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Randall David Johnson (born September 10, 1963), nicknamed "The Big Unit", is an American former baseball pitcher who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB) from 1988 to 2009 for six teams. He played primarily for the Seattle Mariners
Seattle Mariners
and the Arizona Diamondbacks. His 303 career victories rank as the fifth-most by a left-hander in MLB history, while his 4,875 strikeouts place him second all-time behind Nolan Ryan
Nolan Ryan
and are the most by a left-hander. He holds five of the seven highest single-season strikeout totals by a left-hander in modern history. Johnson won the Cy Young Award
Cy Young Award
five times, second only to Roger Clemens' seven, and he is one of two pitchers (the other being Greg Maddux) to win the award four consecutive times (1999–2002). In 1999, he joined Pedro Martínez
Pedro Martínez
and Gaylord Perry
Gaylord Perry
in the rare feat of winning the award in both the American and National Leagues (a feat since accomplished by Roger Clemens, Roy Halladay, and Max Scherzer). He is also one of five pitchers to pitch no-hitters in both leagues. On May 18, 2004, at the age of forty, Johnson became the oldest pitcher in major league history to throw a perfect game, and is one of seven pitchers who have thrown both a perfect game and a no-hitter in their careers. He is also one of eighteen pitchers in history to record a win against all 30 MLB franchises. One of the tallest players in major league history at 6 feet 10 inches (2.08 m) and a ten-time All-Star, Johnson was celebrated for having one of the most dominant fastballs in the game. He regularly approached – and occasionally exceeded – 100 miles per hour (160 km/h) during his prime. He also threw a hard, biting slider. After struggling early in his career, gaining only 64 wins by his 30th birthday, he went on to lead his league in strikeouts nine times, and in earned run average, winning percentage and complete games four times each. Randy won the pitching Triple Crown in 2002. Johnson was named one of two World Series
World Series
Most Valuable Players in 2001, with three pitching victories, leading the Diamondbacks to a world championship in only their fourth year of play. His .646 career winning percentage ranks sixth among lefthanders with at least 200 decisions, and among southpaws he ranks eighth in games started (603) and ninth in innings pitched (​4,135 1⁄3). He also finished his career first in strikeouts per nine innings pitched (10.67), third in hit batsmen (188), and tenth in fewest hits allowed per nine innings pitched (7.24). He was elected to the Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame in 2015, his first year of eligibility, and is the first member of the Hall to be depicted in a Diamondbacks uniform on his plaque.

Contents

1 Early life 2 Major league career (1988–2009)

2.1 Montreal Expos
Montreal Expos
(1988–1989) 2.2 Seattle Mariners
Seattle Mariners
(1989–1998)

2.2.1 1989-1992 2.2.2 1993 2.2.3 1995 2.2.4 1996−1998

2.3 Houston Astros
Houston Astros
(1998) 2.4 Arizona Diamondbacks
Arizona Diamondbacks
(1999–2004) 2.5 New York Yankees
New York Yankees
(2005–2006) 2.6 Second stint with the Arizona Diamondbacks
Arizona Diamondbacks
(2007–2008) 2.7 San Francisco Giants
San Francisco Giants
(2009) 2.8 Retirement

3 Pitching style 4 Accomplishments 5 Personal life

5.1 "Big Unit" nickname 5.2 Acting career

6 See also 7 References 8 External links

Early life[edit] Johnson was born in Walnut Creek, California, to Carol Hannah and Rollen Charles "Bud" Johnson.[1] By the time he entered Livermore High School, he was a star in baseball and basketball. In 1982, as a senior, he struck out 121 batters in 66 innings, and threw a perfect game in his last high school start. He also played on a Bercovich team that assembled top players from throughout California. After high school, he was drafted in 1982 by the Atlanta Braves
Atlanta Braves
in the 4th round and offered $50,000 to sign. Instead, Johnson accepted a full athletic scholarship to play baseball for the University of Southern California. While at USC, he also played 2 years of basketball. He was a starter at USC (where he was a teammate of Mark McGwire) under coach Rod Dedeaux, but often exhibited control problems. Major league career (1988–2009)[edit] Montreal Expos
Montreal Expos
(1988–1989)[edit] Johnson was drafted by the Montreal Expos
Montreal Expos
in the second round of the 1985 Major League Baseball
Baseball
draft. He made his major league debut on September 15, 1988 against the Pittsburgh Pirates, earning a 9–4 victory with a five-inning outing in which he gave up two runs with five strikeouts; his first victim was Orestes Destrade in the second inning. Johnson posted a record of 3–0 with a 2.42 earned run average (ERA) in four games in 1988, but 1989 saw him slip to an 0–4 mark with a 6.67 ERA in seven games through May 7, and on May 25 he was traded to the Seattle Mariners
Seattle Mariners
in a trade involving five pitchers that brought Mark Langston to Montreal. Seattle Mariners
Seattle Mariners
(1989–1998)[edit] 1989-1992[edit] After joining the Mariners during the 1989 season, Johnson led the AL in walks for three consecutive seasons (1990–92), and hit batsmen in 1992 and 1993. In July 1991, facing the Milwaukee Brewers, the erratic Johnson allowed 4 runs on 1 hit, thanks to 10 walks in 4 innings. A month later, a 9th-inning single cost him a no-hitter against the Oakland Athletics. Johnson suffered another 10-walk, 4-inning start in 1992. But his untapped talent was volcanic: In 1990, Johnson became the first left-hander to strike out Wade Boggs
Wade Boggs
three times in one game, and a no-hitter against the Detroit Tigers attested to his potential. Johnson credits a session with Nolan Ryan
Nolan Ryan
late in the 1992 season with helping him take his career to the next level; Ryan has said that he appreciated Johnson's talent and did not want to see him take as long to figure certain things out as he had taken. Ryan recommended a slight change in his delivery; before the meeting, Johnson would land on the heel of his foot after delivering a pitch, and he therefore usually landed offline from home plate. Ryan suggested that he land on the ball of his foot, and almost immediately, he began finding the strike zone more consistently.[2] In a September 27, 1992 game against the Texas Rangers, with Ryan the opposing starting pitcher, Johnson struck out 18 batters in eight innings while throwing 160 pitches, a pitch count that has not been reached in an MLB game since.[3] 1993[edit] Johnson broke out in 1993 with a 19–8 record, 3.24 ERA and his first of six 300-plus strikeout seasons (308). In May 1993, Johnson again lost a no-hitter to a 9th-inning single; again, the opponent was the Oakland Athletics. He also recorded his 1,000th career strikeout against the Minnesota Twins' Chuck Knoblauch. Prior to the trade deadline, Johnson was nearly dealt to the Toronto Blue Jays
Toronto Blue Jays
for Steve Karsay and Mike Timlin. Toronto general manager Pat Gillick
Pat Gillick
had two separate transactions on the table including the one for Johnson with Seattle general manager Woody Woodward and one for Rickey Henderson with Oakland general manager Sandy Alderson. When Gillick was unable to contact Woodward he agreed to utilize the deal with Alderson. When Woodward returned Gillick's call he said he would agree to the deal for Johnson. However, Gillick gave his word to Alderson even though the deal had not been finalized.[4] At the 1993 All-Star Game in Baltimore, Maryland, in a famous incident, Johnson threw a fastball over the head of Philadelphia Phillies
Philadelphia Phillies
first baseman John Kruk.[5] 1995[edit] After pitching well in the strike-shortened 1994 season, Johnson won the American League
American League
Cy Young Award
Cy Young Award
in 1995 with an 18–2 record, 2.48 ERA and 294 strikeouts. His .900 winning percentage was the second highest in AL history, behind Johnny Allen, who had gone 15–1 for the Cleveland Indians
Cleveland Indians
in 1937. Johnson, who also finished second in the 1993 and 1997 Cy Young
Cy Young
voting, and third in 1994, was the first Seattle Mariners
Seattle Mariners
pitcher to win the award, and the only one until Félix Hernández
Félix Hernández
took home the honor in 2010. Johnson capped the Mariners' late season comeback by pitching a three-hitter in the AL West's one-game playoff, crushing the California Angels' hopes with 12 strikeouts. Thus unable to start in the 5-game ALDS series against the Yankees until the third game, Johnson watched as New York took a 2–0 series lead. He defeated the Yankees in Game 3 with 10 strikeouts in seven innings. When the series went the full five games, the Mariners having come back from an 0–2 deficit to win both games at the Kingdome, Johnson made a dramatic relief appearance in the series final, Game 5, on only one day's rest. Entering a 4–4 game in the ninth inning, Johnson pitched the ninth, 10th, and 11th innings. He allowed one run, struck out six, and held on for the series-ending win in Seattle's dramatic comeback. Johnson posted an 0–6 playoff record in his next four playoff series, each of which his teams lost. 1996−1998[edit] Johnson was sidelined throughout much of the 1996 season with a back injury, but he rebounded in 1997 with a 20–4 record, 291 strikeouts, and a 2.28 ERA (his personal best). Between May 1994 and October 1997, Johnson had gone 53–9, including a 16–0 streak that fell one short of the AL record. Johnson had two 19-strikeout starts in 1997, on June 24 and August 8. Another colorful All-Star Game moment proceeded in the 1997 edition involving former Expos teammate Larry Walker, at that point with the Colorado Rockies.[6] When Johnson had started an interleague game versus the Rockies on June 12, Walker chose not to play, explaining that "I faced Randy one time in spring training and he almost killed me."[7] In the All-Star Game, Walker batted against Johnson, who theatrically threw over his head. Ever adaptable, Walker placed his batting helmet backwards and switched sides in the batters' box to stand right-handed for one pitch. He ended the at bat by drawing a walk.[8] The incident momentarily drew mirth and laughter from players in both dugouts, fans and announcers, and, of course, comparisons to the at bat with Kruk in the 1993 All-Star Game.[9] In spite of garnering a reputation of avoiding Johnson,[10] Walker batted .393 (11 hits in 28 at bats) against him in his career,[11] nearly double the rate of all left-handed batters at .199.[12] When the 1998 season began, Johnson was upset the Mariners would not offer him a contract extension, given his contract was expiring after the season.[13] Though the Mariners initially wanted to keep Johnson, turning down a trade offer from the Los Angeles Dodgers,[14] they fell out of contention, going 8-20 in June.[15] Minutes before the non-waiver trade deadline, on July 31, the Mariners traded Johnson to the Houston Astros
Houston Astros
for three minor leaguers, Freddy García, Carlos Guillén, and John Halama.[15] Houston Astros
Houston Astros
(1998)[edit] In 11 regular-season starts with the Astros, Johnson had a 10–1 record, a 1.28 ERA, and 116 strikeouts in 84⅓ innings, and pitched 4 shutouts. Johnson finished 7th in the National League
National League
Cy Young
Cy Young
voting despite pitching only 2 months in the league, and helped Houston win their second straight National League
National League
Central division title. During the playoffs, however, the Astros lost the 1998 NLDS to the San Diego Padres, 3–1. Johnson started Games 1 and 4, both losses. He only gave up three earned runs combined in the two games, but received only one run in support (in Game 4). Arizona Diamondbacks
Arizona Diamondbacks
(1999–2004)[edit] Johnson agreed to a four-year contract, with an option for a fifth year, for $52.4 million, with the Arizona Diamondbacks, a second-year franchise.[16] Johnson led the team to the playoffs that year on the strength of a 17–9 record and 2.48 ERA with 364 strikeouts, leading the majors in innings, complete games and strikeouts. Johnson won the 1999 NL Cy Young Award
Cy Young Award
and Warren Spahn Award
Warren Spahn Award
as the best left-handed pitcher in MLB.[17] Johnson joined Gaylord Perry
Gaylord Perry
and Pedro Martínez as the only pitchers to have won the Cy Young Award
Cy Young Award
in both the American and National Leagues. (Roger Clemens, Roy Halladay, and Max Scherzer have since done so.) Johnson finished 2000 with 19 wins, 347 strikeouts and a 2.64 ERA, and won his second consecutive NL Cy Young
Cy Young
Award[18] and Warren Spahn Award.[19] The Diamondbacks acquired Curt Schilling
Curt Schilling
from the Philadelphia Phillies
Philadelphia Phillies
in July 2000, and the two aces anchored the Diamondbacks rotation.[20] In the fourth year of the franchise's existence, Johnson and Schilling carried the Arizona Diamondbacks
Arizona Diamondbacks
to their first World Series appearance and victory in 2001 against the New York Yankees. Johnson and Schilling shared the World Series
World Series
Most Valuable Player Award, the Babe Ruth
Babe Ruth
Award,[21] and were named Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
magazine's 2001 "Sportsmen of the Year." For the first of two consecutive seasons, Johnson and Schilling finished 1–2 in the Cy Young
Cy Young
balloting.[22] Johnson also won his third consecutive Warren Spahn
Warren Spahn
Award.[23] Johnson's performance was particularly dominating, striking out 11 in a 3-hit shutout in game 2, pitching seven innings for the victory in Game 6 and then coming on in relief the following day to pick up the win in Game 7. Of Arizona's eleven post-season wins in 2001, Johnson had five. Johnson's Game 7 relief appearance was his second of the 2001 season; on July 19, a game against the Padres was delayed by two electrical explosions in Qualcomm Stadium. When the game resumed the following day, Johnson stepped in as the new pitcher and racked up 16 strikeouts in 7 innings, technically setting the record for the most strikeouts in a relief stint.

