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The Pontiac Bonneville is an automobile built by Pontiac from 1957 to 2005. Bonnevilles were full-sized, with the exception of a brief period of mid-size between 1982–1986. The brand was introduced as a limited production performance convertible during the 1957 model year. The Bonneville (known as the Parisienne in Canada until 1981), and its platform partner, the Grand Ville, are some of the largest Pontiacs ever built; in station wagon body styles they reached just over 230 inches (5.8 m) long, and at 5,000 pounds (2,300 kg) and more were also some of the heaviest cars produced at the time. They were also available as hearses.

Early development

1957 Pontiac Star Chief Custom Bonneville convertible

The Bonneville name first appeared in 1954 on a pair of bubble-topped GM Motorama concept cars called the Bonneville Special, sharing an appearance with the Chevrolet Corvette.

It entered the production lineup as a high-performance, fuel-injected luxury convertible version of the Star Chief in 1957, and was loaded with every available option as standard equipment with the exception of air conditioning and a continental kit.[1] This put the Bonneville in a Cadillac-like price range of $5,782.00 - more than double the base price of the Chieftain on which it was built, with the result being a fully equipped Bonneville could cost more than a larger, entry-level Cadillac. Only 630 units were produced that first year, making it one of the most collectible Pontiacs of all time. The following year it became a separate model, and it would endure until 2005 as the division's top-of-the-line model. The name was taken from the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah, the site of much early auto racing and most of the world's land speed record runs, which was named in turn after U.S. Army officer Benjamin Bonneville.

First generation (1958)

First generation
1958 Pontiac Bonneville photo2.JPG
1958 Pontiac Bonneville Sport Coupe
Overview
Model years1958
Body and chassis
Body style2-door convertible
2-door hardtop
LayoutFR layout
PlatformB-body
Powertrain
Engine370CID Tempest 395 255hp 4-bbl V8
370CID Tempest 395 300 hp "Tri-Power" V8
370CID Tempest 395 Fuel Injection 310 hp V8[2]
Transmission3-speed manual
Super Hydra-Matic
Dimensions
Wheelbase122 in (3,099 mm)[2]
Length211.7 in (5,377 mm)
Width77.4 in (1,966 mm)[2]

Bonneville became a separate model in 1958,[3] available as a two-door hardtop or a convertible. It paced the Indianapolis 500 in its first year. As a separate model Bonneville had a significantly lower price tag of around $3,000 thanks to the demotion of most of the luxury items found on the 1957 Star Chief bodystyle from standard equipment to the option list. Also a 300 horsepower (220 kW) 370 cubic inches (6,100 cc) V8 with four-barrel carburetor and dual exhausts was now standard equipment. The fuel-injection system offered with the standard engine on the 1957 Star Chief bodystyle was now listed as an extra cost option but very few 1958 Bonnevilles were so equipped due to a towering option price tag of US$500, which was not considered a very good value considering that for US$93.50, a more reliable Tri-Po

The Bonneville name first appeared in 1954 on a pair of bubble-topped GM Motorama concept cars called the Bonneville Special, sharing an appearance with the Chevrolet Corvette.

It entered the production lineup as a high-performance, fuel-injected luxury convertible version of the Star Chief in 1957, and was loaded with every available option as standard equipment with the exception of air conditioning and a continental kit.[1] This put the Bonneville in a Cadillac-like price range of $5,782.00 - more than double the base price of the Chieftain on which it was built, with the result being a fully equipped Bonneville could cost more than a larger, entry-level Cadillac. Only 630 units were produced that first year, making it one of the most collectible Pontiacs of all time. The following year it became a separate model, and it would endure until 2005 as the division's top-of-the-line model. The name was taken from the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah, the site of much early auto racing and most of the world's land speed record runs, which was named in turn after U.S. Army officer Benjamin Bonneville.

