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The Info List - Randall Cunningham


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Randall Wade Cunningham (born March 27, 1963) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League
National Football League
(NFL). He played in the NFL for 16 seasons, primarily with the Philadelphia Eagles. Cunningham is also known for his tenure with the Minnesota Vikings. He is the younger brother of former college and professional football player Sam Cunningham
Sam Cunningham
and the father of Randall Cunningham II and world champion high jumper Vashti Cunningham. Cunningham was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame
College Football Hall of Fame
in 2016. After playing college football at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Cunningham was selected in the second round of the 1985 NFL Draft by the Eagles, with whom he remained through the 1995 season. Following 11 seasons with the team, he announced his retirement from football, but returned after a year away from the game to join the Vikings. In 1998, Cunningham enjoyed the strongest season of his career and helped the team set the NFL record for most points in a regular season at the time, although the Vikings would be upset in the NFC Championship Game. He was released by the Vikings following the 1999 season after failing to match his success during the previous year. In his final two seasons, he played for the Dallas Cowboys
Dallas Cowboys
and the Baltimore Ravens for one year each, primarily as a backup. Upon retiring for a second and final time, Cunningam became an ordained Protestant
Protestant
minister and a coach at Silverado High School.

Contents

1 High school and college 2 Professional career

2.1 Philadelphia Eagles 2.2 Minnesota Vikings 2.3 Dallas Cowboys 2.4 Baltimore Ravens

3 NFL career statistics 4 After retirement 5 References 6 External links

High school and college[edit] Cunningham was born in Santa Barbara, California, in 1963. He attended Santa Barbara High School, and was a graduate of the class of 1981.[1]As a senior, he led his team to a League title and the CIF Finals.[2] He also competed in track and field at SBHS in the high jump, his big brother was the state champion in the shot put.[3] He then went on to attend the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
University of Nevada, Las Vegas
(UNLV). He was a 1983 and 1984 College Football All-America Team selection as a punter. In 1984, his senior year, he led the UNLV Rebels
UNLV Rebels
to an 11–2 season—still the school's only 10-win season ever—however this was adjusted to 0–13 when it was found out several players were ineligible.[4] Professional career[edit] Philadelphia Eagles[edit] Cunningham was the Eagles' second-round pick in the 1985 NFL Draft. Cunningham was also sought by the United States Football League's Tampa Bay Bandits
Tampa Bay Bandits
that same year. Eagles owner Norman Braman refused to negotiate with Cunningham if he accepted offers from the Bandits. Ultimately, the USFL folded, thus ending that issue. In his rookie season he played sparingly as a backup to veteran Ron Jaworski
Ron Jaworski
but made a big splash with his uncanny scrambling ability, though he completed just 34 percent of his passes and threw just one touchdown against eight interceptions. In 1986, new head coach Buddy Ryan arrived in Philadelphia and made wholesale changes, many of them unorthodox, mostly due to his defensive-minded philosophy. At the quarterback position, Ryan designated 35-year-old Ron Jaworski
Ron Jaworski
the starter but would replace the aging veteran with the fleet-footed Cunningham in third-and-long situations where the youngster’s scrambling would presumably put the defense on its heels. After a hand injury to Jaworski in week 10, Cunningham would replace him as the Eagles’ starter. Despite his limited service and speed, the Eagles' porous offensive line allowed him to be sacked a franchise record 72 times that season. Cunningham was permanently handed the Eagles' starting job for the 1987 season. Cunningham was said to have reached "elite" status during the 1988 season, as he was elected by league players as the NFC starting quarterback for the AFC-NFC Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl
(the first black quarterback to ever be elected a starter). That same year, he combined with fellow Eagle Pro Bowler Reggie White
Reggie White
to lead the Eagles to the NFC Eastern Division Championship. In the 1988 Divisional Playoffs, Cunningham threw 54 passes for 407 yards during the "Fog Bowl" 20–12 loss against the Chicago Bears, both of which remain playoff franchise records. Unfortunately, he also shares the franchise record with 3 interceptions in that same game.[5] In the subsequent Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl
a few weeks later, Cunningham was named game MVP as the NFC defeated the AFC, 28–3. In 1989, on October 2 Cunningham also set the regular season franchise record with 62 pass attempts (now shared with Nick Foles), also against the Chicago Bears. He had been an all-conference quarterback and punter while at UNLV, and unleashed a 91-yard punt against the Giants on December 3, the longest in Eagles history (and the fourth-longest ever).[6] He had 20 punts during his career, with an average of 44.7 yards per punt.[7] In a 1990 game against the Buffalo Bills, Cunningham, throwing from his end zone, was about to be sacked by Bruce Smith from his blind side. Cunningham ducked and threw a pass 60 yards to wide receiver Fred Barnett, resulting in a 95-yard touchdown. That same year, Cunningham finished with 942 rushing yards, 3rd most ever for a quarterback, 10th best in the league. He averaged 8.0 yards per rush, the most ever by an Eagle of any position with 100 attempts on the season, and third most in NFL history.[8] In 1991, Cunningham's season came to an abrupt end when he was tackled by Bryce Paup of the Green Bay Packers
