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Peter Press Maravich
Press Maravich
(June 22, 1947 – January 5, 1988), known by his nickname Pistol Pete, was an American professional basketball player. Maravich was born in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania, part of the Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
metropolitan area, and raised in the Carolinas.[1] Maravich starred in college at Louisiana
Louisiana
State University (LSU) and played for three NBA teams until injuries forced his retirement in 1980. He is the all-time leading NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
scorer with 3,667 points scored and an average of 44.2 points per game. All of his accomplishments were achieved before the adoption of the three point line and shot clock, and despite being unable to play varsity as a freshman under then- NCAA
NCAA
rules.[2] One of the youngest players ever inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame, Maravich was cited by the Hall as "perhaps the greatest creative offensive talent in history".[3] In an April 2010 interview, Hall of Fame player John Havlicek said that "the best ball-handler of all time was Pete Maravich".[4]

Contents

1 Early life 2 College career

2.1 NCAA
NCAA
career statistics

2.1.1 Freshman[18] 2.1.2 Varsity

3 Professional career

3.1 Atlanta
Atlanta
Hawks 3.2 New Orleans
New Orleans
Jazz 3.3 Final season

4 NBA career statistics

4.1 Regular season 4.2 Playoffs

5 Later life and death 6 Legacy 7 Memorabilia 8 Honors, books, films and music 9 Collegiate awards 10 Collegiate records 11 NBA awards 12 NBA records 13 See also 14 References 15 Further reading 16 External links

Early life[edit] Pete Maravich
Pete Maravich
was born to Petar "Press" Maravich (1915–1987) and Helen Gravor Maravich (1925–1974) in Aliquippa, a steel town in Beaver County in western Pennsylvania, near Pittsburgh. Maravich amazed his family and friends with his basketball abilities from an early age. He enjoyed a close but demanding father-son relationship that motivated him toward achievement and fame in the sport. Maravich's father was the son of Serbian immigrants[5][6][7][8][9] and a former professional player-turned-coach. He showed him the fundamentals starting when he was seven years old. Obsessively, Maravich spent hours practicing ball control tricks, passes, head fakes, and long-range shots. Maravich played high school varsity ball at Daniel High School
Daniel High School
in Central, South Carolina, a year before being old enough to attend the school. While at Daniel from 1961 to 1963, Maravich participated in the school's first-ever game against a team from an all-black school. In 1963 his father departed from his position as head basketball coach at Clemson University
Clemson University
and joined the coaching staff at North Carolina State University. The Maravich family's subsequent move to Raleigh, North Carolina, allowed Pete to attend Needham B. Broughton High School.[10] His high school years also saw the birth of his famous moniker. From his habit of shooting the ball from his side, as if he were holding a revolver, Maravich became known as "Pistol" Pete Maravich. He graduated from Needham B. Broughton High School
Needham B. Broughton High School
in 1965 and then attended Edwards Military Institute, where he averaged 33 points per game. College career[edit] Later in life Maravich would tell friends he always desired to play basketball for West Virginia University
West Virginia University
and was originally ready to be a Mountaineer, but his father was the head coach for LSU Men's Basketball
Basketball
and offered him a spot at the school. At that time NCAA rules prohibited first-year students from playing at varsity level,[11] which forced Maravich to play on the freshman team. In his first game, Maravich put up 50 points, 14 rebounds and 11 assists against Southeastern Louisiana
Louisiana
College.[12]

Maravich at LSU in 1967

In only three years playing on the varsity team (and under his father's coaching) at LSU, Maravich scored 3,667 points—1,138 of those in 1968, 1,148 in 1969, and 1,381 in 1970—while averaging 43.8, 44.2, and 44.5 points per game. For his collegiate career, the 6'5" (1.96 m) guard averaged 44.2 points per game in 83 contests and led the NCAA
NCAA
in scoring for each of his three seasons.[13] Maravich's long-standing collegiate scoring record is particularly notable when three factors are taken into account:

First, because of the NCAA
NCAA
rules that prohibited him from taking part in varsity competition during his first year as a student, Maravich was prevented from adding to his career record for a full quarter of his time at LSU. During this first year, Maravich scored 741 points in freshman competition. Second, Maravich played before the advent of the three-point line. This significant difference has raised speculation regarding just how much higher his records would be, given his long-range shooting ability and how such a component might have altered his play. Writing for ESPN.com, Bob Carter stated, "Though Maravich played before [...] the 3-point shot was established, he loved gunning from long range."[14] It has been reported that former LSU coach Dale Brown charted every shot Maravich scored and concluded that, if his shots from three-point range had been counted as three points, Maravich's average would have totaled 57 points per game.[15][16] Third, the shot clock had also not yet been instituted in NCAA
NCAA
play during Maravich's college career. (A time limit on ball possession speeds up play, mandates an additional number of field goal attempts, eliminates stalling, and increases the number of possessions throughout the game, all resulting in higher overall scoring.)[17]

