HOME
The Info List - Rod Laver Arena


--- Advertisement ---



Coordinates: 37°49′18″S 144°58′42″E / 37.82167°S 144.97833°E / -37.82167; 144.97833

Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena

The Tennis
Tennis
Centre

The venue at night, viewed from Batman Avenue in 2006

Full name Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
at Melbourne
Melbourne
Park

Former names National Tennis
Tennis
Centre at Flinders Park (1988–96) Centre Court
Centre Court
(1996–2000)

Location Olympic Boulevard and Batman Avenue Melbourne, VIC 3001 Australia

Owner Melbourne
Melbourne
and Olympic Parks Trust

Capacity 16,200 (concert) 15,400 (basketball / netball) 14,820 (seated)[1]

Record attendance 16,183 – Justin Timberlake, 18 November 2007

Surface Plexicushion
Plexicushion
(tennis) Hardwood (basketball / netball)

Construction

Broke ground 1985

Opened 11 January 1988 (1988-01-11)

Renovated 1995

Construction cost A$94 million (Original) ($230 million in 2010 dollars[2]) $23 million (1996 renovations) ($34 million in 2010 dollars[2])

Architect

Peddle Thorp Learmonth Philip Cox

Main contractors Lendlease (formerly Civil & Civic)

Tenants

Australian Open
Australian Open
(Tennis) (1988–present) Melbourne
Melbourne
Tigers (NBL) (1992–2000) South East Melbourne
Melbourne
Magic (NBL) (1992–98) Victoria Titans
Victoria Titans
(NBL) (1998–2000) 2006 Commonwealth Games

Website

Venue Website

Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
is a multipurpose arena located within Melbourne
Melbourne
Park, in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The arena is the main venue for the Australian Open, the first Grand Slam tennis of the calendar year.

Contents

1 History 2 Features 3 Sports and events

3.1 Tennis 3.2 Basketball 3.3 Swimming 3.4 Commonwealth Games 3.5 Other sports 3.6 Concerts

4 Tennis
Tennis
surface 5 Refurbishment 6 Naming 7 Record attendances

7.1 Concert 7.2 Basketball 7.3 Tennis

8 See also 9 References 10 External links

History[edit] Replacing the aging Kooyong Stadium, construction on the arena began in 1985[3] and was completed in 1987 at a cost of AU$94 million.[4] It opened on 11 January 1988 for the 1988 Australian Open.[5] Originally known in 1988 as the National Tennis
Tennis
Centre at Flinders Park,[6] the arena has officially changed its name twice. First in 1996, when it was known as the Centre Court, and again on 16 January 2000 to honour Rod Laver, a three-time winner of the Australian Open and one of the world's greatest tennis players.[7][8] Features[edit]