Johnson striking a bird with a thrown ball in 2001.

In a freak accident on March 24, 2001 at Tucson Electric Park, during the 7th inning of a spring training game against the San Francisco Giants, Johnson threw a fastball to Calvin Murray that struck and killed a dove. The bird swooped across the infield just as Johnson was releasing the ball. After being struck, the bird fell amid a "sea of feathers." The official call was "no pitch."[24] Johnson struck out 20 batters in a game on May 8, 2001 against the Cincinnati Reds. Johnson recorded all 20 strikeouts in the first nine innings, but because the game went into extra innings, it was not categorized by MLB as an "official" 20-strikeout game. On August 23, 2001, Johnson struck out three batters on nine pitches in the 6th inning of a 5–1 loss to the Pittsburgh Pirates, becoming the 30th pitcher in major league history to pitch an immaculate inning. In 2002, Johnson won the pitching Triple Crown, leading the NL in wins, ERA and strikeouts, and was voted his fourth consecutive Cy Young and Warren Spahn
Warren Spahn
Awards.[25] It was Johnson's fourth consecutive 300-strikeout season with the Diamondbacks, and fifth consecutive overall, extending his own MLB record from the previous season in which he set the record for the most consecutive seasons with 300 or more strikeouts in a season by a pitcher.[26] He also became the first pitcher in baseball history to post a 24–5 record.[27] Johnson spent the majority of the 2003 season on the disabled list and was ineffective in the few injury-hampered starts he did make. One thing he did accomplish that year was hitting his first career home run in a September 19, 2003 game against the Milwaukee Brewers. It was the only home run to date for Johnson, a career .125 hitter. On May 18, 2004, Johnson pitched the 17th perfect game in baseball history. At 40 years of age, he was the oldest pitcher to accomplish this feat. Johnson had 13 strikeouts on his way to a 2–0 defeat of the Atlanta Braves. The perfect game made him the fifth pitcher in Major League history (after Cy Young, Jim Bunning, Nolan Ryan, and Hideo Nomo) to pitch a no-hitter in both leagues. He also became the fifth pitcher in Major League history to throw both a no-hitter and a perfect game in his career (after Young, Bunning, Addie Joss, and Sandy Koufax; since Johnson, Mark Buehrle
Mark Buehrle
and Roy Halladay
Roy Halladay
have joined this group). Johnson struck out Jeff Cirillo of the San Diego Padres on June 29, 2004 to become only the fourth MLB player to reach 4,000 strikeouts in a career.[28] He finished the 2004 season with a 16–14 record, though his poor record was partially due to a lack of run support as his ERA that year was 2.60. Johnson led the major leagues in strikeouts (with 290). In the games where Arizona scored three or more runs, Johnson was 13–2. As his team only won 51 games that year, his ratio of winning 31.3% of his team's games was the highest for any starting pitcher since Steve Carlton in 1972 (who won 27 of the Phillies' 59 wins for an all-time record ratio of 45.8%). New York Yankees
New York Yankees
(2005–2006)[edit]

Johnson with the Yankees

The Diamondbacks traded Johnson to the New York Yankees
New York Yankees
for Javier Vázquez, Brad Halsey, Dioner Navarro, and cash in January 2005.[29] Johnson pitched Opening Day for the Yankees on April 3, 2005 against the Boston Red Sox. Johnson was inconsistent through 2005, allowing 32 home runs; however, he regained his dominance in late 2005. He was 5–0 against the Yankees' division rival Red Sox and finished the season 17–8 with a 3.79 ERA, and was second in the AL with 211 strikeouts. In 2005, The Sporting News published an update of their 1999 book Baseball's 100 Greatest Players. Johnson did not make the original edition, but for the 2005 update, with his career totals considerably higher and his 2001 World Championship season taken into account, he was ranked at Number 60.[citation needed] Johnson was a disappointment in Game 3 of the 2005 Division Series against the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, allowing 5 runs on 2 home runs in 3 innings. In Game 5 in Anaheim, Johnson made an effective relief appearance after Mike Mussina
Mike Mussina
gave up 5 runs and 6 hits to give the Angels a 5–2 lead, but the Yankees were unable to come back in the series. After an inconclusive year in pinstripes, New York fans hoped that Johnson would return to his dominant style in his second Yankee season. Johnson began 2006 well, but then he struggled to find form. In between some impressive performances, he allowed 5 or more runs in 7 of his first 18 starts for the season. Johnson was more effective in the second half. Johnson finished the season with a 17–11 record, a subpar 5.00 ERA with 172 strikeouts. It had been revealed at the end of the 2006 season that a herniated disc in Johnson's back had been stiffening him and it was only in his second to last start of the season that he decided to get it checked. This exposure had caused him to miss his last start of 2006. After being given epidural anesthesia and a few bullpen sessions he was cleared to start in game 3 of the ALDS, however he gave up 5 runs in 5​2⁄3 innings. Second stint with the Arizona Diamondbacks
Arizona Diamondbacks
(2007–2008)[edit]

Johnson pitching for the Arizona Diamondbacks.