More than 40 years later, however, many of his NCAA
NCAA
and LSU records still stand. Maravich was a three-time All-American. Though he never appeared in the NCAA
NCAA
tournament, Maravich played a key role in turning around a lackluster program that had posted a 3–20 record in the season prior to his arrival. Pete Maravich
Pete Maravich
finished his college career in the 1970 National Invitation Tournament, where LSU finished fourth. NCAA
NCAA
career statistics[edit]

Legend

  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game

 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw
Free throw
percentage

 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game

 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Freshman[18][edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1966–67 Louisiana
Louisiana
State 19 ... ... .452 ... .833 10.4 ... ... ... 43.6

Varsity[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1967–68 Louisiana
Louisiana
State 26 ... ... .423 ... .811 7.5 4.0 ... ... 43.8

1968–69 Louisiana
Louisiana
State 26 ... ... .444 ... .746 6.5 4.9 ... ... 44.2

1969–70 Louisiana
Louisiana
State 31 ... ... .447 ... .773 5.3 6.2 ... ... 44.5

Career[19] 83 ... ... .438 ... .775 6.5 5.1 ... ... 44.2

Professional career[edit] Atlanta
Atlanta
Hawks[edit]

Maravich (with the ball) in 1974

The Atlanta Hawks
Atlanta Hawks
selected Maravich with the third pick in the first round of the 1970 NBA draft, where he played for coach Richie Guerin.[20] He was not a natural fit in Atlanta, as the Hawks already boasted a top-notch scorer at the guard position in Lou Hudson. In fact, Maravich's flamboyant style stood in stark contrast to the conservative play of Hudson and star center Walt Bellamy. And it did not help that many of the veteran players resented the $1.9 million contract that Maravich received from the team—a very large salary at that time.[11] Maravich appeared in 81 games and averaged 23.2 points per contest—good enough to earn NBA All-Rookie Team
NBA All-Rookie Team
honors. And he managed to blend his style with his teammates, so much so that Hudson set a career high by scoring 26.8 points per game. But the team stumbled to a 36–46 record—12 wins fewer than in the previous season. Still, the Hawks qualified for the playoffs, where they lost to the New York Knicks
New York Knicks
in the first round. Maravich struggled somewhat during his second season. His scoring average dipped to 19.3 points per game, and the Hawks finished with another disappointing 36–46 record. Once again they qualified for the playoffs, and once again they were eliminated in the first round. However, Atlanta
Atlanta
fought hard against the Boston Celtics, with Maravich averaging 27.7 points in the series. Maravich erupted in his third season, averaging 26.1 points (5th in the NBA) and dishing out 6.9 assists per game (6th in the NBA). With 2,063 points, he combined with Hudson (2,029 points) to become only the second set of teammates in league history to each score over 2,000 points in a single season.[21] The Hawks soared to a 46–36 record, but again bowed out in the first round of the playoffs. However, the season was good enough to earn Maravich his first-ever appearance in the NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game, and also All-NBA Second Team
All-NBA Second Team
honors. The following season (1973–74) was his best yet—at least in terms of individual accomplishments. Maravich posted 27.7 points per game—second in the league behind Bob McAdoo—and earned his second appearance in the All-Star Game. However, Atlanta
Atlanta
sank to a disappointing 35–47 record and missed the postseason entirely. New Orleans
New Orleans
Jazz[edit] In the summer of 1974, an expansion franchise was preparing for its first season of competition in the NBA. The New Orleans
New Orleans
Jazz were looking for something or someone to generate excitement among their new basketball fans. With his exciting style of play, Maravich was seen as the perfect man for the job. Additionally, he was already a celebrity in the state due to accomplishments at LSU. To acquire Maravich, the Jazz traded two players and four draft picks to Atlanta. The expansion team struggled mightily in its first season. Maravich managed to score 21.5 points per game, but shot a career-worst 41.9 percent from the floor. The Jazz posted a 23–59 record, worst in the NBA. Jazz management did its best to give Maravich a better supporting cast. The team posted a 38–44 record in its second season (1975–76) but did not qualify for postseason play, despite the dramatic improvement. Maravich struggled with injuries that limited him to just 62 games that season, but he averaged 25.9 points per contest (third behind McAdoo and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar) and continued his crowd-pleasing antics. He was elected to the All-NBA First Team that year. The following season (1976–77) was his most productive in the NBA. He led the league in scoring with an average of 31.1 points per game. He scored 40 points or more in 13 different games,[22] and 50 or more in 4 games.[23] His 68-point masterpiece against the Knicks[24][25] was at the time the most points ever scored by a guard in a single game, and only two players at any position had ever scored more: Wilt Chamberlain and Elgin Baylor.[26] Baylor was head coach of the Jazz at that time. Maravich earned his third all-star game appearance and was honored as All-NBA First Team
All-NBA First Team
for the second consecutive season. The following season, injuries to both knees forced him to miss 32 games during the 1977–78 season. Despite being robbed of some quickness and athleticism, he still managed to score 27.0 points per game, and he also added 6.7 assists per contest, his highest average as a member of the Jazz. Many of those assists went to new teammate Truck Robinson, who had joined the franchise as a free agent during the off-season. In his first year in New Orleans, he averaged 22.7 points and a league-best 15.7 rebounds per game. His presence prevented opponents from focusing their defensive efforts entirely on Maravich, and it lifted the Jazz to a 39–43 record—just short of making the club's first-ever appearance in the playoffs. Knee problems plagued Maravich for the rest of his career. He played in just 49 games during the 1978–79 season. He scored 22.6 points per game that season and earned his fifth and final All-Star appearance. But his scoring and passing abilities were severely impaired. The team struggled on the court, and faced serious financial trouble as well. Management became desperate to make some changes. The Jazz traded Robinson to the Phoenix Suns, receiving draft picks and some cash in return. However, in 1979, team owner Sam Battistone moved the Jazz to Salt Lake City. Final season[edit] The Utah Jazz
Utah Jazz
began play in the 1979–80 season. Maravich moved with the team to Salt Lake City, but his knee problems were worse than ever. He appeared in 17 games early in the season, but his injuries prevented him from practicing much, and new coach Tom Nissalke had a strict rule that players who didn't practice were not allowed to play in games. Thus, Maravich was parked on the bench for 24 straight games, much to the dismay of Utah fans and to Maravich himself. During that time, Adrian Dantley emerged as the team's franchise player. The Jazz placed Maravich on waivers in January 1980. He signed with the Celtics, the top team in the league that year, led by rookie superstar Larry Bird.[27] Maravich adjusted to a new role as part-time contributor, giving Boston a "hired gun" off the bench. He helped the team post a 61–21 record in the regular season, best in the league. And, for the first time since his early career in Atlanta, Maravich was able to participate in the NBA playoffs. He appeared in nine games during that postseason, but the Celtics were upended by Julius Erving and the Philadelphia 76ers
Philadelphia 76ers
in the Eastern Conference finals, four games to one. Realizing that his knee problems would never go away, Maravich retired at the end of that season. The NBA instituted the 3-point shot just in time for Maravich's last season in the league. He had always been famous for his long-range shooting, and his final year provided an official statistical gauge of his abilities. Between his limited playing time in Utah and Boston, he made 10 of 15 3-point shots, giving him a career 67% completion rate behind the arc. During his ten-year career in the NBA, Maravich played in 658 games, averaging 24.2 points and 5.4 assists per contest. In 1987, he was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame, and his No. 7 jersey has been retired by both the Jazz and the New Orleans Pelicans, as well as his No. 44 jersey by the Atlanta
Atlanta
Hawks. NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend

  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game

 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw
Free throw
percentage

 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game

 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1970–71 Atlanta 81 ... 36.1 .458 ... .800 3.7 4.4 ... ... 23.2

1971–72 Atlanta 66 ... 34.9 .427 ... .811 3.9 6.0 ... ... 19.3

1972–73 Atlanta 79 ... 39.1 .441 ... .800 4.4 6.9 ... ... 26.1

1973–74 Atlanta 76 ... 38.2 .457 ... .826 4.9 5.2 1.5 .2 27.7

1974–75 New Orleans 79 ... 36.1 .419 ... .811 5.3 6.2 1.5 .2 21.5

1975–76 New Orleans 62 ... 38.3 .459 ... .811 4.8 5.4 1.4 .4 25.9

1976–77 New Orleans 73 ... 41.7 .433 ... .835 5.1 5.4 1.2 .3 31.1

1977–78 New Orleans 50 ... 40.8 .444 ... .870 3.6 6.7 2.0 .2 27.0

1978–79 New Orleans 49 ... 37.2 .421 ... .841 2.5 5.0 1.2 .4 22.6

1979–80 Utah 17 ... 30.7 .412 .636 .820 2.4 3.2 .9 .2 17.1

1979–80 Boston 26 4 17.0 .494 .750 .909 1.5 1.1 .3 .1 11.5

Career 658 ... 37.0 .441 .667 .820 4.2 5.4 1.4 .3 24.2

All-Star 4 4 19.8 .409 ... .778 2.0 3.8 1.0 0.0 10.8

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1971 Atlanta 5 ... 39.8 .377 ... .692 5.2 4.8 ... ... 22.0

