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v t e

Diachronic distribution of Celtic peoples:   core Hallstatt territory, by the 6th century BCE   maximal Celtic expansion, by 275 BCE   Lusitanian and Vettonian area of Iberian Peninsula where Celtic presence is uncertain, Para-Celtic?   the six Celtic nations which retained significant numbers of Celtic speakers into the Early Modern period   areas where Celtic languages remain widely spoken today

This is a list of Celtic tribes, listed in order of the Roman province (after Roman conquest) or the general area in which they lived. This geographical distribution of Celtic tribes does not imply that tribes that lived in the same general geographical area were more related. Some tribes' or tribal confederation's names are listed under more than one region because they dwelt in several of the regions.

Contents

1 High Danube-Hercynia

1.1 Hercynia 1.2 Noricum 1.3 Rhaetia 1.4 Vindelicia

2 Venetia 3 Liguria 4 Gaul (Gallia)

4.1 Cisalpine Gaul (Gallia Cisalpina) 4.2 Transalpine Gaul (Gallia Transalpina)

4.2.1 Aquitania Propria (Aquitania Proper) 4.2.2 Belgica 4.2.3 Celtica 4.2.4 Narbonensis

5 Great Britain (Britannia)

5.1 Britain Proper (Britannia Propria) 5.2 Caledonia

6 Ireland (Hibernia) 7 Iberian Peninsula (Hispania)

7.1 Citerior Iberia (Hispania Citerior)

7.1.1 Tarraconensis

7.2 Ulterior Iberia (Hispania Ulterior)

7.2.1 Baetica 7.2.2 Lusitania

8 Middle and Low Danube

8.1 Dacia 8.2 Illyricum

8.2.1 Pannonia 8.2.2 Illyria

8.3 Moesia 8.4 Thrace (Thracia)

9 Anatolia (Asia Minor)

9.1 Bithynia 9.2 Galatia 9.3 Mysia 9.4 Phrygia 9.5 Unlocated

10 See also 11 Notes 12 References 13 External links

High Danube-Hercynia[edit]

Map showing the Roman district (probably not yet a full province by then) of Raetia et Vindelicia, as it stood in AD 14, with some Raeti tribal names

Southern Central Europe, roughly upper Danube river basin and neighboring regions, is hypothesized as the original area of the Celts (Proto-Celts), corresponding to the Hallstatt Culture. Some closely fit the concept of a tribe. Others are confederations or even unions of tribes. Hercynia[edit]

Eastern Celts[1]

Anartes/Anartoi – Celts assimilated by Dacians.[2] Areas of modern Slovakia and modern Northern Hungary, north of the river Tysia/Tibiscus (Tisza). They lived in the east part of the Hercynia Silva (Hercynian Forest). Boii[1]– a tribal confederation, originally from today's Bohemia (Western Czech Republic) that dwelt in the Hercynia Silva and dispersed through migrations to other regions of Europe, to areas of modern Slovakia, Germany, Austria, Hungary and Northern Italy.[3][4]

Boii tribes of unknown names in the Hercynia Silva - roughly in today's Bohemia

Cotini/Gotini – areas of modern Slovakia, west of the Anartes, and areas of Western Hungary, south of Lacus Pelsodis/Pelso (Lake Balaton). Lugii – areas of modern southwestern and southern Poland; also may have been a Germanic tribe. Osi/Osii – areas of modern Slovakia[5] Volcae - a tribal confederation, originally from today's Moravia (Eastern Czech Republic), Central and Upper Danube basin (Slovakia, Austria, Southern Germany), dwelt in Hercynia Silva, north of the Danuvius (Danube), but dispersed through migrations to other regions of Europe (Southern Gaul) and Asia Minor/Anatolia (Galatia).

Volcae tribes of unknown names in the Hercynia Silva - roughly in today's Moravia.

Gauls (Celtae)

Helvetii – original dwellers of Agri Decumates region, in the western part of Hercynia Silva, unknown named tribes of the Helvetii tribal confederation, also dwelt to the South and Southwest in Helvetia (modern day Switzerland). Decumates may have meant "Ten Cantons". Latobrigi/Latovici - uncertain location, maybe to the north or northeast of the Helvetii in the upper Danube (Danubius) and upper Rhine river basins, original dwellers of Agri Decumates region, in the western part of Hercynia Silva. Tulingi (Tylangii?) – localisation unclear, possibly Southern Germany, Switzerland or Austria; also may have been a Germanic tribe.

Noricum[edit]

Eastern Celts[1]

Carni – Carnic Alps, South Austria (Carinthia/Kärnten), Western Slovenia (Carniola/Kranjska) and Northern Friuli/Friûl (Carnia/Cjargna). A tribe related to the Carnutes? Also may have been a Venetic tribe (the Veneti were a transitional people between Celts and Italics or a Celticized Italic people). Norici/Taurisci - a tribal confederation

Alauni - in the middle Aenus river basin (Inn), east of the Aenus in the Eastern Alps, Chiemsee and Attersee lakes region. Ambidravi/Ambidrani - in the upper and middle Dravus (Drau/Drava) river basin in the Eastern Alps and also in the Mur/Mura river basin, today's Carinthia and Styria, Austria. Ambilici - in the Dravus (Drau/Drava) river basin, east of the Ambidravi/Ambidrani (today's Southeast Austria and Northeast Slovenia). Ambisontes/Ambisontii - in the Alpes Noricae (East Central Alps), in the upper Salzach river basin. Norici/Nori - may have been a tribe of the larger Taurisci tribal federation; in the Eastern Alps and in the Mur/Mura and Schwarza rivers basins and other areas, today's Styria and Lower Austria (Austria) south of the Danubius (Danube). Sevaces - in the low Aenus river basin (Inn), east of the Aenus and south of the Danubius (Danube), roughly in today's Upper Austria.

Rhaetia[edit]

Rhaetians – They lived in Central Alps, eastern parts of present-day Switzerland, the Tyrol in Austria, and the Alpine regions of northern Italy. They spoke the Rhaetian language. There is evidence that the non-Celtic (and Pre-Indo-European) elements (see Tyrsenian languages) had, by the time of Augustus, been assimilated by the influx of Celtic tribes and had adopted Celtic speech.[6] In addition, the abundance of Celtic toponyms and the complete absence of Etruscan place names in the Rhaetian territory, leads to the conclusion that, by the time of Roman conquest, the Rhaetians were completely Celticized.[7]

Benlauni - Upper valley of fl. Aenus (r. Inn) in today's North Tirol, Austria, along with the Breuni (may have been older dwellers than the Breuni), not the same as the Breuni, Pons Aeni (modern Wasserburg) was their main centre. Breuni/Brenni/Breones - Upper valley of fl. Aenus (r. Inn) in today's North Tirol, Austria, and Val Bregna and around Brenner Mountain; also may have been an Illyrian tribe and not a Rhaetian one. Brixenetes/Brixentes/Brixantae - Upper valley of fl. Athesis (r. Adige) in today's South Tirol, Italy, around Bressanone/Brixen. Calucones/Culicones - Calanda (upper valley of fl. Rhenus - r. Rhine) in today's Grisons canton, Switzerland and Valtellina, Colico. Camunni/Camuni - Val Camonica (river Oglio) in today's Brescia Province (Lombardia, Italy); also may have been a tribe of the Euganei and not a Rhaetian tribe. Consuanetae/Cosuanetes/Cotuantii? - Upper and middle valley of fl. Isarus (r. Isar) (Bavarian Alps) in today's Upper Bavaria, Germany; also may have been a tribe of the Vindelici (a tribal confederacy), named Cotuantii (if they are the same). Focunates - Upper valley of fl. Aenus (r. Inn) in today's North Tirol, Austria, neighbours to Genaunes and Breuni. Genaunes/Genauni - Upper valleys of the fl. Aenus (r. Inn) and the Athesis (Adige) in today's Tirol (North Tirol and South Tirol); also may have been an Illyrian tribe and not a Rhaetian one; east of the Lepontii. Isarci - Valley of fl. Isarcus (r. Isarco) in today's South Tirol, Italy. Leponti/Lepontii/Leipontii/Lepontes - Val Leventina and Val d'Ossola in today's Province of Verbano-Cusio-Ossola, Piemonte, Italy; also may not have been a Rhaetian tribe but instead a Gaulish tribe; west of the Genaunes/Genauni. Medoaci - close to the Meduacum (Brenta) source, Ausugum (Borgo Valsugana) was their main town. Mesiales - south of the Lepontii. Naunes - in Val di Non, Trento Province. Querquani - in Quero area (today's Belluno Province, Veneto Region). Runicates/Rucinates/Rucantii? - Between rivers Isarus (Isar) and Danuvius (Danube), Low Bavaria; also may have been a tribe of the Vindelici (a tribal confederation). Rugusci/Ruigusci/Rucantii? Upper Engadin (fl. Aenus - r. Inn) in today's Grisons canton, Switzerland. Suanetes/Suanitae/Sarunetes - Upper Rhenus (Upper Rhine) and Valley of r. Albula in today's Grisons canton, Switzerland. Tridentini - in the middle Athesis (Adige) river basin. Trumpilini/Trumplini - Val Trompia in today's Brescia Province, Italy; also may have been a tribe of the Euganei and not a Rhaetian tribe. Vennonetes/Vennones/Vennonienses - Upper valley of fl. Rhenus (r. Rhine) in today's canton of St. Gallen, Switzerland; also may not have been a Rhaetian tribe but instead a tribe of the Vindelici (a tribal confederation). Venostes - Vinschgau (It. Val Venosta) (fl. Athesis - r. Adige) in today's South Tirol, Italy.