Interior of arena during the 2015 Australian Open

Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
has a seating capacity of 14,820, with a capacity of 15,400 for sports such as basketball, when extra seats are added around the court, and up to 16,200 for concerts with floor seating.[9] The arena currently attracts over 1.5 million visitors per year. The arena was the first in Australia to have a retractable roof venue, and it is the largest indoor arena in Australia without a permanent roof (not counting the 56,347 seat Docklands Stadium, also in Melbourne, which is classed as a stadium rather than an arena). It is also the second largest indoor arena in Australia behind the 21,032 capacity Sydney Super Dome. The arena's retractable roof allows competitors to continue play during rain or extreme heat. Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
is equipped with the Hawk-Eye
Hawk-Eye
electronic system which allows tennis players to challenge the umpire's decision on calls made throughout championships. Sports and events[edit] Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
is the centrepiece of the National Tennis
Tennis
Centre at Melbourne
Melbourne
Park, and besides tennis, the arena has hosted basketball, motorbike super-crosses, music concerts, conferences, World Wrestling Entertainment events and ballet. Other than for tennis, during sporting events or concerts, a section of the southern the lower seating bowl is retracted to allow space for a stage or special floor level seating. Tennis[edit] Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
acts as the centre court for the Australian Open tennis championships every year. The player after whom the arena is named, Rod Laver, is a frequent guest of honour at the Championships and has presented the trophy to the men's singles champion on several occasions. Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
was also the scene for Australia's famous Davis Cup victories in 2003. The arena hosted the semi-final and Final, at which Australia was successful in recording their 28th Davis Cup
Davis Cup
title. Basketball[edit] Aside from tennis, the sport most often held at Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
in the past was basketball. The arena's first basketball game was in 1991 when the Australian Boomers
Australian Boomers
played host to a touring All-Star team headlined by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, with over 15,000 in attendance. On 3 April 1992, the arena became the home of Melbourne
Melbourne
basketball when the Melbourne
Melbourne
Tigers (now known as Melbourne
Melbourne
United) defeated the Canberra Cannons
Canberra Cannons
112-104. The venue was actually criticised in its early days as a basketball venue due to the poor quality of the backboards and rings used. However, these concerns were quickly addressed and the arena became known as one of the best in the country, especially with anywhere near a full house in attendance. The arena was also home to the South East Melbourne
Melbourne
Magic (later renamed the Victoria Titans
Victoria Titans
in 1998 after merging with the North Melbourne Giants) with both teams attracting some of the largest crowds in the history of the NBL. Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
was also the site of the first ever "outdoor" pro basketball game in Australia when the Magic hosted the Adelaide 36ers
Adelaide 36ers
on 31 December 1997 with the roof open. The largest basketball crowd at Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
was set in 1996 when 15,366 attended a local derby game between the Magic and Tigers. This remains the second largest basketball attendance ever in Australia behind the 17,803 who attended an NBL game between the Sydney Kings and West Sydney Razorbacks at the Sydney Super Dome
Sydney Super Dome
in 1999. Game two of the 1996 NBL Grand Final series, also between the Magic and Tigers, saw the NBL's largest ever single game Grand Final crowd when 15,064 watched the Magic defeat the Tigers 88-84.[10] 1992 saw the first time two teams from the one city had reached the NBL Grand Final series when the Magic faced fellow Melbourne
Melbourne
Park tenants the Tigers. With all games being played at the leagues largest venue a record aggregate of 43,605 (average 14,535) fans saw the Magic win their first championship two games to one, coming back to win games two and three 115-93 and 95-88 after losing game one 98-116. In all, Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
hosted 287 NBL games including NBL Championship deciders in 1992, 1996, 1997 and 1999, and played host to its last game in April 2000 before Hisense Arena
Arena
opened in 2000 and became the new home of basketball in Melbourne. The arena hosted the Australian Boomers
Australian Boomers
on numerous occasions, including playing against the Magic Johnson
Magic Johnson
All-Stars in 1995, as well as hosting the 1997 FIBA Under-22 World Championship, which Australia won for the first time.[11][12] The arena also played host to the 1993 NBL All-Star Game with the NBL Stars defeating the Boomers 124–119. On 15 August 2015, Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
played host to the opening game of the 2015 FIBA Men's Oceania Basketball
Basketball
Championship between the Australian Boomers
Australian Boomers
and the New Zealand Tall Blacks. In front of 15,062 fans Australia ran out 71–59 winners.[13] Swimming[edit] Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
was the centrepiece of the 12th FINA World Aquatics Championships, which were held from 17 March-1 April 2007. A temporary swimming pool, named the Susie O'Neill Pool after Australian swimming champion Susie O'Neill, was built at significant cost. Commonwealth Games[edit] Rod Laver
Rod Laver
was the host venue for the gymnastics competition at the 2006 Commonwealth Games. Other sports[edit] The venue has hosted professional wrestling events such as the WWE, World Championship Wrestling
World Championship Wrestling
event in October 2000, World Wrestling All-Stars and World Cup skateboarding.[14][15] Concerts[edit] See also: Entertainment events at Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
consistently hosts Melbourne's highest-profile musical and entertainment concerts. In 2009, the arena polled 9th out of 50 worldwide top arenas for first-quarter ticket sales, making it the second highest ticket selling venue in Australia, second to Sydney's Qudos Bank Arena, which placed third. In 2012, the arena became Australia's highest selling venue and 4th in the world, based on 2011 ticket sales.[16] Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena's record attendance of 16,183 was set on 18 November 2007 for a Justin Timberlake
Justin Timberlake
concert during his FutureSex/LoveShow tour.[17] American singer P!nk performed a record breaking 18 concerts at the venue in the winter of 2013 with her Truth About Love Tour, beating her own record of 17 shows from the Funhouse Tour
Funhouse Tour
in 2009.[18] She is currently the artist who holds the record for most shows at the venue. On 7 August 2018 Céline Dion
Céline Dion
will perform at this arena for a first time as a part of Celine Dion Live 2018. This will be the first show of Dion since Taking Chances World Tour
Taking Chances World Tour
in 10 years. Tennis
Tennis
surface[edit]

