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Richard Francis Dennis Barry III (born March 28, 1944) is an American retired professional basketball player who played in both the American Basketball
Basketball
Association (ABA) and National Basketball
Basketball
Association (NBA). Named one of the 50 Greatest Players in history by the NBA in 1996, Barry is the only player to lead the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), ABA and NBA in scoring for an individual season. He was known for his unorthodox but effective underhand free throw shooting technique, and at the time of his retirement in 1980, his .900 free throw percentage ranked first in NBA history.[1] In 1987, Barry was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame.[2] He is the father of former NBA players Brent Barry
Brent Barry
and Jon Barry and current professional player Canyon Barry.

Contents

1 Early years and college career 2 Professional playing career

2.1 San Francisco Warriors 2.2 Oakland Oaks 2.3 Washington Caps 2.4 Virginia Squires 2.5 New York Nets 2.6 Golden State Warriors 2.7 Houston
Houston
Rockets

3 Later years 4 Broadcasting career 5 Personal life 6 Career achievements 7 NBA records

7.1 Regular season 7.2 Playoffs 7.3 NBA Finals 7.4 All-Star

8 See also 9 References 10 External links

Early years and college career[edit] Barry grew up in Roselle Park, New Jersey, graduating from Roselle Park High School in 1962.[3] Barry was an All-American basketball player for the University of Miami, where he starred for three seasons. While at Miami, Barry met his wife Pamela, the daughter of Hurricanes head coach Bruce Hale. As a senior in the 1964–65 campaign, Barry led the NCAA with a 37.4 points-per-game average. Barry and the Hurricanes did not take part in the NCAA Tournament, however, because the basketball program was on probation at the time. Barry is one of just two basketball players to have his number retired by the school.[4] Barry was drafted by the San Francisco Warriors
San Francisco Warriors
with the second pick of the 1965 NBA draft. Professional playing career[edit] San Francisco Warriors[edit]

Rick Barry
Rick Barry
1972 publicity photo

In Barry's first season in the NBA with the Warriors, the team improved from 17 to 35 victories. In the All-Star Game one season later, Barry erupted for 38 points as the West team stunned the East squad, which featured Wilt Chamberlain, Oscar Robertson, Bill Russell and head coach Red Auerbach
Red Auerbach
among other all-time greats. Later that season, Barry and company extended the mighty Philadelphia 76ers
Philadelphia 76ers
to six highly competitive games in the NBA Finals, something that Russell and the Boston Celtics
Boston Celtics
could not do in the Eastern Conference playoffs. That 76ers team is considered to be one of the greatest in basketball history. Nicknamed the "Miami Greyhound" by longtime San Francisco-area broadcaster Bill King because of his slender physical build and remarkable quickness and instincts, the 6'7" Barry won the NBA Rookie of the Year Award after averaging 25.7 points and 10.6 rebounds per game in the 1965–66 season. The following year, he won the 1967 NBA All-Star Game MVP award with a 38-point outburst and led the NBA in scoring with a 35.6 point per game average — which still ranks as the eighth- highest output in league annals. Teamed with star center Nate Thurmond
Nate Thurmond
in San Francisco, Barry helped take the Warriors to the 1967 NBA Finals, which they lost to the Philadelphia 76ers
Philadelphia 76ers
in six games. Including a 55-point outburst in Game 3, Barry averaged 40.8 points per game in the series, an NBA Finals
NBA Finals
record that stood for three decades. Upset that he was not paid incentive monies that he believed due from Warriors owner Franklin Mieuli, Barry jumped to the ABA's Oakland Oaks, who offered him a lucrative contract and the chance to play for Bruce Hale, his then father-in-law. The three-year contract offer from Pat Boone, the singer and team owner, was estimated to be worth $500,000, with Barry saying "the offer Oakland made me was one I simply couldn't turn down" and that it would make him one of basketball's highest-paid players.[5] The courts ordered Barry to sit out the 1967–68 season before he starred in the ABA, upholding the validity of the reserve clause in his contract.[6] He preceded St. Louis Cardinals' outfielder Curt Flood, whose better-known challenge to the reserve clause went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, by two years as the first American major-league professional athlete to bring a court action against it.[7] The ensuing negative publicity cast Barry in a negative light, portraying him as selfish and money-hungry. However, many NBA players at the time were looking at jumping to the ABA for more lucrative contracts. Barry would star in the ABA, twice averaging more than 30 points per game. Oakland Oaks[edit]

Barry before the 1969 ABA All-Star Game
1969 ABA All-Star Game
in Louisville, Kentucky