Vindelicia[edit]

Eastern Celts[1]

Vindelici – a tribal confederation, areas of modern Southern Germany (Bavaria and Baden-Württemberg), in the upper Danube basin.

Brigantii – in the Lacus Brigantinus (Lake Constance) area, Brigantia (Bregenz) was the main centre, in the border areas of modern Germany, Austria and Switzerland, north of the Vennonetes/Vennones/Vennonienses. Catenates - South of the Danubius (Danube), in the low Licus (Lech) river area, Augusta Vindelicorum region (today's Augsburg), north of the Licates. Consuanetae/Cosuanetes/Cotuantii? - Upper and middle valley of fl. Isarus (r. Isar) (Bavarian Alps) in today's Upper Bavaria, Germany. Estiones - South of the Danubius (Danube), in the Ilargus (Roth) and Riss rivers area, including today's Ulm area (between modern Bavaria and Baden-Württemberg), Cambodunum (today's Kempten) was one of their towns. Leuni - in the Isarus (Isar) and Ammer (Amper) river areas, Munich area, Bavaria. Licates - in the Licus (Lech) river valley, south of the Catenates. Runicates/Rucinates/Rucantii? - Between rivers Isarus (Isar) and Danuvius (Danube), Low Bavaria. Vennonetes/Vennones/Vennonienses - Upper valley of fl. Rhenus (r. Rhine) in today's canton of St. Gallen, Switzerland, south of the Brigantii.

Venetia[edit]

Eastern Celts[1]

Carni – Carnic Alps, South Austria (Carinthia/Kärnten), Western Slovenia (Carniola/Kranjska) and Northern Friuli/Friûl (Carnia/Cjargna). A tribe related to the Carnutes? Catubrini - In the Alps Southeastern slopes, close to Atesis (Adige) and near Tridentum (Trento), to the Southwest of the Carni. They came from Central Europe and not from Gaul (Gallia). (They were not Cisalpine Gaulish Celts).

Veneti? (Transitional people between Celts and Italics? Celticized Italic people? Para-Celtic people?)

Carni – Carnic Alps, South Austria (Carinthia/Kärnten), Western Slovenia (Carniola/Kranjska) and Northern Friuli/Friûl (Carnia/Cjargna). A tribe related to the Carnutes? Catali Catari Histri Secusses Subocrini Veneti Proper

Liguria[edit]

Ligures – Northern Mediterranean Coast straddling South-east French and North-west Italian coasts, including Northern Tuscany and Corsica. Because of the strong Celtic influences on their language and culture, they were known already in antiquity as Celto-Ligurians (in Greek Κελτολίγυες, Keltolígues).[8] Very little is known about this language, Ligurian (mainly place names and personal names remain) which is generally believed to have been Celtic or Para-Celtic;[9][10] (i.e. an Indo-European language branch not Celtic but more closely related to Celtic).

Apuani – Eastern Liguria from the Northern Apennines Mountains to the mediterranean coast. Bagienni (or Vagienni) – (in the area of Bene Vagienna) Briniates (or Boactes) – (in the area of Brugnato) Deciates – (in modern Provence, west of the river Var) Friniates – (in the area now called Frignano) Garuli – (in the area of Cenisola) Genuates – (in the area of Genua - Genova) Hercates – Ilvates (or Iluates) – (if different from the Iriates) (on the island of Elba) Ingauni – Western Liguria from the Northern Apennines Mountains and Ligurian Alps to the mediterranean coast. Intemelii - Western Liguria from the Ligurian Alps to the mediterranean coast, west of the Ingauni, in the Albium Intemelium area (today's Ventimiglia). Laevi – a ligurian tribe that dwelt in the low river Ticinus (Ticino), according to both Livy & Pliny.[11] According to Livy (v. 34), they took part in the expedition of Bellovesus into Italy in the 6th century BC Lapicini (or Lapicinii) – In the extreme northern regions of Liguria, as it was defined in Roman times, on a tributary of the Magra Marici – (near the confluence of the rivers Orba, Bormida and Tanaro) Statielli – on the road from Vada Sabatia, near Savona to Dertona (Tortona) and Placentia Tigulli – from the Northern Apennines Mountains to the mediterranean coast, west of the Apuani. Tricastini –

Gaul (Gallia)[edit] See also: List of peoples of Gaul Cisalpine Gaul (Gallia Cisalpina)[edit]

Celtic tribes in orange. Many Roman writers thought the Umbrians to be Celtic as well.[12][13][14]

Peoples of northern Italy during the 4th to 3rd centuries BC (Celtic tribes in blue).

Cisalpine Gaul (Gallia Cisalpina), also called Gallia Citerior or Gallia Togata,[15] was the part of Italy continually inhabited by Celts since the 13th century BC.[16] Conquered by the Roman Republic in the 220s BC, it was a Roman province from c. 81 BC until 42 BC, when it was merged into Roman Italy.[17] Until that time, it was considered part of Gaul, precisely that part of Gaul on the "hither side of the Alps" (from the perspective of the Romans), as opposed to Transalpine Gaul ("on the far side of the Alps").[18]

Cisalpine Gauls (Celtae/Galli Cisalpini) - Multiple waves of population movements from France.[4] They spoke Cisalpine Gaulish (a Continental Celtic language of the P Celtic type) closely related to Gaulish or Gallic.

Seven Gaulish tribes that according to Livy settled in Cisalpine Gaul around 600 BC. Led by Bellovesus, they defeated the Etruscans at the Ticino, settled in Insubria and founded the city of Mediolanum, the modern Milan.[19]

Aedui Ambarri Arverni Aulerci Bituriges Carnutes Salyes

Anani – Western Emilia, Po Valley, (Fidentia, Province of Piacenza) Anamares – Minor tribe whose precise location along the southern bank of the river Padus in Italy is uncertain Anares – Middle Po Valley, Placentia (Piacenza, Province of Piacenza) Cenomani – Eastern Lombardy (Brixia, Cremona). Related to or a branch of the Cenomani (Aulerci Cenomani) that lived in Gaul (Gallia). Gaesatae – Numbering c. 30,000, they participated in the battle of Telamon[20] Graioceli/Garocelli – Northwestern Piedmont in the Graian Alps Insubres – Western Lombardy (Milan) Libici/Libui – Between the rivers Duria Bautica/Duria Maior (Dora Baltea) and Sesites/Sessites (Sesia). Lingones – North-eastern Emilia-Romagna (Ferrara), Po Valley. Related to or a branch of the Lingones that lived in Gaul (Gallia). Orobii or Orumbovii – Central Lombardy (Bergamo) Salassi – Aosta Valley and Canavese (Northern Piedmont) (Ivrea) Segusini (or Cottii) – Western Piedmont on Cottian Alps (Susa) Senones – South-eastern Emilia-Romagna (Rimini) and Northern Marche (Senigallia). Related to or a branch of the Senones that lived in Gaul (Gallia). Taurini – Piedmont (Turin) Vertamocorii – Eastern Piedmont (Novara) Boii – Central Emilia-Romagna (Bologna).

Lepontine Celts - They seem to have been an older group of Celts that lived in Cisalpine Gaul before the Gaulish Celtic migration. They spoke Lepontic (a Continental Celtic language) a Celtic language that seems to precede Cisalpine Gaulish.