1972 Atlanta 6 ... 36.5 .446 ... .817 5.3 4.7 ... ... 27.7

1973 Atlanta 6 ... 39.0 .419 ... .794 4.8 6.7 ... ... 26.2

1980 Boston 9 ... 11.6 .490 .333 .667 .9 .7 .3 .0 6.0

Career[19] 26 ... 29.1 .423 .333 .784 3.6 3.8 ... ... 18.7

Later life and death[edit] After injuries forced his retirement from the game in the fall of 1980, Maravich became a recluse for two years. Through it all, Maravich said he was searching "for life". He tried the practices of yoga and Hinduism, read Trappist
Trappist
monk Thomas Merton's The Seven Storey Mountain and took an interest in the field of ufology, the study of unidentified flying objects. He also explored vegetarianism and macrobiotics. Eventually, he embraced evangelical Christianity. A few years before his death, Maravich said, "I want to be remembered as a Christian, a person that serves him [Jesus] to the utmost, not as a basketball player."[28] On January 5, 1988, Maravich collapsed and died of heart failure at age 40[29] while playing in a pickup basketball game in the gym at First Church of the Nazarene in Pasadena, California, with a group that included evangelical author James Dobson. Maravich had flown out from his home in Louisiana
Louisiana
to tape a segment for Dobson's radio show that aired later that day. Dobson has said that Maravich's last words, less than a minute before he died, were "I feel great. I just feel great." An autopsy revealed the cause of death to be a rare congenital defect; he had been born with a missing left coronary artery, a vessel that supplies blood to the muscle fibers of the heart. His right coronary artery was grossly enlarged and had been compensating for the defect.[30] Maravich died the year after his father's passing and a number of years after his mother, who had committed suicide with a self-inflicted gunshot. Maravich is buried at Resthaven Gardens of Memory and Mausoleum in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Legacy[edit] Maravich was survived by his wife Jackie and his two sons Jaeson, who was 8 years old, and Josh, aged 5. Only the previous year, Maravich had taken Jaeson to the 1987 NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game in Seattle, Washington, and introduced him to Michael Jordan. Since Maravich's children were very young when he died, Jackie Maravich initially shielded them from unwanted media attention, not even allowing Jaeson and Josh to attend their father's funeral.[17] However, a proclivity to basketball seemed to be an inherited trait. During a 2003 interview, Jaeson told USA Today
USA Today
that, when he was still only a toddler, "My dad passed me a (Nerf) basketball, and I've been hooked ever since... . My dad said I shot and missed, and I got mad and I kept shooting. He said his dad told him he did the same thing."[31] Despite some setbacks coping with their father's death and without the benefit that his tutelage might have provided, both sons eventually were inspired to play high school and collegiate basketball—Josh at his father's alma mater, LSU.[31][32] On June 27, 2014, Governor Bobby Jindal
Bobby Jindal
proposed that LSU erect a statue of Maravich outside the Assembly Center which already bears the basketball star's name. Former coach Dale Brown opposes such a monument, but Maravich's widow, Jackie McLachlan, said that she had been promised a statue after the passing of her husband. McLachlan said that she has noticed how fans struggle to get the Maravich name on the Assembly Center into a camera frame.[33] In February 2016, the LSU Athletic Hall of Fame Committee unanimously approved a proposal that a statue honoring Maravich be installed on the campus.[34] Memorabilia[edit] Maravich's untimely death and mystique have made memorabilia associated with him among the most highly prized of any basketball collectibles. Game-used Maravich jerseys bring more money at auction than similar items from anybody other than George Mikan, with the most common items selling for $10,000 and up and a game-used LSU jersey selling for $94,300 in a 2001 Grey Flannel auction.[35] The signed game ball from his career-high 68 point night on February 25, 1977, sold for $131,450 in a 2009 Heritage auction.[36] Honors, books, films and music[edit]

In 1987, roughly a year before his death, Maravich co-authored an autobiography titled Heir to a Dream that devoted much focus to his life after retirement from basketball and his later devotion to Christianity. After Maravich's death, Louisiana
Louisiana
Governor Buddy Roemer
Buddy Roemer
signed a proclamation officially renaming the LSU home court the Pete Maravich Assembly Center. In 1991, a biographical film dramatizing his 8th grade season entitled The Pistol: The Birth of a Legend was released.[37] In 1996, he was named one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History
50 Greatest Players in NBA History
by a panel made up of NBA historians, players, and coaches. He was the only deceased player on the list. At the 1997 All-Star Game in Cleveland, he was represented by his two sons at halftime. In 2001, a comprehensive 90-minute documentary film debuted on CBS entitled Pistol Pete: The Life and Times of Pete Maravich. In 2005, ESPNU
ESPNU
named Maravich the greatest college basketball player of all time. In 2007, two biographies of Maravich were released: Maravich by Wayne Federman and Marshall Terrill
Marshall Terrill
and Pistol by Mark Kriegel. The Ziggens, a band from Southern California, wrote a song about Maravich entitled "Pistol Pete".[38]