Green Bay Packers
and tore his anterior cruciate ligament in the first game of the season. He would return to the Eagles completely healed the following season, and led the team to its first playoff victory in 12 years. However, it was evident that the injury he suffered took away much of his speed and athleticism. The 1993 and 1994 seasons would be riddled by a series of nagging injuries and a transition to the West Coast Offense that eventually led to his benching in favor of veteran Rodney Peete. Feeling as if the fans and organization did not fully appreciate his contributions to the team's success, as well as being unhappy with his role as a back-up, Cunningham retired from football after the 1995 season. He left Philadelphia with the third most rushing yards in Eagles history, with 4,482, behind Hall of Famer Steve Van Buren
Steve Van Buren
and Wilbert Montgomery, although he has since fallen to sixth after Duce Staley, Brian Westbrook, and LeSean McCoy
LeSean McCoy
all rushed for more yards than him. He also left second only to Ron Jaworski
Ron Jaworski
in passing yards, with 22,877, though both were later surpassed by Donovan McNabb. He still holds the Eagles record with 6.62 yards per rush attempt, 422 sacks taken, and 6.5 yards per pass attempt in playoff games. Minnesota Vikings[edit] Cunningham joined the Vikings in 1997 after being out of football in 1996. Vikings' coach Dennis Green called him when he was on a job site for his granite business. There he reunited with former Eagles wide receiver Cris Carter. In his first year with the Vikings, he orchestrated two late scoring drives to bring them back from a 9-point deficit to defeat the New York Giants
New York Giants
in an NFC Wild Card game at Giants Stadium, 23–22. However, the Vikings lost in the Divisional Round to Steve Young
Steve Young
and the San Francisco 49ers. Cunningham enjoyed the greatest season of his career in Minnesota during the 1998 campaign when he guided the Vikings to a 15–1 regular season record with 34 touchdown passes, only 10 interceptions, and 3,704 passing yards. Cunningham had a good supporting cast that year with Cris Carter, rookie Randy Moss, and Jake Reed at wide receiver and Robert Smith and Leroy Hoard at running back. Cunningham led the league with a 106.0 passer rating while the Vikings scored a then-NFL record 556 points during the 1998 season, making him the first black quarterback to lead the league in that category.[citation needed] Cunningham claimed the Vikings' Monday night 37–24 victory over the Green Bay Packers
Green Bay Packers
was "the greatest night of my football career".[9] He threw for 442 yards and four touchdowns. However, the Vikings ended up being the first 15–1 team to fall short of the Super Bowl, losing to the underdog Atlanta Falcons
Atlanta Falcons
in the conference championship game by a field goal. During the early stages of the 1999 season, after throwing nine interceptions in just six games, Cunningham was benched again, this time in favor of Jeff George. After the team announced that second-year quarterback Daunte Culpepper
Daunte Culpepper
would be the starter prior to the 2000 season, Cunningham was released. Dallas Cowboys[edit] Shortly before the 2000 season, Cunningham signed with the Dallas Cowboys to serve as backup to Troy Aikman. After a series of concussions ended Aikman's season, and ultimately his career, Cunningham again took the helm at quarterback. Despite posting a 1–2 record as a starter, he put up respectable numbers (849 yards passing with 6 touchdowns and 4 interceptions). One notable occurrence during his time with the Cowboys was a return to Philadelphia. Cunningham started the game and dueled the new Eagles quarterback, Donovan McNabb. The game was decided in overtime, with an Eagles field goal giving them the 16–13 victory. He received a mixed reception of cheers and boos upon his return to Philadelphia. A 5–11 subpar year for the Cowboys led to major roster changes, and Cunningham was one of the many changes. At the end of the season, he reached incentive clauses that voided his contract and made him an unrestricted free agent. He was not re-signed, after the Cowboys signed quarterback Tony Banks instead. Baltimore Ravens[edit] On May 29, 2001, he was signed by the Baltimore Ravens, reuniting with head coach Brian Billick, who was his offensive coordinator with the Minnesota Vikings. Cunningham was originally intended to serve as the third-string quarterback, but he was named the backup behind Elvis Grbac after performing better than Chris Redman. He went 2–0 as a starter. He was not re-signed, after the Ravens signed quarterback Jeff Blake instead. On August 15, 2002, Cunningham signed a one-day contract with the Philadelphia Eagles
Philadelphia Eagles
to officially announce his retirement. In his final 10 NFL seasons, Cunningham played in only 80 games, but finished his 16-year career completing 2,429 of his 4,289 attempts for 29,997 yards and 207 touchdowns, with 134 interceptions. He was sacked 484 times, third-most all time behind (2nd) John Elway
John Elway
with 516 sacks, and (1st) Brett Favre
Brett Favre
with 525 sacks. Cunningham also rushed for 4,928 yards on 775 carries and 35 touchdowns. He retired after the 2001 season as the NFL's all-time leader in rushing yards and carries for the quarterback position, (a record broken in 2011 by Michael Vick), and tied for fourth with Steve Grogan in rushing touchdowns by a QB. Cunningham also averaged 30.6 rushing yards per game during his career—second most all-time for quarterbacks, behind Michael Vick. NFL career statistics[edit]