Lepontii – Northern Lombardy, North-eastern Piedmont and Switzerland in the Lepontine Alps. They were not Gaulish Celts

Camunni – in the Valcamonica and Valtellina valleys of the Central Alps. A celticized Rhaetic tribe. Some consider them to be Celtic.[21]

Transalpine Gaul (Gallia Transalpina)[edit] Transalpine Gaul, meaning literally "Gaul on the other side of the Alps" or "Gaul across the Alps", is approximately modern Belgium, France, Switzerland, Netherlands, and Western Germany. in what would become the Roman provinces of Gallia Narbonensis, Gallia Celtica (later Lugdunensis and Aquitania) and Gallia Belgica. Some closely fit the concept of a tribe. Others are confederations or even unions of tribes. List of peoples of Gaul (with their capitals/major settlements):

Map of Gaul (58 BC) with important tribes, towns, rivers, etc.

Aquitania Propria (Aquitania Proper)[edit]

Gauls (Celtae/Galli Cisalpini) - They spoke Gaulish (a Continental Celtic language of the P Celtic type).

Garumni – along the banks of the high Garumna (Garonne), southwest of the Volcae Tectosages, and in and around Lugdunum Convenarum, among the Convenae. Although they dwelt in Aquitania Proper, they seem to have been a Celtic tribe and not a tribe of the Aquitani (a people that may have been ancestor of the Basques).

Eastern Celts[1]

Boii Boiates/Boviates/Boates – La Tête de Buch, probably around Arcachon Bay and northwest of Landes (departement), in the Pays de Buch and Pays de Born. Although they dwelt in Aquitania Proper, they seem to have been a Celtic tribe and not a tribe of the Aquitani (a people that may have been ancestor of the Basques).

Celtiberians (Eastern Hispano-Celts/Celts of Eastern Hispania)

Belendi/Pelendi – Belinum territory (Belin-Béliet), in the middle Sigmatis river (in today's Leyre) river area, south of the Bituriges Vivisci and the Boii Boiates; they may have been related to the Pellendones (a Celtiberian tribe). Although they dwelt in Aquitania Proper, they seem to have been a Celtic tribe and not a tribe of the Aquitani (a people that may have been ancestor of the Basques).

Belgica[edit]

Belgae[22] They dwelt in Belgica, parts of Britannia, and may have dwelt in parts of Hibernia and also of Hispania) (large tribal confederation).

Ambiani – Amiens Ambivareti Atrebates – Arras Bellovaci – Beauvais Caleti/Caletes – Harfleur (Caracotinum), later Lillebonne (Juliobona) Catalauni – Châlons-en-Champagne Catuslogi Eburones (mixed Belgae and Germani cisrhenani people) Leuci – Toul (Tullum Leucorum) Mediomatrici – Metz Meldi – Marne (Matrona) – Meaux Menapii – Cassel Morini – Boulogne-sur-Mer Nervii – Bavay, Belgae largest tribal confederation.

Ceutrones (Belgae) Geidumni Grudii Levaci Nervii Proper Pleumoxii

Remi – Reims Silvanectii – Senlis Suessiones – Soissons (Suessetani may have been related, result of a migration towards south)[23] Tencteri – Rhine east bank, may have been a Celtic tribe (and not a Germanic one) or a mixed Belgae and Germani tribe. Treveri – Trier Usipetes – Rhine east bank, may have been a Celtic tribe (and not a Germanic one) or a mixed Belgae and Germani tribe. Veliocasses/Velicasses/Velocasses – Rouen Viromandui – Noyon

Celtica[edit]

Gauls (Celtae) - They spoke Gaulish (a Continental Celtic language of the P Celtic type).

Aremorican tribes (Northwestern Gaulish tribes) - Aremorica/Armorica (Civitates Armoricae)

Abrincatui Ambibarii/Ambivarii  Armoricani/Aremoricii proper Ambiliates/Ambilatres – Low Liger (Loire) Baiocasses/Boiocasses – Bayeux Carnutes – Autricum (Chartres), Cenabum/Genabum (Orleans) Coriosolites/Curiosolitae – Corseul Lexovii – Lisieux Namnetes – Nantes Osismii - Western end of Brittany Peninsula Redones – Rennes Venelli/Unelli – Coutances, Contentin Peninsula, in today's Western Normandy region Veneti – Vannes Viducasses/Vadicasses/Vadicassii – Vieux

Central Gaulish tribes

Aedui/Haedui  - Gaulish Celts largest tribal confederation.

Aedui/Haedui proper - Bibracte Ambarri Ambivareti Aulerci Brannovices/Brannovii/Blannovii (a southern branch of the Aulerci but within the Aedui tribal confederation) Bituriges Cubi – Bourges (an eastern branch of the Bituriges but within the Aedui tribal confederation) Mandubii – Alesia Parisii – Paris Segusiavi/Segobriges - Lugdunum (Lyon), that was to be capital of Gallia Lugdunensis, was in their land Senones – Sens

Agenisates/Angesinates – Angoumois Agnutes – Vendee Anagnutes Andecamulenses Andecavi/Andes – Angers Antobroges Arverni – Gergovia (tribal confederation)

Arverni proper Gabali

Arvii Atacini – Aussière Atesui Aulerci (tribal confederation)

Aulerci Cenomani – Le Mans Aulerci Diablintes Aulerci Eburovices Aulerci Sagii

Avantices Bipedimui/Pimpedunni Bituriges Vivisci – Bordeaux (Burdigala) Cadurci – Cahors Caeresi Cambolectres Corisopiti Eleuterii Elycoces Epomandui Helvetii – La Tène, (tribal confederation).

Tigurini – Yverdon Tougeni Verbigeni Unknown named tribe (Helvetii Proper?)

Insubres Lemovices – Limoges Lingones Medulli Meduci – Médoc Nantuates/Nantuatae Nitiobroges/Nitiobriges Petrocorii – Périgueux Pictones/Pictavi – Poitiers Raurici/Rauraci – Kaiseraugst (Augusta Raurica) Reieni Ruteni – Rodez Santones – Saintes Seduni – High Rhône river valley, Sion (Middle Valais, Switzerland) Sequani – Besançon Tornates/Turnates Tricasses/Tricassini Triviatii Trones Turones/Turoni – Tours Uberi/Viberi – High Rhône river valley, Upper Valais Vellavi/Velaunii – Ruessium Veragri - High Rhône river valley, Lower Valais Veroduni Boii – Boui near Entrain[3] - They were related to or a branch of the Boii.

Narbonensis[edit]

Gauls (Celtae) - They spoke Gaulish (a Continental Celtic language of the P Celtic type).

Adenates – slopes of the Western Alps (Maurienne-Modanne) Adunicates – Andon area Albici – Middle and Lower Durance river valley (tribal confederation)

Albienses/Albici Proper Vordenses Vulgientes

Allobroges/Allobriges – Vienne Avatici – Camargue Bebryces (Gauls) – in southern Gaul, south of the Volcae Arecomici, close to Narbo (Narbonne) region. Bodiontici Bramovices – Low Tarentaise, Savoy Briganii – Briançon, High Durance river valley Caturiges – Chorges, High Durance river valley Cavares/Cavari – North of Low Durance, Arausio (Orange), (tribal confederation)

Cavares Proper Meminii

Ceutrones/Centrones – Moûtiers Chalbici – Chablais Edenates Esubii/Esuvii/Sesuvii – Ubaye Valley Gaesatae/Gaesati Graioceli/Garocelli Helvii/Elvi Iconii – Gap Medulli – Vienne Nemalones Nemeturii – High Var river valley Quariates Salyes/Salluvii (may have been a Celtic tribe or a mixed Celtic-Ligurian tribe) Segovellauni Segusini Sentienes – Senez Tricorii Veamini Vergunni – Vinon-sur-Verdon Vertamocori – Vercors Vesubiani – Vésubie Vocontii – Vaison-la-Romaine (in modern Provence, on the east bank of the Rhône)

Ligures - A Celtic related people, closer to the Celts, they spoke ancient Ligurian.