Interior of Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
with the original Rebound Ace
Rebound Ace
surface

From 1988 until 2007, the surface of the court at the Australian Open and on Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
was Rebound Ace, which was coloured green and played slowly. The surface was also blamed for many injuries in the Australian Open, with many players claiming that the surface became sticky in hot weather, making it difficult to play on. In 2008, the surface was changed to Plexicushion, which is coloured blue. The surface is similar in properties to DecoTurf, the surface used in the US Open. This has more cushioning and more "give" than Rebound Ace. The change of surfaces gained a mostly positive reaction from players, as the surface is said to be easier to play on than Rebound Ace.[citation needed] It has also had a temporary grass court in use, during the 1993 Davis Cup quarterfinals, 2001 Davis Cup
Davis Cup
final and the 2003 Davis Cup
Davis Cup
final. Refurbishment[edit] In June 2015, it was announced that the arena would undergo a redevelopment of its exterior facade and interior customer features, such as bars and other facilities. The refurbishment constitutes the main aspect of the $338 million second stage of redevelopments occurring at the Melbourne
Melbourne
Park precinct, which includes a new pedestrian bridge linking Melbourne
Melbourne
Park and Birrarung Marr
Birrarung Marr
and a new media and administration centre.[19][20] Construction began in April 2016 and is expected to conclude in 2019–2020.[19] The refurbishment includes a new eastern-facing primary entrance, an expanded public concourse space and other amenities designed to "open up" the arena and provide enhanced facilities and entry points for spectators.[21] Naming[edit]

National Tennis
Tennis
Centre at Flinders Park (11 January 1988—28 January 1996) Centre Court
Centre Court
(29 January 1996—15 January 2000) Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
(16 January 2000—Present)

Record attendances[edit] Concert[edit]

16,183 – Justin Timberlake, 18 November 2007 39,299 – Lady Gaga, 23, 24 March 2010 42,765 – Green Day, 14, 16 December 2009

Basketball[edit]

National Basketball
Basketball
League

15,366 – South East Melbourne
Melbourne
Magic vs Melbourne
Melbourne
Tigers, 22 June 1996

International

15,062 – Australia vs New Zealand, 15 August 2015

Tennis[edit]

14,820 – Australian Open
Australian Open
/ Davis Cup
Davis Cup
(various)

See also[edit]

List of tennis stadiums by capacity List of sports venues in Australia List of indoor arenas in Australia List of National Basketball
Basketball
League (Australia) venues

References[edit]

^ " Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
– Austadiums". www.austadiums.com. Retrieved 17 March 2018.  ^ a b Australian Consumer Price Inflation figures follow the Long Term Linked Series provided in Australian Bureau of Statistics (2011) 6461.0 – Consumer Price Index: Concepts, Sources and Methods, 2011 as explained at §§3.10–3.11; this series comprises "from 1901 to 1914, the A Series Retail Price Index; from 1914 to 1946–47, the C Series Retail Price Index; from 1946–47 to 1948–49, a combination of the C Series Index, excluding rent, and the housing group of the CPI; and from 1948–49 onwards, the CPI." (3.10). Retrieved May 4, 2015 ^ "Tennis". Melbourne
Melbourne
& Olympic Parks. Archived from the original on 27 February 2012. Retrieved 28 June 2013.  ^ National Tennis
Tennis
Centre Trust and Zoological Board of Victoria (Report) (20 ed.). L.V. North. April 1993. p. 5. ISBN 0730634353.  ^ Colebatch, Tim (12 January 1988). "Melbourne's state-of-the-art tennis centre is a knockout". The Age. Melbourne. Retrieved 21 October 2013.  ^ Sources for original venue name:

Rabar, Julia (18 January 2013). "Looking back at the Australian Open from Kooyong to Melbourne
Melbourne
Park". Herald Sun. Retrieved 19 May 2015.  "25 Years of Retractable Roof Tennis
Tennis
in Australia". World Tennis Magazine. 10 January 2013. Retrieved 19 May 2013.  Feinstein, John (1991). "The Flinders Park Jinx". Hard Courts: Real Life on the Professional Tennis
Tennis
Tours. New York City: Villard Books. ISBN 9780307800961.  Higdon, David (30 January 1994). "Women's Tennis
Tennis
Misses Seles As Graf Wins Again". Sun-Sentinel. Retrieved 19 May 2015.  Rowthron, Chris (September 2002). Landragin, Alex; Daly, Kate, eds. Victoria (4th ed.). Melbourne: Lonely Planet. p. 137. ISBN 1740592409.  Beckley, Rachel (1 December 2012). "10Best: The History of Melbourne Park, Home of the Australian Open". USA Today. Retrieved 19 May 2015.  "How Peddle Thorp designed opening roof at Melbourne
Melbourne
Tennis
Tennis
Centre". Peddle Thorp Architects. 3 February 2012. Retrieved 19 May 2015. 

^ "Centre court named after Laver". New Straits Times. Kuala Lumpur]. 22 December 1999. p. 43. Retrieved 21 October 2013.  ^ "History – Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena". Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena. Retrieved 2018-01-28.  ^ Brandie, Lars (13 May 2013). "Pink's Australian Arena
Arena
Tour Grows to 45 Shows". Billboard. Retrieved 19 May 2015.  ^ [1] Archived 29 August 2009 at the Wayback Machine. ^ illusiv13 (22 January 2015). "1995 Australian Boomers
Australian Boomers
vs Magic Johnson's All Stars - Melbourne". Retrieved 17 March 2018 – via YouTube.  ^ nblbball (16 July 2008). "OZ97 semi final australia vs argentina". Retrieved 17 March 2018 – via YouTube.  ^ "FIBA Oceania Championship 2015". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 17 March 2018.  ^ "Globe World Cup Skateboarding". World Cup Skateboarding. 17 February 2002. Retrieved 5 October 2017.  ^ Paul Daffey (13 February 2005). "Thousands thrilled by half-pipe heroes". The Age.  access-date= requires url= (help) ^ "World's busiest arenas". PlaceNorthWest. 2012-01-25. Retrieved 2013-08-22.  ^ "Records & Performers – Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena". rodlaverarena.com.au. Retrieved 17 March 2018.  ^ Brandle, Lars (2013-05-27). "Pink's Australia Tour Breaks Melbourne Venue Record". Billboard. Retrieved 2013-06-28.  ^ a b "Demolition Works Begin At Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena". Major Projects Victoria. 5 April 2016.  ^ " Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
plans unveiled". SBS. 2 June 2015.  ^ " Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena". Major Projects Victoria. 1 January 2017. 

External links[edit] Media related to Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
at Wikimedia Commons

Official website Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena
Arena
at Austadiums Peddle Thorp Melbourne

v t e

Grand Slam tournament venues

Australian Open

Melbourne
Melbourne
Park

Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena Hisense Arena Margaret Court Arena

French Open

Stade Roland Garros

Court Philippe Chatrier Court Suzanne Lenglen Court 1

Wimbledon

All England Lawn Tennis
Tennis
and Croquet Club

Centre Court No. 1 Court No. 2 Court No. 3 Court

US Open

USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis
Tennis
Center

Arthur Ashe Stadium Louis Armstrong Stadium Grandstand

Links to related articles

v t e

Melbourne
Melbourne
United

Formerly the Melbourne
Melbourne
Tigers (1931–2014) Est. 1931 in Melbourne, Victoria

Franchise

History

Arenas

Albert Park Basketball
Basketball
Stadium The Glasshouse Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena Hisense Arena State Netball
Netball
and Hockey Centre Margaret Court Arena

League

NBL

Retired numbers (6)

6 8 10 21 25 50

NBL Championships (4)

1993 1997 2006 2008

NBL runners-up (4)

1992 1996 2007 2009

Rivals

Adelaide 36ers Sydney Kings

Important figures

Lindsay Gaze Andrew Gaze Mark Bradtke Lanard Copeland Dave Simmons Chris Anstey Al Westover Chris Goulding Patty Mills

Seasons (34)

