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Peter Francis Newell (August 31, 1915 – November 17, 2008) was an American college men's basketball coach and basketball instructional coach. He coached for 15 years at the University of San Francisco, Michigan State University and the University of California, Berkeley, compiling an overall record of 234 wins and 123 losses.[1] He led the University of California to the 1959 NCAA men's basketball championship, and a year later coached the gold medal-winning U.S. team at the 1960 Summer Olympics, a team that would be inducted as a unit to the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame in 2010.[2] After his coaching career ended he ran a world-famous instructional basketball camp and served as a consultant and scout for several National Basketball
Basketball
Association (NBA) teams. He is often considered to be one of the most influential figures in the history of basketball.[3][4][5]

Contents

1 Early life 2 Coaching career 3 NBA Work 4 Basketball
Basketball
camps 5 Personal life 6 Death 7 Legacy 8 Selected bibliography 9 See also 10 References 11 Sources 12 External links

Early life[edit] He was born in Vancouver
Vancouver
and grew up in Los Angeles. Encouraged by his mother, he had small roles in several movies before he turned ten.[6] It is even said that Charlie Chaplin
Charlie Chaplin
considered him for the title role in his film The Kid (1921), which was later played by Jackie Coogan.[7] Newell attended both high school and college in Los Angeles, California, and was a classmate of Phil Woolpert at Loyola Marymount University (then called Loyola University). He played on the basketball team. Coaching career[edit] After serving in the United States
United States
Navy from 1942 to 1946,[1] Newell was appointed head men's basketball coach at the University of San Francisco in 1946. During his four-year tenure at USF, Newell compiled a 70-37 record and coached the Dons to the 1949 National Invitation Tournament championship.[1] In 1950 he accepted an appointment as head coach at Michigan State University, where he stayed until 1954.[1] Newell returned to the West Coast in 1954 when he was hired as head coach at the University of California, Berkeley. Newell was very successful at Cal, compiling a 119-44 record, winning four consecutive Pac-8 titles from 1957 to 1960, and leading the Golden Bears to two straight appearances in the NCAA tournament championship game—which they won in 1959.[1] Newell himself earned national Coach of the Year honors in 1960. At Berkeley, he became a faculty initiate of the Nu Chapter of Phi Kappa Tau
Phi Kappa Tau
Fraternity where player Darrall Imhoff
Darrall Imhoff
was a member. Newell also coached the U.S. men's Olympic basketball team to a gold medal in the 1960 Summer Olympics, leading a talented squad that featured future National Basketball
Basketball
Association (NBA) stars and Hall of Famers Walt Bellamy, Oscar Robertson, Jerry West, and Jerry Lucas.[2] His win in the Olympics made him one of only three coaches to win the "Triple Crown" of NCAA, NIT and Olympic championships.[3] Newell is also known to have introduced the reverse-action offense in the late nineteen fifties. After being advised by doctors to give up coaching because of stress, he served as the Athletic Director at Cal from 1960 to 1968.[6] Among his various achievements includes having a winning record against UCLA Coach John Wooden, considered by many to be the greatest coach in college basketball history. NBA Work[edit]

This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (January 2007)