Deciates - a tribe that dwelt in the region of Antipolis (Antibes) west of the river Varus (Var). Elisyces/Helisyces - a tribe that dwelt in the region of Narbo (Narbonne) and modern northern Roussillon. May have been either Iberian or Ligurian or a Ligurian-Iberian tribe. Euburiates Oxybii - a Ligurian tribe that dwelt on the Mediterranean coast near Massalia (Marseille). Salyes/Salluvii (may have been a Celtic tribe or a mixed Celtic-Ligurian tribe) Vediantii

v t e

Iron Age tribes in Gaul

Belgica

Ambiani Aresaces Atrebates Atuatuci Bellovaci Caeroesi Catalauni Condrusi Eburones Leuci Mediomatrici Menapii Morini Nervii Paemani Remi Segni Silvanectes Suessiones Toxandri Treveri Vellocasses Viromandui

Celtica

Abrincatui Aedui Ambarri Andes (Andecavi) Arverni Baiocasses Bituriges Cubi Cadurci Caletes Carnutes Caturiges Cenomani Curiosolitae Diablintes Eburovices Esuvii Gabali Helvetii Lemovici Lexovii Lingones Meldi Namnetes Nitiobriges Osismii Parisii Petrocorii Pictones Redones Ruteni Santones Senones Segusiavi Sequani Tricasses Turones Unelli Vellavi Veneti Viducasses

Aquitania

Ausci Boii Convenae Elusates Lactorates Sotiates Tarbelli Vasates Vivisci

Narbonensis

Allobroges Arecomici Avatici Cavares Caturiges Ceutrones Deciates Helvii Nantuates Salluvii Volcae (Arecomici and Tectosages) Tricastini Vocontii

Part of: Celtic tribes in Europe

Great Britain (Britannia)[edit]

Northern Britain about the year 150 CE

Southern Britain about the year 150 CE

Wales about the year 40 CE

See also: Iron Age tribes in Britain Britannia was the name Romans gave, based on the name of the people: the Britanni. Some closely fit the concept of a tribe but others are confederations or even unions of tribes. Britain Proper (Britannia Propria)[edit]

Belgae[22] (Wiltshire and Hampshire) (according to classical authors, see Caesar's De Bello Gallico, they were a different people and spoke a different language (Ancient Belgic) from the Gauls and Britons; they were clearly an Indo-European people and may have spoken a Celtic language, although there is a remote possibility that their language may have been Proto-Celtic or Proto-Germanic; they dwelt in Belgica, parts of Britannia, and may have dwelt in parts of Hibernia and also of Hispania)

Atrebates – an important Belgic tribe of today's Southern England, in Berkshire. Related to or a branch of the Atrebates that lived in Gallia Belgica. Belgae (tribe) – Belgic tribe, in today's England's south coast, Isle of Wight, Hampshire, Wiltshire Catuvellauni (Hertfordshire) – Belgic tribe, neighbours of the Iceni, they joined in their rebellion. May have been related to the Catalauni. Regnenses/Regni – Belgic tribe, in today's East Hampshire, Sussex and Surrey Parisii (East Riding of Yorkshire)

Britons (Britanni) - They spoke Britonic (an Insular Celtic language of the P Celtic type).

Ancalites (uncertain: speculatively Hampshire and Wiltshire) Attacotti (origin uncertain) Bibroci (mentioned by Caesar, location uncertain but possibly Berkshire) Boresti (sometimes Horesti) (In or near Fife, Scotland according to Tacitus) Brigantes (an important tribe in most of Northern England and in the south-east corner of Ireland) Cantiaci (in present-day Kent which preserves the ancient tribal name) Carvetii (Cumberland) Cassi (mentioned by Caesar, possibly south-east England) Cateni (north and west of Sutherland) – they gave the county its Gaelic name Cataibh Cenimagni (mentioned by Caesar, perhaps the same as the Iceni) Corieltauvi/Coritani (East Midlands including Leicester) Corionototae (possibly a tribe) (Northumberland) Cornovii (Midlands) Damnonii (Southwestern Scotland) Deceangli (Flintshire, Wales) Demetae (Dyfed, Wales) Dobunni (Cotswolds and Severn valley) Dumnonii (Devon, Cornwall, Somerset)

Cornovii (Cornwall) (a sub-tribe, or sept, of the Dumnonii)

Durotriges (Dorset, south Somerset, south Wiltshire) Gabrantovices Gangani (Llŷn Peninsula, Wales) Iceni (East Anglia) – under Boudica, they rebelled against Roman rule) Novantae (Galloway and Carrick) Ordovices (Gwynedd, Wales) – they waged guerrilla warfare from the north Wales hills Scotti (western portion of Scotland) Segontiaci (probably south-east England) Selgovae (Dumfriesshire and the Stewartry of Kirkcudbright) Setantii (possibly a tribe) (Lancashire) Silures (south Wales) – resisted the Romans in present-day south Wales Trinovantes/Trinobantes (Essex) – neighbours of the Iceni, they joined in their rebellion Votadini/Otadini (north-east England and south-east Scotland) – they later formed Gododdin

Caledonia[edit]

Picts (Picti) - They were a different people from the Britons, but may have shared common ancestry; If their language, Pictish language, was not Celtic it may have been Para-Celtic like Ligurian (i.e. an Indo-European language branch not Celtic but more closely related to Celtic). They lived in Caledonia (today's Northern Scotland). Caledonian Forest (Caledonia Silva) was in their land. A tribal confederation.

Caledones/Caledonii (along the Great Glen) Carnonacae (western Highlands) Caereni (far western Highlands) Cornovii/Cornavii (far northern mainland Scotland) (northernmost known Celtic tribe) Creones (Argyll) Decantae or Ducantae (eastern Ross and Black Isle) Epidii (Kintyre and neighboring islands) Lugi (southern Sutherland) Smertae (central Sutherland) Taexali (Angus and Grampian) Vacomagi (in and around the Cairngorms) Venicones (Fife and south-west Tayside in Scotland) Tribe of unknown name in the Orkney Islands (may have been Picts) Tribe of unknown name in the Shetland Islands (may have been Picts) Tribe of unknown name in the Faroe Islands (may have been Picts)

v t e

Iron Age tribes in Britain

Atrebates Belgae Brigantes Caereni Caledonii Cantiaci Carnonacae Carvetii Catuvellauni Coritani Corionototae Cornovii (Central) Cornovii (Northern) Creones Damnonii Decantae Deceangli Demetae Dobunni Dumnonii Durotriges Epidii Gabrantovices Iceni Lopocares Lugi Novantae Ordovices Parisi Regnenses Selgovae Setantii Silures Smertae Suessiones Taexali Textoverdi Trinovantes Vacomagi Venicones Votadini

Part of: Celtic tribes in Europe

Ireland (Hibernia)[edit]

The population groups (tribes and tribal confederations) of Ireland (Iouerníā/Hibernia) mentioned in Ptolemy's Geographia in a modern interpretation.

See also: List of Irish kingdoms and Túath According to Ptolemy's Geography (2nd century AD):

Autini (Auteinoi) Brigantes Cauci (Kaukoi) Coriondi (or Koriondoi) Darini (Darinoi) Eblani (Eblanioi) Erdini (Erdinoi) Gangani (Ganganoi) Iverni (Iwernoi) Manapii (Manapioi) Nagnatae or Magnatae (Nagnatai or Magnatai) Robogdii (Rhobogdioi) Usdiae (Ousdiai) Uterni Velabri or Vellabori (Wellaboroi) Vennicnii (Wenniknioi) Volunti (Woluntioi) – identifiable with the Ulaidh/Uluti[24]

v t e

Ptolemy's Ireland

Peoples

Auteini Brigantes Cauci Coriondi Darini Eblani Erdini Gangani Iverni Manapii Nagnatae Robogdii Uellabori Uennicnii Uodiae Uoluntii

Towns

Dunon Eblana Iuernis Labiros Makolikon Manapia Nagnata Raiba Regia Regia Etera

Rivers

Argita Auoba Birgos Buuinda Dabrona Dur Iernos Libnios Logia Modonnos Oboka Rauios Senos Uidua Uinderios

Promontories

Isamnion Northern Robogdion Sacron Southern Uennicnion

Islands

Adros Ebuda Epidion Erimnos Limnos Malaios Mona Monaoida Rikina

Iberian Peninsula (Hispania)[edit]

Main language areas, peoples and tribes in Iberian Peninsula c. 300 BC.

Territory of the Celtiberi, mixed Celtic and Iberian tribes or Celtic tribes influenced by Iberians, with the possible location of the tribes.