1980s

1984 1985 1986 1987 1988

1990s

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1998–99

2000s

1999–00 2000–01 2001–02 2002–03 2003–04 2004–05 2005–06 2006–07 2007–08 2008–09

2010s

2009–10 2010–11 2011–12 2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18

v t e

Landmarks in the Melbourne
Melbourne
City Centre

Note: this includes landmarks in the Melbourne
Melbourne
City Centre and its immediate surrounds, not the Greater Melbourne
Melbourne
metropolitan area

Precincts

Arts Chinatown Docklands East End Government Greek Little Italy Paris End RMIT Quarter Southbank/Wharf Sports and Entertainment University of Melbourne

Entertainment

Aquarium Arts Centre Convention and Exhibition Centre Crown Entertainment Complex Luna Park Theatre District Tramcar Restaurant Visitor Shuttle Zoo

Shopping centres

Block Arcade Collins Place DFO Emporium GPO Melbourne
Melbourne
Central Myer
Myer
Flagship Store Queen Victoria Market QV Royal Arcade St. Collins Lane The District Docklands

Public museums

ACCA ACMI Chinese Hellenic Ian Potter Immigration Melbourne Observatory NGV Australia NGV International Old Melbourne
Melbourne
Gaol Old Treasury Building RMIT Gallery

Institutions

Government House Town Hall Parliament House State Library Supreme Court Victoria Barracks

Notable structures

Arts Centre Eureka Tower Federation Square Melbourne
Melbourne
Star Royal Exhibition Building Shrine of Remembrance St Patrick's Cathedral St Paul's Cathedral

Sports venues

Docklands (Etihad) Stadium Grand Prix Circuit Icehouse Lakeside Stadium MCG Melbourne
Melbourne
Park (Margaret Court Arena
Arena
- Multi-Purpose Venue (Hisense Arena) - Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena) Rectangular Stadium
Stadium
(AAMI Park) Sports and Aquatic Centre Sports and Entertainment (Holden) Centre Royal Park Golf Club State Netball
Netball
and Hockey Centre

Parks and gardens

Albert Park Alexandra Gardens Birrarung Marr Carlton Gardens Fitzroy Gardens Flagstaff Gardens Kings Domain Queen Victoria Gardens Royal Botanic Gardens Royal Park Treasury Gardens Yarra Park

Transport

Bolte Bridge Capital City Trail City Circle Tram CityLink City Loop Flinders Street station Melbourne
Melbourne
Central station Southern Cross station Trams West Gate Bridge Yarra River

See also: Lanes and arcades of Melbourne, List of museums in Melbourne, List of theatres in Melbourne, and Parks and gardens of Melbourne

v t e

National Basketball
Basketball
League arenas

Current arenas

Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre Brisbane Entertainment Centre Cairns Convention Centre Hisense Arena North Shore Events Centre
North Shore Events Centre
(NZ) Perth Arena Qudos Bank Arena State Netball
Netball
& Hockey Centre Titanium Security Arena Spark Arena
Arena
(NZ) WIN Entertainment Centre

Former arenas

AIS Arena Albert Park Basketball
Basketball
Stadium Alexandria Stadium Apollo Stadium Auchenflower Stadium Bankstown Basketball
Basketball
Stadium Beaton Park Stadium Bendigo Basketball
Basketball
Stadium Broadmeadow Basketball
Basketball
Stadium Burswood Dome Canberra Showgrounds Canterbury Arena
Arena
(NZ) Carrara Indoor Stadium Challenge Stadium Chandler Arena Dandenong Basketball
Basketball
Stadium Derwent Entertainment Centre Dowling Street Stadium Geelong Arena Gold Coast Convention & Exhibition Centre Keilor Stadium Ken Watson Stadium Kingborough Sports Centre Liverpool Basketball
Basketball
Stadium Margaret Court Arena Melbourne
Melbourne
Sports & Aquatic Centre Mystery Creek Events Centre
Mystery Creek Events Centre
(NZ) Niels Hansen Stadium Newcastle Entertainment Centre Perry Lakes Basketball
Basketball
Stadium Perth Entertainment Centre Rod Laver
Rod Laver
Arena Singapore Indoor Stadium Sydney Entertainment Centre Sydney Olympic Park Sports Centre The Glass House Townsville Entertainment & Convention Centre Townsville RSL Stadium Trusts Stadium
Stadium
(NZ) TSB Bank Arena
Arena
(

.