After the 1966–67 season, Barry became one of the first NBA players to jump to the American Basketball
Basketball
Association when he signed with the Oakland Oaks. In the ABA's first season, the Oaks were the only ABA team located in the same market as an NBA team (the Warriors). The Warriors went to court and prevented Barry from playing for the Oaks during the 1967–68 season. Barry instead worked on Oaks radio broadcasts during the ABA's first season. During the 1968–69 season Barry suited up for the Oaks and averaged 34 points per game. He also led the ABA in free throw percentage for the season (a feat he repeated in the 1970–71 and 1971–72 seasons). However, on December 27, 1968, late in a game against the New York Nets, Barry and Kenny Wilburn collided and Barry tore ligaments in his knee. He tried to play again in January but only aggravated the injury and sat out the rest of the season, only appearing in 35 games as a result. Despite the injury Barry was named to the ABA All-Star team. The Oaks finished with a record of 60-18, winning the Western Division by 14 games over the second place New Orleans Buccaneers. In the 1969 ABA Playoffs the Oaks defeated the Denver Rockets
Denver Rockets
in a seven-game series and then defeated New Orleans in the Western Division finals. In the finals the Oaks defeated the Indiana Pacers
Indiana Pacers
4 games to 1 to win the 1969 ABA Championship. The Oaks' on-court success had not translated into solid attendance. The team averaged 2,800 fans per game. Instead of remaining in Oakland for another season to see if the championship would draw fans, the team was sold by owner Pat Boone
Pat Boone
and relocated to Washington, D.C. for the 1969–70 season. Washington Caps[edit] Barry played the 1969–70 season with the ABA's Washington Caps. Barry did not like the move and refused to report to the team, at one point commenting, "If I wanted to go to Washington, I'd run for president!" He missed the first 32 games before the ABA forced him to join the team. The Caps played in the Western Division, making for a grueling travel schedule. The Caps finished 44-40, claiming third place in the Western Division. Appearing in only 52 games due to a knee injury, Barry finished the season with 1,442 points, second best in the ABA (27.7 points per game). The Denver Rockets
Denver Rockets
defeated the Caps, 4 games to 3, in the Western Division semifinals. As the seventh and deciding game drew to a close, Barry was ejected for fighting with Rockets players. Virginia Squires[edit] The Washington Caps
Washington Caps
became the Virginia Squires
Virginia Squires
after the 1969–70 season, but Barry was openly despondent about playing in Virginia. At the same time, he wanted to continue playing in the ABA. Featured on the August 24, 1970 cover of Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
in a Squires jersey,[8] he indicated that he would not return to the NBA if the league paid him "a million dollars a year." He denounced the Squires (and, subsequently, never suited up for them), saying he did not want his kids growing up with a southern accent. On September 1, 1970, the Squires traded Barry to the New York Nets
New York Nets
for a draft pick and $200,000. The negative comments were not the primary reason; rather, Squires owner Earl Foreman was still bogged down by financial troubles and sold Barry to help meet his expenses. New York Nets[edit] After the Squires dealt Barry to the New York Nets, he played in only 59 games in the 1970–71 season due to a knee injury but still made the ABA All Star team. He repeated as an ABA All Star during the 1971–72 season. During the 1970–71 season he led the league in scoring (29.4 points per game) and led the league again in 1971–72 with 31.5 points per game. In both of those years he also led the ABA in free throw percentage as he had in 1968–69. Barry also became the ABA record holder for most consecutive free throws in one game with 23. In the 1970–71 season the Nets finished 40-44, good for fourth place in the Eastern Division and a place in the 1971 ABA Playoffs. The Virginia Squires
Virginia Squires
defeated the Nets 4 games to 2 in the Eastern Division semifinals. The 1971–72 Nets finished the season at 44-40, making the 1972 ABA Playoffs by claiming third place in the Eastern Division, 24 games behind the 68-16 Kentucky Colonels. In the Eastern Division semifinals the Nets shocked the ABA by defeating the Colonels 4 games to 2. The Nets then eked out a 4-game to 3 victory over the Virginia Squires
Virginia Squires
in the Eastern Division finals. The Nets were then edged by the Western Division champion Indiana Pacers, 4 games to 2, in the 1972 ABA Finals. On June 23, 1972 a United States District Court judges issued a preliminary injunction to prohibit Barry from playing for any team other than the Golden State Warriors
Golden State Warriors
after his contract with the Nets ended. On October 6, 1972 the Nets released Barry and he returned to the Warriors. Golden State Warriors[edit]