See also: Pre-Roman peoples of the Iberian Peninsula The Celts in the Iberian peninsula were traditionally thought of as living on the edge of the Celtic world of the La Tène culture that defined classical Iron Age Celts. Earlier migrations were Hallstatt in culture and later came La Tène influenced peoples. Celtic or (Indo-European) Pre-Celtic cultures and populations existed in great numbers and Iberia experienced one of the highest levels of Celtic settlement in all of Europe. They dwelt in northern, central and western regions of Iberian Peninsula, but also in several southern regions. The Roman province of Hispania included both Celtic speaking and non-Celtic speaking tribes. Some closely fit the concept of a tribe. Others are confederations or even unions of tribes. Citerior Iberia (Hispania Citerior)[edit] Hispania Citerior ("Nearer Hispania", "Hispania that is Closer", from the perspective of the Romans), was a region of Hispania during the Roman Republic, roughly occupying the northeastern coast and the Iberus (Ebro) Valley and later the eastern, central, northern and northwestern areas of the Iberian peninsula in what would become the Tarraconensis Roman province (of what is now Spain and northern Portugal). Tarraconensis[edit]

Hispano-Celts/Celts of Hispania - They lived in large parts of the Iberian Peninsula, in the Northern, Central and Western regions (more than half of the peninsula's territory).

Celtiberians (Eastern Hispano-Celts/Celts of Eastern Hispania) – Eastern Iberian meseta (Spain), mountains of the headwaters of the rivers Douro, Tagus, Guadiana (Anas), Júcar, Jalón, Jiloca and Turia, (tribal confederation). Mixed Celtic and Iberian tribes or Celtic tribes influenced by Iberians. Not synonymous of all the Celts that lived in the Iberian Peninsula but to a narrower group, the majority of Celtic tribes in the Iberian Peninsula were not Celtiberians. They spoke Celtiberian (a Continental Celtic language of the Q Celtic type).

Arevaci Belli Cratistii Lobetani Lusones – Western Zaragoza (province), Eastern Guadalajara (Spain). Olcades Pellendones/Cerindones, in high Duero river course (Numantia) and neighboring mountains, may also have been related to the Pelendi/Belendi that dwelt in the middle of the river Sigmatis, today's Leyre. Titii (Celtiberian) Turboletae/Turboleti Uraci/Duraci

Western Hispano-Celts/Celts of Western Hispania - They spoke Gallaecian (a Continental Celtic language of the Q Celtic type).

Allotriges/Autrigones – East Burgos (Spain), Northwestern La Rioja (Spain) to the Atlantic Coast Astures – Asturias and northern León (Spain), and east of Trás os Montes (Portugal), (tribal confederation).

Cismontani

Amaci Cabruagenigi Gigurri Lancienses Lougei Orniaci Superatii Susarri/Astures Proper Tiburi Zoelae – Eastern Trás-os-Montes (Portugal), (Miranda do Douro).

Transmontani

Baedunienses Brigaentini Cabarci Iburri Luggones/Lungones Paenii Paesici Saelini Vinciani Viromenici. Might be related to the Viromandui.

Bebryaces/Berybraces – unknown location, may have been related to the Bebryces (gauls) or the Berones, there is also the possibility that it was an old name of the Celtiberians. Cantabri – Cantabria, part of Asturias and part of Castile-Leon (Spain); some consider them not Celtic, may have been Pre-Celtic Indo-European as could have been the Lusitani and Vettones [2]. If their language was not Celtic it may have been Para-Celtic like Ligurian (i.e. an Indo-European language branch not Celtic but more closely related to Celtic). A Tribal confederation.

Avarigines Blendii/Plentusii/Plentuisii Camarici/Tamarici Concani Coniaci/Conisci Moroecani Noegi Orgenomesci Salaeni/Selaeni Vadinienses Vellici/Velliques

Caristii/Carietes – today's West Basque Country, they may have been Celtic (see Late Basquisation), they were later assimilated by the Vascones in the 6th and 7th centuries CE; Some consider them not Celtic, may have been a Pre-Celtic Indo-European people as the Lusitani and Vettones could have been. [3]. If their language was not Celtic it may have been Para-Celtic like Ligurian (i.e. an Indo-European language branch not Celtic but more closely related to Celtic). Carpetani – Central Iberian meseta (Spain), in the geographical centre of the Iberian Peninsula, in a large part of today's Castilla-La Mancha and Madrid regions. A tribal confederation with 27 identified tribes.[25]

Aelariques - Aeturiques - Arquioci - in Iplacea, Roman named Complutum (today's Alcalá de Henares) region. Acualiques - Bocouriques - Canbarici - in Toletum (Toledo) region. Contucianci - in Segobriga region. Dagencii - Doviliques - Duitiques - Duniques - Elguismiques - Langioci - Longeidoci - Maganiques - Malugeniques - Manuciques - Maureici - Mesici - Metturici - Moenicci - Obisodiques - in Toletum (Toledo) region Pilonicori - Solici - Tirtaliques - in Segobriga region. Uloques - Venatioques -

Gallaecians or Callaici – Gallaecia (Spain & Portugal). Western Hispano-Celts largest tribal confederation.

Addovi/Iadovi Aebocosi Albiones/Albioni – western Asturias (Spain). Amphiloci Aobrigenses Arroni/Arrotrebi Arrotrebae/Artabri – Northern Galicia (Spain), They might be related to the Atrebates of Gallia Belgica. Aunonenses Baedi Banienses – around Baião Municipality, Eastern Porto District, (Portugal). Biballi Bracari/Callaeci/Gallaeci Proper – Southeastern Braga District, Braga, Western Porto District, Oporto, (Portugal). Brigantes (Callaici tribe) – Northern Bragança District, Bragança, (Portugal). Caladuni Capori Celtici Praestamarici Celtici Supertamarici Cibarci Cileni Coelerni/Aquaflavienses – Braga District, Vila Real District (Chaves), (Portugal) and Ourense (Spain). Egi Egovarri Equaesi – Minho and Trás-os-Montes (Portugal). Grovii – Minho (Portugal) and Galicia (Spain). Iadones Interamici/Interamnici – Trás-os-Montes (Portugal). Lapatianci Lemavi Leuni – Minho (Portugal). Limici – Lima river banks, Minho (Portugal) and Galicia (Spain). Louguei Luanqui – Trás-os-Montes (Portugal). Naebisoci/Aebisoci Namarii Namarini Narbasi -Minho (Portugal) and Galicia (Spain). Nemetati – Minho (Portugal). Nerii Poemani, they might be related to the Paemani. Quaquerni/Querquerni – Minho (Portugal). Seurbi – Minho (Portugal). Seurri – Sarria Municipality, East Central Galicia (Spain) Tamagani – Chaves (Portugal). Turodi – Trás-os-Montes (Portugal) and Galicia (Spain). Varri

Mantesani/Mentesani/Mantasani – La Mancha Plateau, Castilla-La Mancha (Spain); were a different people from the Oretani. Plentauri – Northwestern La Rioja (Spain). Turmodigi or Turmogi - Central Burgos. Vaccaei – North Central Iberian meseta (Spain), middle Duero river basin. A tribal confederation. Ptolemy mentions 20 vaccaean Civitates (that also had the meaning of tribes)[26]

Cauci (Vaccaei) – in Cauca (Coca, Segovia)

Varduli – today's East Basque Country, they may have been Celtic (see Late Basquisation), they were later assimilated by the Vascones in the 6th and 7th centuries CE; Some consider them not Celtic, may have been a Pre-Celtic Indo-European people as the Lusitani and Vettones could have been. If their language was not Celtic it may have been Para-Celtic like Ligurian (i.e. an Indo-European language branch not Celtic but more closely related to Celtic). [4].

Belgae? - They spoke Ancient Belgian language.

Suessetani - Far North Western Aragon and Far South Eastern Navarra (Spain), between the rivers Gallicus (Gállego) and Low Aragon, and between the river Ebro and Sierra de Santo Domingo mountains. Alba (Arba) river basin (a tributary of the Ebro) was in the centre of their territory that also included the Bardenas Reales. Corbio was their capital. They were North of the Celtiberians, South of the Iacetani and the Vascones, West of the Galli (tribe). They were later conquered by the Vascones in the 2nd Century B.C. that were allies of the Romans. Could have been related to the Suessiones (a tribe of the Belgae).[23] Berones – La Rioja (Spain). Could have been related to the Eburones. Oretani? – northeastern Andalusia, northwest Múrcia and southern fringes of La Mancha, (Spain), mountains of the headwaters of the Guadalquivir (ancient river Baetis); Some consider them not Celtic [5] (see Germani (Oretania)).