In January 2007, the Yankees traded Johnson back to the Diamondbacks, almost two years to the day that Arizona had traded him to New York, for a package of Luis Vizcaíno, Alberto González, Steven Jackson, and Ross Ohlendorf.[18] The Yankees' decision to trade Johnson was primarily based on his pre-season request to be traded after the death of his brother. Yankees General Manager Brian Cashman was very sympathetic to Johnson's grief and agreed to trade him back to the Diamondbacks so that Johnson could be closer to his family in Phoenix.[citation needed] Johnson missed most of April, rehabilitating his injured back before returning on April 24, 2007. Johnson allowed six runs in 5 innings and took the loss, but struck out seven. He returned to form, and by his tenth start of the season was among the NL's top ten strikeout pitchers. But on July 3, his surgically repaired disc from the previous season was reinjured. Johnson had season-ending surgery on the same disc, this time removing it completely. Reporting that the procedure went "a little better than expected", Arizona hoped that Johnson would be ready for the 2008 season.[30] Johnson made his season debut on April 14, 2008 against the San Francisco Giants at AT&T Park eight months following his back surgery. On June 3, 2008, Johnson struck out Mike Cameron
Mike Cameron
of the Milwaukee Brewers
Milwaukee Brewers
for career strikeout number 4,673. With this strikeout Johnson surpassed Roger Clemens
Roger Clemens
for the number two spot on the all-time strikeout leaders list.[31] Johnson struck out 8 in the game but could not get the win as the Diamondbacks lost 7–1. Johnson got his 4,700th career strikeout on July 6, 2008.[32] He finished the season with an 11–10 record and an ERA of 3.91, recording his 100th career complete game in a 2–1 victory over the Colorado Rockies.[33] San Francisco Giants
San Francisco Giants
(2009)[edit] On December 26, 2008, Johnson signed a one-year deal with the San Francisco Giants for a reported $8 million, with a possible $2.5 million in performance bonuses and another $2.5 million in award bonuses.[34][35] Johnson became the twenty-fourth pitcher to reach 300 wins, beating the Washington Nationals
Washington Nationals
(the team that he first played for when they were known as the Montreal Expos) on June 4 at Nationals Park in Washington, D.C.[36] He became the seventh left-handed pitcher to achieve the 300 win milestone and the fifth pitcher in the last 50 years to get his 299th and 300th win in consecutive starts, joining Warren Spahn, Steve Carlton, Gaylord Perry, and Tom Seaver. Johnson was placed on the 60-day disabled list with a torn rotator cuff in his throwing shoulder on July 28, 2009.[37] Johnson was activated by the Giants on September 16, 2009, and assigned to the Giants bullpen.[38] On September 19, 2009, Johnson made his first relief appearance in 4 years, facing the Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
for 3 batters.[39] At age 46, he was at the time the second oldest player in Major League Baseball, trailing only Jamie Moyer.[40] Retirement[edit]

Randy Johnson's number 51 was retired by the Arizona Diamondbacks
Arizona Diamondbacks
in 2015.

On January 5, 2010, he announced his retirement from professional baseball.[41] The Mariners invited Johnson to throw out the ceremonial first pitch at the Seattle Mariners
Seattle Mariners
home opener at Safeco Field
Safeco Field
on April 12, 2010[42] and inducted Johnson into the Mariners Hall of Fame on January 17, 2012.[43] The Diamondbacks also invited Johnson and former teammate Curt Schilling
Curt Schilling
to both throw out the ceremonial first pitches for the Arizona Diamondbacks' 10th Anniversary of the 2001 World Series
World Series
team that defeated the New York Yankees. [44] Johnson was selected to the Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility in 2015.[45] The Diamondbacks retired his number on August 8, 2015.[46]

Pitching style[edit] In the prime of his career, Johnson's fastball was sometimes clocked over 100 mph (160 km/h), even as high as 102 mph (164 km/h) with a low three-quarters delivery (nearly sidearm).[47] His signature pitch was a slider that broke down and away from left-handed hitters and down and in to right-handed hitters. The effectiveness of the pitch is marked by its velocity being in the low 90s along with tight late break; hitters often believed they were thrown a fastball until the ball broke just before it crossed home plate. Right-handed hitters have swung through and missed sliders that nearly hit their back foot.[48] Johnson dubbed his slider "Mr. Snappy".[49] In later years, his fastball declined to the 96 mph (154 km/h) range and his slider clocked at around 87 mph (140 km/h). Johnson also threw a split-finger fastball that behaved like a change-up and a sinker to induce ground-ball outs.[50] In a June 27, 2012, appearance on The Dan Patrick Show, Adam Dunn
Adam Dunn
(a left-handed batter) was asked who the best pitcher he faced was. "Honestly, Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
when he was good. It's hopeless. It's like a hopeless feeling. The first time you face him you feel like he's going to hit you right in the back of the neck when he throws it, like every pitch is going to hit you in the back of the neck. And it ends up down and away for a strike and you just have to trust it's going to be a strike, and heaven forbid he doesn't lose one out there and heaven forbid, there goes your cheek." Accomplishments[edit]

Johnson throwing out the ceremonial first pitch at the Seattle Mariners home opener at Safeco Field

Pitched a no-hitter for Seattle on June 2, 1990, against Detroit 10-time All-Star (1990, 1993–95, 1997, 1999–02, 2004) Led the league in strikeouts nine times (1992–95, 1999–2002, 2004) Led the league in ERA four times (1995, 1999, 2001, 2002) Triple crown (2002) 5 time Cy Young Award
Cy Young Award
winner (1995, 1999–2002) 4 time Warren Spahn Award
Warren Spahn Award
winner (1999–2002) Holds the record for most strikeouts in a relief appearance (16 against San Diego on July 18, 2001) Holds the record for highest single season and career strikeout per 9 innings ratio: 13.41 and 10.61 World Series
World Series
co-MVP (Curt Schilling, 2001) Co-winner of the Babe Ruth Award
Babe Ruth Award
(Curt Schilling, 2001) Pitched a perfect game for Arizona against Atlanta (May 18, 2004) – oldest pitcher to do so in major-league history Collected his 300th win in a 5–1 victory against the Washington Nationals on June 4, 2009 Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
MLB All-Decade Team (2009) Has defeated every major-league team at least once Most strikeouts in a game by a left-handed pitcher, Struck out 20 batters on May 8, 2001 against Cincinnati Reds Set American League
American League
record for strikeouts in a nine inning game by a left-handed pitcher with 19 against the Oakland Athletics and later the Chicago White Sox in 1997 Won 16 consecutive decisions from 1995-1997 4,875 strikeouts, most all time for lefthanded pitcher; 2nd most ever (Nolan Ryan, 5,714) Named to the Mariners Hall of Fame Pitched two immaculate innings (September 2, 1998 against the Atlanta Braves and August 23, 2001 against the Pittsburgh Pirates) Johnson was elected to the National Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame on 97.3% of the vote on January 6, 2015, third highest percentage of all time for pitchers. Johnson was formally inducted to the National Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame on July 26, 2015, in Cooperstown, N.Y.

Personal life[edit] Johnson has four children with his wife Lisa: Sammy (born 1994), Tanner (born 1996), Willow (born 1998), and Alexandria (born 1999). He also has a daughter from a previous relationship, Heather Renee Roszell (born 1989).[51] He is a resident of Paradise Valley, Arizona.[52] Since retiring from baseball, Johnson has pursued a second career as a photographer.[53] Johnson is a Christian. Johnson has spoken about his faith saying, "... there's only one way to be on this earth, and that's to be a Christian! ... The Lord's given me the ability to go out and do the things that I do."[54] In January 2015, Johnson became the Assistant to General Manager of the Arizona Diamondbacks. "Big Unit" nickname[edit] During batting practice in 1988, the 6'10" Johnson, then with the Montreal Expos, collided head-first with outfielder Tim Raines, prompting his teammate to exclaim, "You're a big unit!"[55] The nickname stuck. Throughout much of his career, Johnson held the title of tallest player in MLB history. Former pitcher Eric Hillman and current pitchers Andrew Sisco, Andrew Brackman, and Chris Young have also been measured at 6'10". The title of tallest player, as of 2012[update], is held by Johnson's former Diamondback teammate Jon Rauch, a relief pitcher who is 6'11". Acting career[edit] Johnson guest starred in The Simpsons
The Simpsons
episode "Bart Has Two Mommies", which aired on March 19, 2006. Johnson appeared in the movie Little Big League, playing himself. Johnson appeared in a "Just For Men" commercial where he had a grey beard and his neighbors told him "Your beard is weird." Johnson also appeared in a Right Guard commercial where he fired dodgeballs at Kyle Brandt, who represented odor. Johnson also appeared in several commercials for Nike in 1998. The spots comedically portrayed him taking batting practice (swinging ineptly at balls from a pitching machine) in his hope that he would break Roger Maris' then-single-season record for home runs. He made a cameo appearance in a commercial for MLB 2K9
MLB 2K9
with teammate Tim Lincecum. Johnson made an appearance in a GEICO
GEICO
insurance commercial.[56] Johnson has been featured as a playable character in various Backyard Baseball
Baseball
games. Johnson appeared in the episode "Control" on Franklin & Bash as himself. See also[edit]