First generation (1958)

First generation
1958 Pontiac Bonneville photo2.JPG
1958 Pontiac Bonneville Sport Coupe
Overview
Model years1958
Body and chassis
Body style2-door convertible
2-door hardtop
LayoutFR layout
PlatformB-body
Powertrain
Engine370CID Tempest 395 255hp 4-bbl V8
370CID Tempest 395 300 hp "Tri-Power" V8
370CID Tempest 395 Fuel Injection 310 hp V8[2]
Transmission3-speed manual
Super Hydra-Matic
Dimensions
Wheelbase122 in (3,099 mm)[2]
Length211.7 

It entered the production lineup as a high-performance, fuel-injected luxury convertible version of the Star Chief in 1957, and was loaded with every available option as standard equipment with the exception of air conditioning and a continental kit.[1] This put the Bonneville in a Cadillac-like price range of $5,782.00 - more than double the base price of the Chieftain on which it was built, with the result being a fully equipped Bonneville could cost more than a larger, entry-level Cadillac. Only 630 units were produced that first year, making it one of the most collectible Pontiacs of all time. The following year it became a separate model, and it would endure until 2005 as the division's top-of-the-line model. The name was taken from the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah, the site of much early auto racing and most of the world's land speed record runs, which was named in turn after U.S. Army officer Benjamin Bonneville.

Bonneville became a separate model in 1958,[3] available as a two-door hardtop or a convertible. It paced the Indianapolis 500 in its first year. As a separate model Bonneville had a significantly lower price tag of around $3,000 thanks to the demotion of most of the luxury items found on the 1957 Star Chief bodystyle from standard equipment to the option list. Also a 300 horsepower (220 kW) 370 cubic inches (6,100 cc) V8 with four-barrel carburetor and dual exhausts was now standard equipment. The fuel-injection system offered with the standard engine on the 1957 Star Chief bodystyle was now listed as an extra cost option but very few 1958 Bonnevilles were so equipped due to a towering option price tag of US$500, which was not considered a very good value considering that for US$93.50, a more reliable Tri-Power option was available with three Rochester two-barrel carburetors and similar power [4]. The electric clock was standard.[2]

For 1958, GM was promoting their fiftieth year of production, and introduced Anniversary models for each brand; Cadillac, Buick, Oldsmobile, Pontiac, and Chevrolet.[5] The 1958 models shared a common appearance on the top models for each brand; Cadillac Eldorado Seville, Buick Roadmaster Riviera, Oldsmobile Holiday 88, Pontiac Bonneville Catalina, and the all-new Chevrolet Bel-Air Impala.

Second generation (1959–1960)

Second generation
60 Pontiac Bonneville.jpg
1960 Pontiac Bonneville
Overview
Model years1959–1960
AssemblyPontiac, Michigan, United States
Flint, Michigan, United States
Ypsilanti, Michigan, United States
Wentzville, Missouri, United States
Body and chassis
Body style2-door convertible
2-door coupe
4-door sedan
4-door station wagon
4-door hardtop
LayoutFR layout
PlatformFor 1958, GM was promoting their fiftieth year of production, and introduced Anniversary models for each brand; Cadillac, Buick, Oldsmobile, Pontiac, and Chevrolet.[5] The 1958 models shared a common appearance on the top models for each brand; Cadillac Eldorado Seville, Buick Roadmaster Riviera, Oldsmobile Holiday 88, Pontiac Bonneville Catalina, and the all-new Chevrolet Bel-Air Impala.

In its third year, the 1959 Bonneville became a full top-line series with the addition of the four-door hardtop sedan and Safari station wagon body styles. The Bonneville played an important part that year in the introduction of two of Pontiac's greatest marketing inspirations — the split grille and the Wide Track slogan. The latter was not just ad copy, either, as Pontiac pushed its wheels further out toward the fenders than anyone else and created what were considered to be the best-cornering full-size cars in the industry. Both the grille design and the Wide Track phrase remained part of Pontiac's image up to its termination. A "Safe-T-Track" differential, used to minimize wheel spin, was an option beginning in 1959.[7]

1960 Pontiac Bonneville Safari
1959 Pontiac Bonneville

Third generation (1961–1964)

Third generation
1962 Pontiac Bonneville Convertible.jpg
1962 Pontiac Bonneville convertible
Overview
Model years1961–1964
AssemblyPontiac, Michigan, United States
Flint, Michigan, United States
Ypsilanti, Michigan, United States
Body and chassis
Body style2-door convertible
2-door hardtop
4-do

The Bonneville remained Pontiac's costliest and most luxurious model throughout the 1960s and was instrumental in pushing Pontiac to third place in sales from 1962 to 1970.

The distinctive protruding grille made its appearance on all Pontiac products during the early 1960s, and was a modern revival of a similar appearance on Pontiac products during the 1930s and early 1940s, as demonstrated on the Pontiac Torpedo.