Collegiate awards[edit]

The Sporting News College Player of the Year (1970) USBWA College Player of the Year (1969, 1970) Naismith Award Winner (1970) Helms Foundation Player of the Year (1970) UPI Player of the Year (1970) Sporting News Player of the Year (1970) AP College Player of the Year (1970) The Sporting News All-America First Team (1968, 1969, 1970) Three-time AP and UPI First-Team All-America (1968, 1969, 1970) Led the NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
in scoring with 43.8 ppg (1968); 44.2 (1969) and 44.5 ppg (1970) Averaged 43.6 ppg on the LSU freshman team (1967) Scored a career-high 69 points vs. Alabama (000000001970-02-07-0000February 7, 1970); 66 vs. Tulane (000000001969-02-10-0000February 10, 1969); 64 vs. Kentucky (000000001970-02-21-0000February 21, 1970); 61 vs. Vanderbilt (000000001969-12-11-0000December 11, 1969) Holds LSU records for most field goals made (26) and attempted (57) in a game against Vanderbilt on 000000001969-01-29-0000January 29, 1969 All-Southeastern Conference (1968, 1969, 1970) #23 Jersey retired by LSU (2007) In 1970, Maravich led LSU to a 20–8 record and a fourth-place finish in the National Invitation Tournament

Collegiate records[edit]

Points, career: 3,667 (three seasons) Highest scoring average, points per game, career: 44.2 (3,667 points/83 games) Points, season: 1,381 (1970) Highest scoring average, points per game, season: 44.5 (1,381/31) (1970) Games scoring 50 or more points, career: 28 Games scoring 50 or more points, season: 10 (1970) Field goals made, career: 1,387 Field goals made, season: 522 (1970) Field goal attempts, career: 3,166 Field goal attempts, season: 1,168 (1970) Free throws made, game: 30 (in 31 attempts), vs. Oregon State, 000000001969-12-22-0000December 22, 1969

Tied by Ben Woodside, North Dakota State, on 000000002008-12-06-0000December 6, 2008[39]

NBA awards[edit]

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NBA All-Rookie Team All-NBA First Team
All-NBA First Team
(1976, 1977) All-NBA Second Team
All-NBA Second Team
(1973, 1978) Five-time NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
(1973, 1974, 1977, 1978, 1979) Led the league in scoring (31.1 ppg) in 1977, his career best Scored a career-high 68 points against the New York Knicks
New York Knicks
on Feb. 25, 1977 #7 jersey retired by the Utah Jazz
Utah Jazz
(1985) #7 jersey retired by the Superdome (1988) NBA 50th Anniversary All-Time Team (1996) #7 jersey retired by the New Orleans
New Orleans
Hornets (now Pelicans) (2002), even though he never played for them—one of only four players to have a number retired by a team they did not play for; Maravich did play professionally for the New Orleans
New Orleans
Jazz, however, and has remained a greatly admired figure amongst New Orleans
New Orleans
sports fans ever since. #44 jersey retired by the Atlanta Hawks
Atlanta Hawks
(2017)

NBA records[edit] Free throws made, quarter: 14, Pete Maravich, third quarter, Atlanta Hawks vs. Buffalo Braves, 000000001973-11-28-0000November 28, 1973

Broken by Vince Carter
Vince Carter
on 000000002005-12-23-0000December 23, 2005[40]

Free throw
Free throw
attempts, quarter: 16, Pete Maravich, second quarter, Atlanta Hawks
Atlanta Hawks
at Chicago Bulls, 000000001973-01-02-0000January 2, 1973

Broken by Ben Wallace
Ben Wallace
on 000000002005-12-11-0000December 11, 2005[41]

Second pair of teammates in NBA history to score 2,000 or more points in a season: 2, Atlanta Hawks
Atlanta Hawks
(1972–73) Maravich: 2,063 Lou Hudson: 2,029 Third pair of teammates in NBA history to score 40 or more points in the same game: New Orleans
New Orleans
Jazz vs. Denver Nuggets, 000000001977-04-10-0000April 10, 1977 Maravich: 45 Nate Williams: 41 David Thompson of the Denver Nuggets
Denver Nuggets
also scored 40 points in this game. Ranks 4th in NBA history – Free throws made, none missed, game: 18–18, Pete Maravich, Atlanta Hawks
Atlanta Hawks
vs. Buffalo Braves, 000000001973-11-28-0000November 28, 1973 Ranks 5th in NBA history – Free throws made, game: 23, Pete Maravich, New Orleans
New Orleans
Jazz vs. New York Knicks, 000000001975-10-26-0000October 26, 1975 (2 OT) See also[edit]