Biography portal Baseball
Baseball
portal

300 win club 3,000 strikeout club Arizona Diamondbacks
Arizona Diamondbacks
team records List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
career bases on balls allowed leaders List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
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Baseball
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Baseball
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Baseball
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Baseball
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Baseball
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Baseball
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Baseball
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Baseball
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Baseball
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Seattle Mariners
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Baseball
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Seattle Mariners
award winners and league leaders

References[edit]

^ "1. Randall David ("Randy") Johnson". rootsweb. Ancestry.com. Retrieved January 6, 2010.  ^ " Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
Biography". JockBio. September 10, 1963. Retrieved July 18, 2012.  ^ Kepner, Tyler (January 7, 2010). "AN APPRECIATION; Worth Watching, From Start to Finish". The New York Times. Retrieved December 1, 2011.  ^ " Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
Almost Traded to the Blue Jays".  ^ "AN ALL-STAR STRIKEOUT THAT WAS GOOD FOR SOME LAUGHS JOHN KRUK MAY HAVE LOOKED A BIT OVERMATCHED AGAINST RANDY JOHNSON. BUT IT DIDN'T COST HIM HIS SENSE OF HUMOR". Philadelphia Inquirer. July 18, 1993. p. E07. Retrieved December 1, 2011.  (subscription required) ^ Crasnick, Jerry (July 9, 1997). "Walker gets Kruk off hook Wilting under Johnson's high heat". Denver Post. p. D–01. Retrieved December 1, 2011.  (subscription required) ^ Associated Press
Associated Press
(June 12, 1997). "Walker will not face Johnson". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved February 4, 2017.  ^ Cut4Staff (July 8, 2016). "Today in All-Star Game history: Larry Walker flips helmet, bats right-handed". MLB.com
MLB.com
Cut 4. Retrieved January 7, 2017.  ^ Baker, Chris (July 9, 1997). "Johnson's wild toss amuses Walker, fans". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 7, 2017.  ^ Eisenberg, John; Kubatko, Roch (July 9, 1997). "Relieved Walker walks away from hairy at-bat vs. Johnson Kruk-like wild pitch keeps Rockie on toes". Baltimore Sun. Retrieved January 7, 2017.  ^ Elias Sports Bureau, Inc. (June 11, 2005). "Elias says ..." ESPN.com. Retrieved February 4, 2017.  ^ " Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
career pitching splits". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 7, 2017.  ^ "Baseball; Johnson and Seattle: No Reconciliation". The New York Times. February 25, 1998. Retrieved December 2, 2011.  ^ Chass, Murray (June 3, 1998). "Baseball; Mariners Put Stop to Offers And Plan to Keep Their Ace". The New York Times. Retrieved December 2, 2011.  ^ a b Finnigan, Bob (August 2, 1998). "Mariners / Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
Trade -- What Happened?". Seattle Times. Retrieved December 2, 2011.  ^ Chass, Murray (December 1, 1998). "Johnson Signs With the Diamondbacks for $52 Million". The New York Times. Retrieved January 7, 2010.  ^ Gonzales, Mark (February 19, 2000). "Durable Johnson Carries Big Load". Arizona Republic. p. C1. Retrieved October 10, 2011.  (subscription required) ^ a b " Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 18, 2012.  ^ "The Warren Spahn
Warren Spahn
Award". Okcspahnawards.com. Retrieved July 18, 2012.  ^ Howard, Johnette (November 5, 2001). "WORLD SERIES 2001 / Arizona: Shake, Rattle & Roll / Schilling, Johnson prove two can beat 25". Newsday. p. A.75. Retrieved December 1, 2011. (Subscription required (help)).  ^ "The Hutch Award, Lou Gehrig
Lou Gehrig
Award, Babe Ruth Award
Babe Ruth Award
& Roberto Clemente Award Winners". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved October 4, 2011.  ^ "Johnson scoops pitching prize". BBC Sport. November 6, 2002. Retrieved December 1, 2011.  ^ "Johnson wins award". Altus Times. Associated Press. December 5, 2001. p. 5. Retrieved October 10, 2011.  ^ "The Official Site of Major League Baseball: Official info: Umpires: Feature". Mlb.mlb.com. June 19, 2012. Retrieved July 18, 2012.  ^ Bloom, Barry M. (August 21, 2002). "More hardware for Big Unit". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Retrieved October 10, 2011.  ^ Steve Gilbert / MLB.com. "Unit's historic career like no other MLB.com: News". Mlb.mlb.com. Retrieved July 18, 2012. CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) ^ "The Neyer/James Guide to Pitchers: An Historical Compendium of Pitching, Pitchers, and Pitches: Books: Bill James, Rob Neyer". Amazon.com. ISBN 0743261585.  Missing or empty url= (help) ^ Steve Gilbert / MLB.com. "Big Unit joins 4,000-strikeout club MLB.com: News". Mlb.mlb.com. Retrieved July 18, 2012. CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) ^ "Paperwork in place for Johnson-Vazquez trade – MLB". ESPN.com. Retrieved December 16, 2014.  ^ Associated, The (March 9, 2008). " Hideki Matsui
Hideki Matsui
returns to Yankees' lineup; Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
ready for spring debut". Usatoday.Com. Retrieved July 18, 2012.  ^ "Randy "Big Unit" Johnson vs. Roger Clemens". CBSSports.com. Retrieved July 18, 2012.  ^ "D-backs fall on Johnson's historic night MLB.com: News". Arizona.diamondbacks.mlb.com. June 19, 2012. Retrieved July 18, 2012.  ^ Bagnato, Andrew (September 28, 2008). "Johnson Throws 2-hitter, Diamondbacks Edge Rockies". Yahoo! Sports. Retrieved December 1, 2011.  ^ "Giants sign free-agent pitcher Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
to one-year deal". MLB.com. December 26, 2008. Retrieved September 14, 2009.  ^ Haft, Chris (December 26, 2008). "Giants sign Big Unit to one-year deal". MLB.com. Retrieved September 14, 2009.  ^ Haft, Chris (June 4, 2009). "Big Unit gets 300th win on first try". MLB.com. Retrieved December 1, 2011.  ^ "Johnson has rotator cuff tear". ESPN.com. July 29, 2009. Retrieved December 1, 2009.  ^ "Giants Activate Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
to Pitch Out of Bullpen". fanhouse.com. Retrieved September 16, 2009.  ^ "MLB Gameday". Retrieved October 27, 2014.  ^ Ortiz, Jorge L. (June 1, 2009). "At 45 years old, Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
is still fired up". USA Today. Retrieved July 18, 2012.  ^ "Lefty Johnson retires". ESPN.com. Associated Press. January 6, 2010. Retrieved January 7, 2010.  ^ Stone, Larry (April 10, 2010). " Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
is enjoying retirement". The Seattle Times.  ^ Stone, Larry (January 27, 2012). "Randy Johnson, Dan Wilson named to Mariners Hall of Fame". The Seattle Times.  ^ http://www.zimbio.com/pictures/RKTjds3r8b-/San+Diego+Padres+v+Arizona+Diamondbacks/P6zIHgGy0en ^ " Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame: Johnson, Martinez, Smoltz, Biggio elected". CBS Sports. Retrieved January 6, 2015.  ^ "Diamondbacks to retire Randy Johnson's No. 51". HardballTalk.  ^ " Fastball
Fastball
clocked as high as 103 mph". Hypertextbook.com. Retrieved July 18, 2012.  ^ Verducci, Tom (May 16, 2006). "Showing his age: Johnson's woes reveal his best days are behind him". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on August 23, 2006. Retrieved November 30, 2011.  ^ Lewin, Josh (May 4, 2005). "El Meteoro? Not quite the same ring as Twinkletoes". Sporting News. Retrieved October 9, 2007.  ^ " Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
Scouting Report". Feeds.foxsports.com. Retrieved July 18, 2012.  ^ "'Love child', mother lambaste Big Unit". NBCSports.com. March 29, 2006. Retrieved August 28, 2008.  ^ " Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
House Pictures". CelebrityHousePictures.com. Retrieved July 18, 2012.  ^ " Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
Photography". rj51photos.com. Retrieved April 11, 2016.  ^ "Randy Johnson, Big Man in Seattle". Sports Spectrum. Retrieved April 11, 2016.  ^ Santasiere, Alfred; Haley Swindal; Quentin Washington (May 27, 2005). "Big beginnings for the Big Unit". MLB Advanced Media, L.P. Retrieved June 18, 2007.  ^ "Commercials". GEICO. December 14, 2010. Retrieved July 18, 2012. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Randy Johnson.