After retiring from coaching, Newell served as team executive or scout for several NBA teams. He served as General Manager of the San Diego Rockets from 1968 to 1971, until the team was sold to Houston in June, 1971.[8] After a short stint in Houston, to assist with the transfer, Pete returned to the west coast and later joined the Los Angeles Lakers. As general manager of the Lakers, he was instrumental in trading for star center Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
from the Milwaukee Bucks.[6] He retired from his job as Lakers GM in 1976 to spend more time with his ailing wife.[3] Basketball
Basketball
camps[edit] Considered "America's Basketball
Basketball
Guru", Newell conducted an annual training camp for centers and forwards known simply as "Big Man Camp", which has since been informally dubbed "Pete Newell's Big Man Camp". The camp originated when word spread that Newell was working with Kermit Washington. After Washington's game rapidly improved, more and more big men started to work with Newell, and he later opened the camp. The camp's impressive participants list features over 200 current and former NBA players.[9] Newell attracted this list of players due to his reputation of teaching footwork, being what one publication described as "The Footwork Master".[4] Former attendees include Shaquille O'Neal, Hakeem Olajuwon, Bill Walton, and many others.[9] The camp was almost seen as standard for players coming out of college into the NBA; according to ESPN's Ric Bucher, "[f]or the past 24 years, every big man of any significance has spent at least one summer week trying to get close enough to Pete."[3] From the time Newell opened the camp in 1976 until his death, he never accepted any money for his services, stating that "I owe it to the game. I can never repay what the game has given me."[10] The camp has taken place in Honolulu, Hawaii and most recently Las Vegas, Nevada. In 2001 Newell opened his version of the Big Man Camp for women and dubbed it "Pete Newell's Tall Women's Basketball
Basketball
Camp" with the following simple sentence serving as a summary of its intentions: "The Pete Newell
Pete Newell
Tall Women's Basketball
Basketball
Camp goal is to continue to do what Pete Newell
Pete Newell
has done his whole life-to teach the fundamentals and footwork of the game of basketball to young players." Personal life[edit]

Newell in his Del Mar home, 2007[11]

Newell's wife, Florence, died in 1984. His four sons have all been involved with basketball. His son, Pete Newell
Pete Newell
Jr., coached the Santa Cruz High School boys' basketball team to the California state championship in 2005. Another son, Tom Newell, is a longtime NBA scout and assistant coach who has recently worked on international basketball projects in China and Russia. Tom currently is a Fox Sports studio commentator in the network's Northwest region. His 3rd son, Roger, was the first person to bring computer software and analytics to the NBA in 1982 thru 2000 with the Newell Productivity System. This same computer software system was used throughout Jim Harrick's tenure at UCLA including their NCAA Championship season. Roger was also a Consultant at Hollywood Park racetrack from 1990-1999 before the track was sold to Churchill Downs. Death[edit] Newell died at Rancho Santa Fe, California
Rancho Santa Fe, California
on November 17, 2008, at age 93.[12] Legacy[edit] In 1979 Newell was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame as a contributor,[1] and in 2010 the 1960 Olympic team he coached was inducted into the Hall as a unit.[2] An annual college basketball tournament was held in his honor in Oakland, California, and frequent participants in the Pete Newell
Pete Newell
Challenge included USF and Cal—the very schools where Newell coached. In addition in 1987 Cal dedicated the court in Harmon Gym as " Pete Newell
Pete Newell
Court". In 1999, author Bruce Jenkins published a biography of Newell entitled A Good Man.[13] Since 2000, the National Association of Basketball
Basketball
Coaches has annually presented the Pete Newell Big Man Award
Pete Newell Big Man Award
to the top frontcourt player in the nation. In an interview with Mike Greenberg
Mike Greenberg
on ESPN's Mike and Mike in the Morning on January 2, 2007, Bob Knight
Bob Knight
singled Newell out as one of the greatest coaches in men's college basketball history. Knight stated that although he had not won as many championships as some other coaches he felt "he was as good as anybody who's ever coached this game." Newell's influence on basketball is often stated in what would seem to be almost exaggerated terms by many Hall of Fame coaches and players.[14] However, his contributions to the game of basketball have been so great that according to many Newell has perhaps had as much or more influence on the game of basketball as any person in the modern era.[3] Selected bibliography[edit]

Basketball
Basketball
Methods (1962) with John Benington Basketball: The Sports Playbook (1976) Basketball
Basketball
Post Play (1995) Pete Newell's Defensive Basketball: Winning Techniques and Strategies (Art & Science of Coaching) (2001)

See also[edit]

List of NCAA Division I Men's Final Four appearances by coach

References[edit]