1976 photo of Barry with the Warriors

Upon Barry's return to the Warriors and the NBA, the cumulative effects of knee problems were taking their toll. Barry gradually moved his game away from the basket, becoming more of a perimeter shooter and ball distributor. The Warriors ran one of the few offenses in basketball where a forward (Barry) was the primary ball-handler. Two seasons later (1974–75) the Warriors captured the division crown and Barry averaged 30.6 points per game, led the league in free throw percentage (.904) and steals per game (2.9) and ranked sixth in assists per game (6.2). The Warriors executed a four-game sweep of Elvin Hayes, Wes Unseld
Wes Unseld
and the Washington Bullets
Washington Bullets
in the NBA Finals. The Bullets had posted a league-high 60 victories, 12 more than the Warriors total in the regular season. Barry was named NBA Finals
NBA Finals
Most Valuable Player. The next season, the Warriors drafted Gus Williams to play point guard and began to utilize the talents of Phil Smith more at shooting guard. Barry's scoring average dipped to 21.8 ppg, but the Warriors finished with the NBA's best record at 59-23 and were heavy favorites to return to the NBA Finals. However, the Warriors were upset in the Western Conference finals by the Phoenix Suns. The Warriors won 49 games the next season (1976–77) with Barry, Smith, and Williams sharing scoring and ball-handling, but were ousted in the second round by the Los Angeles Lakers. Reportedly, Barry and Williams clashed over the ball-handling role,[9] and Williams was traded after the season to the Seattle SuperSonics. Barry played one more season with the Warriors before leaving as a free agent for the Houston
Houston
Rockets. Houston
Houston
Rockets[edit] Barry ended his career with the Houston
Houston
Rockets, playing through the 1979–80 NBA season. Barry was signed by the Rockets as a free agent before the 1978–79 season. The league awarded John Lucas to the Warriors as compensation. Now in the twilight of his career, he pioneered the "point forward" position as a ball distributor (passing for a career-high 502 assists) and three-point threat. Until the arrival of Larry Bird, Barry, John Havlicek, and Billy Cunningham
Billy Cunningham
were the only players in NBA history to pass for more than 500 assists while primarily playing the forward position. He averaged 13.5 points and set a new NBA record (since broken) with a .947 free throw percentage for the season. He retired in 1980. Later years[edit] During the 1990s he coached the Cedar Rapids Sharpshooters of the Global Basketball
Basketball
Association[10] and the Continental Basketball Association, guiding the Fort Wayne Fury
Fort Wayne Fury
to a 19-37 win-loss record in 1993–94. In 1998 and 1999, he served as head coach of the New Jersey ShoreCats of the United States Basketball
Basketball
League. Former Warriors teammate Clifford Ray
Clifford Ray
was his top assistant. Barry finished 2nd in his division at the 2005 World Long Drive Championship.[11] Barry is part owner and promoter for the Ektio basketball shoe, which doctor and former college basketball player Barry Katz designed to reduce ankle injuries. He also serves on the company's Board of Directors.[12] Broadcasting career[edit] Barry was among the first professional basketball players to make a successful transition to the broadcasting profession. He began broadcasting during the 1967–68 season broadcasting Oakland Oaks games because of contractual matters that kept him off of the court. Barry continues to work in the field, a career that began with his own radio show in San Francisco and CBS while still an active player and then with TBS. While working as a CBS analyst during Game 5 of the 1981 NBA Finals, Barry made a controversial comment when CBS displayed an old photo of colleague Bill Russell, who is African-American, and Barry joked that "it looks like some fool over there with that big watermelon grin".[13][14] Barry later apologized for the comment, claiming that he did not realize that a reference to watermelons would have racial overtones. Russell said that he believed Barry with regard to Barry's racial attitudes, but nonetheless, the two men are reported not to have been particularly friendly for other reasons, unrelated to that comment.[15] CBS did not renew Barry's employment for the subsequent season, with producers later citing the overall negative tone of Barry's game commentary.[15] The next season, Barry did some broadcasting for the Seattle SuperSonics, however a plan for permanent employment fell through when Barry insisted that his then-wife be allowed to join him when the team was on the road, which would have been contrary to team policy.[15] The next year, Barry was featured in a lengthy Sports Illustrated article written by Tony Kornheiser
Tony Kornheiser
in which he lamented the failure of his broadcasting career to that point, as well as the fact that he'd left a reputation within NBA circles for being an unlikable person.[15] In a rare non-sports venture, he hosted the pilot for the mid-1980s game show Catchphrase; however, when the series debuted in the fall of 1985, game show veteran Art James
Art James
replaced him (the series itself was short-lived in the US, but was brought over to the UK and is still running).[16] In September 2001, Barry began hosting a sports talk show on KNBR-AM in San Francisco until June 2003, when KNBR
KNBR
paired him up with Rod Brooks to co-host a show named Rick and Rod. The show aired on KNBR until August 2006, when Barry left the station abruptly for reasons not disclosed to the public.[17] Personal life[edit] Rick Barry
Rick Barry
is of Irish, English, French, and Lithuanian descent.[18] He has four sons with his first wife Pam: Scooter, Jon, Brent and Drew, all of whom were professional basketball players. He has one daughter, Shannon. He also has a son named Canyon with his third wife, Lynn Barry; Canyon played for the College of Charleston Cougars men's basketball team,[19] redshirting in the 2012–13 season[20] before playing from 2013 to 2016. A three-time Academic All-American, Canyon graduated from Charleston with a physics degree[21] in May 2016 and played his final season of college eligibility at Florida under the NCAA's graduate transfer rule.[22] In February 2017, Canyon broke the Gators' record for consecutive free throws made by using the under-hand style, which was also used by his father.[23] Canyon capped off his college career with recognition as the Southeastern Conference Sixth Man of the Year[24] and Academic All-America of the Year for Division I men's basketball in 2017.[25] When his son Brent won the NBA Championship in 2005 with the San Antonio Spurs, Rick and Brent became the second father-son duo to both win NBA Championships as players, following the Guokases (Matt Guokas Sr. and Matt Guokas Jr.). Later, this would be repeated by the Waltons (Bill and Luke) and the Thompsons (Mychal and Klay). Scooter won titles in the CBA and the top Belgian League. Jon and Brent have likewise moved to broadcasting after retirement. Jon currently serves as a game analyst on ESPN while Brent works as a studio analyst on NBA TV. Rick was also a member of the Kappa Sigma
Kappa Sigma
fraternity. Career achievements[edit]

Roselle Park High School
Roselle Park High School
Roselle Park, New Jersey
Roselle Park, New Jersey
(1957–61)

Two-time All-State selection

University of Miami
University of Miami
(1961–65)

Associated Press
Associated Press
First-Team All-America (1965) The Sporting News All-America Second Team (1965) Consensus All-America (1965) Led the nation in scoring (37.4 ppg) as a senior

NBA San Francisco Warriors
San Francisco Warriors
(1965–67)

NBA Rookie of the Year (1966)

NBA All-Rookie First Team
NBA All-Rookie First Team
(1966)

NBA leading scorer in 1967 (35.6 ppg) ABA leading scorer in 1969 (34.0 ppg) NBA highest free-throw percentage 1973, 1975, 1976, 1978, 1979, 1980 ABA highest free-throw percentage 1969, 1971, 1972 NBA All-Star Game MVP (1967)

ABA Oakland Oaks (1968–69) ABA Washington Caps
Washington Caps
(1969–70) ABA New York Nets
New York Nets
(1970–72) NBA Golden State Warriors
Golden State Warriors
(1972–78)

All-NBA Second Team
All-NBA Second Team
(1973) NBA Finals
NBA Finals
MVP (1975) NBA champion (1975)

NBA Houston Rockets
Houston Rockets
(1978–79) All-NBA First Team
All-NBA First Team
(1966, 1967, 1974, 1975, 1976) Eight time NBA All-Star (1966, 1967, 1973–78) ABA All-Star First Team (1969–72) NBA 50 Greatest Players (1996) Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame (1988) Sports Hall of Fame of New Jersey (1994) University of Miami
University of Miami
Sports Hall of Fame (1976) 15 games in NBA career scoring 50 or more points (5th in NBA history) 115 games in professional career scoring 40 or more points — 70 NBA, 45 ABA (4th in professional basketball history after Wilt Chamberlain, Michael Jordan
Michael Jordan
and Kobe Bryant)

NBA records[edit] Regular season[edit] Only player in history to lead the NCAA, ABA and NBA in scoring