Legend

Led the league

NFL record

Bold Career high

Year Team Games Passing Rushing Sacked Fumbles

G GS Cmp Att Pct Yds Y/A TD Int Rtg Att Yds Avg TD Sck YdsL Fum FumL

1985 PHI 6 4 34 81 42.0 548 6.8 1 8 29.8 29 205 7.1 0 20 150 - -

1986 PHI 15 5 111 209 53.1 1,391 6.7 8 7 72.9 66 540 8.2 5 72 489 - -

1987 PHI 12 12 223 406 54.9 2,786 6.9 23 12 83.0 76 505 6.6 3 54 380 - -

1988 PHI 16 16 301 560 53.8 3,808 6.8 24 16 77.6 93 624 6.7 6 57 442 - -

1989 PHI 16 16 290 532 54.5 3,400 6.4 21 15 75.5 104 621 6.0 4 45 343 - -

1990 PHI 16 16 271 465 58.3 3,466 7.5 30 13 91.6 118 942 8.0 5 49 431 - -

1991 PHI 1 1 1 4 25.0 19 4.8 0 0 46.9 0 0 0 0 2 16 - -

1992 PHI 15 15 233 384 60.7 2,775 7.2 19 11 87.3 87 594 6.3 5 60 437 13 8

1993 PHI 4 4 76 110 69.1 850 7.7 5 5 88.1 18 110 6.1 1 7 33 3 2

1994 PHI 14 14 265 490 54.1 3,229 6.6 16 13 74.4 65 288 4.4 3 43 333 10 3

1995 PHI 7 4 69 121 57.0 605 5.0 3 5 61.5 21 98 4.7 0 13 79 3 2

1997 MIN 6 3 44 88 50.0 501 5.7 6 4 71.3 19 127 6.7 0 7 60 4 1

1998 MIN 15 14 259 425 60.9 3,704 8.7 34 10 106.0 32 132 4.1 1 20 132 2 1

1999 MIN 6 6 124 200 62.0 1,475 7.4 8 9 79.6 10 58 5.8 0 15 101 2 2

2000 DAL 6 3 74 125 59.2 849 6.8 6 4 82.4 23 89 3.9 1 8 45 4 1

2001 BAL 6 2 54 89 60.7 573 6.4 3 2 81.3 14 40 2.9 1 12 66 4 0

Career 161 135 2,429 4,289 56.6 29,979 7.0 207 134 81.5 775 4,928 6.4 35 484 3,537 45 20

