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Randy Foye (born September 24, 1983) is an American professional basketball player. He played collegiately at Villanova University. He was selected seventh overall in the 2006 NBA draft by the Boston Celtics, but was immediately traded to the Portland Trail Blazers, and later traded to the Minnesota Timberwolves where he began his career.[1]

Contents

1 High school career 2 College career 3 Professional career

3.1 Minnesota Timberwolves (2006–2009) 3.2 Washington Wizards (2009–2010) 3.3 Los Angeles Clippers (2010–2012) 3.4 Utah Jazz (2012–2013) 3.5 Denver Nuggets (2013–2016) 3.6 Oklahoma City Thunder (2016) 3.7 Brooklyn Nets (2016–2017)

4 NBA career statistics

4.1 Regular season 4.2 Playoffs

5 Personal life 6 References 7 External links

High school career[edit] Foye attended East Side High School in Newark, where he was selected as New Jersey Player of the Year, before being recruited by Jay Wright and Villanova.[2] Considered a four-star recruit by Scout.com, Foye was listed as the No. 7 shooting guard and the No. 37 player in the nation in 2002.[3] College career[edit] Foye, along with Allan Ray, Curtis Sumpter, and Jason Fraser were proclaimed as the players to lead the Villanova Wildcats back to a championship. Foye and Ray reached the Elite Eight of the 2006 NCAA Tournament, playing with the other three starters in the four-guard offense (Kyle Lowry, Mike Nardi and Will Sheridan), while Sumpter was sidelined as a medical redshirt with a knee injury. Foye's college career was productive and eventful, but his senior season was by far the best statistically. In the 2005 NCAA Tournament, Foye averaged 20 points in three games, before a heartbreaking loss to #1 seed and eventual national champion North Carolina in which Foye scored a career-high 28 points.[4] He was named third-team all Big East that year. In 2006, Foye won the honor of Big East Player of the Year, beating out teammate Allan Ray, Connecticut star Rudy Gay and the league's leading scorer Quincy Douby of Rutgers. Villanova tied for the Big East regular season championship with Uconn and split their two games with the Huskies, winning the one played at home, in what some called the biggest Villanova win in over 20 years. Their final Big East regular season record was 14–2 in what some called the toughest conference ever.[citation needed] Overall, their record was 28–5. In the NCAA Tournament in 2006, Foye continued to be Villanova's biggest scoring threat. He had 24 points in their second round game against Arizona in a winning effort. Foye scored a team-high 25 points in his final game as a Wildcat, on March 26, 2006, a 75–62 loss to Florida in the Elite Eight.[5] As a senior Foye averaged 20.5 points, 5.9 rebounds, 3.3 assists, 1.4 steals, and 0.6 blocks, with a field goal percentage of 41.1%. Professional career[edit] Minnesota Timberwolves (2006–2009)[edit] On June 28, 2006, Foye was selected seventh overall in the 2006 NBA draft by the Boston Celtics, but was immediately traded to the Portland Trail Blazers, and later traded to the Minnesota Timberwolves.[1] He entered his rookie year on a team that already had six guards on its roster. Off-season free-agent acquisition Mike James was slated to start at point guard, Foye's most likely position in the NBA, with Ricky Davis at small forward and Rashad McCants at shooting guard. This left Foye to battle for minutes on a bench full of guards. In November, Foye's first month as a professional basketball player, Timberwolves coach Dwane Casey only gave Foye an average of 14.6 minutes per game. Foye, however, was productive whenever he was given minutes. He scored in double digits in each of the four games he was given 20 or more minutes of playing time.