^ a b c d e f "Peter F. "Pete" Newell". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on August 31, 2009. Retrieved December 3, 2010.  ^ a b c "1960 United States
United States
Olympic Team". Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on February 15, 2011. Retrieved December 3, 2010.  ^ a b c d e Pete Newell
Pete Newell
was also the first college basketball coach to achieve the Triple Crown in coaching - NIT Champs [USF] , NCAA Champs [Cal] - Olympic Gold Medal.The Godfather, espn.com, accessed October 9, 2010. ^ a b Pete Newell
Pete Newell
Still The Footwork Master Archived 2011-07-16 at the Wayback Machine., scout.com, accessed October 9, 2010. ^ A beautiful basketball mind Archived 2008-02-20 at the Wayback Machine., www.sdhoc.com, accessed October 9, 2010. *Ortiz, Jorge L. Another legacy at Newell Many coaches with links to Heathcote, December 28, 2001. * Chin. pg. 135 *Mandelbaum. pg. 329 ^ a b c Weber, Bruce. Basketball
Basketball
innovator wielded lasting influence on NBA players, obituary, The New York Times, November 25, 2008, accessed October 9, 2010. ^ IMDb Trivia for "The Kid" ^ NBA Silver Anniversary Edition Program, 21st annual All-Star Game. Host San Diego Rockets, San Diego International Sports Arena, San Diego, CA. January 12, 1971. Page 32 ^ a b Pete Newell
Pete Newell
Big Man Camp Archived 2013-02-22 at Archive.is, petenewellbigmancamp.com, accessed October 9, 2010. ^ Bucher, Bucher.A good man, espn.com, accessed October 9, 2010. ^ Chapin, Dwight &Kroichick, Ron. Pete Newell: Basketball
Basketball
coach and teacher, San Francisco Chronicle, November 18, 2008, accessed October 9, 2010. ^ Chapin, Dwight &Kroichick, Ron. Pete Newell: Basketball
Basketball
coach and teacher, San Francisco Chronicle, November 18, 2008, accessed October 9, 2010. ^ Basketball
Basketball
innovator wielded lasting influence on NBA players, obituary, by Bruce Weber, The New York Times, November 25, 2008. ^ Ramsay and Halberstam. pg. 43

Sources[edit]

Chin, Oliver Clyde. The Tao of Yao: Insights from Basketball's Brightest Big Man, California: Frog, LTD. 2003 ISBN 1-58394-090-1 Mandelbaum, Michael. The Meaning Of Sports: why americans watch baseball, football and basketball and what they see when they do, New York: Public Affairs 2004 ISBN 1-58648-330-7 Ramsay, Jack and Halberstam, David. Dr. Jack's Leadership Lessons Learned From a Lifetime in Basketball, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons. 2004 ISBN 0-471-46929-7

External links[edit]

Pete Newell
Pete Newell
at the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame

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San Francisco Dons men's basketball
San Francisco Dons men's basketball
head coaches

Jimmy Needles (1923–1931) Phil Morrissey (1931–1932) Wally Cameron (1932–1941) Forrest Twogood
Forrest Twogood
(1941–1942) Jimmy Needles (1942–1944) No team (1944–1945) William Bussenius (1945–1946) Pete Newell
Pete Newell
(1946–1950) Phil Woolpert (1950–1959) Ross Giudice (1959–1960) Peter Peletta (1960–1966) Phil Vukicevich (1966–1970) Bob Gaillard (1970–1978) Dan Belluomini (1978–1980) Pete Barry (1980–1982) No team (1982–1985) Jim Brovelli (1985–1995) Philip Mathews (1995–2004) Jessie Evans (2004–2007) Eddie Sutton # (2007–2008) Rex Walters
Rex Walters
(2008–2016) Kyle Smith (2016– )

Pound sign (#) denotes interim head coach.

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San Francisco Dons head baseball coaches

Pete Newell
Pete Newell
(1946–1950) Unknown (1951–1956) John Anderson (1957–1960) Unknown (1961–1966) Dante Benedetti (1967–1980) Ken Bowman (1981–1993) Rich Hill (1994–1998) Nino Giarratano (1999– )

v t e

Michigan State Spartans men's basketball
Michigan State Spartans men's basketball
head coaches