After retirement[edit] After retirement, Cunningham returned to UNLV to finish his college degree in Leisure studies. Cunningham has also been active in the Gospel music business since his retirement from the NFL by opening a recording studio and producing a Christian worship music. Cunningham, a born again Christian, became an ordained Protestant
Protestant
minister and founded a church called Remnant Ministries in Las Vegas in 2004.[10] In December 2009 Cunningham was hired by Silverado High School in Henderson, Nevada
Henderson, Nevada
as the offensive coordinator of the school's varsity and junior varsity football team. His son, Randall Cunningham II, was a freshman quarterback for the Skyhawks.[11] On June 29, 2010, one of Cunningham's children, two-year-old son Christian, drowned in a hot tub while unattended at the family home in Las Vegas.[12][13] In August 2011, following a rumored spat with Silverado's head coach, Cunningham resigned his coaching position at SHS. His son, Randall Jr, withdrew from SHS and registered the same day at Bishop Gorman High School, a private Roman Catholic school in Las Vegas.[14] In July 2012, Cunningham was named the 23rd greatest quarterback of the NFL's post-merger era, according to Football Nation.[15] In March 2013, Cunningham authored Lay It Down: How Letting Go Brings Out Your Best (Worthy Publishing, ISBN 9781617951275). The book shows readers how to work out the “lay it down” principle in all phases of life.[16] In December 2014, Cunningham was named head coach at Silverado High School.[17] In his rookie season as head coach, he and his staff turned the football program around from a previous record of 3–7 to a 2015 record of 7–4. The team recorded its first playoff victory since the year 2007. He helped coach two National All-Americans who were chosen to participate in the Blue-Grey All-American Bowl games.[citation needed] References[edit]

^ "Santa Barbara High School". Archived from the original on 2007-09-15. Retrieved 2007-11-17.  ^ " Randall Cunningham practices with Santa Barbara High". Archived from the original on September 8, 2008. Retrieved 2007-11-17.  ^ http://lynbrooksports.prepcaltrack.com/ATHLETICS/TRACK/stateres.htm ^ "Members of UNLV's 1984 football team converge for reunion". Retrieved 2014-08-30.  ^ Three interceptions in a single playoff game, record shared with Ron Jaworski and Donavan McNabb
Donavan McNabb
(who did it twice). ^ "Where are they now? Randall Cunningham". Retrieved 2008-12-17.  ^ "Career Stats-NFL.com". Retrieved 2008-12-17.  ^ Third to Michael Vick's 8.45 yards/rush in 2006, and Beattie Feathers' 8.44 in 1934. Jim Brown
Jim Brown
holds the record for rushers with over 200 carries in a season, with 6.40 in 1963. ^ Freeman, Mike (6 October 1998). "PRO FOOTBALL; Big Plays, Big Victory For Vikings". The New York Times. Retrieved 20 February 2017.  ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2007-03-06. Retrieved 2006-11-28.  ^ Keefer, Case (December 14, 2009). "Silverado hires Randall Cunningham as offensive coordinator". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved December 15, 2009.  ^ "Randall Cunningham's son dies in hot tub accident". USA Today. June 30, 2010.  ^ Koster, Kyle (June 30, 2010). "Randall Cunningham's 2-year-old son drowns in hot tub". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on July 3, 2010.  ^ "Cunningham resigns as Silverado aide". Nevada Preps. August 17, 2011.  ^ "Top 100 Modern Quarterbacks: 40-21". Football Nation. July 26, 2012. Archived from the original on October 30, 2012.  ^ [1] ^ "Ray Brewer" (December 29, 2014). "Silverado High hires NFL great Randall Cunningham"". Las Vegas Sun. 