Led the NCAA in scoring in 1964–65 (973 points, 37.4 ppg) Led the NBA in scoring in 1966–67 (2,775 points, 35.6 ppg) Led the ABA in scoring in 1968–69 (1,190 points; 34.0 ppg)

Youngest player to score 57 points in a game: 21 years, 261 days (57 points, San Francisco Warriors
San Francisco Warriors
at New York Knicks, 000000001965-12-14-0000December 14, 1965) Playoffs[edit] Scoring 30 or more points in all games, any playoff series: 6 games, vs. Philadelphia 76ers, 1967 NBA Finals Field goal attempts, 6-game series: 235, vs. Philadelphia 76ers, 1967 NBA Finals Field goal attempts, game: 48, vs. Philadelphia 76ers, 000000001967-04-18-0000April 18, 1967 Field goal attempts, quarter: 17, at Philadelphia 76ers, 000000001967-04-14-0000April 14, 1967 Steals, quarter: 4, second quarter, at Chicago Bulls, 000000001975-05-11-0000May 11, 1975

Tied with many other players

NBA Finals[edit] Highest scoring average (career): 36.3 Scoring 30 or more points in all games, any championship series: 6 games, vs. Philadelphia 76ers, 1967 NBA Finals

Elgin Baylor, Michael Jordan, Hakeem Olajuwon, Shaquille O'Neal, and Kevin Durant
Kevin Durant
also achieved this feat.

Field goals made, game: 22, vs. Philadelphia 76ers, 000000001967-04-18-0000April 18, 1967

Tied with Elgin Baylor

Field goal attempts, 6-game series: 235, vs. Philadelphia 76ers, 1967 NBA Finals Field goal attempts, game: 48, vs. Philadelphia 76ers, 000000001967-04-18-0000April 18, 1967 Field goal attempts, quarter: 17, at Philadelphia 76ers, 000000001967-04-14-0000April 14, 1967 Steals, 4-game series: 14, vs. Washington Bullets, 1975 NBA Finals (3.5 spg) All-Star[edit] Field goal attempts, game: 27 (1967) Steals, game: 8 (1975) Personal fouls, game: 6, twice (1966, 1978) Disqualifications, career: 2

Tied with Bob Cousy

See also[edit]

American Basketball
Basketball
Association (2000–present) List of individual National Basketball
Basketball
Association scoring leaders by season List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association players with most points in a game List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association players with most steals in a game List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association players with 50 or more points in a playoff game List of NCAA Division I men's basketball players with 2000 points and 1000 rebounds

References[edit]

^ "Rick Barry". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Retrieved January 26, 2016.  ^ "Hall of Famers". Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2009-08-02.  ^ The Ultimate New Jersey High School Year Book. 1998.  ^ Miami Hurricanes 2011-12 media guide. Retrieved on January 5, 2012. ^ via United Press International. "Barry Accepts $500,000 Contract; He Quits N.B.A. for 3-Year Pact With Oakland Five", The New York Times, June 21, 1967. Accessed September 1, 2010. ^ via United Press International. "WARRIORS UPHELD ON OPTION CLAUSE; Court Rules Barry is Bound to Club One More Year", The New York Times, August 9, 1967. Accessed September 1, 2010. ^ Hollander, Dave (November 24, 2013). "Big Jerk, Bigger Hero". Slate. Retrieved November 26, 2013.  ^ Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
covers online ^ "Sit Up And Take Notice". CNN. January 18, 1982.  ^ "Barry to Coach" (AP). The New York Times. October 30, 1992.  ^ "RE/MAX World Championship's 2005". Morgan Studios.  ^ Heitner, Darren. "Professor of Sport Agency Management at Indiana University". Forbes. Retrieved 2 September 2014.  ^ Cook, Bob (June 2004). "Kick Out the Sports!". Flak Magazine.  ^ Thornton, Jerry (September 21, 2005). "Sportscasters Gone Wild". Barstool Sports. Archived from the original on May 9, 2006.  ^ a b c d Kornheiser, Tony. (1983, April 25). "A Voice Crying In The Wilderness", Sports Illustrated ^ "Telepictures' "Catch Phrase" (page 120)" (PDF). Broadcasting [date=1985-01-14.  ^ "Barry leaves afternoon radio show at KNBR". San Francisco Chronicle. 2006-08-14.  ^ Gordon, Amanda. "A Basketball
Basketball
Legend Scores for Migdal Ohr and Children of Israel". NYSun.com. Retrieved 15 May 2008.  ^ Canyon Barry to play at College of Charleston barry, ramsey, college - RAMSEY - Colorado Springs Gazette, CO ^ Briggemann, Brent (November 7, 2011). " Canyon Barry will continue family legacy, committing to play basketball at College of Charleston". The Gazette. Colorado Springs, Colorado. Retrieved April 14, 2016.  ^ Bilodeau, Kevin (March 14, 2016). "CofC's Canyon Barry to transfer after graduating". Charleston, South Carolina: WCSC-TV. Retrieved April 14, 2016.  ^ Goodman, Jeff (May 9, 2016). "Canyon Barry, son of Hall of Famer Rick Barry, transfers to Florida". ESPN.com. Retrieved May 11, 2016.  ^ " Canyon Barry Sets Florida Free Throw Record While Shooting Underhand [VIDEO]". CBS Detroit. February 14, 2017. Retrieved February 14, 2017.  ^ "2017 SEC Men's Basketball
Basketball
Awards announced" (Press release). Southeastern Conference. March 7, 2017. Retrieved March 13, 2017.  ^ "Ally Disterhoft of Iowa, Canyon Barry of Florida Highlight CoSIDA Academic All-America® Division I Basketball
Basketball
Teams" (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. March 2, 2017. Retrieved March 2, 2017. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Rick Barry.

Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame profile Rick Barry
Rick Barry
profile at NBA Encyclopedia at the Wayback Machine (archived April 27, 2006) RememberTheABA.com Rick Barry
Rick Barry
page 1972 Jim O'Brien biographical article on Rick Barry Rick Barry
Rick Barry
and Rod Brooks Home Page at KNBR
KNBR
Radio Rick Barry
Rick Barry
Career Statistics A Voice Crying in the Wilderness

Links to related articles

v t e

1965 NBA Draft

Territorial pick

Bill Bradley Bill Buntin Gail Goodrich

First round

Fred Hetzel Rick Barry Dave Stallworth Jerry Sloan Billy Cunningham Jim Washington Nate Bowman Ollie Johnson

Second round

Wilbert Frazier Dick Van Arsdale Tom Van Arsdale Tal Brody Jesse Branson Hal Blevins Flynn Robinson John Fairchild Ron Watts

v t e

Oakland Oaks 1968–69 ABA champions

11 Brown 12 Logan 14 Critchfield 24 Barry 30 Bradds 31 Jabali (Playoffs MVP) 32 Clawson 33 Harge 34 Moe 40 Peterson 42 Eakins

Head coach Hannum

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

Golden State Warriors
Golden State Warriors
1974–75 NBA champions

10 C. Johnson 15 Dudley 20 Smith 21 Beard 22 Bracey 23 Mullins 24 Barry (Finals MVP) 32 Bridges 40 Dickey 41 Wilkes 44 Ray 52 G. Johnson

Head coach Attles

Assistant coach Roberts

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

1965 NCAA Men's Basketball
Basketball
Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Rick Barry Bill Bradley Gail Goodrich Fred Hetzel Cazzie Russell

Second Team

Bill Buntin Wayne Estes Clyde Lee Dave Schellhase Dave Stallworth

v t e

NCAA Division I men's basketball season scoring leaders

Unofficial

1936: Luisetti 1937: Luisetti 1938: Jaworski 1939: Jaworski 1940: Modzelewski 1941: Modzelewski 1942: Modzelewski 1943: Senesky 1944: Calverley 1945: Mikan 1946: Mikan 1947: Lacy

Official

1948: Wier 1949: Lavelli 1950: Arizin 1951: Mlkvy 1952: Lovellette 1953: Selvy 1954: Selvy 1955: Floyd 1956: Floyd 1957: Wallace 1958: Robertson 1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Burgess 1962: McGill 1963: Werkman 1964: Komives 1965: Barry 1966: Schellhase 1967: Walker 1968: Maravich 1969: Maravich 1970: Maravich 1971: Neumann 1972: Lamar 1973: Averitt 1974: Fogle 1975: McCurdy 1976: Rogers 1977: F. Williams 1978: F. Williams 1979: Butler 1980: Murphy 1981: Fredrick 1982: Kelly 1983: Kelly 1984: Jakubick 1985: McDaniel 1986: Bailey 1987: Houston 1988: Hawkins 1989: Gathers 1990: Kimble 1991: Bradshaw 1992: Roberts 1993: Guy 1994: Robinson 1995: Thomas 1996: Granger 1997: Jones 1998: Jones 1999: A. Young 2000: Alexander 2001: McCollum 2002: Conley 2003: Douglas 2004: Clark 2005: Clark 2006: Morrison 2007: R. Williams 2008: R. Williams 2009: Curry 2010: Coleman 2011: Fredette 2012: Hamilton 2013: Green 2014: McDermott 2015: Harvey 2016: Daniel 2017: Keene 2018: T. Young

v t e

Golden State Warriors

Founded in 1946 Played in Philadelphia (1946–1962) and San Francisco (1962–1971) Based in Oakland, California

Franchise

Franchise Team history All-time roster Draft history Seasons Head coaches Current season

Arenas

Philadelphia Arena Philadelphia Convention Hall Cow Palace San Francisco Civic Auditorium War Memorial Gymnasium
War Memorial Gymnasium
(University of San Francisco) San Jose Arena Oracle Arena Chase Center

General managers

Tyrell Gottlieb Feerick Vertlieb Stirling Attles Nelson Twardzik St. Jean Mullin Riley Myers

G League affiliate

Santa Cruz Warriors

Retired numbers

13 14 16 17 24 42

Hall of Famers

Paul Arizin Rick Barry Wilt Chamberlain Joe Fulks Tom Gola Neil Johnston Jerry Lucas Šarūnas Marčiulionis Chris Mullin Mitch Richmond Don Nelson Robert Parish Andy Phillip Guy Rodgers Ralph Sampson Nate Thurmond Jamaal Wilkes

NBA Championships (5)

1947 1956 1975 2015 2017

Conference Championships (9)

1947 1948 1956 1964 1967 1975 2015 2016 2017

Culture/lore

Wilt the Stilt

100 point game

Nate the Great Nellie Ball Run TMC The Sleepy Floyd game Splash Brothers Death Lineup Warrior Girls 73–9 The Block

Rivalries

Cleveland Cavaliers

Media

TV NBC Sports Bay Area Radio KGMZ Announcers Bob Fitzgerald Jim Barnett Tim Roye

v t e

Houston
Houston
Rockets

Founded in 1967 Played in San Diego (1967–1971) Based in Houston, Texas

Franchise

Franchise History Expansion Draft All-time roster Seasons Records Draft history Head coaches Current season

Arenas

San Diego Sports Arena Hofheinz Pavilion HemisFair Arena The Summit/Compaq Center Toyota Center

Culture and lore

Red Rowdies ClutchFans Clutch City Clutch the Rockets Bear The Clock Incident 13 points in 35 seconds The Kiss of Death The Dream Shake 22 in a row Arrest of O. J. Simpson The Punch Dancing Barry

NBA Championships (2)

1994 1995

Western Conference Championships (4)