Foye as a member of the Washington Wizards

In December 2007, Foye's minutes per game average increased to 19.6 and he scored in double digits in half of the T-Wolves' games. However, after Dwane Casey's firing after the Twolves' 40th game (when they had a record of 20–20), the Twolves struggled, yet the young star played well when given minutes. In March, Foye saw nearly 24 minutes of playing time a night, and in April saw almost 27 minutes a night to perform. Foye played all 82 games (12 starts) in his rookie season and averaged 22.9 minutes, 10.1 points, 2.7 rebounds, 2.8 assists, 0.65 steals, and 0.3 blocks per game. Among rookies, he ranked fifth in scoring (10.1 ppg), eighth in field goal percentage (43.4%), third in 3-point shooting percentage (37%), third in free throw shooting percentage (85%), 5th in assists (2.8 apg) and 9th in steals (0.65 spg).[6] He was one of the most consistent rookie performers and was selected to the NBA All-Rookie First Team.[7] On December 23, 2008, Foye pulled down 16 rebounds to set a career high and break the team record of 15 for a guard set by Isaiah Rider in 1996. Foye also had 26 points and 1 assist in the 99–93 loss to the San Antonio Spurs.[8] Washington Wizards (2009–2010)[edit] On June 23, 2009, Foye, along with Mike Miller, was traded to the Washington Wizards for Oleksiy Pecherov, Etan Thomas, Darius Songaila, and a first round draft pick.[9] On January 9, 2010, Foye was fined $10,000 by the Washington Wizards for participating in Gilbert Arenas' antics before a game on January 5, 2010 against the Philadelphia 76ers. Arenas was being investigated for a prior incident involving guns in the Wizards' locker room, but made light of the accusations by pointing his finger at his teammates, as if he were shooting them. His teammates were photographed smiling and laughing with him.[10] Los Angeles Clippers (2010–2012)[edit]

Foye (center) with DeAndre Jordan (left) and Nick Young (right) in 2011

On July 8, 2010, Foye was signed by the Los Angeles Clippers.[11] Utah Jazz (2012–2013)[edit] On July 25, 2012, Foye agreed to terms with the Utah Jazz.[12] During the one season Foye played for the Jazz, he set the franchise record for most 3-pointers made in a year, making 178 out of 434 shots (with a shooting percentage of 41%).[13] Denver Nuggets (2013–2016)[edit] On July 10, 2013, Foye was traded to the Denver Nuggets as part of a three-team trade involving the Jazz and the Golden State Warriors.[14] On February 3, 2014, Foye hit the first game-winning shot of his eight-year NBA career, making a 30-foot three-pointer as time expired to claim a 116–115 win over the Los Angeles Clippers.[15] On December 23, 2015, Foye scored a season-high 31 points and made seven three-pointers in a 104–96 win over the Phoenix Suns.[16] Oklahoma City Thunder (2016)[edit] On February 18, 2016, Foye was traded to the Oklahoma City Thunder in exchange for D. J. Augustin, Steve Novak, two second-round draft picks and cash considerations.[17] Three days later, he made his debut with the Thunder in a 115–92 loss to the Cleveland Cavaliers, recording two points and one assist in 14 minutes coming off the bench.[18] Brooklyn Nets (2016–2017)[edit] On July 15, 2016, Foye signed with the Brooklyn Nets.[19] He missed the first six games of the 2016–17 season with a strained right hamstring.[20] On December 26, 2016, Foye made a three-pointer to beat the buzzer and give the Nets a 120–118 victory over the Charlotte Hornets.[21] NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend

  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game

 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage

 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game

 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

2006–07 Minnesota 82 12 22.9 .434 .368 .854 2.7 2.8 .6 .3 10.1

2007–08 Minnesota 39 31 32.3 .429 .412 .815 3.3 4.2 .9 .1 13.1

2008–09 Minnesota 70 61 35.6 .407 .360 .846 3.1 4.3 1.0 .4 16.3

2009–10 Washington 70 38 23.8 .414 .346 .890 1.9 3.3 .5 .1 10.1

2010–11 L.A. Clippers 63 24 24.6 .388 .327 .893 1.6 2.7 .7 .3 9.8

2011–12 L.A. Clippers 65 48 25.9 .398 .386 .859 2.1 2.2 .7 .4 11.0

2012–13 Utah 82 72 27.4 .397 .410 .819 1.5 2.0 .8 .3 10.8

2013–14 Denver 81 78 30.7 .413 .380 .849 2.9 3.5 .8 .5 13.2

2014–15 Denver 50 21 21.7 .368 .357 .818 1.7 2.4 .7 .2 8.7

2015–16 Denver 54 7 19.8 .351 .296 .830 1.9 2.1 .5 .3 6.0

2015–16 Oklahoma City 27 1 21.2 .349 .309 .815 1.9 1.8 .5 .5 5.6

2016–17 Brooklyn 70 70 30.2 .373 .382 .857 2.2 2.0 .5 .1 10.2

Career 752 433 25.6 .401 .376 .852 2.2 2.8 .7 .3 10.3

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

2012 L.A. Clippers 11 11 26.5 .392 .438 .846 2.0 1.5 .5 .3 7.5

2016 Oklahoma City 16 0 11.9 .341 .308 1.000 1.3 .8 .1 .2 2.5

Career 27 11 17.8 .374 .379 .882 1.6 1.1 .3 .2 4.6

Personal life[edit] Foye was born with a condition called situs inversus that caused him to be born with his organs reversed, meaning his heart is on the right side of his body and his liver is on the left.[22] Foye has two daughters, Paige Christine Foye and Penny Carter Foye.[23] Due to his inverted organs, Foye featured on a 2015 BBC series called Countdown to Life explaining how his condition was caused. The show stated Foye was lucky to be alive, because his organs are a perfect mirror image of the normal system of human organs. If only a few of his organs had swapped, this could have caused severe disability or death.[24] Foye has also appeared on a PBS documentary 9 Months That Made You which premiered June 29, 2016 discussing his condition.[25] Foye appeared in the sitcom Wingin' It, guest-starring as himself.[26] A resident of Rumson, New Jersey, Foye purchased his home from Bruce Springsteen.[27] References[edit]

^ a b "TRAIL BLAZERS LAND BRANDON ROY AND LAMARCUS ALDRIDGE". NBA.com. June 28, 2006. Retrieved February 27, 2016.  ^ "Randy Foye: Career Stats and Totals". NBA.com. Retrieved March 21, 2006.  ^ "Randy Foye Recruiting Profile". Scout.com. Retrieved March 21, 2006.  ^ "Villanova's spirited surge in closing minutes falls short". ESPN. March 26, 2005. Retrieved March 21, 2006.  ^ "Noah's monster night sends Florida to Final Four". ESPN. March 26, 2006. Retrieved March 26, 2006.  ^ "Randy Foye 2006-07 Game Log". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2016.  ^ "Roy Headlines 2006-07 NBA T-Mobile All-Rookie Team". NBA.com. May 11, 2007. Retrieved February 27, 2016.  ^ "Parker, Spurs send Wolves to 13th straight loss". ESPN. December 24, 2008. Retrieved February 27, 2016.  ^ "Source: Foye, Miller head to Wiz". ESPN. June 24, 2009. Retrieved October 2, 2010.  ^ "Wiz fine Blatche, McGee, Foye, Young". ESPN. January 9, 2010. Retrieved January 9, 2010.  ^ "CLIPPERS SIGN FREE AGENT GUARD RANDY FOYE". NBA.com. July 8, 2010. Retrieved July 9, 2010.  ^ "Jazz Agrees to Terms with Guard Randy Foye". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. July 25, 2012. Retrieved July 25, 2012.  ^ "Randy Foye 2012-13 Game Log". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2016.  ^ "Denver Nuggets Acquire Randy Foye In Three-Team Trade". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. July 10, 2013. Retrieved July 14, 2013.  ^ "Notebook: Nuggets 116, Clippers 115". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. February 3, 2014. Retrieved April 9, 2016.  ^ "Foye scores 31 points, Nuggets bounce back to beat Suns". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. December 23, 2015. Retrieved December 23, 2015.  ^ "Thunder Acquires Randy Foye". NBA.com. February 18, 2016. Retrieved February 18, 2016.  ^ "Love scores 29, leads Cavaliers past Thunder 115-92". NBA.com. February 21, 2016. Retrieved February 27, 2016.  ^ "Brooklyn Nets Sign Randy Foye". NBA.com. July 15, 2016. Retrieved July 15, 2016.  ^ "Nets keep Wolves winless on the road with 119-110 win". ESPN.com. November 8, 2016. Retrieved November 9, 2016.  ^ "Randy Foye's 3 gives Nets 120-118 victory over Hornets". ESPN.com. December 26, 2016. Retrieved December 27, 2016.  ^ Mascaro, Chris (October 4, 2013). "Nuggets guard Randy Foye's heart is in the wrong place -- literally". SI.com. Retrieved December 23, 2015.  ^ "Randy Foye Stats, Video, Bio, Profile". NBA.com. Retrieved December 23, 2015.  ^ Mount, Harry (September 14, 2015). "Countdown to Life: the Extraordinary Making of You, review: 'gripping'". Telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved September 14, 2015.  ^ "9 Months That Made You". PBS. June 29, 2016. Retrieved July 4, 2017.  ^ "Wingin' It with Foye". YouTube.com. May 24, 2010. Retrieved September 14, 2015.  ^ Hyman, Vicki. "Bruce Springsteen selling Rumson home to NBA's Randy Foye for $1.7M", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, May 11, 2016. Accessed February 28, 2018. "Bruce Springsteen has sold off one of his Rumson homes to Newark native and NBA player Randy Foye for $1.737 million, according to Monmouth County records and Zillow.com."