External links[edit]

Career statistics and player information from NFL.com • ESPN • CBS Sports • Yahoo! Sports • Pro-Football-Reference

Randall Cunningham—awards and honors

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UNLV Rebels
UNLV Rebels
starting quarterbacks

Glenn Carano (1974–1976) Greg Van Ness (1977) Doug Robertson (1978) Sam King (1979, 1981) Larry Gentry (1980) Randall Cunningham (1982–1984) Steve Stallworth (1985–1986) Scott Sims (1987) Charles Price (1988) Derek Stott (1989–1991) John Ma'ae (1992) Bob Stockham (1993) Jason Davis (1994) Jared Brown (1995) Jon Denton (1996–1997) Kevin Cook (1998) Jason Vaughn (1999) Jason Thomas (2000–2002) Kurt Nantkes (2003–2004) Shane Steichen (2005) Rocky Hinds (2006) Travis Dixon (2007) Omar Clayton
Omar Clayton
(2007–2010) Caleb Herring (2011–2013) Nick Sherry (2012–2013) Blake Decker (2014–2015) Kurt Palandech (2015–2016) Johnny Stanton (2016–2017) Dalton Sneed (2016) Armani Rogers (2017)

v t e

Philadelphia Eagles
Philadelphia Eagles
1985 NFL draft selections

Kevin Allen Randall Cunningham Greg Naron Dwayne Jiles Ken Reeves Tom Polley Dave Toub Joe Drake Mark Kelso Herman Hunter Todd Russell

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Philadelphia Eagles
Philadelphia Eagles
starting quarterbacks

Red Kirkman (1933–1935) Jim Leonard (1934, 1936) Stumpy Thomason
Stumpy Thomason
(1935) Irv Kupcinet
Irv Kupcinet
(1935) Glenn Frey (1936–1937) Jess Dow (1938–1939) Davey O'Brien
Davey O'Brien
(1939–1940) Len Barnum
Len Barnum
(1941) Tommy Thompson (1941–1942, 1946–1950) Foster Watkins (1941) Roy Zimmerman (1943–1946) Allie Sherman (1945) Bill Mackrides (1948) Jack Myers (1948) Adrian Burk
Adrian Burk
(1951–1956) Bobby Thomason
Bobby Thomason
(1952–1957) Sonny Jurgensen
Sonny Jurgensen
(1957, 1961–1963) Norm Van Brocklin
Norm Van Brocklin
(1958–1960) King Hill (1962–1966, 1968) Norm Snead (1964–1970) Jack Concannon
Jack Concannon
(1964, 1966) John Huarte (1968) George Mira
George Mira
(1969) Rick Arrington (1970–1971) Pete Liske (1971–1972) John Reaves (1972) Roman Gabriel (1973–1976) Mike Boryla (1974–1976) Ron Jaworski
Ron Jaworski
(1977–1986) Joe Pisarcik (1984) Randall Cunningham (1985–1995) Matt Cavanaugh
Matt Cavanaugh
(1986) Scott Tinsley (1987) Guido Merkens (1987) Jim McMahon
Jim McMahon
(1991–1992) Jeff Kemp (1991) Brad Goebel (1991) Bubby Brister (1993–1994) Ken O'Brien (1993) Rodney Peete
Rodney Peete
(1995–1998) Ty Detmer
Ty Detmer
(1996–1997) Bobby Hoying (1997–1998) Koy Detmer
Koy Detmer
(1998–1999, 2002, 2004) Doug Pederson
Doug Pederson
(1999) Donovan McNabb
Donovan McNabb
(1999–2009) A. J. Feeley
A. J. Feeley
(2002, 2007) Mike McMahon (2005) Jeff Garcia
Jeff Garcia
(2006) Kevin Kolb
Kevin Kolb
(2009–2010) Michael Vick
Michael Vick
(2010–2013) Vince Young
Vince Young
(2011) Nick Foles
Nick Foles
(2012–2014, 2017–present) Mark Sanchez
Mark Sanchez
(2014–2015) Sam Bradford
Sam Bradford
(2015) Carson Wentz
Carson Wentz
(2016–2017)

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Minnesota Vikings
Minnesota Vikings
starting quarterbacks