1981 1986 1994 1995

Administration

Owner Tilman Fertitta General Manager Daryl Morey Head Coach Mike D'Antoni

Retired numbers

11 22 23 24 34 45 CD

Most Valuable Players

Moses Malone Hakeem Olajuwon

Hall of Famers

Charles Barkley Rick Barry Clyde Drexler Elvin Hayes Moses Malone Tracy McGrady Calvin Murphy Dikembe Mutombo Hakeem Olajuwon Scottie Pippen Ralph Sampson Yao Ming

G League affiliate

Rio Grande Valley Vipers

Rivals

San Antonio Spurs Dallas Mavericks Utah Jazz

Media

TV AT&T SportsNet Southwest Radio Sportstalk 790 Announcers Bill Worrell Clyde Drexler Matt Bullard Craig Ackerman

v t e

Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame Class of 1987

Players

Rick Barry Walt Frazier Bob Houbregs Pete Maravich Bobby Wanzer

v t e

Members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame

Players

Guards

R. Allen Archibald Beckman Belov Bing Blazejowski Borgmann Brennan Cervi Cheeks Clayton Cooper-Dyke Cousy Dampier Davies Drexler Dumars Edwards Frazier Friedman Galis Gervin Goodrich Greer Guerin Hanson Haynes Holman Hyatt Isaacs Iverson Jeannette D. Johnson E. Johnson K. Jones S. Jones Jordan Kidd Lieberman Maravich Marcari Marčiulionis Martin McDermott McGrady D. McGuire Meyers R. Miller Monroe C. Murphy Nash Page Payton Petrović Phillip Posey Richmond Robertson Rodgers Roosma J. Russell Schommer Scott Sedran Sharman K. Smith Staley Steinmetz Stockton Swoopes Thomas Thompson Vandivier Wanzer West J. White Wilkens Woodard Wooden

Forwards

Arizin Barkley Barry Baylor Bird Bradley R. Brown Cunningham Curry Dalipagić Dantley DeBusschere Dehnert Endacott English Erving Foster Fulks Gale Gates Gola Hagan Havlicek Hawkins Hayes Haywood Heinsohn Hill Howell G. Johnson King Lucas Luisetti K. Malone McClain B. McCracken J. McCracken McGinnis McHale Mikkelsen C. Miller Mullin Pettit Pippen Pollard Radja Ramsey Rodman Schayes E. Schmidt O. Schmidt Stokes C. Thompson T. Thompson Twyman Walker Washington N. White Wilkes Wilkins Worthy Yardley

Centers

Abdul-Jabbar Barlow Beaty Bellamy Chamberlain Ćosić Cowens Crawford Daniels DeBernardi Donovan Ewing Gallatin Gilmore Gruenig Harris-Stewart Houbregs Issel W. Johnson Johnston M. Krause Kurland Lanier Leslie Lovellette Lapchick Macauley M. Malone McAdoo Meneghin Mikan Mourning S. Murphy Mutombo Olajuwon O'Neal Parish Pereira Reed Risen Robinson B. Russell Sabonis Sampson Semjonova Thurmond Unseld Wachter Walton Yao

Coaches

Alexeeva P. Allen Anderson Auerbach Auriemma Barmore Barry Blood Boeheim L. Brown Calhoun Calipari Cann Carlson Carnesecca Carnevale Carril Case Chancellor Chaney Conradt Crum Daly Dean Díaz-Miguel Diddle Drake Driesell Ferrándiz Gaines Gamba Gardner Gaze Gill Gomelsky Gunter Hannum Harshman Haskins Hatchell Heinsohn Hickey Hobson Holzman Hughes Hurley Iba Izzo P. Jackson Julian Keaney Keogan Knight Krzyzewski Kundla Lambert Leonard Lewis Litwack Loeffler Lonborg Magee McCutchan McGraw A. McGuire F. McGuire McLendon Meanwell Meyer Miller Moore Nelson Nikolić Novosel Olson Pitino Ramsay Richardson Riley Rubini Rupp Rush Sachs Self Sharman Shelton Sloan D. Smith Stringer Summitt Tarkanian Taylor Teague J. Thompson VanDerveer Wade Watts Wilkens G. Williams R. Williams Wooden Woolpert Wootten Yow

Contributors

Abbott Barksdale Bee Biasone H. Brown W. Brown Bunn Buss Clifton Colangelo Cooper Davidson Douglas Duer Embry Fagan Fisher Fleisher Gavitt Gottlieb Granik Gulick Harrison Hearn Henderson Hepp Hickox Hinkle Irish M. Jackson Jernstedt Jones Kennedy Knight J. Krause Lemon Liston Lloyd McLendon Lobo Mokray Morgan Morgenweck Naismith Newell Newton J. O'Brien L. O'Brien Olsen Podoloff Porter Raveling Reid Reinsdorf Ripley Sanders Saperstein Schabinger St. John Stagg Stanković Steitz Stern Taylor Thorn Tower Trester Vitale Wells Welts Wilke Winter Zollner

Referees

Bavetta Enright Garretson Hepbron Hoyt Kennedy Leith Mihalik Nichols Nucatola Quigley Rudolph Shirley Strom Tobey Walsh

Teams

1960 United States Olympic Team 1992 United States Olympic Team All-American Red Heads Buffalo Germans The First Team Harlem Globetrotters Immaculata College New York Renaissance Original Celtics Texas Western

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National Basketball
Basketball
Association's 50 Greatest Players in NBA History

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Nate Archibald Paul Arizin Charles Barkley Rick Barry Elgin Baylor Dave Bing Larry Bird Wilt Chamberlain Bob Cousy Dave Cowens Billy Cunningham Dave DeBusschere Clyde Drexler Julius Erving Patrick Ewing Walt Frazier George Gervin Hal Greer John Havlicek Elvin Hayes Magic Johnson Sam Jones Michael Jordan Jerry Lucas Karl Malone Moses Malone Pete Maravich Kevin McHale George Mikan Earl Monroe Hakeem Olajuwon Shaquille O'Neal Robert Parish Bob Pettit Scottie Pippen Willis Reed Oscar Robertson David Robinson Bill Russell Dolph Schayes Bill Sharman John Stockton Isiah Thomas Nate Thurmond Wes Unseld Bill Walton Jerry West Lenny Wilkens James Worthy