The Bonneville differed from its lesser Catalina and Star Chief counterparts by featuring more luxurious interior trim with upgraded cloth and Morrokide vinyl or expanded Morrokide upholstery in sedans and coupes, expanded Morrokide in Safari wagons and genuine leather seating in convertibles. Bonnevilles (with the exception of Bonneville Safari station wagons) were also (along with Star Chiefs) built on a longer wheelbase version of GM's B-Body. Also found in the Bonneville were instrument panels and door panels with walnut veneer trim, carpeted lower door panels, grab bar on the passenger side of the dash and courtesy lights and a rear arm rest. Beginning in 1964, a Bonneville Brougham option package was available that included an even more luxurious interior trim level with front and rear seats featuring center armrests, upgraded door panels and a standard Cordova (vinyl) roof with "Brougham" nameplates. The two-door hardtop was marketed as the "Sports Coupe", the four door pillarless models were called "Vistas".

Bonneville models were standard equipped with Hydra-Matic (through 1964) or Turbo Hydra-Matic (1965-on) automatic transmissions. Options included power steering and power brakes as well as air conditioning. Other popular options included power windows, power seats, radio, cruise control, and 8-lug aluminum wheels that included integral brake drums for improved stopping power. The Bonneville, also, had more powerful standard V8 engines than other full-sized Pontiacs, including the 389 cu in (6.4 l) or 400 cu in (6.6 l) V8s with four-barrel carburetors (power ratings of 303 to 340 hp (226 to 254 kW) depending on year) with many optional V8 offerings, such as the availability of the Tri-Power (three two-barrel carburetor) options on both the 389 cu in (6.4 l) and 421 cu in (6.9 l) V8s that offered up to 376 hp (280 kW) through 1966. For 1963 only <1963 Pontiac shop manual>, Pontiac offered the 421 cu in (6.9 l) Super Duty with two four-barrel carburetors, rated at 425 hp (317 kW), as a US$2,250 option (when the base Bonneville listed at US$3,349).[11]

Fourth generation (1965–1970)

Fourth generation
MHV Pontiac Bonneville 1965 01.jpg
1965 Pontiac Bonneville Convertible
Overview
Model years1965–1970
AssemblyPontiac, Michigan, United States
Flint, Michigan, United States
Ypsilanti, Michigan, United States
Body and chassis
Body style2-door convertible
2-door hardtop
4-door hardtop
4-door sedan
4-door station wagon
LayoutFR layout
PlatformB-body
RelatedBuick LeSabre
Chevrolet Impala
Pontiac Catalina/Laurentian
Chevrolet Bel Air
Chevrolet Caprice
Powertrain
Engine389 cu in (6.4 L) V8
421 cu in (6.9 L) V8
400 cu in (6.6 L) V8
428 cu in (7.0 L) V8
455 cu in (7.5 L) V8
Transmission3-speed speed synchromesh manual
4-speed synchromesh manual
3 Speed Turbo-Hydramatic 400 Automatic
Dimensions
Wheelbase124 in (3,150 mm)
Length222.6 in (5,654 mm)
Width79.7 in (2,024 mm)
1965 Pontiac Bonneville Convertible
1966 Pontiac Bonneville 4-Door Hardtop
1967 Pontiac Bonneville Hardtop Coupe
1968 Pontiac Bonneville convertible
1969 Pontiac Bonneville convertible
Pontiac Torpedo.

The Bonneville differed from its lesser Catalina and Star Chief counterparts by featuring more luxurious interior trim with upgraded cloth and Morrokide vinyl or expanded Morrokide upholstery in sedans and coupes, expanded Morrokide in Safari wagons and genuine leather seating in convertibles. Bonnevilles (with the exception of Bonneville Safari station wagons) were also (along with Star Chiefs) built on a longer wheelbase version of GM's B-Body. Also found in the Bonneville were instrument panels and door panels with walnut veneer trim, carpeted lower door panels, grab bar on the passenger side of the dash and courtesy lights and a rear arm rest. Beginning in 1964, a Bonneville Brougham option package was available that included an even more luxurious interior trim level with front and rear seats featuring center armrests, upgraded door panels and a standard Cordova (vinyl) roof with "Brougham" nameplates. The two-door hardtop was marketed as the "Sports Coupe", the four door pillarless models were called "Vistas".