Volcae

Volciani – may have been a tribe related to the Volcae and not to the Hispano-Celts/Iberian Celts (i.e. the Celts of the Iberian Peninsula). Located north of the river Iberus (Ebro), but not very precisely.

Gauls (Galli) – Some gaulish tribes may have migrated towards south and crossed the Pyrenees (by the north, the central or the south areas of the mountains) in a second or a third Celtic wave to the Iberian Peninsula. These tribes were different from the Hispano-Celtic/Iberian Celtic tribes. They spoke Gaulish (a Continental Celtic language of the P Celtic type).

Galli (tribe) – along Gallicus (Gállego) river banks, see place names (toponyms) like Forum Gallorum, Gallur, a different tribe from the Suessetani; may have been a tribe related to the Galli (Gauls) and not to the Hispano-Celts/Iberian Celts.

Ulterior Iberia (Hispania Ulterior)[edit] Hispania Ulterior ("Further Hispania", "Hispania that is Beyond", from the perspective of the Romans) was a region of Hispania during the Roman Republic, roughly located in what would become the provinces of Baetica (that included the Baetis, Guadalquivir, valley of modern Spain) and extending to all of Lusitania (modern south and central Portugal, Extremadura and a small part of Salamanca province). Baetica[edit]

Hispano-Celts/Celts of Hispania - They lived in large parts of the Iberian Peninsula, in the Northern, Central and Western regions (more than half of the peninsula's territory).

Western Hispano-Celts/Celts of Western Hispania - They spoke Gallaecian (a Continental Celtic language of the Q Celtic type).

Celtici of Arunda (Ronda) – in south Turdetania, later Baetica Roman province, (in today's western Málaga Province), Andalucia region (southernmost known Celtic tribe). Turduli – Guadiana valley (Portugal) and Extremadura (Spain); may have been related to Lusitanians, Callaeci or Turdetani.

Turduli Baetici/Turduli Baetures - Baeturia/Baeturia Turdulorum (ancient northern region of Baetica Province), south and east of the river Anas (Guadiana) and northern slope of Marianus Mons (Sierra Morena), Southern Extremadura region, Badajoz Province, Portugal Southeastern corner, East Beja District, Alentejo region.

Turdetanians – Today's Western Andalucia (Hispania Baetica), Baetis (Guadalquivir) river valley and basin, Marianus Mons (Sierra Morena), some consider them Celtic.,[27] may have been Pre-Celtic Indo-European people as the Lusitani and Vettones. If their language, called Turdetanian or Tartessian, was not Celtic it may have been Para-Celtic like Ligurian (i.e. an Indo-European language branch not Celtic but more closely related to Celtic). Also may have been a non-Indo-European people related to the Iberians, but not the same people. A tribal confederation but with a much more centralized power, may have formed an early form of Kingdom or a Proto-civilisation (see Tartessos)

Cilbiceni – approximately in today's Cádiz Province Elbisini/Eloesti/Olbisini – in today's Huelva Province Etmanei – in the middle area of Baetis (Guadalquivir) river course and surrounding region, approximately in today's Córdoba Province Gletes/Galetes/Ileates – in Marianus Mons (Sierra Morena), approximately in today's northern areas of the provinces of Huelva, Seville and Córdoba Turdetani/Tartessii Proper – in the low course of 'the river 'Baetis (Guadalquivir) and surrounding region, approximately in today's Seville Province

Lusitania[edit]

Hispano-Celts/Celts of Hispania - They lived in large parts of the Iberian Peninsula, in the Northern, Central and Western regions (more than half of the peninsula's territory).

Western Hispano-Celts/Celts of Western Hispania - They spoke Gallaecian (a Continental Celtic language of the Q Celtic type).

Celtici – Portugal south of the Tagus and north of Guadiana (Anas), Alentejo and Algarve (Portugal), western Extremadura (Spain), (tribal confederation).

Cempsi Conii – according to some scholars, Conii and Cynetes were two different peoples or tribes and the names were not two different names of the same people or tribe; in this case, the Conii may have dwelt along the northern banks of the middle Anas (Guadiana) river, in today's western Extremadura region of Spain, and were a Celtici tribe wrongly confused with the Cynetes of Cyneticum (Algarve) that dwelt from the west banks of the Low river Anas (Guadiana) further to the south (the celticization of the Cynetes by the Celtici confused the distinction between the two peoples or tribes).[28] Mirobrigenses Sefes/Saefes

Cynetes – Cyneticum (today's Algarve region) and Low Alentejo (Portugal); originally probably Tartessians or similar, later celtized by the Celtici; according to some scholars, Cynetes and Conii were two different peoples or tribes[28] [6]. Turduli – Guadiana valley (Portugal) and Extremadura (Spain); may have been related to Lusitanians, Callaeci or Turdetani.

Turduli Bardili – Setubal Peninsula (Portugal); may have been related to Lusitanians, Callaeci or Turdetani. Turduli Oppidani – Estremadura (Portugal); may have been related to Lusitanians, Callaeci or Turdetani. Turduli Veteres – Southern Douro banks, between Douro and Vouga River, Aveiro District, (Portugal); may have been related to Lusitanians, Callaeci or Turdetani.

Lusitanians-Vettones

Lusitanians (Lusitani/Bellitani) – Portugal south of the Duoro and north of the Tagus, and northwestern Extremadura (Spain). They spoke Lusitanian that is a clearly Indo-European language but the filiation as a Celtic language is not surely proven (although many tribal names and place names, toponyms, are Celtic). Attempts to classify the language have also pointed at an Italic origin.[29] Hence Lusitanian language may have been a Para-Celtic Indo-European branch like Ligurian (i.e. an Indo-European language branch not Celtic but more closely related to Celtic). The Lusitanians have also been identified as being a pre-Celtic Indo-European speaking culture of the Iberian Peninsula closely related to the neighbouring Vettones tribal confederation.[28] However, under their controversial theory of Celtic originating in Iberia, John T Koch and Barry Cunliffe have proposed a para-Celtic identity for the Lusitanian language and culture or that they spoke an archaic Proto-Celtic language and were Proto-Celtic in ethnicity.

Arabrigenses Aravi Coelarni/Colarni Interamnienses Lancienses

Lancienses Oppidani Lancienses Transcudani Ocelenses Lancienses

Meidubrigenses Paesuri – Douro and Vouga (Portugal). Palanti Tangi

Elbocori Igaeditani Tapori/Tapoli – river Tagus, around the border area of Portugal and Spain.

Talures Veaminicori Other Lusitanian tribes? (According to some scholars, these tribes were Lusitanians and not Vettones)[28]

Calontienses Caluri Coerenses

Vettones – Ávila and Salamanca (Spain), may have been a Pre-Celtic Indo-European people, closely related to the Lusitani. If their language was not Celtic it may have been Para-Celtic like Ligurian (i.e. an Indo-European language branch not Celtic but more closely related to Celtic). A tribal confederation.

Bletonesii – Bletisama (today's Ledesma) was their main centre, Salamanca Province, Spain. Other Vettonian tribes? (According to some scholars, these tribes were Lusitanians and not Vettones)[28]

Calontienses Caluri Coerenses

Middle and Low Danube[edit] Dacia[edit] See also: List of ancient tribes in Thrace and Dacia Some closely fit the concept of a tribe. Others are confederations or even unions of tribes.

Eastern Celts[1]

Anartes/Anartii/Anartoi - Celts assimilated by Dacians[2] Areas of modern Slovakia and modern Northern Hungary, north of the river Tysia/Tibiscus (Tisza), north of the Teuriscii. Bastarnae,[30][31] a Celto-Germanic people, and according to Livy "the bravest nation on earth" Boii – a tribal confederation, originally from today's Southern France who migrated to Hercynia Silva under Segovesus, and dispersed through migrations to other regions of Europe, to areas of modern Slovakia, Germany, Austria, Hungary.[3][4] Eravisci[32] Teuriscii - A branch of the Celtic Taurisci (originally from Noricum) in the Tysia/Tibiscus (Tisza) river basin south of the Anartes/Anartii/Anartoi. Celts assimilated by Dacians[2]

Illyricum[edit]

Ancient tribes in the middle Danube river basin around 1st C. BCE

Central and northern Illyrian tribes and neighbouring Celtic tribes to the North and Northwest during the Roman period.