List of individual National Basketball
Basketball
Association scoring leaders by season List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association players with most points in a game List of NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
men's basketball players with 60 or more points in a game List of NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
men's basketball season scoring leaders List of NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
men's basketball career scoring leaders List of NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
men's basketball career free throw scoring leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association annual minutes leaders

References[edit]

^ http://www.anb.org/articles/19/19-00449.html ^ "Peter Maravich at Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame". Archived from the original on February 16, 2008. Retrieved 2007-09-17. CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link) ^ "The Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame – Hall of Famers". Hoophall.com. 1988-01-05. Archived from the original on 2012-08-31. Retrieved 2015-05-09.  ^ "What If——-Pete Maravich?". Thomaston Times. Archived from the original on 2013-06-30. Retrieved 2013-05-04.  ^ "The My Hero Project – Pete Maravich". Myhero.com. Retrieved 2015-05-09.  ^ "Serbica Americana – Pete Maravich". Eserbia.org. Retrieved 2015-05-09.  ^ Kriegel, Mark. "'Pistol' Draws a Bead on Pete Maravich". NPR.org. Retrieved 2015-05-09.  ^ Jennings, Jay (February 11, 2007). "Crowd Pleaser". The New York Times. Retrieved 2012-01-14.  ^ "Pistol: The Life of Pete Maravich". Amazon.com. Retrieved 2012-01-14.  ^ " Pete Maravich
Pete Maravich
Summary". NBA.com. Retrieved 2010-09-06.  ^ a b " Pete Maravich
Pete Maravich
Bio". NBA.com. Retrieved 2015-05-09.  ^ Federman, Wayne; Terrill, Marshall; Maravich, Jackie (2006). Maravich. p. 68. ISBN 1-894963-52-0.  ^ Rogers, Thomas. "Pete Maravich, a Hall of Famer Who Set Basketball Marks, Dies", The New York Times, January 6, 1988. Retrieved June 14, 2009. ^ Medcalf, Myron (2014-08-18). "What if 'Pistol' Pete had a 3-point line?". ESPN.com. ESPN. Retrieved 2015-09-16.  ^ Diaz, Angel; Erwin, Jack; Warner, Ralph (2012-03-02). "The 25 Most Unbreakable Records in Sports History". Complex.com. Retrieved 2015-09-16.  ^ Steve Bunin, Bill Walton
Bill Walton
(2006). Remembering Pete Maravich (Television production). The Hot List. Event occurs at 1:56. Retrieved 2015-10-03.  ^ a b Thamel, Pete (February 17, 2004). "In the Name of His Father: The Journey of Pete Maravich's Son". The New York Times. Archived from the original on August 5, 2009. Retrieved May 22, 2010.  ^ At this time, freshmen did not play on the varsity team and these stats do not count in the NCAA
NCAA
record books. ^ a b " Pete Maravich
Pete Maravich
NBA Stats". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2015-05-09.  ^ "1970 NBA Draft". Basketball
Basketball
Reference. Archived from the original on December 6, 2008. Retrieved October 31, 2008.  ^ Elgin Baylor
Elgin Baylor
and Jerry West
Jerry West
were the first to accomplish this feat in the Los Angeles Lakers' 1964–65 season. It has since accomplished only three times: back-to-back by Kiki Vandeweghe
Kiki Vandeweghe
and Alex English
Alex English
of the 1982–1984 Denver Nuggets, and by Larry Bird
Larry Bird
and Kevin McHale of the 1986–87 Boston Celtics. ^ At the time, Tiny Archibald's 18 games of 40+ points in 1972–73 was the only total higher by a guard. ^ The most ever by a guard, until Michael Jordan
Michael Jordan
did it 8 times in 1986–87. Jordan would go on to get 4 or more 50+ point games in three more seasons; Kobe Bryant
Kobe Bryant
is the only other guard to reach this mark, 6 times in 2005–06, and a record 10 times in 2006–07. ^ "Pete Maravich's 68 points a record" by Larry Schwartz on ESPN Classic, November 19, 2003 ^ "'Pistol' Pete Maravich
Pete Maravich
– Career Recap – LSUsports.net – The Official Web Site of LSU Tigers Athletics". LSUsports.net. Retrieved 2015-05-09.  ^ "Most points by 1 player in a NBA game, 50 point games in NBA history". Nbahoopsonline.com. Retrieved 2015-05-09.  ^ Linda Hamilton (2004-11-02). "25 years later the Jazz are going strong". Deseret.news.com. Retrieved 2015-05-09.  ^ Federman, p. 367 ^ "Maravich Is Eulogized". The New York Times. 1988-01-10. Retrieved 2015-05-09.  ^ [1] Archived August 7, 2013, at the Wayback Machine. ^ a b Weir, Tom (February 14, 2003). "Playing in Pistol Pete's shadow". USA Today. Retrieved May 22, 2010.  ^ "Josh Maravich Stats, Bio – ESPN". Espn.go.com. Retrieved 2015-05-09.  ^ Michelle Millhollon (June 27, 2014). "Jindal to LSU: How about a statue of Pete Maravich?". Baton Rouge Morning Advocate. Retrieved June 27, 2014.  ^ "LSU will add statue of 'Pistol' Pete Maravich
Pete Maravich
outside of arena named in his honor". The Times-Picayune. 8 February 2016. Retrieved 11 January 2018.  ^ "Demand for Pistol Pete memorabilia is stronger tha". Sports Collectors Digest. 2007-12-21. Retrieved 2015-05-09.  ^ "1977 Pete Maravich
Pete Maravich
Sixty-Eighth Point Game Used Basketball Basketball
Basketball
Collectibles: Balls". Sports.ha.com. Retrieved 2010-09-06.  ^ [2] Archived December 18, 2014, at the Wayback Machine. ^ " Pistol Pete Lyric Meaning – The Ziggens
The Ziggens
Meanings". Songmeanings.net. Retrieved October 17, 2012.  ^ "Remember the Name: Ben Woodside". Sports.espn.go.com. Retrieved 2015-05-09.  ^ New Jersey Nets vs. Miami Heat – Play By Play – December 23, 2005 – ESPN
ESPN
(4th quarter) NB: While this link only backs up the fact that Carter made 16 free throws in a quarter, there is no mention of any records broken or set. ^ Detroit Pistons vs. Los Angeles Clippers – Recap – December 11, 2005 – ESPN
ESPN
NB: While this link only backs up the fact that Wallace attempted 20 free throws in a quarter, there is no mention of any records broken or set.