Bonneville models were standard equipped with Hydra-Matic (through 1964) or Turbo Hydra-Matic (1965-on) automatic transmissions. Options included power steering and power brakes as well as air conditioning. Other popular options included power windows, power seats, radio, cruise control, and 8-lug aluminum wheels that included integral brake drums for improved stopping power. The Bonneville, also, had more powerful standard V8 engines than other full-sized Pontiacs, including the 389 cu in (6.4 l) or 400 cu in (6.6 l) V8s with four-barrel carburetors (power ratings of 303 to 340 hp (226 to 254 kW) depending on year) with many optional V8 offerings, such as the availability of the Tri-Power (three two-barrel carburetor) options on both the 389 cu in (6.4 l) and 421 cu in (6.9 l) V8s that offered up to 376 hp (280 kW) through 1966. For 1963 only <1963 Pontiac shop manual>, Pontiac offered the 421 cu in (6.9 l) Super Duty with two four-barrel carburetors, rated at 425 hp (317 kW), as a US$2,250 option (when the base Bonneville listed at US$3,349).[11]

In 1965 B-Body Pontiacs received a dramatic re-style, featuring fastback rooflines on coupes, rakish fender lines and even more pronounced "Coke Body" styling. Bonnevilles followed largely the same styling cues as on other 1965 Pontiacs, but was 8 inches longer thanks to its new 124-inch wheelbase chassis. The interior featured new instrumentation and dashboard styling as well as new upholstery.

Engine options remained unchanged from the 1964 model year, with a389 cu in (6.4 L), 333 hp unit being standard, equipped with a Carter AFB 4-barrel carburetor. A 421 cu in (6.9 L) engine was an optional upgrade. Both engines had choices of Tri-Power multi-carburetion setups and higher compression ratios. [12]

New for Pontiacs in 1965 was GM's Turbo-Hydramatic 400 transmission, which was released the year prior. This new 3-speed unit had a torque converter, unlike the old fluid-coupling based Super-Hydramatic featured on past Bonneville models. The new transmission also changed the shift pattern from "P-N-D-S-L-R" to a safer and ultimately more modern "P-R-N-D-S-L."

In 1965 Pontiac Motor Division received the Motor Trend "Car of the Year" award. As part of this award, Motor Trend reviewed GTO, Grand Prix, Catalina 2+2 and Bonneville. [13]

In 1966, Bonneville featured a minor update, with new front and rear sheet metal, trim and bright work. The interior saw some updates, including a more squared-up dashboard and minor changes in instrumentation. Power train components were the same as 1965.

Bonneville for 1967 received a major update over the previous years. Styling was changed dramatically and featured a new grille-in-bumper front design, more creases to accentuate the "Coke body" styling and an updated rear fascia. The interior featured a new wrap around style dash with new switchgear, instrumentation and trim. As per the up-and-coming US Title 49 legislation, 67' Bonnevilles were equipped with seatbelts as standard, as well as other government mandated safety equipment.

1967 also saw a large power-train and chassis refresh for Pontiac. The 389 cubic inch plant was replaced with 400 cu in (6.6 L) one, and the 421 cubic inch plant was replaced with a 428 cu in (7.0 L) one. As per GM's internal edict, the multi-carburation setups found on earlier cars were replaced with the new Quadra Jet "spread bore" carburetor. Carter AFB carburetors were still standard, but the Quadra Jet was featured as the new "High performance" upgrade. A myriad of horsepower ratings were optional. A dual-circuit master cylinder was standard as per legislation and disc brakes became an optional extra. [14]

1968 also saw a large styling update for Bonneville. The front fascia was heavily revised with new side-by-side headlights, however, the side and rear styling stayed largely the same from 1967. The interior saw some minor updates to styling with less chrome, as well as an available 8-Track Tape player.

Power was upgraded to 340 horsepower on the base 400 CI engine, up from 333 on the 1967 model year, the 428 CI engine remained an option

In 1969 the rest of Bonneville's styling was updated. The front fascia stayed similar to 68', however, the rest of the car saw a re-style. The creases on the side were removed and the overall "Coke Bottle" effect was lessened. The rear end saw widened taillights and a color coded bumper insert. The interior saw even more updates, featuring more padding, wood trim and a slanted dashboard.

Power trains were upgraded to a standard 360 hp 428 CI engine.

1970 saw the most dramatic update to styling for Bonneville, featuring an entirely new front fascia, with more square features and an updated vertical twin grille design. Wrap around amber turn signals were integrated into the lower bumper. Side body lines remained similar to the 69' model year, however the rear design was completely revised with lowered tail lights and bumper, with a design more similar to that of 65' and 66' model years than those directly prior.