George Shaw (1961) Fran Tarkenton
Fran Tarkenton
(1961–1966, 1972–1978) Ron Vander Kelen
Ron Vander Kelen
(1963, 1966–1967) Bob Berry (1966, 1974) Joe Kapp
Joe Kapp
(1967–1969) Gary Cuozzo (1969–1971) Bob Lee (1970–1971, 1976–1977) Norm Snead (1971) Tommy Kramer
Tommy Kramer
(1977, 1979–1989) Steve Dils (1980–1981, 1983) Wade Wilson (1983–1991) Archie Manning
Archie Manning
(1984) Tony Adams (1987) Rich Gannon
Rich Gannon
(1990–1992) Sean Salisbury (1992–1994) Jim McMahon
Jim McMahon
(1993) Warren Moon
Warren Moon
(1994–1996) Brad Johnson (1996–1998, 2005–2006) Randall Cunningham (1997–1999) Jeff George (1999) Daunte Culpepper
Daunte Culpepper
(2000–2005) Todd Bouman
Todd Bouman
(2001) Spergon Wynn (2001) Gus Frerotte
Gus Frerotte
(2003, 2008) Tarvaris Jackson
Tarvaris Jackson
(2006–2008, 2010) Kelly Holcomb (2007) Brooks Bollinger
Brooks Bollinger
(2007) Brett Favre
Brett Favre
(2009–2010) Joe Webb
Joe Webb
(2010) Donovan McNabb
Donovan McNabb
(2011) Christian Ponder
Christian Ponder
(2011–2014) Matt Cassel
Matt Cassel
(2013–2014) Josh Freeman
Josh Freeman
(2013) Teddy Bridgewater
Teddy Bridgewater
(2014–2015) Shaun Hill
Shaun Hill
(2016) Sam Bradford
Sam Bradford
(2016–2017) Case Keenum
Case Keenum
(2017)

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Dallas Cowboys
Dallas Cowboys
starting quarterbacks

Eddie LeBaron
Eddie LeBaron
(1960–1963) Don Meredith
Don Meredith
(1960–1968) Don Heinrich
Don Heinrich
(1960) John Roach (1964) Jerry Rhome (1965–1966) Craig Morton (1965, 1967–1972) Roger Staubach
Roger Staubach
(1969–1971, 1973–1979) Clint Longley (1975) Danny White (1978, 1980–1987) Glenn Carano (1981) Gary Hogeboom (1984–1985) Steve Pelluer (1986–1988) Reggie Collier (1986) Kevin Sweeney (1987–1988) Troy Aikman
Troy Aikman
(1989–2000) Steve Walsh (1989) Babe Laufenberg
Babe Laufenberg
(1990) Steve Beuerlein (1991) Bernie Kosar
Bernie Kosar
(1993) Jason Garrett
Jason Garrett
(1993–1994, 1998–1999) Rodney Peete
Rodney Peete
(1994) Wade Wilson (1996) Randall Cunningham (2000) Anthony Wright (2000–2001) Quincy Carter (2001–2003) Ryan Leaf (2001) Clint Stoerner (2001) Chad Hutchinson (2002) Vinny Testaverde
Vinny Testaverde
(2004) Drew Henson
Drew Henson
(2004) Drew Bledsoe
Drew Bledsoe
(2005–2006) Tony Romo
Tony Romo
(2006–2015) Brad Johnson (2008) Jon Kitna
Jon Kitna
(2010) Stephen McGee
Stephen McGee
(2010) Kyle Orton
Kyle Orton
(2013) Brandon Weeden
Brandon Weeden
(2014–2015) Matt Cassel
Matt Cassel
(2015) Kellen Moore
Kellen Moore
(2015) Dak Prescott
Dak Prescott
(2016–present)

v t e

Baltimore Ravens
Baltimore Ravens
starting quarterbacks

Vinny Testaverde
Vinny Testaverde
(1996–1997) Eric Zeier
Eric Zeier
(1997–1998) Jim Harbaugh
Jim Harbaugh
(1998) Scott Mitchell (1999) Stoney Case (1999) Tony Banks (1999–2000) Trent Dilfer
Trent Dilfer
(2000) Elvis Grbac
Elvis Grbac
(2001) Randall Cunningham (2001) Chris Redman
Chris Redman
(2002) Jeff Blake (2002) Kyle Boller
Kyle Boller
(2003–2005, 2007) Anthony Wright (2003, 2005) Steve McNair
Steve McNair
(2006–2007) Troy Smith
Troy Smith
(2007) Joe Flacco
Joe Flacco
(2008–present) Matt Schaub
Matt Schaub
(2015) Jimmy Clausen
Jimmy Clausen
(2015) Ryan Mallett
Ryan Mallett
(2015)