No coach (1898–1899) Charles Bemies
Charles Bemies
(1899–1901) George Denman (1901–1903) Chester Brewer
Chester Brewer
(1903–1910) John Macklin
John Macklin
(1910–1916) George Gauthier (1916–1920) Lyman Frimodig (1920–1922) Mysterious Walker
Mysterious Walker
(1922–1924) John Kobs (1924–1926) Benjamin Van Alstyne
Benjamin Van Alstyne
(1926–1943) No team (1943–1944) Benjamin Van Alstyne
Benjamin Van Alstyne
(1944–1949) Al Kircher (1949–1950) Pete Newell
Pete Newell
(1950–1954) Forddy Anderson (1954–1965) John E. Benington (1965–1969) Gus Ganakas (1969–1976) Jud Heathcote (1976–1995) Tom Izzo
Tom Izzo
(1995– )

v t e

California Golden Bears men's basketball
California Golden Bears men's basketball
head coaches

No coach (1907–1915) Kilduff (1915–1916) Ben Cherrington (1916–1917) Walter Christie (1917–1918) William Hollender (1918–1920) E. H. Wright (1920–1924) Nibs Price
Nibs Price
(1924–1954) Pete Newell
Pete Newell
(1954–1960) Rene Herrerias (1960–1968) Jim Padgett (1968–1972) Dick Edwards (1972–1978) Dick Kuchen (1978–1985) Lou Campanelli (1985–1993) Todd Bozeman (1993–1996) Ben Braun (1996–2008) Mike Montgomery
Mike Montgomery
(2008–2014) Cuonzo Martin (2014–2017) Wyking Jones (2017– )

v t e

California Golden Bears
California Golden Bears
athletic directors

Brutus Hamilton
Brutus Hamilton
(1946–1955) Greg Englehard (1956–1960) Pete Newell
Pete Newell
(1960–1968) Paul Brechler
Paul Brechler
(1968–1971) Ray Willsey
Ray Willsey
# (1971–1972) Dave Maggard (1972–1991) Bob Bockrath (1991–1993) John Kasser (1993–2001) Steve Gladstone (2001–2004) Sandy Barbour (2004–2014) H. Michael Williams (2014– )

# denotes interim athletic director.

Pete Newell—championships, awards, and honors

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California Golden Bears men's basketball
California Golden Bears men's basketball
1958–59 NCAA champions

22 Denny Fitzpatrick 23 Al Buch 33 Jack Grout 34 Bob Dalton 40 Darrall Imhoff 42 Bill McClintock 45 Stan Morrison

Head coach Pete Newell

Assistant coach Rene Herrerias

v t e

United States
United States
basketball squad – 1960 Summer Olympics
1960 Summer Olympics
– Gold medal

4 Arnette 5 Bellamy 6 Boozer 7 Dischinger 8 Haldorson 9 Imhoff 10 Kelley 11 Lane 12 Lucas 13 Robertson 14 Smith 15 West Coach: Newell

v t e

Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame Class of 1979

Players

Wilt Chamberlain

Coaches

Sam Barry Eddie Hickey Ray Meyer

Contributors

John McLendon Pete Newell

Referee

James Enright

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Members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame

Players

Guards

R. Allen Archibald Beckman Belov Bing Blazejowski Borgmann Brennan Cervi Cheeks Clayton Cooper-Dyke Cousy Dampier Davies Drexler Dumars Edwards Frazier Friedman Galis Gervin Goodrich Greer Guerin Hanson Haynes Holman Hyatt Isaacs Iverson Jeannette D. Johnson E. Johnson K. Jones S. Jones Jordan Kidd Lieberman Maravich Marcari Marčiulionis Martin McDermott McGrady D. McGuire Meyers R. Miller Monroe C. Murphy Nash Page Payton Petrović Phillip Posey Richmond Robertson Rodgers Roosma J. Russell Schommer Scott Sedran Sharman K. Smith Staley Steinmetz Stockton Swoopes Thomas Thompson Vandivier Wanzer West J. White Wilkens Woodard Wooden

Forwards

Arizin Barkley Barry Baylor Bird Bradley R. Brown Cunningham Curry Dalipagić Dantley DeBusschere Dehnert Endacott English Erving Foster Fulks Gale Gates Gola Hagan Havlicek Hawkins Hayes Haywood Heinsohn Hill Howell G. Johnson King Lucas Luisetti K. Malone McClain B. McCracken J. McCracken McGinnis McHale Mikkelsen C. Miller Mullin Pettit Pippen Pollard Radja Ramsey Rodman Schayes E. Schmidt O. Schmidt Stokes C. Thompson T. Thompson Twyman Walker Washington N. White Wilkes Wilkins Worthy Yardley