The interior stuck to a design similar to 69' model years, retaining the slanted design and minimal chrome trim.

A new 455 cu in (7.5 L) V8 was made standard for the 1970 model year, with the 400 CI engine being an option. [15]

Fifth generation (1971–1976)

Fifth generation
Pontiac Bonneville dutch licence registration 57-YB-55.JPG
Overview
Model years1971–1976
AssemblyPontiac, Michigan, United States
Flint, Michigan, United States
Ypsilanti, Michigan, United States
Body and chassis
Body style4-door hardtop
2-door coupe
4-door sedan
LayoutFR layout
PlatformB-body
RelatedBuick LeSabre
Chevrolet Impala
Pontiac Catalina/Laurentian
Chevrolet Bel Air
Chevrolet Caprice
Oldsmobile 88
Powertrain
Engine455 cu in (7.5 L) V8
400 cu in (6.6 L) V8
Dimensions
Wheelbase126 in (3,200 mm) (1971-72)[16]
124 in (3,150 mm) (1973-74)
123.4 in (3,134 mm) (1975-76)
Length226.2 in (5,745 mm)[16]
Width79.5 in (2,019 mm)[16]

For 1971, the Bonneville was downgraded in the model hierarchy, as a new top line Grand Ville series was introduced. In effect, it replaced the discontinued Executive above the lower-priced Catalina. The Bonneville had new "Monocoque" styling[17] and was offered in three

Engine options remained unchanged from the 1964 model year, with a389 cu in (6.4 L), 333 hp unit being standard, equipped with a Carter AFB 4-barrel carburetor. A 421 cu in (6.9 L) engine was an optional upgrade. Both engines had choices of Tri-Power multi-carburetion setups and higher compression ratios. [12]

New for Pontiacs in 1965 was GM's Turbo-Hydramatic 400 transmission, which was released the year prior. This new 3-speed unit had a torque converter, unlike the old fluid-coupling based Super-Hydramatic featured on past Bonneville models. The new transmission also changed the shift pattern from "P-N-D-S-L-R" to a safer and ultimately more modern "P-R-N-D-S-L."

In 1965 Pontiac Motor Division received the Motor Trend "Car of the Year" award. As part of this award, Motor Trend reviewed GTO, Grand Prix, Catalina 2+2 and Bonneville. [13]

In 1966, Bonneville featured a minor update, with new front and rear sheet metal, trim and bright work. The interior saw some updates, including a more squared-up dashboard and minor changes in instrumentation. Power train components were the same as 1965.

Bonneville for 1967 received a major update over the previous years. Styling was changed dramatically and featured a new grille-in-bumper front design, more creases to accentuate the "Coke body" styling and an updated rear fascia. The interior featured a new wrap around style dash with new switchgear, instrumentation and trim. As per the up-and-coming US Title 49 legislation, 67' Bonnevilles were equipped with seatbelts as standard, as well as other government mandated safety equipment.

1967 also saw a large power-train and chassis refresh for Pontiac. The 389 cubic inch plant was replaced with 400 cu in (6.6 L) one, and the 421 cubic inch plant was replaced with a 428 cu in (7.0 L) one. As per GM's internal edict, the multi-carburation setups found on earlier cars were replaced with the new Quadra Jet "spread bore" carburetor. Carter AFB carburetors were still standard, but the Quadra Jet was featured as the new "High performance" upgrade. A myriad of horsepower ratings were optional. A dual-circuit master cylinder was standard as per legislation and disc brakes became an optional extra. [14]

1968 also saw a large styling update for Bonneville. The front fascia was heavily revised with new side-by-side headlights, however, the side and rear styling stayed largely the same from 1967. The interior saw some minor updates to styling with less chrome, as well as an available 8-Track Tape player.

Power was upgraded to 340 horsepower on the base 400 CI engine, up from 333 on the 1967 model year, the 428 CI engine remained an option

In 1969 the rest of Bonneville's styling was updated. The front fascia stayed similar to 68', however, the rest of the car saw a re-style. The creases on the side were removed and the overall "Coke Bottle" effect was lessened. The rear end saw widened taillights and a color coded bumper insert. The interior saw even more updates, featuring more padding, wood trim and a slanted dashboard.

