Red River County, Texas
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Red River County is a county in the
U.S. state In the United States The United States of America (U.S.A. or USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US) or America, is a country Continental United States, primarily located in North America. It consists of 50 U.S. state, ...
of
Texas Texas (, ; Spanish language, Spanish: ''Texas'', ''Tejas'') is a state in the South Central United States, South Central region of the United States. At 268,596 square miles (695,662 km2), and with more than 29.1 million residents in 2 ...
. As of the 2010 census, its population was 11,587. Its
county seat A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or parish (administrative division), civil parish. The term is in use in Canada, China, Hungary, Romania, Taiwan, and the United States. The equivalent te ...
is Clarksville. The county was created in 1835 and organized in 1837. It is named for the Red River, which forms its northern boundary. Red River County was the birthplace of John Nance Garner, 32nd Vice President of the United States.


Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of , of which is land and (1.9%) is water.


Major highways

* U.S. Highway 82 * U.S. Highway 271 * State Highway 37


Adjacent counties

* McCurtain County, Oklahoma (north) * Bowie County (east) * Morris County (southeast) * Titus County (south) * Franklin County (southwest) * Delta County (southwest) * Lamar County (west) * Choctaw County, Oklahoma (northwest)


Communities


Cities

* Bogata * Clarksville (county seat) * Deport (mostly in Lamar County) *
Detroit Detroit ( , ; , ) is the List of municipalities in Michigan, largest city in the U.S. state of Michigan. It is also the largest U.S. city on the Canada–United States border, United States–Canada border, and the County seat, seat of gov ...


Towns

* Annona * Avery


Unincorporated communities

* Aikin Grove * Albion * Bagwell * English * Maple * Negley


Ghost town

* Opah


Demographics

''Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.'' As of the census of 2000, there were 14,314 people, 5,827 households, and 4,067 families residing in the county. In 2020, its population was 11,587. From the 2000 census, the population density was 14 people per square mile (5/km2). There were 6,916 housing units at an average density of 7 per square mile (3/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 78.04% White, 17.80% Black or African American, 0.59% Native American, 0.12% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 2.29% from other races, and 1.15% from two or more races. 4.67% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 5,827 households, out of which 28.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.50% were married couples living together, 11.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.20% were non-families. 27.70% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41 and the average family size was 2.91. In the county, the population was spread out, with 23.90% under the age of 18, 7.80% from 18 to 24, 24.40% from 25 to 44, 24.30% from 45 to 64, and 19.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 92.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.80 males. The median income for a household in the county was $27,558, and the median income for a family was $33,436. Males had a median income of $24,609 versus $17,566 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,058, making it one of the economically poorest counties in the state of Texas. About 13.10% of families and 17.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.20% of those under age 18 and 17.70% of those age 65 or over.


Education

The following school districts serve Red River County: * Avery ISD * Clarksville ISD * Detroit ISD * Prairiland ISD (mostly in Lamar County) * Rivercrest ISD (partly in Titus County, small portion in Franklin County)


Notable people

* Edward H. Tarrant, for whom Tarrant County was named, lived in Red River County when he first moved to
Texas Texas (, ; Spanish language, Spanish: ''Texas'', ''Tejas'') is a state in the South Central United States, South Central region of the United States. At 268,596 square miles (695,662 km2), and with more than 29.1 million residents in 2 ...
in the 1830s. * John "Cactus Jack" Garner, Vice President of the U.S. who served for eight years under President F. D. Roosevelt, was born in Red River County, in 1868. * B.P. Newman (1927–2008), a Texas business entrepreneur, developer, and philanthropist based in Laredo, was born in Red River County. * Jim Leavelle,
Dallas Dallas () is the List of municipalities in Texas, third largest city in Texas and the largest city in the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex, the List of metropolitan statistical areas, fourth-largest metropolitan area in the United States at 7.5 ...
homicide detective, who became renowned for escorting Lee Harvey Oswald when Oswald was shot by Jack Ruby, was born here in 1920. * J. D. Tippit, Dallas policeman, who was shot to death a short time after the John F. Kennedy assassination. A monument to J.D. Tippit is located on Highway 37 South. He was born and raised in Red River County. * William Humphrey, author of ''Home from the Hill'' and ''The Ardways'' and other works was born and raised in Red River County. ''Home from the Hill'' was made into a movie starring George Hamilton among other great stars.


Politics

Red River County is represented, as of January 2015, in the Texas House of Representatives by the Republican Gary VanDeaver, the former superintendent of the New Boston Independent School District in New Boston, Texas.


See also

* National Register of Historic Places listings in Red River County, Texas * Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks in Red River County


References


External links


Red River County government's website
* {{Coord, 33.62, -95.05, display=title, type:adm2nd_region:US-TX_source:UScensus1990 1837 establishments in the Republic of Texas Populated places established in 1837