Pannonia[edit]

Eastern Celts[1]

Arabiates - areas of modern Western Hungary and eastern Austria, west of the river Danubius (Danube). Belgites - areas of modern Western Hungary, west of the river Danubius (Danube). Boii – a tribal confederation, originally from today's Southern France who migrated to Hercynia Silva under Segovesus, and dispersed through migrations to other regions of Europe, to areas of modern Slovakia, Germany, Austria, Hungary.[3][4]

Pannonian Boii - in Pannonia, today's Western Hungary.

Carni – Carnic Alps, South Austria (Carinthia/Kärnten), Western Slovenia (Carniola/Kranjska) and Northern Friuli/Friûl (Carnia). A tribe related to the Carnutes. Cornacates - areas of modern Western Hungary, west of river Danubius (Danube). Cotini – areas of modern Slovakia and Western Hungary, west of the river Danubius (Danube). Eravisci/Aravisci – areas of modern Western Hungary, west of the river Danubius (Danube), Aquincum (modern Budapest) was in their territory. Hercuniates/Hercuniatae - areas of modern Western Hungary, west of the river Danubius (Danube). Latobici/Latovici - not the same tribe as the Latobrigi but could be related, areas of modern Western Hungary, west of the river Danubius (Danube). Scordisci – areas of modern Serbia, Croatia, Austria, Romania, west of the river Danubius (Danube). Serrapilli - areas of modern Western Hungary, west of the river Danubius (Danube). Serretes - areas of modern Western Hungary, west of the river Danubius (Danube). Varciani – areas of modern Slovenia, Croatia.

Veneti? (Transitional people between Celts and Italics? Celticized Italic people? Para-Celtic people?)

Carni – Carnic Alps, South Austria (Carinthia/Kärnten), Western Slovenia (Carniola/Kranjska) and Northern Friuli/Friûl (Carnia/Cjargna). A tribe related to the Carnutes? Also may have been a Venetic tribe (the Veneti were a transitional people between Celts and Italics or a Celticized Italic people). Catari

Illyria[edit] See also: List of ancient tribes in Illyria and Celticization Some closely fit the concept of a tribe. Others are confederations or even unions of tribes.

Tribes in Illyricum and environs during AD 6 showing the extent of Celtic influence

Tribes in Thrace before the Roman period.

This list includes tribes parts of which migrated to Illyria.

Eastern Celts[1]

Arabiates[33] Belgites[34] Boii[35] Breuci[36] Carni – Carnic Alps, South Austria (Carinthia/Kärnten), Western Slovenia (Carniola/Kranjska) and Northern Friuli/Friûl (Carnia/Cjargna). A tribe related to the Carnutes? Also may have been a Venetic tribe (the Veneti were a transitional people between Celts and Italics or a Celticized Italic people). Celegeri[37] Celengeri[citation needed] Cornacates[38] Hercuniates[39] Iapodes/Japodes[40][41]

Posenoi,[42] a community of the Iapodes

Latobici,[43] Scordisci[44]

Dindari or Dindarii (Greek Δινδάριοι),[37] a tribe that was a branch of the Scordisci.[45]

Serrapilli[citation needed] Serretes[46] Tricornenses[47] Varciani[43]

Veneti? (Transitional people between Celts and Italics? Celticized Italic people? Para-Celtic people?)

Liburnians

Lopsi

Moesia[edit] See also: List of ancient tribes in Thrace and Dacia Some closely fit the concept of a tribe. Others are confederations or even unions of tribes.

Eastern Celts[1]

Scordisci[44] Serdi[48][49]

Thrace (Thracia)[edit] See also: List of ancient tribes in Thrace and Dacia Some closely fit the concept of a tribe. Others are confederations or even unions of tribes.

Eastern Celts[1]

Gauls of Tylis[50]

Anatolia (Asia Minor)[edit]

Classical regions of Asia Minor/Anatolia

In the 3rd century BC, Gauls immigrated from Thrace into the highlands of central Anatolia (modern Turkey), that was called Galatia after that. These people, called Galatians, were eventually Hellenized,[51][52] but retained many of their own traditions. Some closely fit the concept of a tribe. Others are confederations or even unions of tribes. Bithynia[edit]

Galatians - They spoke Galatian (a Gaulish dialect).

Territory of Gaezatorix,[53] between Bithynia and Galatia at modern Bolu (unknown tribe)

Galatia[edit]

Galatians - They spoke Galatian (a Gaulish dialect).

Tectosages,[53] in Galatia Tolistobogii,[53] in Galatia Trocmii,[53] in Galatia (easternmost known Celtic tribe)

Mysia[edit]

Galatians - They spoke Galatian (a Gaulish dialect).

Aigosages,[53] between Troy and Cyzicus Daguteni,[53] in modern Marmara region around Orhaneli

Phrygia[edit]

Galatians - They spoke Galatian (a Gaulish dialect).

Trocnades,[53] in Phrygia around modern Sivrihisar Inovanteni,[53] east of the Trocnades Okondiani,[53] between Phrygia and Galatia northeast of modern Akşehir Gölü

Unlocated[edit]

Galatians - They spoke Galatian (a Gaulish dialect).

Rigosages,[53] unlocated

See also[edit]

The summary table on Celtic tribes (in French) Celticization Late Basquisation Illyrians Thracians Britannia Caledonia Hibernia Scotia Hispania Iberia

Pre-Roman peoples of the Iberian Peninsula

Notes[edit]