Further reading[edit]

Berger, Phil (1999). Forever Showtime: The Checkered Life of Pistol Pete Maravich. Taylor Trade. ISBN 0-87833-237-5.  Federman, Wayne and Terrill, Marshall (2007). Maravich. SportClassic Books. ISBN 1-894963-52-0.  Federman, Wayne and Terrill, Marshall (2008). Pete Maravich: The Authorized Biography of Pistol Pete. Focus on the Family/Tyndale House Publishers. ISBN 1-58997-535-9.  Gutman, Bill (1972). Pistol Pete Maravich: The making of a basketball superstar. Grosset & Dunlap. ISBN 0-448-01973-6.  Kriegel, Mark (2007). Pistol: The Life of Pete Maravich. Free Press. ISBN 0-7432-8497-6.  Maravich, Pete and Campbell, Darrel (1987). Heir To A Dream. Nashville: Thomas Nelson. ISBN 0-8407-7609-8.  Towle, Mike (2000). I Remember Pete Maravich. Nashville: Cumberland House. ISBN 1-58182-148-4.  Towle, Mike (2003). Pete Maravich: Magician of the Hardwood. Nashville: Cumberland House. ISBN 1-58182-374-6.  Brown, Danny (2008). Shooting the Pistol: Courtside Photographs of Pete Maravich
Pete Maravich
at LSU. Louisiana
Louisiana
State University Press ISBN 978-0-8071-3327-9

External links[edit]

Wikiquote has quotations related to: Pete Maravich

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ESPN
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Links to related articles

v t e

1970 NBA Draft

First round

Bob Lanier Rudy Tomjanovich Pete Maravich Dave Cowens Sam Lacey Jim Ard John Johnson Geoff Petrie George Johnson Greg Howard Jimmy Collins Al Henry Jim McMillian John Vallely John Hummer Gary Freeman Mike Price

Second round

Calvin Murphy Nate Archibald Jake Ford Rex Morgan Doug Cook Pete Cross Cornell Warner Walt Gilmore Dave Sorenson Fred Taylor Paul Ruffner Joe DePre Earnie Killum Dan Hester Ken Warzynski Bill Zopf Howie Wright

v t e

Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame Class of 1987

Players

Rick Barry Walt Frazier Bob Houbregs Pete Maravich Bobby Wanzer

v t e

Members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame

Players

Guards

R. Allen Archibald Beckman Belov Bing Blazejowski Borgmann Brennan Cervi Cheeks Clayton Cooper-Dyke Cousy Dampier Davies Drexler Dumars Edwards Frazier Friedman Galis Gervin Goodrich Greer Guerin Hanson Haynes Holman Hyatt Isaacs Iverson Jeannette D. Johnson E. Johnson K. Jones S. Jones Jordan Kidd Lieberman Maravich Marcari Marčiulionis Martin McDermott McGrady D. McGuire Meyers R. Miller Monroe C. Murphy Nash Page Payton Petrović Phillip Posey Richmond Robertson Rodgers Roosma J. Russell Schommer Scott Sedran Sharman K. Smith Staley Steinmetz Stockton Swoopes Thomas Thompson Vandivier Wanzer West J. White Wilkens Woodard Wooden