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ABA season scoring leaders

1968: Hawkins 1969: Barry 1970: Haywood 1971: Issel 1972: Scott 1973: Erving 1974: Erving 1975: McGinnis 1976: Erving

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ABA All-Time Team

Marvin Barnes Rick Barry Zelmo Beaty Ron Boone Roger Brown Mack Calvin Darel Carrier Billy Cunningham Louie Dampier Mel Daniels Julius Erving Donnie Freeman George Gervin Artis Gilmore Connie Hawkins Spencer Haywood Dan Issel Warren Jabali Jimmy Jones Freddie Lewis Maurice Lucas Moses Malone George McGinnis Doug Moe Bob Netolicky Billy Paultz Charlie Scott James Silas David Thompson Willie Wise

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Bill Russell
Bill Russell
NBA Finals
NBA Finals
Most Valuable Player Award

1969: West 1970: Reed 1971: Alcindor 1972: Chamberlain 1973: Reed 1974: Havlicek 1975: Barry 1976: White 1977: Walton 1978: Unseld 1979: D. Johnson 1980: E. Johnson 1981: Maxwell 1982: E. Johnson 1983: Malone 1984: Bird 1985: Abdul-Jabbar 1986: Bird 1987: E. Johnson 1988: Worthy 1989: Dumars 1990: Thomas 1991: Jordan 1992: Jordan 1993: Jordan 1994: Olajuwon 1995: Olajuwon 1996: Jordan 1997: Jordan 1998: Jordan 1999: Duncan 2000: O'Neal 2001: O'Neal 2002: O'Neal 2003: Duncan 2004: Billups 2005: Duncan 2006: Wade 2007: Parker 2008: Pierce 2009: Bryant 2010: Bryant 2011: Nowitzki 2012: James 2013: James 2014: Leonard 2015: Iguodala 2016: James 2017: Durant

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NBA Rookie of the Year Award

1953: Meineke 1954: Felix 1955: Pettit 1956: Stokes 1957: Heinsohn 1958: Sauldsberry 1959: Baylor 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Robertson 1962: Bellamy 1963: Dischinger 1964: Lucas 1965: Reed 1966: Barry 1967: Bing 1968: Monroe 1969: Unseld 1970: Alcindor 1971: Cowens & Petrie 1972: Wicks 1973: McAdoo 1974: DiGregorio 1975: Wilkes 1976: Adams 1977: Dantley 1978: Davis 1979: Ford 1980: Bird 1981: Griffith 1982: Williams 1983: Cummings 1984: Sampson 1985: Jordan 1986: Ewing 1987: Person 1988: Jackson 1989: Richmond 1990: Robinson 1991: Coleman 1992: Johnson 1993: O'Neal 1994: Webber 1995: Hill & Kidd 1996: Stoudamire 1997: Iverson 1998: Duncan 1999: Carter 2000: Brand & Francis 2001: Miller 2002: Gasol 2003: Stoudemire 2004: James 2005: Okafor 2006: Paul 2007: Roy 2008: Durant 2009: Rose 2010: Evans 2011: Griffin 2012: Irving 2013: Lillard 2014: Carter-Williams 2015: Wiggins 2016: Towns 2017: Brogdon

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NBA All-Star Game Most Valuable Player Award

1951: Macauley 1952: Arizin 1953: Mikan 1954: Cousy 1955: Sharman 1956: Pettit 1957: Cousy 1958: Pettit 1959: Baylor & Pettit 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Robertson 1962: Pettit 1963: Russell 1964: Robertson 1965: Lucas 1966: A. Smith 1967: Barry 1968: Greer 1969: Robertson 1970: Reed 1971: Wilkens 1972: West 1973: Cowens 1974: Lanier 1975: Frazier 1976: Bing 1977: Erving 1978: R. Smith 1979: Thompson 1980: Gervin 1981: Archibald 1982: Bird 1983: Erving 1984: Thomas 1985: Sampson 1986: Thomas 1987: Chambers 1988: Jordan 1989: Malone 1990: Johnson 1991: Barkley 1992: Johnson 1993: Stockton & Malone 1994: Pippen 1995: Richmond 1996: Jordan 1997: Rice 1998: Jordan 1999: No game played 2000: O'Neal & Duncan 2001: Iverson 2002: Bryant 2003: Garnett 2004: O'Neal 2005: Iverson 2006: James 2007: Bryant 2008: James 2009: Bryant & O'Neal 2010: Wade 2011: Bryant 2012: Durant 2013: Paul 2014: Irving 2015: Westbrook 2016: Westbrook 2017: Davis

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NBA season scoring leaders

1947: Fulks 1948: Zaslofsky 1949: Mikan 1950: Mikan 1951: Mikan 1952: Arizin 1953: Johnston 1954: Johnston 1955: Johnston 1956: Pettit 1957: Arizin 1958: Yardley 1959: Pettit 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Chamberlain 1962: Chamberlain 1963: Chamberlain 1964: Chamberlain 1965: Chamberlain 1966: Chamberlain 1967: Barry 1968: Bing 1969: Hayes 1970: West 1971: Alcindor 1972: Abdul-Jabbar 1973: Archibald 1974: McAdoo 1975: McAdoo 1976: McAdoo 1977: Maravich 1978: Gervin 1979: Gervin 1980: Gervin 1981: Dantley 1982: Gervin 1983: English 1984: Dantley 1985: King 1986: Wilkins 1987: Jordan 1988: Jordan 1989: Jordan 1990: Jordan 1991: Jordan 1992: Jordan 1993: Jordan 1994: Robinson 1995: O'Neal 1996: Jordan 1997: Jordan 1998: Jordan 1999: Iverson 2000: O'Neal 2001: Iverson 2002: Iverson 2003: McGrady 2004: McGrady 2005: Iverson 2006: Bryant 2007: Bryant 2008: James 2009: Wade 2010: Durant 2011: Durant 2012: Durant 2013: Anthony 2014: Durant 2015: Westbrook 2016: Curry 2017: Westbrook