Centers

Abdul-Jabbar Barlow Beaty Bellamy Chamberlain Ćosić Cowens Crawford Daniels DeBernardi Donovan Ewing Gallatin Gilmore Gruenig Harris-Stewart Houbregs Issel W. Johnson Johnston M. Krause Kurland Lanier Leslie Lovellette Lapchick Macauley M. Malone McAdoo Meneghin Mikan Mourning S. Murphy Mutombo Olajuwon O'Neal Parish Pereira Reed Risen Robinson B. Russell Sabonis Sampson Semjonova Thurmond Unseld Wachter Walton Yao

Coaches

Alexeeva P. Allen Anderson Auerbach Auriemma Barmore Barry Blood Boeheim L. Brown Calhoun Calipari Cann Carlson Carnesecca Carnevale Carril Case Chancellor Chaney Conradt Crum Daly Dean Díaz-Miguel Diddle Drake Driesell Ferrándiz Gaines Gamba Gardner Gaze Gill Gomelsky Gunter Hannum Harshman Haskins Hatchell Heinsohn Hickey Hobson Holzman Hughes Hurley Iba Izzo P. Jackson Julian Keaney Keogan Knight Krzyzewski Kundla Lambert Leonard Lewis Litwack Loeffler Lonborg Magee McCutchan McGraw A. McGuire F. McGuire McLendon Meanwell Meyer Miller Moore Nelson Nikolić Novosel Olson Pitino Ramsay Richardson Riley Rubini Rupp Rush Sachs Self Sharman Shelton Sloan D. Smith Stringer Summitt Tarkanian Taylor Teague J. Thompson VanDerveer Wade Watts Wilkens G. Williams R. Williams Wooden Woolpert Wootten Yow

Contributors

Abbott Barksdale Bee Biasone H. Brown W. Brown Bunn Buss Clifton Colangelo Cooper Davidson Douglas Duer Embry Fagan Fisher Fleisher Gavitt Gottlieb Granik Gulick Harrison Hearn Henderson Hepp Hickox Hinkle Irish M. Jackson Jernstedt Jones Kennedy Knight J. Krause Lemon Liston Lloyd McLendon Lobo Mokray Morgan Morgenweck Naismith Newell Newton J. O'Brien L. O'Brien Olsen Podoloff Porter Raveling Reid Reinsdorf Ripley Sanders Saperstein Schabinger St. John Stagg Stanković Steitz Stern Taylor Thorn Tower Trester Vitale Wells Welts Wilke Winter Zollner

Referees

Bavetta Enright Garretson Hepbron Hoyt Kennedy Leith Mihalik Nichols Nucatola Quigley Rudolph Shirley Strom Tobey Walsh

Teams

1960 United States
United States
Olympic Team 1992 United States
United States
Olympic Team All-American Red Heads Buffalo Germans The First Team Harlem Globetrotters Immaculata College New York Renaissance Original Celtics Texas Western

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FIBA Hall of Fame
FIBA Hall of Fame
inductees

Coaches (22)

Alexeyeva Canavesi Díaz-Miguel Donohue Ferrándiz A. Gomelsky E. Gomelsky Gaze Iba Ivković Kondrashin Newell Nikolić Novosel Primo Rubini Smith Soares Stirling Summitt Yow Žeravica

Contributors (35)

Airaldi Rivarola Ashry Atakol Bouffard Busnel Calvo Carneiro Dos Reis Greim Hepp Jones Killian Klieger Kozlowski López Martín Naismith Otto Pitzl Popović Ramsay Samaranch Šaper Saporta Scuri Seguro de Luna Semashko Seye Moreau Stanković Steitz Stern Ueda Vitale Wahby Yoon

Players (55)

