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Non-fiction

  • "Béranger, Pierre Jean de" . Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). 1911. – first published in the 9th edition (1875–1889).
  • Virginibus Puerisque, and Other Papers (1881), contains the essays Virginibus Puerisque i (1876); Virginibus Puerisque ii (1881); Virginibus Puerisque iii: On Falling in Love (1877); Virginibus Puerisque iv: The Truth of Intercourse (1879); Crabbed Age and Youth (1878); An Apology for Idlers (1877); Ordered South (1874); Aes Triplex (1878); El Dorado (1878); The English Admirals (1878); Some Portraits by Raeburn (previously unpublished); Child's Play (1878); Walking Tours (1876); Pan's Pipes (1878); A Plea for Gas Lamps (1878).
  • Familiar Studies of Men and Books (1882) containing Preface, by Way of Criticism (not previously published); Victor Hugo's Romances (1874); Some Aspects of Robert Burns (1879); The Gospel According to Walt Whitman (1878); Henry David Thoreau: His Character and Opinions (1880); Yoshida-Torajiro (1880); François Villon, Student, Poet, Housebreaker (1877); Charles of Orleans (1876); Samuel Pepys (1881); John Knox and his Relations to Women (187

    Although not well known, his island fiction and non-fiction is among the most valuable and collected of the 19th century body of work that addresses the Pacific area.

    See also

    References

    1. ^ a b Balfour, Graham (1906). The Life of Robert Louis Stevenson London: Methuen. 264
    2. ^ Osborn, Jacob. "49 most-translated authors from around the world". Stacker. Stacker. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
    3. ^ Mehew (2004). The spelling "Lewis" is said to have been rejected because his father violently disliked another person of the same name, and the new spelling was not accompanied by a change of pronunciation (Balfour (1901) I, 29 n. 1.
    4. ^ Furnas (1952), 23–4; Mehew (2004)).
    5. ^ a b Paxton (2004).
    6. ^ Balfour (1901), 10–12; Furnas (1952), 24; Mehew (2004).
    7. ^ Memories and Portraits (1887), Chapter VII. The Manse.
    8. ^ "A Robert Louis Stevenson Timeline (born Nov. 13th 1850 in Edinburgh, died Dec. 3rd 1894 in Samoa)". Robert-louis-stevenson.org. Retrieved 14 May 2012.
    9. ^ Furnas (1952), 25–8; Mehew (2004).
    10. ^ Holmes, Lowell (2002). Treasured Islands: Cruising the South Seas with Robert Louis Stevenson. Sheridan House, Inc. ISBN 1-57409-130-1.
    11. ^ Sharma OP (2005). "Murray Kornfeld, American College of Chest Physician, and sarcoidosis: a historical footnote: 2004 Murray Kornfeld Memorial Founders Lecture". Chest. 128 (3): 1830–35. doi:10.1378/chest.128.3.1830. PMID 16162793.
    12. ^ "Stevenson's Nurse Dead: Alison Cunningham ("Cummy") lived to be over 91 years old" (PDF). The New York Times. 10 August 1913. p. 3.
    13. ^ Furnas (1952), 28–32; Mehew (2004).
    14. ^ Available at Bartleby and elsewhere.
    15. ^ Furnas (1952), 29; Mehew (2004).
    16. ^ Furnas (1952), 34–6; Mehew (2004). Alison Cunningham's recollection of Stevenson balances the picture of an oversensitive child, "like other bairns, whiles very naughty": Furnas (1952), 30.
    17. ^ Mehew (2004).
    18. ^ Balfour (1901) I, 67; Furnas (1952), pp. 43–45.
    19. ^ Stephenson, Robert Louis (1850–1894) – Childhood and schooling. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved: 1 August 2013.
    20. ^ Furnas (1952), 51–54, 60–62; Mehew (2004)
    21. ^ Balfour (1901) I, 86–8; 90–4; Furnas (1952), 64–9
    22. ^ Balfour (1901) I, 70–2; Furnas (1952), 48–9; Mehew (2004)
    23. ^ Balfour (1901) I, 85–6
    24. ^ Underwoods (1887), Poem XXXVIII
    25. ^ Furnas (1952), 69–70; Mehew (2004)
    26. ^ Furnas (1952), 53–7; Mehew (2004.
    27. ^ Theo Tait (30 January 2005). "Like an intelligent hare – Theo Tait reviews Robert Louis Stevenson by Claire Harman". The Telegraph. Retrieved 4 August 2013. A decadent dandy who envied the manly Victorian achievements of his family, a professed atheist haunted by religious terrors, a generous and loving man who fell out with many of his friends – the Robert Louis Stevenson of Claire Harman's biography is all of these and, of course, a bed-ridden invalid who wrote some of the finest adventure stories in the language. [...] Worse still, he affected a Bohemian style, haunted the seedier parts of the Old Town, read Charles Darwin and Herbert Spencer, and declared himself an atheist. This caused a painful rift with his father, who damned him as a "careless infidel".
    28. ^ Furnas (1952), 69 with n. 15 (on the club); 72–6
    29. ^ Stevenson, Robert Loui (2001). Selected Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson. New Have CT: Yale University Press. p. 29. ISBN 0300091249. Retrieved 23 October 2020.