Career statistics and player information from MLB, or ESPN, or Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or The Baseball Cube, or Baseball-Reference (Minors), or Retrosheet Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
at the Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
on IMDb Randy Johnson: Countdown to 300 Wins Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
Video on ESPN Video Archive Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
Video on FoxSports Video Archive Box score of Johnson's perfect game CBS Player Page SABR BioProject Player Article

Awards and achievements

Preceded by Erik Hanson Jeff Fassero Opening Day starting pitcher for the Seattle Mariners 1992 – 1996 1998 Succeeded by Jeff Fassero Jeff Fassero

Preceded by Dwight Gooden National League
National League
Pitching Triple Crown 2002 Succeeded by Jake Peavy

Preceded by Mark Langston & Mike Witt Roy Oswalt, Peter Munro, Kirk Saarloos, Brad Lidge, Octavio Dotel
Octavio Dotel
& Billy Wagner No-hitter
No-hitter
pitcher June 2, 1990 May 18, 2004 Succeeded by Nolan Ryan Aníbal Sánchez

Preceded by David Cone Perfect game
Perfect game
pitcher May 18, 2004 Succeeded by Mark Buehrle

Preceded by Chan Ho Park Kerry Wood NL hits per nine innings 2001 2004 Succeeded by A. J. Burnett Roger Clemens

Preceded by Nolan Ryan Roger Clemens Juan Guzmán AL hits per nine innings 1992–1993 1995 1997 Succeeded by Roger Clemens Juan Guzmán Roger Clemens

Preceded by Jimmy Key Charles Nagy American League
American League
All-Star Game Starting Pitcher 1995 1997 Succeeded by Charles Nagy David Wells

Preceded by Curt Schilling National League
National League
All-Star Game Starting Pitcher 2000–2001 Succeeded by Curt Schilling

Links to related articles

v t e

Arizona Diamondbacks
Arizona Diamondbacks
2001 World Series
World Series
champions

4 Craig Counsell
Craig Counsell
(NLCS MVP) 5 Tony Womack 9 Matt Williams 12 Steve Finley 13 Midre Cummings 16 Reggie Sanders 17 Mark Grace 20 Luis Gonzalez 22 Greg Swindell 25 David Dellucci 26 Damian Miller 28 Greg Colbrunn 29 Danny Bautista 32 Albie Lopez 33 Jay Bell 34 Brian Anderson 36 Mike Morgan 37 Junior Spivey 38 Curt Schilling
Curt Schilling
( World Series
World Series
MVP) 40 Bobby Witt 43 Miguel Batista 44 Erubiel Durazo 48 Rod Barajas 49 Byung-hyun Kim 51 Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
( World Series
World Series
MVP) 54 Troy Brohawn 61 Lyle Overbay

Manager 15 Bob Brenly

Coaches Bench Coach 3 Bob Melvin First Base Coach 14 Eddie Rodríguez Hitting Coach 21 Dwayne Murphy Pitching Coach 24 Bob Welch Third Base Coach 35 Chris Speier Bullpen Coach 53 Glenn Sherlock

Regular season National League
National League
Division Series National League
National League
Championship Series

v t e

Seattle Mariners
Seattle Mariners
Opening Day starting pitchers

Glenn Abbott Floyd Bannister Érik Bédard Jeff Fassero Freddy García Erik Hanson Félix Hernández Brian Holman Randy Johnson Mark Langston Mike Moore Jamie Moyer Mike Parrott Gaylord Perry Diego Seguí

v t e

Arizona Diamondbacks
Arizona Diamondbacks
Opening Day starting pitchers

Andy Benes Josh Collmenter Patrick Corbin Zack Greinke Dan Haren Randy Johnson Ian Kennedy Wade Miley Javier Vázquez Brandon Webb

v t e

New York Yankees
New York Yankees
Opening Day starting pitchers

Stan Bahnsen Tiny Bonham Hank Borowy Jim Bouton Ray Caldwell Spud Chandler Jack Chesbro Roger Clemens Jim Coates David Cone Atley Donald Slow Joe Doyle Whitey Ford Lefty Gomez Ron Guidry Orlando Hernández Waite Hoyt Tom Hughes Catfish Hunter Tommy John Randy Johnson Sad Sam Jones Jimmy Key Dave LaPoint Don Larsen Tim Leary Eddie Lopat Carl Mays George McConnell Joe McGinnity Marty McHale Doc Medich George Mogridge Mike Mussina Doc Newton Phil Niekro Al Orth Carl Pavano Herb Pennock Andy Pettitte George Pipgras Vic Raschi Dennis Rasmussen Allie Reynolds Rick Rhoden Red Ruffing Marius Russo CC Sabathia Scott Sanderson Luis Severino Bob Shawkey Urban Shocker Mel Stottlemyre Masahiro Tanaka Ralph Terry Bob Turley Hippo Vaughn Chien-Ming Wang Jack Warhop

v t e

Arizona Diamondbacks

Based in Phoenix, Arizona

Franchise

History Expansion

Expansion draft

Records No-hitters Players Owners and executives Managers Broadcasters Seasons Opening Day starters First-round draft picks

Ballparks

Chase Field Spring training: Tucson Electric Park Salt River Fields at Talking Stick

Culture

Baxter the Bobcat D-backs Luchador The Last Night of the Yankee Dynasty

Lore

Randy Johnson's perfect game

Key personnel

Owner: Ken Kendrick President and CEO: Derrick Hall General Manager: Mike Hazen Manager: Torey Lovullo

World Series
World Series
championships (1)

2001

National League
National League
pennants (1)

2001

Division titles (5)

1999 2001 2002 2007 2011

Wild Card berths (1)

2017

Minor league affiliates

AAA: Reno Aces AA: Jackson Generals A Adv.: Visalia Rawhide A: Kane County Cougars Short A: Hillsboro Hops Rookie Adv: Missoula Osprey Rookie: AZL Diamondbacks DSL Diamondbacks

Broadcasting

Television

Fox Sports Arizona

Radio

KMVP-FM KTAR (AM) Arizona Diamondbacks
Arizona Diamondbacks
Radio Networks

Broadcasters

Steve Berthiaume Greg Schulte Bob Brenly Tom Candiotti

Seasons (21)

1990s

1990 · 1991 · 1992 · 1993 · 1994 · 1995 · 1996 · 1997 · 1998 1999

2000s

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

2010s

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

v t e

Arizona Diamondbacks
Arizona Diamondbacks
retired numbers

20 Luis Gonzalez 51 Randy Johnson

v t e

American League
American League
Cy Young
Cy Young
Award

1967: Lonborg 1968: McLain 1969: Cuellar & McLain 1970: J. Perry 1971: Blue 1972: G. Perry 1973: Palmer 1974: Hunter 1975: Palmer 1976: Palmer 1977: Lyle 1978: Guidry 1979: Flanagan 1980: Stone 1981: Fingers 1982: Vuckovich 1983: Hoyt 1984: Hernández 1985: Saberhagen 1986: Clemens 1987: Clemens 1988: Viola 1989: Saberhagen 1990: Welch 1991: Clemens 1992: Eckersley 1993: McDowell 1994: Cone 1995: Johnson 1996: Hentgen 1997: Clemens 1998: Clemens 1999: Martínez 2000: Martínez 2001: Clemens 2002: Zito 2003: Halladay 2004: Santana 2005: Colón 2006: Santana 2007: Sabathia 2008: Lee 2009: Greinke 2010: Hernández 2011: Verlander 2012: Price 2013: Scherzer 2014: Kluber 2015: Keuchel 2016: Porcello 2017: Kluber

v t e

National League
National League
Cy Young
Cy Young
Award

1967: McCormick 1968: Gibson 1969: Seaver 1970: Gibson 1971: Jenkins 1972: Carlton 1973: Seaver 1974: Marshall 1975: Seaver 1976: Jones 1977: Carlton 1978: Perry 1979: Sutter 1980: Carlton 1981: Valenzuela 1982: Carlton 1983: Denny 1984: Sutcliffe 1985: Gooden 1986: Scott 1987: Bedrosian 1988: Hershiser 1989: Davis 1990: Drabek 1991: Glavine 1992: Maddux 1993: Maddux 1994: Maddux 1995: Maddux 1996: Smoltz 1997: Martínez 1998: Glavine 1999: Johnson 2000: Johnson 2001: Johnson 2002: Johnson 2003: Gagné 2004: Clemens 2005: Carpenter 2006: Webb 2007: Peavy 2008: Lincecum 2009: Lincecum 2010: Halladay 2011: Kershaw 2012: Dickey 2013: Kershaw 2014: Kershaw 2015: Arrieta 2016: Scherzer 2017: Scherzer