A. Belov S. Belov Berkovich Cameron Chazalon Ćosić Cruz Dalipagić Daneu Delibašić Divac Donovan Edwards Epi Fasoulas Furlong Galis Gaze Gonçalves González Herrera Jean-Jacques Jordan Kićanović Korać Kukoč Maciel Marcari Marčiulionis Martín Marzorati Meneghin Meyers Miller Mujanović Olajuwon O'Neal Pasos Petrović Raga Rigaudeau Robertson Robinson Rodríguez Ronchetti Russell Sabonis Schmidt Semjonova Slavnić Timms Tkachenko Valters Voynova Zasulskaya

Teams (1)

United States
United States
Men's 1992 Olympic Dream Team

Technical officials (14)

Arabadjian Bain Belošević Blanchard Dimou Hopenhaym Kassai Kostin Lazarov Pfeuti Rae Reverberi Rigas Righetto

v t e

Henry Iba Award
Henry Iba Award
winners

1959: Hickey 1960: Newell 1961: Taylor 1962: Taylor 1963: Jucker 1964: Wooden 1965: van Breda Kolff 1966: Rupp 1967: Wooden 1968: Lewis 1969: John 1970: Wooden 1971: Wooden 1972: Wooden 1973: Wooden 1974: Sloan 1975: Knight 1976: Orr 1977: Sutton 1978: Meyer 1979: D. Smith 1980: Meyer 1981: Miller 1982: Thompson 1983: Carnesecca 1984: Keady 1985: Carnesecca 1986: Versace 1987: Chaney 1988: Chaney 1989: Knight 1990: Williams 1991: Ayers 1992: Clark 1993: Fogler 1994: Spoonhour 1995: Sampson 1996: Keady 1997: Haskins 1998: Izzo 1999: Ellis 2000: Eustachy 2001: Skinner 2002: Howland 2003: T. Smith 2004: Martelli 2005: Weber 2006: Williams 2007: Bennett 2008: Davis 2009: Self 2010: Boeheim 2011: Brey 2012: Haith 2013: Larrañaga 2014: Marshall 2015: Bennett 2016: Mack 2017: Few 2018: Bennett

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NABC Coach of the Year winners

1959: Hickey 1960: Newell 1961: Taylor 1962: Taylor 1963: Jucker 1964: Wooden 1965: van Breda Kolff 1966: Rupp 1967: Wooden 1968: Lewis 1969: Wooden 1970: Wooden 1971: Kraft 1972: Wooden 1973: Bartow 1974: McGuire 1975: Knight 1976: Orr 1977: D. Smith 1978: Foster & Lemons 1979: Meyer 1980: Olson 1981: Hartman & Miller 1982: Monson 1983: Carnesecca 1984: Harshman 1985: Thompson 1986: Sutton 1987: Pitino 1988: Chaney 1989: Carlesimo 1990: Heathcote 1991: Krzyzewski 1992: Raveling 1993: Fogler 1994: Keady & Richardson 1995: Harrick 1996: Calipari 1997: Haskins 1998: Guthridge 1999: Krzyzewski & O'Brien 2000: Keady 2001: Izzo 2002: Sampson 2003: T. Smith 2004: Martelli & Montgomery 2005: Weber 2006: Wright 2007: Lickliter 2008: McKillop 2009: Anderson & Calipari 2010: Boeheim 2011: Fisher 2012: Izzo 2013: Crews 2014: Marshall 2015: Calipari 2016: Self 2017: Few 2018: Bennett

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UPI College Basketball
Basketball
Coach of the Year Award winners

1955: Woolpert 1956: Woolpert 1957: F. McGuire 1958: Winter 1959: Rupp 1960: Newell 1961: Taylor 1962: Taylor 1963: Jucker 1964: Wooden 1965: Strack 1966: Rupp 1967: Wooden 1968: Lewis 1969: Wooden 1970: Wooden 1971: A. McGuire 1972: Wooden 1973: Wooden 1974: Phelps 1975: Knight 1976: Young 1977: Gaillard 1978: Sutton 1979: Hodges 1980: Meyer 1981: Miller 1982: Stewart 1983: Tarkanian 1984: Meyer 1985: Carnesecca 1986: Krzyzewski 1987: Thompson 1988: Chaney 1989: Knight 1990: Calhoun 1991: Majerus 1992: Clark 1993: Fogler 1994: Stewart 1995: Hamilton 1996: Keady

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 78025212 LCCN: n95040

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