^ a b c d e f g h i j k Mallory, J.P.; Douglas Q. Adams (1997). Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture. London: Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers. ISBN 978-1-884964-98-5 ^ a b c Ioana A. Oltean, Dacia: Landscape, Colonization and Romanization, ISBN 0-415-41252-8, 2007, p. 47. ^ a b c d Koch, John T. (2006). Celtic culture: a historical encyclopedia (illustrated ed.). Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO. pp. 224–225. ISBN 1-85109-440-7, ISBN 978-1-85109-440-0.  ^ a b c d "Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 5, chapter 34". www.perseus.tufts.edu. Retrieved 2018-02-12.  ^ The Osi's categorization as Celtic is disputed; see Osi; also may have been a Dacian or Germanic tribe. ^ Géza Alföldy, Noricum, Tome 3 of History of the Provinces of the Roman Empire, 1974, p. 24-5. ^ Cowles Prichard, James (1841). Researches Into the Physical History of Mankind: 3, Volume 1. Sherwood, Gilbert and Piper. p. 240.  ^ Baldi, Philip (2002). The Foundations of Latin. Walter de Gruyter. p. 112. ISBN 978-3-11-080711-0.  ^ Kruta, Venceslas, ed. (1991). The Celts. Thames and Hudson. p. 54. ISBN 978-0500015247.  ^ Kruta, Venceslas, ed. (1991). The Celts. Thames and Hudson. p. 55. ISBN 978-0500015247.  ^ (Liv. v. 35; Plin. iii. 17. s. 21.) ^ Percivaldi, Elena (2003). I Celti: una civiltà europea. Giunti Editore. p. 82.  ^ Leonelli, Valentina. La necropoli delle Acciaierie di Terni: contributi per una edizione critica (Cestres ed.). p. 33.  ^ Farinacci, Manlio. Carsulae svelata e Terni sotterranea. Associazione Culturale UMRU - Terni.  ^ von Hefner, Joseph (1837). Geographie des Transalpinischen Galliens. Munich.  ^ Venceslas Kruta: La grande storia dei celti. La nascita, l'affermazione e la decadenza, Newton & Compton, 2003, ISBN 88-8289-851-2, ISBN 978-88-8289-851-9 ^ Long, George (1866). Decline of the Roman republic: Volume 2. London.  ^ Snith, William George (1854). Dictionary of Greek and Roman geography: Vol.1. Boston.  ^ Titus, Livius. Ab Urbe Condita. p. 5,34.  access-date= requires url= (help) ^ Plutarch, Marcellus, chapters 6-7 [1] ^ Markey, Thomas (2008). Shared Symbolics, Genre Diffusion, Token Perception and Late Literacy in North-Western Europe. NOWELE.  ^ a b Koch, John T. (2006). Celtic culture: a historical encyclopedia (illustrated ed.). Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO. pp. 198–200. ISBN 1-85109-440-7, ISBN 978-1-85109-440-0.  ^ a b Mountain, Harry. (1997). The Celtic Encyclopedia p.225 ISBN 1-58112-890-8 (v. 1) ^ The Encyclopedia of Ireland, B. Lalor and F. McCourt editors, © 2003 New Haven: Yale University Press, p. 1089 ISBN 0-300-09442-6, noting that Ulaidh was the original tribal designation of the Uluti, who are identifiable as the Voluntii of the Ptolomey map and who occupied, at start, all of the historic province of Ulster. ^ http://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/articulo?codigo=1404299 ^ Ptolemy, Geographia, II, 5, 6 ^ Koch, John T. (2006). Celtic culture: a historical encyclopedia (illustrated ed.). Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO. pp. 198–200. ISBN 1-85109-440-7, ISBN 978-1-85109-440-0. ^ Jump up to: a b Koch, John T. (2006). Celtic culture: a historical encyclopedia (illustrated ed.). Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO. pp. 224–225. ISBN 1-85109-440-7, ISBN 978-1-85109-440-0. ^ a b c d e Jorge de Alarcão, “Novas perspectivas sobre os Lusitanos (e outros mundos)”, in Revista portuguesa de Arqueologia, vol. IV, n° 2, 2001, p. 312 e segs. ^ Indoeuropeos y no Indoeuropeos en la Hispania Prerromana, Salamanca: Universidad, 2000 ^ Adrian Goldsworthy, How Rome Fell: Death of a Superpower, ISBN 0-300-13719-2, 2009, p. 105: "... who had moved to the Hungarian Plain. Another tribe, the Bastarnae, may or may not have been Germanic. ..." ^ Christopher Webber and Angus McBride, The Thracians 700 BC-AD 46 (Men-at-Arms), ISBN 1-84176-329-2, 2001, p. 12: "... never got near the main body of Roman infantry. The Bastarnae (either Celts or Germans, and `the bravest nation on earth' – Livy ..." ^ Ion Grumeza, Dacia: Land of Transylvania, Cornerstone of Ancient Eastern Europe, ISBN 0-7618-4465-1, 2009, p. 51: "In a short time the Dacians imposed their conditions on the Anerati, Boii, Eravisci, Pannoni, Scordisci," ^ Andrea Faber, Körpergräber des 1.-3. Jahrhunderts in der römischen Welt: internationales Kolloquium, Frankfurt am Main, 19.-20. November 2004, ISBN 3-88270-501-9, p. 144. ^ Géza Alföldy, Noricum, Tome 3 of History of the Provinces of the Roman Empire, 1974, p. 69. ^ A. Mocsy and S. Frere, Pannonia and Upper Moesia. A History of the Middle Danube Provinces of the Roman Empire. p. 14. ^ Pannonia. A History of the Middle Danube Provinces of the Roman Empire. p. 14. ^ a b J. J. Wilkes, The Illyrians, 1992, ISBN 0-631-19807-5, p. 217. ^ Velika Dautova-Ruševljan and Miroslav Vujović, Rimska vojska u Sremu, 2006, p. 131: "extended as far as Ruma whence continued the territory of another community named after the Celtic tribe of Cornacates" ^ John T. Koch, Celtic culture: a historical encyclopedia, ISBN 1-85109-440-7, 2006, p. 907. ^ Charles Anthon, A Classical Dictionary: Containing The Principal Proper Names Mentioned In Ancient Authors, Part One, 2005, p. 539: "... Tor, " elevated," " a mountain. (Strabo, 293)"; "the Iapodes (Strabo, 313), a Gallo-Illyrian race occupying the valleys of ..." ^ J. J. Wilkes, The Illyrians, 1992, ISBN 0-631-19807-5, p. 79: "along with the evidence of name formulae, a Venetic element among the Japodes. A group of names identified by Alföldy as of Celtic origin: Ammida, Andes, Iaritus, Matera, Maxa," ^ J. J. Wilkes, Dalmatia, Tome 2 of History of the Provinces of the Roman Empire, 1969, pp. 154 and 482. ^ a b J. J. Wilkes, The Illyrians, 1992, ISBN 0-631-19807-5, p. 81: "In Roman Pannonia the Latobici and Varciani who dwelt east of the Venetic Catari in the upper Sava valley were Celtic but the Colapiani of ..." ^ a b J. J. Wilkes, The Illyrians, 1992, ISBN 0-631-19807-5, p. 140: "... Autariatae at the expense of the Triballi until, as Strabo remarks, they in their turn were overcome by the Celtic Scordisci in the early third century" ^ Population and economy of the eastern part of the Roman province of Dalmatia, 2002, ISBN 1-84171-440-2, p. 24: "the Dindari were a branch of the Scordisci" ^ Dubravka Balen-Letunič, 40 godina arheoloških istraživanja u sjeverozapadnoj Hrvatskoj, 1986, p. 52: "and the Celtic Serretes" ^ Alan Bowman, Edward Champlin, and Andrew Lintott, The Cambridge Ancient History, Vol. 10: The Augustan Empire, 43 BC-AD 69, 1996, p. 580: "... 580 I3h. DANUBIAN AND BALKAN PROVINCES Tricornenses of Tricornium (Ritopek) replaced the Celegeri, the Picensii of Pincum ..." ^ John Boardman, I. E. S. Edwards, E. Sollberger, and N. G. L. Hammond, The Cambridge Ancient History, Vol. 3, Part 2: The Assyrian and Babylonian Empires and Other States of the Near East, from the Eighth to the Sixth Centuries BC, ISBN 0-521-22717-8, 1992, p. 600: "In the place of the vanished Treres and Tilataei we find the Serdi for whom there is no evidence before the first century BC. It has for long been supposed on convincing linguistic and archeological grounds that this tribe was of Celtic origin" ^ Dio Cassius, Earnest Cary, and Herbert B. Foster, Dio Cassius: Roman History, Vol. IX, Books 71–80 (Loeb Classical Library, No. 177), 1927, Index: "... 9, 337, 353 Seras, philosopher, condemned to death, 8. 361 Serdi, Thracian tribe defeated by M. Crassus, 6. 73 Seretium,"" ^ Frank W. Walbank, Polybius, Rome and the Hellenistic World: Essays and Reflections, ISBN 0-521-81208-9, 2002, p. 116: "... in A7P 60 (1939) 452 8, is not Antigonus Doson but barbarians from the mainland (either Thracians or Gauls from Tylis) (cf. Rostovizef and Welles (1940) 207-8, Rostovizef (1941) 111, 1645), nor has that inscription anything to do with the Cavan expedition. On ..." ^ William M. Ramsay, Historical Commentary on Galatians, 1997, p. 302: "... these adaptable Celts were Hellenized early. The term Gallograecia, compared with Themistius' (p. 360) Γαλατία ..." ^ Roger D. Woodard, The Ancient Languages of Asia Minor, 2008, p. 72: "... The Phrygian elite (like the Galatian) was quickly Hellenized linguistically; the Phrygian tongue was devalued and found refuge only ..." ^ a b c d e f g h i j Prifysgol Cymru, University of Wales, A Detailed Map of Celtic Settlements in Galatia, Celtic Names and La Tène Material in Anatolia, the Eastern Balkans, and the Pontic Steppes.

References[edit]

Alberro, Manuel and Arnold, Bettina (eds.), e-Keltoi: Journal of Interdisciplinary Celtic Studies, Volume 6: The Celts in the Iberian Peninsula, University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee, Center for Celtic Studies, 2005. Haywood, John. (2001). Atlas of the Celtic World. London: Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0500051097 ISBN 978-0500051092 Kruta, Venceslas. (2000). Les Celtes, Histoire et Dictionnaire. Paris: Éditions Robert Laffont, coll. « Bouquins ». ISBN 2-7028-6261-6. Mallory, J.P. and Douglas Q. Adams (1997). Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture. London: Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers. ISBN 978-1-884964-98-5.

External links[edit]

http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/home.html – 51 complete works of authors from Classical Antiquity (Greek and Roman). http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Caesar/Gallic_War/home.html – Julius Caesar text of De Bello Gallico (Gallic War). http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Caesar/Spanish_War/home.html – Unknown author text (about Julius Caesar in Hispania) of De Bello Hispaniensi (Spanish War). http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Pliny_the_Elder/home.html – Pliny the Elder text of Naturalis Historia (Natural History) – books 3–6 (Geography and Ethnography). http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Strabo/home.html – Strabo's text of De Geographica (The Geography).

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