v t e

World Series
World Series
MVP Award

1955: Podres 1956: Larsen 1957: Burdette 1958: Turley 1959: Sherry 1960: Richardson 1961: Ford 1962: Terry 1963: Koufax 1964: Gibson 1965: Koufax 1966: F. Robinson 1967: Gibson 1968: Lolich 1969: Clendenon 1970: B. Robinson 1971: Clemente 1972: Tenace 1973: Jackson 1974: Fingers 1975: Rose 1976: Bench 1977: Jackson 1978: Dent 1979: Stargell 1980: Schmidt 1981: Cey, Guerrero & Yeager 1982: Porter 1983: Dempsey 1984: Trammell 1985: Saberhagen 1986: Knight 1987: Viola 1988: Hershiser 1989: Stewart 1990: Rijo 1991: Morris 1992: Borders 1993: Molitor 1994: No series 1995: Glavine 1996: Wetteland 1997: Hernandez 1998: Brosius 1999: Rivera 2000: Jeter 2001: Johnson & Schilling 2002: Glaus 2003: Beckett 2004: Ramirez 2005: Dye 2006: Eckstein 2007: Lowell 2008: Hamels 2009: Matsui 2010: Rentería 2011: Freese 2012: Sandoval 2013: Ortiz 2014: Bumgarner 2015: Pérez 2016: Zobrist 2017: Springer

v t e

Babe Ruth
Babe Ruth
Award

1949: Page 1950: Coleman 1951: Rizzuto 1952: Mize 1953: Martin 1954: Rhodes 1955: Podres 1956: Larsen 1957: Burdette 1958: Howard 1959: Sherry 1960: Mazeroski 1961: Ford 1962: Terry 1963: Koufax 1964: Gibson 1965: Koufax 1966: F. Robinson 1967: Brock 1968: Lolich 1969: Weis 1970: B. Robinson 1971: Clemente 1972: Tenace 1973: Campaneris 1974: Green 1975: Tiant 1976: Bench 1977: Jackson 1978: Dent 1979: Stargell 1980: McGraw 1981: Cey 1982: Sutter 1983: Dempsey 1984: Morris 1985: Saberhagen 1986: Knight 1987: Viola 1988: Hershiser 1989: Stewart 1990: Hatcher 1991: Morris 1992: Winfield 1993: Molitor 1994: None 1995: Glavine 1996: Fielder 1997: Alou 1998: Brosius 1999: Rivera 2000: Jeter 2001: Johnson & Schilling 2002: Glaus 2003: Beckett 2004: Foulke 2005: Dye 2006: Eckstein 2007: Papelbon 2008: Hamels 2009: Rodriguez 2010: Lincecum 2011: Freese 2012: Sandoval 2013: Ortiz 2014: Bumgarner 2015: Davis 2016: Lester 2017: Altuve & Verlander

v t e

Warren Spahn
Warren Spahn
Award

1999: Johnson 2000: Johnson 2001: Johnson 2002: Johnson 2003: Pettitte 2004: Santana 2005: Willis 2006: Santana 2007: Sabathia 2008: Sabathia 2009: Sabathia 2010: Price 2011: Kershaw 2012: González 2013: Kershaw 2014: Kershaw 2015: Keuchel 2016: Lester 2017: Kershaw

v t e

National League
National League
season wins leaders

1876: Spalding 1877: Bond 1878: Bond 1879: Ward 1880: J. McCormick 1881: Corcoran & Whitney 1882: J. McCormick 1883: Radbourn 1884: Radbourn 1885: Clarkson 1886: Baldwin & Keefe 1887: Clarkson 1888: Keefe 1889: Clarkson 1890: Hutchinson 1891: Hutchinson 1892: Hutchinson & Young 1893: Killen 1894: Rusie 1895: Young 1896: Killen & Nichols 1897: Nichols 1898: Nichols 1899: Hughes & McGinnity 1900: McGinnity 1901: Donovan 1902: Chesbro 1903: McGinnity 1904: McGinnity 1905: Mathewson 1906: McGinnity 1907: Mathewson 1908: Mathewson 1909: Brown 1910: Mathewson 1911: Alexander 1912: Cheney & Marquard 1913: Seaton 1914: Alexander 1915: Alexander 1916: Alexander 1917: Alexander 1918: Vaughn 1919: Barnes 1920: Alexander 1921: W. Cooper & Grimes 1922: Rixey 1923: Luque 1924: Vance 1925: Vance 1926: Donohue, Kremer, Meadows & Rhem 1927: Root 1928: Benton & Grimes 1929: Malone 1930: Kremer & Malone 1931: Elliott, Hallahan & Meine 1932: Warneke 1933: Hubbell 1934: Dean 1935: Dean 1936: Hubbell 1937: Hubbell 1938: Lee 1939: Walters 1940: Walters 1941: Higbe & Wyatt 1942: M. Cooper 1943: M. Cooper, Riddle & Sewell 1944: Walters 1945: Barrett 1946: Pollet 1947: Blackwell 1948: Sain 1949: Spahn 1950: Spahn 1951: Jansen & Maglie 1952: Roberts 1953: Roberts & Spahn 1954: Roberts 1955: Roberts 1956: Newcombe 1957: Spahn 1958: Friend & Spahn 1959: Burdette, S. Jones & Spahn 1960: Broglio & Spahn 1961: Jay & Spahn 1962: Drysdale 1963: Koufax & Marichal 1964: L. Jackson 1965: Koufax 1966: Koufax 1967: M. McCormick 1968: Marichal 1969: Seaver 1970: Gibson & Perry 1971: Jenkins 1972: Carlton 1973: Bryant 1974: Messersmith & P. Niekro 1975: Seaver 1976: R. Jones 1977: Carlton 1978: Perry 1979: J. Niekro & P. Niekro 1980: Carlton 1981: Seaver 1982: Carlton 1983: Denny 1984: Andújar 1985: Gooden 1986: Valenzuela 1987: Sutcliffe 1988: Hershiser & D. Jackson 1989: Scott 1990: Drabek 1991: Glavine & Smiley 1992: Glavine & Maddux 1993: Burkett & Glavine 1994: Hill & Maddux 1995: Maddux 1996: Smoltz 1997: Neagle 1998: Glavine 1999: Hampton 2000: Glavine 2001: Morris & Schilling 2002: Johnson 2003: Ortiz 2004: Oswalt 2005: Willis 2006: Harang, Lowe, Penny, Smoltz, Webb & Zambrano 2007: Peavy 2008: Webb 2009: Wainwright 2010: Halladay 2011: Kennedy & Kershaw 2012: González 2013: Wainwright & Zimmermann 2014: Kershaw 2015: Arrieta 2016: Scherzer 2017: Kershaw

v t e

American League
American League
season ERA leaders

1901: Young 1902: Siever 1903: E. Moore 1904: Joss 1905: Waddell 1906: White 1907: Walsh 1908: Joss 1909: Krause 1910: Walsh 1911: Gregg 1912: W. Johnson 1913: W. Johnson 1914: Leonard 1915: Wood 1916: Ruth 1917: Cicotte 1918: W. Johnson 1919: W. Johnson 1920: Shawkey 1921: Faber 1922: Faber 1923: Coveleski 1924: W. Johnson 1925: Coveleski 1926: Grove 1927: W. Moore 1928: Braxton 1929: Grove 1930: Grove 1931: Grove 1932: Grove 1933: Harder 1934: Gomez 1935: Grove 1936: Grove 1937: Gomez 1938: Grove 1939: Grove 1940: Feller 1941: T. Lee 1942: Lyons 1943: Chandler 1944: Trout 1945: Newhouser 1946: Newhouser 1947: Haynes 1948: Bearden 1949: Garcia 1950: Wynn 1951: Rogovin 1952: Reynolds 1953: Lopat 1954: Garcia 1955: Pierce 1956: Ford 1957: Shantz 1958: Ford 1959: Wilhelm 1960: Baumann 1961: Donovan 1962: Aguirre 1963: Peters 1964: Chance 1965: McDowell 1966: Peters 1967: Horlen 1968: Tiant 1969: Bosman 1970: Seguí 1971: Blue 1972: Tiant 1973: Palmer 1974: Hunter 1975: Palmer 1976: Fidrych 1977: Tanana 1978: Guidry 1979: Guidry 1980: May 1981: Stewart 1982: Sutcliffe 1983: Honeycutt 1984: Boddicker 1985: Stieb 1986: Clemens 1987: Key 1988: Anderson 1989: Saberhagen 1990: Clemens 1991: Clemens 1992: Clemens 1993: Appier 1994: Ontiveros 1995: R. Johnson 1996: Guzmán 1997: Clemens 1998: Clemens 1999: Martínez 2000: Martínez 2001: García 2002: Martínez 2003: Martínez 2004: Santana 2005: Millwood 2006: Santana 2007: Lackey 2008: C. Lee 2009: Greinke 2010: Hernández 2011: Verlander 2012: Price 2013: An. Sánchez 2014: Hernández 2015: Price 2016: Aa. Sanchez 2017: Kluber

