate Metropolitan Archbishop Diocesan bishop Coadjutor bishop Auxiliary bishop Titular bishop Bishop emeritus Abbot Abbess Superior general Provincial superior Grand Master Prior
Prior
(-ess) Priest Brother

Friar

Sister Monk Nun Hermit Master of novices Novice Oblate Postulant Laity

Theology

Body and soul Bible Catechism Divine grace Dogma Ecclesiology

Four Marks of the Church

Original sin

List

Salvation Sermon on the Mount Ten Commandments Trinity Worship

Mariology

Assumption History Immaculate Conception Mariology of the popes Mariology of the saints Mother of God Perpetual virginity Veneration

Philosophy

Natural law Moral theology Personalism Social teaching Philosophers

Sacraments

Baptism Confirmation Eucharist Penance Anointing of the Sick

Last rites

Holy orders Matrimony

Saints

Mary Apostles Archangels Confessors Disciples Doctors of the Church Evangelists Church Fathers Martyrs Patriarchs Prophets Virgins

Doctors of the Church

Gregory the Great Ambrose Augustine of Hippo Jerome John Chrysostom Basil of Caesarea Gregory of Nazianzus Athanasius of Alexandria Cyril of Alexandria Cyril of Jerusalem John of Damascus Bede
Bede
the Venerable Ephrem the Syrian Thomas Aquinas Bonaventure Anselm of Canterbury Isidore of Seville Peter Chrysologus Leo the Great Peter Damian Bernard of Clairvaux Hilary of Poitiers Alphonsus Liguori Francis de Sales Peter Canisius John of the Cross Robert Bellarmine Albertus Magnus Anthony of Padua Lawrence of Brindisi Teresa of Ávila Catherine of Siena Thérèse of Lisieux John of Ávila Hildegard of Bingen Gregory of Narek

Institutes, orders, and societies

Assumptionists Annonciades Augustinians Basilians Benedictines Bethlehemites Blue nuns Camaldoleses Camillians Carmelites Carthusians Cistercians Clarisses Conceptionists Crosiers Dominicans Franciscans Good Shepherd Sisters Hieronymites Jesuits Mercedarians Minims Olivetans Oratorians Piarists Premonstratensians Redemptorists Servites Theatines Trappists Trinitarians Visitandines

Associations of the faithful

International Federation of Catholic Parochial Youth Movements International Federation of Catholic Universities International Kolping Society Schoenstatt Apostolic Movement International Union of Catholic Esperantists Community of Sant'Egidio

Charities

Aid to the Church in Need Caritas Internationalis Catholic Home Missions Catholic Relief Services CIDSE

Particular churches (By country)

Latin Church Eastern Catholic Churches: Albanian Armenian Belarusian Bulgarian Chaldean Coptic Croatian and Serbian Eritrean Ethiopian Georgian Greek Hungarian Italo-Albanian Macedonian Maronite Melkite Romanian Russian Ruthenian Slovak Syriac Syro-Malabar Syro-Malankara Ukrainian

Liturgical rites

Alexandrian Antiochian Armenian Byzantine East Syrian Latin

Anglican Use Ambrosian Mozarabic Roman

West Syrian

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Pope
portal Vatican City
Vatican City
portal

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Category Temp

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