Power trains were upgraded to a standard 360 hp 428 CI engine.

1970 saw the most dramatic update to styling for Bonneville, featuring an entirely new front fascia, with more square features and an updated vertical twin grille design. Wrap around amber turn signals were integrated into the lower bumper. Side body lines remained similar to the 69' model year, however the rear design was completely revised with lowered tail lights and bumper, with a design more similar to that of 65' and 66' model years than those directly prior.

The interior stuck to a design similar to 69' model years, retaining the slanted design and minimal chrome trim.

A new 455 cu in (7.5 L) V8 was made standard for the 1970 model year, with the 400 CI engine being an option. [15]

For 1971, the Bonneville was downgraded in the model hierarchy, as a new top line Grand Ville series was introduced. In effect, it replaced the discontinued Executive above the lower-priced Catalina. The Bonneville had new "Monocoque" styling[17] and was offered in three body styles, a pillared four-door sedan, four-door hardtop sedan and two-door hardtop coupe. The standard engine for 1971-72 was a 455 cubic-inch V8 with two-barrel carburetor that was rated at 280 gross horsepower for 1971 and 185 net horsepower for 1972 and optionally available was the four-barrel version of the 455 rated at 325 gross horsepower in 1971 and 250 net horsepower in 1972. The on-paper power ratings reflect the change in power measurement undertaken by the industry for 1972. 1971 was also the first year for Pontiac and other GM divisions to reduce compression ratios on all engines across the board to operate on lower-octane regular leaded, low-lead or unleaded gasoline, reflecting a corporate edict anticipating the introduction of catalytic converters in 1975 to help meet increasing stringent federal (and California) emission requirements.

In mid-1971, a Turbo-Hydramatic transmission, power steering and power front-disc brakes became standard equipment on Bonneville and other full-sized Pontiacs (as well as other full-sized GM cars).

From 1973 to 1976, the Bonneville's standard engine dropped to a 170-horsepower 400 cubic-inch V8. Optionally available was the 455 four-barrel V8 rated at 250 horsepower (186 kW) for 1973-74 and 200 for 1975-76. In 1973, Bonneville was the only full-sized Pontiac to offer a "Radial Tuned Suspension" option package which included the steel-belted radial tires along with an upgraded suspension with Pliacell shock absorbers and front and rear sway bars. The RTS option was expanded for 1974 to all full-sized Pontiacs and radial-ply tires became standard on all 1975 models though an upgraded "RTS" package was still available as an option.

1975 saw the end of the pillarless 2-door hardtop model, replaced by a coupe with frameless door glass but with a thick "B" pillar and fixed rear "opera" window. The 1975 model year introduced rectangular headlights - its frontal appearance was similar to the Cadillac DeVilles and Fleetwoods of the same era.

With the demise of the Grand Ville series after 1975, Bonneville once again became the top-line full-sized Pontiac series, with a Bonneville Brougham model featuring the luxurious interior appointments from the departed Grand Ville.

Adjustable pedals were optional in 1976, the last year the Bonneville was offered as a pillarless 4-door hardtop; all subsequent Bonnevilles would have a thick B-pillar and metal-framed door glass. [18]

Size comparison between 1974 and 1984 full-size Pontiac sedans

1974 Pontiac Bonneville 1984 Pontiac Parisienne
Wheelbase 124 in (3,150 mm) 116.0 in (2,946 mm)
Overall length 226.0 in (5,740 mm) 212.0 in (5,385 mm)
Width 79.6 in (2,022 mm) 75.2 in (1,910 mm)
Height 54.2 in (1,377 mm) 56.4 in (1,433 mm)
Front headroom 38.9 in (988 mm) 39.5 in (1,003 mm)
Front legroom 42.3 in (1,074 mm) 42.2 in (1,072 mm)
Front hip room 62.0 in (1,575 mm) 55.0 in (1,397 mm)
Front shoulder room 64.3 in (1,633 mm) 60.6 in (1,539 mm)
Rear headroom 38.0 in (965 mm) 38.2 in (970 mm)
Rear legroom 38.8 in (986 mm) 38.9 in (988 mm)
Rear hip room 61.9 in (1,572 mm) 55.7 in (1,415 mm)
Rear shoulder room 63.5 in (1,613 mm) 60.5 in (1,537 mm)
Luggage capacity 19.5 cu ft (552 L) 20.8 cu ft (589 L)

Sixth generation (1977–1981)