v t e

National League
National League
season ERA leaders

1876: Bradley 1877: Bond 1878: Ward 1879: Bond 1880: Keefe 1881: Wiedman 1882: Corcoran 1883: J. McCormick 1884: Radbourn 1885: Keefe 1886: Boyle 1887: Casey 1888: Keefe 1889: Clarkson 1890: Rhines 1891: Ewing 1892: Young 1893: Breitenstein 1894: Rusie 1895: Maul 1896: Rhines 1897: Rusie 1898: Griffith 1899: Willis 1900: Waddell 1901: Tannehill 1902: Taylor 1903: Leever 1904: McGinnity 1905: Mathewson 1906: M. Brown 1907: Pfiester 1908: Mathewson 1909: Mathewson 1910: Cole 1911: Mathewson 1912: Tesreau 1913: Mathewson 1914: Doak 1915: Alexander 1916: Alexander 1917: Anderson 1918: Vaughn 1919: Alexander 1920: Alexander 1921: Doak 1922: Douglas 1923: Luque 1924: Vance 1925: Luque 1926: Kremer 1927: Kremer 1928: Vance 1929: Walker 1930: Vance 1931: Walker 1932: Warneke 1933: Hubbell 1934: Hubbell 1935: Blanton 1936: Hubbell 1937: Turner 1938: Lee 1939: Walters 1940: Walters 1941: Riddle 1942: Cooper 1943: Lanier 1944: Heusser 1945: Prim 1946: Pollet 1947: Spahn 1948: Brecheen 1949: Koslo 1950: Maglie 1951: Nichols, Jr. 1952: Wilhelm 1953: Spahn 1954: Antonelli 1955: Friend 1956: Burdette 1957: Podres 1958: Miller 1959: S. Jones 1960: M. McCormick 1961: Spahn 1962: Koufax 1963: Koufax 1964: Koufax 1965: Koufax 1966: Koufax 1967: Niekro 1968: Gibson 1969: Marichal 1970: Seaver 1971: Seaver 1972: Carlton 1973: Seaver 1974: Capra 1975: R. Jones 1976: Denny 1977: Candelaria 1978: Swan 1979: Richard 1980: Sutton 1981: Ryan 1982: Rogers 1983: Hammaker 1984: Peña 1985: Gooden 1986: Scott 1987: Ryan 1988: Magrane 1989: Garrelts 1990: Darwin 1991: D. Martínez 1992: Swift 1993: Maddux 1994: Maddux 1995: Maddux 1996: K. Brown 1997: P. Martínez 1998: Maddux 1999: R. Johnson 2000: K. Brown 2001: R. Johnson 2002: R. Johnson 2003: Schmidt 2004: Peavy 2005: Clemens 2006: Oswalt 2007: Peavy 2008: Santana 2009: Carpenter 2010: J. Johnson 2011: Kershaw 2012: Kershaw 2013: Kershaw 2014: Kershaw 2015: Greinke 2016: Hendricks 2017: Kershaw

v t e

American League
American League
season strikeout leaders

1901: Young 1902: Waddell 1903: Waddell 1904: Waddell 1905: Waddell 1906: Waddell 1907: Waddell 1908: Walsh 1909: Smith 1910: W. Johnson 1911: Walsh 1912: W. Johnson 1913: W. Johnson 1914: W. Johnson 1915: W. Johnson 1916: W. Johnson 1917: W. Johnson 1918: W. Johnson 1919: W. Johnson 1920: Coveleski 1921: W. Johnson 1922: Shocker 1923: W. Johnson 1924: W. Johnson 1925: Grove 1926: Grove 1927: Grove 1928: Grove 1929: Grove 1930: Grove 1931: Grove 1932: Ruffing 1933: Gomez 1934: Gomez 1935: Bridges 1936: Bridges 1937: Gomez 1938: Feller 1939: Feller 1940: Feller 1941: Feller 1942: Hughson & Newsom 1943: Reynolds 1944: Newhouser 1945: Newhouser 1946: Feller 1947: Feller 1948: Feller 1949: Trucks 1950: Lemon 1951: Raschi 1952: Reynolds 1953: Pierce 1954: Turley 1955: Score 1956: Score 1957: Wynn 1958: Wynn 1959: Bunning 1960: Bunning 1961: Pascual 1962: Pascual 1963: Pascual 1964: Downing 1965: McDowell 1966: McDowell 1967: Lonborg 1968: McDowell 1969: McDowell 1970: McDowell 1971: Lolich 1972: Ryan 1973: Ryan 1974: Ryan 1975: Tanana 1976: Ryan 1977: Ryan 1978: Ryan 1979: Ryan 1980: Barker 1981: Barker 1982: Bannister 1983: Morris 1984: Langston 1985: Blyleven 1986: Langston 1987: Langston 1988: Clemens 1989: Ryan 1990: Ryan 1991: Clemens 1992: R. Johnson 1993: R. Johnson 1994: R. Johnson 1995: R. Johnson 1996: Clemens 1997: Clemens 1998: Clemens 1999: Martínez 2000: Martínez 2001: Nomo 2002: Martínez 2003: Loaiza 2004: Santana 2005: Santana 2006: Santana 2007: Kazmir 2008: Burnett 2009: Verlander 2010: Weaver 2011: Verlander 2012: Verlander 2013: Darvish 2014: Price 2015: Sale 2016: Verlander 2017: Sale

v t e

National League
National League
season strikeout leaders

1876: Devlin 1877: Bond 1878: Bond 1879: Ward 1880: Corcoran 1881: Derby 1882: Radbourn 1883: Whitney 1884: Radbourn 1885: Clarkson 1886: Baldwin 1887: Clarkson 1888: Keefe 1889: Clarkson 1890: Rusie 1891: Rusie 1892: Hutchinson 1893: Rusie 1894: Rusie 1895: Rusie 1896: Young 1897: McJames & Seymour 1898: Seymour 1899: Hahn 1900: Hahn 1901: Hahn 1902: Willis 1903: Mathewson 1904: Mathewson 1905: Mathewson 1906: Beebe 1907: Mathewson 1908: Mathewson 1909: Overall 1910: Moore 1911: Marquard 1912: Alexander 1913: Seaton 1914: Alexander 1915: Alexander 1916: Alexander 1917: Alexander 1918: Vaughn 1919: Vaughn 1920: Alexander 1921: Grimes 1922: Vance 1923: Vance 1924: Vance 1925: Vance 1926: Vance 1927: Vance 1928: Vance 1929: Malone 1930: Hallahan 1931: Hallahan 1932: Dean 1933: Dean 1934: Dean 1935: Dean 1936: Mungo 1937: Hubbell 1938: Bryant 1939: Passeau & Walters 1940: Higbe 1941: Vander Meer 1942: Vander Meer 1943: Vander Meer 1944: Voiselle 1945: Roe 1946: Schmitz 1947: Blackwell 1948: Brecheen 1949: Spahn 1950: Spahn 1951: Newcombe & Spahn 1952: Spahn 1953: Roberts 1954: Roberts 1955: Jones 1956: Jones 1957: Sanford 1958: Jones 1959: Drysdale 1960: Drysdale 1961: Koufax 1962: Drysdale 1963: Koufax 1964: Veale 1965: Koufax 1966: Koufax 1967: Bunning 1968: Gibson 1969: Jenkins 1970: Seaver 1971: Seaver 1972: Carlton 1973: Seaver 1974: Carlton 1975: Seaver 1976: Seaver 1977: Niekro 1978: Richard 1979: Richard 1980: Carlton 1981: Valenzuela 1982: Carlton 1983: Carlton 1984: Gooden 1985: Gooden 1986: Scott 1987: Ryan 1988: Ryan 1989: DeLeón 1990: Cone 1991: Cone 1992: Smoltz 1993: Rijo 1994: Benes 1995: Nomo 1996: Smoltz 1997: Schilling 1998: Schilling 1999: Johnson 2000: Johnson 2001: Johnson 2002: Johnson 2003: Wood 2004: Johnson 2005: Peavy 2006: Harang 2007: Peavy 2008: Lincecum 2009: Lincecum 2010: Lincecum 2011: Kershaw 2012: Dickey 2013: Kershaw 2014: Cueto & Strasburg 2015: Kershaw 2016: Scherzer 2017: Scherzer

v t e

300 win club

Cy Young Walter Johnson Christy Mathewson Grover Cleveland Alexander Warren Spahn Pud Galvin Kid Nichols Greg Maddux Roger Clemens Tim Keefe Steve Carlton John Clarkson Eddie Plank Nolan Ryan Don Sutton Phil Niekro Gaylord Perry Tom Seaver Charles Radbourn Mickey Welch Tom Glavine Randy Johnson Lefty Grove Early Wynn

