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The Rhode Island
Rhode Island
State House is the capitol of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Rhode Island. It is located on the border of the Downtown and Smith Hill sections of the state capital city of Providence. The State House is a neoclassical building that houses the Rhode Island
Rhode Island
General Assembly and the offices of the governor of Rhode Island
Rhode Island
as well as the lieutenant governor, secretary of state, and General Treasurer of Rhode Island. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Contents

1 History 2 Description 3 Christmas at the State House 4 Photo gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External links

History[edit] The current State House is Rhode Island's seventh state house and the second in Providence after the Old Rhode Island
Rhode Island
State House. It was designed by the architectural firm of McKim, Mead, and White
McKim, Mead, and White
and constructed from 1895 to 1904. The building had a major renovation in the late 1990s.[1] The building served as the United States Capitol
United States Capitol
exterior in the 1997 film Amistad. It also served as the City Hall of Capital City in Disney's Underdog. Description[edit] The Rhode Island
Rhode Island
State House is composed of 327,000 cubic feet (9,300 m3) of white Georgia marble, 15 million bricks, and 1,309 short tons (1,188 t) of iron floor beams.[2] The dome of the State House is the fourth-largest self-supporting marble dome in the world, after St. Peter's Basilica, the Minnesota State Capitol, and the Taj Mahal.[2][3] On top of the dome is a gold-covered bronze statue of the Independent Man, originally named "Hope". The statue, weighing more than 500 pounds (230 kg), is 11 feet (3.4 m) tall and stands 278 feet (85 m) above the ground. The Independent Man represents freedom and independence and alludes to the independent spirit which led Roger Williams to settle and establish Providence and later Rhode Island. The chamber of the Rhode Island
Rhode Island
Senate is located in the east wing of the building while the chamber of the Rhode Island
Rhode Island
House of Representatives is located in the west wing. Other notable rooms in the State House include the rotunda (beneath the dome), the State Library (north end), and the State Room (south end). The State Room is an entrance area for the office of the governor and contains a full-scale portrait of George Washington
George Washington
by Rhode Island
Rhode Island
native Gilbert Stuart. This room is also where the governor has press conferences and bill signings at the State House. One of the first public buildings to use electricity, the Rhode Island State House is lit by 109 floodlights and two searchlights at night.[2] Inside the State House is carved marble. Over the pillared porticoes are quotations and historical chronologies of Rhode Island. Throughout the rotunda are battle flags, statues, and guns representing the state's military past. In the center of the rotunda, under the marble dome, is a brass replica of the state seal. The building can be seen from I-95, though the Providence Place
Providence Place
Mall has blocked much of the view from the northbound lanes. In 2013, Governor Lincoln Chafee's administration started to remove grass from the eastern side of the Statehouse lawn in order to provide extra parking for employees. The move was opposed by the Capital Center Commission,[4] which is a public board designated with the task of overseeing zoning requirements within the district. Supporters of the proposed parking say that there is demand from employees and visitors to the building.[4] Opponents point to existing zoning requirements that make the surface lot illegal, point to the expense of providing parking, and advocate an increased presence for transit, biking, walking, and carpooling instead.[5][6][7] The state spent $3.1 million on an adjoining piece of land on Francis Street next to I-95 for parking, which provides 100 parking spots at around $30,000 a space.[8] Christmas at the State House[edit]

The State House tree in 2013

It is an annual State House tradition to feature a Christmas tree
Christmas tree
and community and cultural holiday displays each December. A Fraser fir
Fraser fir
or Balsam fir
Balsam fir
is erected in the large central rotunda and decorated. The tree, donated by a local family or tree farm, is typically between 17 and 25 feet tall.[9] Rhode Island's State House tree has sometimes been the subject of media attention:

In 2005, the tree was removed from the rotunda after a treatment of flame retardant caused the needles to fall out.[9] In 2011 and 2012, Bishop Thomas J. Tobin and others objected to the wording on tree-lighting ceremony invitations, which referred to the tree as a "holiday" tree; in 2013, Governor Chafee changed the wording to "Christmas" tree.[10] In 2016, a 14-foot Fraser Fir was deemed to be too small for the rotunda.[9] A replacement 20-foot tree was placed in the rotunda, and the smaller tree moved to the south steps.[9] In 2017, the rotunda's 25-foot Fraiser Fir made national headlines when it began dropping needles "at an alarming rate," after being on display for three weeks.[11] The sickly tree was replaced with a smaller (12-foot) tree.[12]

Since 2014, holiday displays from "any Rhode Island
Rhode Island
area-based religious or secular group" have been featured on the first and second floors.[13] Participating groups have included local religious, ethnic, and secular organizations.[13] Photo gallery[edit]

The Rhode Island
Rhode Island
State House at sunset

The State House in front of Providence Place
Providence Place
Mall

State House across the plaza in front of Veterans Memorial Auditorium

Inside

From front left

Ceiling of the rotunda, showing four personified values with Latin names. (Here: Educatio, Iustitia, Commercia, Litera.)

Cannon at front entrance to capitol

House chamber

Senate chamber

The day after a 9/11 vigil, with giant flag

"Independent Man" atop the dome of the Providence State House.

State House lit in pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month, October 2010

See also[edit]

National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
listings in Providence, Rhode Island

References[edit]

^ "Cupolas of Capitalism: State Capitol Building Histories: States from P to S". Cupola. Retrieved January 10, 2014.  ^ a b c "Facts and Figures". State of Rhode Island
Rhode Island
General Assembly. Archived from the original on May 15, 2012. Retrieved January 10, 2014.  ^ "The Providence Heritage Trail". VisitRhodeIsland.com (Rhode Island Tourism Division). Archived from the original on September 3, 2012. Retrieved January 10, 2014.  ^ a b Grimaldi, Paul (October 16, 2013). "Capital Center chairman opposed to more parking near R.I. State House". The Providence Journal. Retrieved January 10, 2014.  ^ Nickerson, Jef (October 18, 2013). "State defiantly moves ahead with surface parking". Greater City Providence. Retrieved January 10, 2014.  ^ Kennedy, James (February 21, 2013). "Guest post: Parking reform should start at the State House". Greater City Providence. Archived from the original on February 2013. Retrieved January 10, 2014.  ^ Rachel, James (November 2011). "Dear Audubon Society..." Transport Providence. Retrieved January 10, 2014.  ^ Grimaldi, Paul (July 2, 2013). "R.I. will pay $3.1M for land across from State House". The Providence Journal. Retrieved January 10, 2014.  ^ a b c d Anderson, Patrick (22 November 2016). "State House Christmas tree didn't measure up, so it got replaced". The Providence Journal. Retrieved 24 November 2016.  ^ McKinney, Mike (2 December 2013). "After 'holiday tree' controversy, Chafee now calls RI State House tree a 'Christmas tree'". The Providence Journal. Retrieved 24 November 2016.  ^ Bender, John (18 December 2017). "After A Moment In The Spotlight, RI Statehouse Christmas Tree Comes Down". Rhode Island
Rhode Island
Public Radio. Retrieved 19 December 2017.  ^ Anderson, Patrick (18 December 2017). "Dead Christmas tree
Christmas tree
is replaced at R.I. State House". The Providence Journal. Retrieved 20 December 2017.  ^ a b Gregg, Katherine (27 November 2015). "Holiday displays at the State House: Open to all, but follow the rules". The Providence Journal. Retrieved 24 November 2016. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Rhode Island
Rhode Island
State House.

Rhode Island
Rhode Island
State House Tour Rhode Island
Rhode Island
State House, 90 Smith Street, Providence, Providence, RI at the Historic American Buildings Survey
Historic American Buildings Survey
(HABS)

Preceded by Unknown Tallest Building in Providence 1904–1927 68 m Succeeded by Industrial Trust Building

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1 Rhode Island
Rhode Island
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