External links[edit]

Career statistics and player information from NBA.com, or Basketball-Reference.com My Amazing Journey – Randy Foye

Links to related articles

v t e

2006 NBA draft

First round

Andrea Bargnani LaMarcus Aldridge Adam Morrison Tyrus Thomas Shelden Williams Brandon Roy Randy Foye Rudy Gay Patrick O'Bryant Mouhamed Sene J. J. Redick Hilton Armstrong Thabo Sefolosha Ronnie Brewer Cedric Simmons Rodney Carney Shawne Williams Oleksiy Pecherov Quincy Douby Renaldo Balkman Rajon Rondo Marcus Williams Josh Boone Kyle Lowry Shannon Brown Jordan Farmar Sergio Rodríguez Maurice Ager Mardy Collins Joel Freeland

Second round

James White Steve Novak Solomon Jones Paul Davis P. J. Tucker Craig Smith Bobby Jones Kosta Perović David Noel Denham Brown James Augustine Daniel Gibson Marcus Vinicius Lior Eliyahu Alexander Johnson Dee Brown Paul Millsap Vladimir Veremeenko Leon Powe Ryan Hollins Cheikh Samb Guillermo Diaz Yotam Halperin Hassan Adams Ejike Ugboaja Edin Bavčić Loukas Mavrokefalidis J. R. Pinnock Damir Markota Will Blalock

v t e

2006 NCAA Men's Basketball Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Randy Foye Adam Morrison J. J. Redick Brandon Roy Shelden Williams

Second Team

Dee Brown Rodney Carney Rudy Gay Tyler Hansbrough Leon Powe Allan Ray P. J. Tucker

v t e

Robert V. Geasey Trophy winners

1956: Rodgers 1957: Rodgers 1958: Rodgers 1959: Spratt 1960: Kennedy 1961: Drysdale 1962: White 1963: W. Jones & Lynam 1964: Courtin & W. Jones 1965: Washington 1966: Melchionni 1967: Anderson 1968: J. Jones 1969: Durrett & Porter 1970: Durrett 1971: Durrett 1972: Calhoun & Ford 1973: Ingelsby 1974: Haigler 1975: Haigler 1976: Wise 1977: McDonald 1978: Brooks 1979: Price & Reed 1980: Brooks 1981: Pinone 1982: Clark & Pinone 1983: Pinone & Stansbury 1984: Lewis 1985: Pinckney 1986: Pressley 1987: Blackwell 1988: Simmons 1989: Simmons 1990: Simmons 1991: Macon 1992: Woods 1993: McKie 1994: E. Jones 1995: Kittles 1996: Kittles 1997: Bey 1998: Bey 1999: Sánchez 2000: Sánchez 2001: O'Connor 2002: Greer 2003: Nelson 2004: Nelson 2005: Carroll 2006: Foye 2007: Jaaber 2008: Calathes & Tyndale 2009: Nivins 2010: Reynolds 2011: Allen 2012: Rosen 2013: Wyatt 2014: Bell 2015: Hilliard 2016: Bembry 2017: Hart

v t e

Big East Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

1980: Duren 1981: Bagley 1982: Callandrillo 1983: Mullin 1984: Ewing & Mullin 1985: Ewing & Mullin 1986: Berry 1987: Williams 1988: C. D. Smith 1989: C. E. Smith 1990: Coleman 1991: Owens 1992: Mourning 1993: Dehere 1994: Marshall 1995: Kittles 1996: Allen 1997: Garrity 1998: Hamilton 1999: Hamilton & James 2000: Murphy 2001: Bell & Murphy 2002: Butler & Knight 2003: Bell 2004: Okafor 2005: Warrick 2006: Foye 2007: Green 2008: Harangody 2009: Blair & Thabeet 2010: Johnson 2011: Hansbrough 2012: Crowder 2013: Porter 2014: McDermott 2015: Arcidiacono & Dunn 2016: Dunn 2017:

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