Book:300 win club

v t e

3,000 strikeout club

Nolan Ryan Randy Johnson Roger Clemens Steve Carlton Bert Blyleven Tom Seaver Don Sutton Gaylord Perry Walter Johnson Greg Maddux Phil Niekro Ferguson Jenkins Pedro Martínez Bob Gibson Curt Schilling John Smoltz

Book:3,000 strikeout club

v t e

Major League Baseball
Baseball
pitchers who have pitched a perfect game

Lee Richmond
Lee Richmond
(game) John Montgomery Ward Cy Young
Cy Young
(game) Addie Joss
Addie Joss
(game) Charlie Robertson
Charlie Robertson
(game) Don Larsen
Don Larsen
(game) Jim Bunning
Jim Bunning
(game) Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
(game) Catfish Hunter
Catfish Hunter
(game) Len Barker (game) Mike Witt (game) Tom Browning
Tom Browning
(game) Dennis Martínez (game) Kenny Rogers (game) David Wells
David Wells
(game) David Cone
David Cone
(game) Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
(game) Mark Buehrle
Mark Buehrle
(game) Dallas Braden
Dallas Braden
(game) Roy Halladay
Roy Halladay
(game) Philip Humber
Philip Humber
(game) Matt Cain
Matt Cain
(game) Félix Hernández
Félix Hernández
(game)

Italics denotes post-season perfect game

v t e

Major League Baseball
Baseball
pitchers who have won the Triple Crown

Grover Cleveland Alexander Tommy Bond Steve Carlton John Clarkson Roger Clemens Bob Feller Lefty Gomez Dwight Gooden Lefty Grove Guy Hecker Randy Johnson Walter Johnson Tim Keefe Clayton Kershaw Sandy Koufax Pedro Martínez Christy Mathewson Hal Newhouser Jake Peavy Charles Radbourn Amos Rusie Johan Santana Dazzy Vance Hippo Vaughn Justin Verlander Rube Waddell Bucky Walters Cy Young

v t e

Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
Sportsperson of the Year

1954: Roger Bannister 1955: Johnny Podres 1956: Bobby Morrow 1957: Stan Musial 1958: Rafer Johnson 1959: Ingemar Johansson 1960: Arnold Palmer 1961: Jerry Lucas 1962: Terry Baker 1963: Pete Rozelle 1964: Ken Venturi 1965: Sandy Koufax 1966: Jim Ryun 1967: Carl Yastrzemski 1968: Bill Russell 1969: Tom Seaver 1970: Bobby Orr 1971: Lee Trevino 1972: Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
& John Wooden 1973: Jackie Stewart 1974: Muhammad Ali 1975: Pete Rose 1976: Chris Evert 1977: Steve Cauthen 1978: Jack Nicklaus 1979: Terry Bradshaw
Terry Bradshaw
& Willie Stargell 1980: U.S. Olympic Hockey Team 1981: Sugar Ray Leonard 1982: Wayne Gretzky 1983: Mary Decker 1984: Edwin Moses
Edwin Moses
& Mary Lou Retton 1985: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar 1986: Joe Paterno 1987: Bob Bourne, Judi Brown King, Kipchoge Keino, Dale Murphy, Chip Rives, Patty Sheehan, Rory Sparrow, & Reggie Williams 1988: Orel Hershiser 1989: Greg LeMond 1990: Joe Montana 1991: Michael Jordan 1992: Arthur Ashe 1993: Don Shula 1994: Bonnie Blair
Bonnie Blair
& Johann Olav Koss 1995: Cal Ripken Jr. 1996: Tiger Woods 1997: Dean Smith 1998: Mark McGwire
Mark McGwire
& Sammy Sosa 1999: U.S. Women's Soccer Team 2000: Tiger Woods 2001: Curt Schilling
Curt Schilling
& Randy Johnson 2002: Lance Armstrong 2003: David Robinson & Tim Duncan 2004: Boston Red Sox 2005: Tom Brady 2006: Dwyane Wade 2007: Brett Favre 2008: Michael Phelps 2009: Derek Jeter 2010: Drew Brees 2011: Mike Krzyzewski
Mike Krzyzewski
& Pat Summitt 2012: LeBron James 2013: Peyton Manning 2014: Madison Bumgarner 2015: Serena Williams 2016: LeBron James 2017: José Altuve
José Altuve
& J. J. Watt

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Sporting News Major League Baseball
Baseball
All Decade Team (2000–2009)

Catcher: Joe Mauer First baseman: Albert Pujols Second baseman: Jeff Kent Shortstop: Derek Jeter Third baseman: Alex Rodriguez Outfielders: Barry Bonds, Ichiro Suzuki, Manny Ramirez Designated hitter: David Ortiz Starting pitcher: Randy Johnson Relief pitcher: Mariano Rivera

Manager: Joe Torre Executive: Theo Epstein

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Members of the Seattle Mariners
Seattle Mariners
Hall of Fame

Jay Buhner Alvin Davis Ken Griffey Jr. Randy Johnson Edgar Martínez Jamie Moyer Dave Niehaus Lou Piniella Dan Wilson

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Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame Class of 2015

BBWAA Vote

Craig Biggio
Craig Biggio
(82.7%) Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
(97.3%) Pedro Martínez
Pedro Martínez
(91.7%) John Smoltz
John Smoltz
(82.9%)

Veterans Committee

None

J. G. Taylor Spink Award

Tom Gage

Ford C. Frick Award

Dick Enberg

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Members of the National Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame

Pitchers

Alexander Bender Blyleven M. Brown R. Brown Bunning Carlton Chesbro Clarkson Cooper Coveleski Cummings Day Dean Dihigo Drysdale Eckersley Faber Feller Fingers Ford B. Foster Galvin B. Gibson Glavine Gomez Gossage Grimes Grove Haines Hoffman Hoyt Hubbell Hunter Jenkins R. Johnson W. Johnson Joss Keefe Koufax Lemon Lyons Maddux Marichal Marquard Martínez Mathewson McGinnity Méndez Morris Newhouser Nichols Niekro Paige Palmer Pennock Perry Plank Radbourn Rixey Roberts Rogan Ruffing Rusie Ryan Seaver H. Smith Smoltz Spahn Sutter Sutton Vance Waddell Walsh Welch Wilhelm J. Williams Willis Wynn Young

Catchers

Bench Berra Bresnahan Campanella Carter Cochrane Dickey Ewing Ferrell Fisk J. Gibson Hartnett Lombardi Mackey Piazza Rodríguez Santop Schalk

First basemen

Anson Bagwell Beckley Bottomley Brouthers Cepeda Chance Connor Foxx Gehrig Greenberg G. Kelly Killebrew Leonard McCovey Mize Murray Pérez Sisler Suttles Taylor Terry Thomas Thome

Second basemen

Alomar Biggio Carew E. Collins Doerr Evers Fox Frisch Gehringer Gordon Grant Herman Hornsby Lajoie Lazzeri Mazeroski McPhee Morgan J. Robinson Sandberg Schoendienst

Third basemen

Baker Boggs Brett J. Collins Dandridge J. Johnson Jones Kell Lindstrom Mathews Molitor B. Robinson Santo Schmidt Traynor J. Wilson D. White

Shortstops

Aparicio Appling Bancroft Banks Boudreau Cronin Davis T. Jackson Jennings Larkin Lloyd Maranville Reese Ripken Jr. Rizzuto Sewell O. Smith Tinker Trammell Vaughan Wagner Wallace Ward Wells Yount

Outfielders

Aaron Ashburn Averill Bell Brock W. Brown Burkett Carey Charleston Clarke Clemente Cobb Combs Crawford Cuyler Dawson Delahanty DiMaggio Doby Duffy Flick Goslin Griffey Jr. Guerrero Gwynn Hafey Hamilton Heilmann Henderson Hill Hooper Irvin R. Jackson Kaline Keeler Kelley K. Kelly Kiner Klein Mantle Manush Mays T. McCarthy Medwick Musial O'Rourke Ott Puckett Raines J. Rice S. Rice F. Robinson Roush Ruth Simmons Slaughter Snider Speaker Stargell Stearnes Thompson Torriente L. Waner P. Waner Wheat B. Williams T. Williams H. Wilson Winfield Yastrzemski Youngs

Managers

Alston Anderson Cox Durocher Hanlon Harris Herzog Huggins La Russa Lasorda López Mack J. McCarthy McGraw McKechnie W. Robinson Selee Southworth Stengel Torre Weaver D. Williams

Executives / pioneers

Barrow Bulkeley Cartwright Chadwick Chandler Comiskey Dreyfuss R. Foster Frick Giles Gillick Griffith Harridge Hulbert B. Johnson Kuhn Landis La. MacPhail Le. MacPhail Manley O'Malley Pompez Posey Rickey Ruppert Schuerholz Selig Spalding Veeck Weiss S. White Wilkinson G. Wright H. Wright Yawkey

Umpires

Barlick Chylak Conlan Connolly Evans Harvey Hubbard Klem McGowan O'Day

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 21413880 LCCN: n96

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