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Bert Bell Award winners

1959: Unitas 1960: Van Brocklin 1961: Hornung 1962: Robustelli 1963: J. Brown 1964: Unitas 1965: Retzlaff 1966: Meredith 1967: Unitas 1968: Kelly 1969: Gabriel 1970: Blanda 1971: Staubach 1972: L. Brown 1973: Simpson 1974: Olsen 1975: Tarkenton 1976: Stabler 1977: Griese 1978: Bradshaw 1979: Campbell 1980: Jaworski 1981: Anderson 1982: Theismann 1983: Riggins 1984: Marino 1985: Payton 1986: Taylor 1987: Rice 1988: Cunningham 1989: Montana 1990: Cunningham 1991: Sanders 1992: Young 1993: Smith 1994: Young 1995: Favre 1996: Favre 1997: Sanders 1998: Cunningham 1999: Warner 2000: Gannon 2001: Faulk 2002: Gannon 2003: Manning 2004: Manning 2005: Alexander 2006: Tomlinson 2007: Brady 2008: Peterson 2009: Brees 2010: Vick 2011: Rodgers 2012: Peterson 2013: Manning 2014: Watt 2015: Newton 2016: Ryan 2017: Wentz

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PFW/PFWA NFL Comeback Player of the Year Award

1972: Morrall 1973: Gabriel 1974: Namath 1975: Hampton 1976: Landry 1977: Morton 1978: Riggins 1979: Csonka 1980: Plunkett 1981: Anderson 1982: Alzado 1983: B. Johnson 1984: Stallworth 1985: No Selection 1986: Montana & Kramer 1987: White 1988: Bell 1989: Anderson 1990: Word 1991: McMahon 1992: Cunningham 1993: Allen 1994: Marino 1995: Harbaugh 1996: Bettis 1997: Brooks 1998: Flutie 1999: Young 2000: J. Johnson 2001: Hearst 2002: Maddox 2003: Kitna 2004: McGahee 2005: Smith 2006: Pennington 2007: Moss 2008: Pennington 2009: Brady 2010: Vick 2011: Stafford 2012: Peterson 2013: Rivers 2014: Gronkowski 2015: Berry 2016: Nelson 2017: Allen

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Eagles Hall of Fame inductees

1987 Chuck Bednarik Bert Bell Harold Carmichael Bill Hewitt Sonny Jurgensen Wilbert Montgomery Earle "Greasy" Neale Pete Pihos Ollie Matson Jim Ringo Norm Van Brocklin Steve Van Buren Alex Wojciechowicz 1988 Bill Bergey Tommy McDonald 1989 Tom Brookshier Pete Retzlaff 1990 Timmy Brown 1991 Jerry Sisemore Stan Walters 1992 Ron Jaworski 1993 Bill Bradley 1994 Dick Vermeil 1995 Jim Gallagher Mike Quick 1996 Jerome Brown 1999 Otho Davis 1948 and 1949 NFL Championship teams 2004 Bob Brown 2005 Reggie White 2009 Randall Cunningham Al Wistert 2011 Eric Allen Jim Johnson 2012 Leo Carlin Brian Dawkins Troy Vincent 2013 Donovan McNabb 2015 Brian Westbrook Maxie Baughan

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NFL on TNT

Related programs

College Football on TBS NBC Sunday Night Football ESPN Sunday Night Football

Related articles

NFL on television (history) Results (1990-1997) 1982 NFLPA "all-star games"

Commentators

Play-by-play

Skip Caray
Skip Caray
(1990–1991) Gary Bender (1992–1994) Verne Lundquist
Verne Lundquist
(1995–1997)

Color commentary

Pat Haden
Pat Haden
(1990–1997) Mark May
Mark May
(1997)

Sideline reporters

Craig Sager
Craig Sager
(1990–1997) Bryan Burwell (1997)

Studio hosts

Ernie Johnson (1990–1994) Vince Cellini (1995–1997)

Studio analysts

Lawrence Taylor
Lawrence Taylor
(1994) Warren Moon
Warren Moon
(1995) Mark May
Mark May
(1995–1996) Randall Cunningham (1996) Keith Jackson (1997)

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