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NBA season steals leaders

1974: Steele 1975: Barry 1976: Watts 1977: Buse 1978: Lee 1979: Carr 1980: Richardson 1981: Johnson 1982: Johnson 1983: Richardson 1984: Green 1985: Richardson 1986: Robertson 1987: Robertson 1988: Jordan 1989: Stockton 1990: Jordan 1991: Robertson 1992: Stockton 1993: Jordan 1994: McMillan 1995: Pippen 1996: Payton 1997: Blaylock 1998: Blaylock 1999: Gill 2000: Jones 2001: Iverson 2002: Iverson 2003: Iverson 2004: Davis 2005: Hughes 2006: Wallace 2007: Davis 2008: Paul 2009: Paul 2010: Rondo 2011: Paul 2012: Paul 2013: Paul 2014: Paul 2015: Leonard 2016: Curry 2017: Green

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NBA on CBS

Related programs

The CBS Late Movie College Basketball
Basketball
on CBS

Related articles

Ratings

NBA Finals

Commentators

All-Star Game NBA Finals

Key figures

Gary Bender Tim Brant Bob Costas Don Criqui Eddie Doucette Frank Glieber Greg Gumbel Jim Kelly Verne Lundquist Brent Musburger Andy Musser Jim Nantz Don Robertson Dick Stockton Pat Summerall

Color commentators

John Andariese Rick Barry Hubie Brown Elgin Baylor James Brown Quinn Buckner Doug Collins Billy Cunningham Terry Dischinger Len Elmore Keith Erickson John Havlicek Tom Heinsohn Rod Hundley Gus Johnson Steve Jones Sonny Jurgensen Stu Lantz Kevin Loughery Pete Maravich Jon McGlocklin Dick Motta Jeff Mullins Billy Packer Bill Raftery Cal Ramsey Oscar Robertson Mendy Rudolph Bill Russell Cazzie Russell Larry Steele Lenny Wilkens

Sideline reporters

Charlsie Cantey Jane Chastain Irv Cross Jim Gray Sonny Hill Andrea Joyce Pat O'Brien Lesley Visser

NBA Finals

1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

All-Star Game

1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

Lore

Music "The Bad Boys" Christmas Day "The Greatest Game Ever Played" "The Shot"

Rivalries

Celtics–Lakers Lakers–Pistons

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NBA on TNT

Related programs

Inside the NBA

Shaqtin' a Fool

NBA on TBS NBA All-Star Weekend NCAA Men's Division I Basketball
Basketball
Championship

commentators

NBA Awards

Related articles

Ratings NBA TV NBA 07

Commentators

Play-by-play

Marv Albert Brian Anderson Gary Bender Tim Brando Mike Breen Kevin Calabro Skip Caray Matt Devlin Jim Durham Kevin Harlan Jim Huber Verne Lundquist Bob Neal Mel Proctor Dick Stockton Pete Van Wieren

Color commentators

Danny Ainge Brent Barry Rick Barry Hubie Brown P. J. Carlesimo Rex Chapman Doug Collins Chuck Daly Mike Dunleavy Sr. Mike Fratello Jack Givens Grant Hill Steve Kerr Kevin McHale Reggie Miller Doc Rivers Steve Smith John Thompson Jeff Van Gundy Dick Versace Chris Webber

Sideline reporters

David Aldridge Rosalyn Gold-Onwude Lewis Johnson Allie LaForce Kristen Ledlow Cheryl Miller Pam Oliver Craig Sager Marty Snider Tracy Wolfson

Studio hosts

Vince Cellini Marc Fein Ernie Johnson Jr. Bob Lorenz Casey Stern Matt Winer

Studio analysts

Charles Barkley Magic Johnson Lisa Leslie Kevin McHale Shaquille O'Neal Gary Payton Kenny Smith Reggie Theus Isiah Thomas

NBA Drafts

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

All-Star Game

2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021

Lore

Music Christmas Day NBA outdoor games Disputed foul against Scottie Pippen

v t e

NBA on TBS

Related programs

NBA on TNT NBA All-Star Weekend NCAA Men's Division I Basketball
Basketball
Championship

Related articles

Ratings Atlanta Hawks broadcasters

Key figures

Marv Albert Tim Brando Kevin Calabro Chip Caray Skip Caray Jim Durham Mike Gorman Kevin Harlan Verne Lundquist Bob Neal Mel Proctor Dick Stockton Ron Thulin Pete Van Wieren

Color commentators

Danny Ainge John Andariese Rick Barry Hubie Brown Quinn Buckner Doug Collins Chuck Daly Mike Fratello Walt Frazier Jack Givens Mike Glenn Rod Hundley Steve Jones John MacLeod Don Nelson Bill Raftery Doc Rivers Oscar Robertson Bill Russell John Thompson Dick Versace Bill Walton

Studio hosts

Vince Cellini Fred Hickman Ernie Johnson Jr.

Studio analysts

Scott Hastings Kenny Smith Reggie Theus Peter Vecsey

Sideline reporters

Kevin Kiley Cheryl Miller Craig Sager

Contributors

Bryan Burwell Jim Huber

NBA Drafts

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989

Music

"The Payback" "Takin' Care of Business" "Bad" "Higher Ground"

Lore

Christmas Day Celtics–Pistons rivalry

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 266716580 LCCN: n50020

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