Forwards

Arizin Barkley Barry Baylor Bird Bradley R. Brown Cunningham Curry Dalipagić Dantley DeBusschere Dehnert Endacott English Erving Foster Fulks Gale Gates Gola Hagan Havlicek Hawkins Hayes Haywood Heinsohn Hill Howell G. Johnson King Lucas Luisetti K. Malone McClain B. McCracken J. McCracken McGinnis McHale Mikkelsen C. Miller Mullin Pettit Pippen Pollard Radja Ramsey Rodman Schayes E. Schmidt O. Schmidt Stokes C. Thompson T. Thompson Twyman Walker Washington N. White Wilkes Wilkins Worthy Yardley

Centers

Abdul-Jabbar Barlow Beaty Bellamy Chamberlain Ćosić Cowens Crawford Daniels DeBernardi Donovan Ewing Gallatin Gilmore Gruenig Harris-Stewart Houbregs Issel W. Johnson Johnston M. Krause Kurland Lanier Leslie Lovellette Lapchick Macauley M. Malone McAdoo Meneghin Mikan Mourning S. Murphy Mutombo Olajuwon O'Neal Parish Pereira Reed Risen Robinson B. Russell Sabonis Sampson Semjonova Thurmond Unseld Wachter Walton Yao

Coaches

Alexeeva P. Allen Anderson Auerbach Auriemma Barmore Barry Blood Boeheim L. Brown Calhoun Calipari Cann Carlson Carnesecca Carnevale Carril Case Chancellor Chaney Conradt Crum Daly Dean Díaz-Miguel Diddle Drake Driesell Ferrándiz Gaines Gamba Gardner Gaze Gill Gomelsky Gunter Hannum Harshman Haskins Hatchell Heinsohn Hickey Hobson Holzman Hughes Hurley Iba Izzo P. Jackson Julian Keaney Keogan Knight Krzyzewski Kundla Lambert Leonard Lewis Litwack Loeffler Lonborg Magee McCutchan McGraw A. McGuire F. McGuire McLendon Meanwell Meyer Miller Moore Nelson Nikolić Novosel Olson Pitino Ramsay Richardson Riley Rubini Rupp Rush Sachs Self Sharman Shelton Sloan D. Smith Stringer Summitt Tarkanian Taylor Teague J. Thompson VanDerveer Wade Watts Wilkens G. Williams R. Williams Wooden Woolpert Wootten Yow

Contributors

Abbott Barksdale Bee Biasone H. Brown W. Brown Bunn Buss Clifton Colangelo Cooper Davidson Douglas Duer Embry Fagan Fisher Fleisher Gavitt Gottlieb Granik Gulick Harrison Hearn Henderson Hepp Hickox Hinkle Irish M. Jackson Jernstedt Jones Kennedy Knight J. Krause Lemon Liston Lloyd McLendon Lobo Mokray Morgan Morgenweck Naismith Newell Newton J. O'Brien L. O'Brien Olsen Podoloff Porter Raveling Reid Reinsdorf Ripley Sanders Saperstein Schabinger St. John Stagg Stanković Steitz Stern Taylor Thorn Tower Trester Vitale Wells Welts Wilke Winter Zollner

Referees

Bavetta Enright Garretson Hepbron Hoyt Kennedy Leith Mihalik Nichols Nucatola Quigley Rudolph Shirley Strom Tobey Walsh

Teams

1960 United States Olympic Team 1992 United States Olympic Team All-American Red Heads Buffalo Germans The First Team Harlem Globetrotters Immaculata College New York Renaissance Original Celtics Texas Western

v t e

National Basketball
Basketball
Association's 50 Greatest Players in NBA History

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Nate Archibald Paul Arizin Charles Barkley Rick Barry Elgin Baylor Dave Bing Larry Bird Wilt Chamberlain Bob Cousy Dave Cowens Billy Cunningham Dave DeBusschere Clyde Drexler Julius Erving Patrick Ewing Walt Frazier George Gervin Hal Greer John Havlicek Elvin Hayes Magic Johnson Sam Jones Michael Jordan Jerry Lucas Karl Malone Moses Malone Pete Maravich Kevin McHale George Mikan Earl Monroe Hakeem Olajuwon Shaquille O'Neal Robert Parish Bob Pettit Scottie Pippen Willis Reed Oscar Robertson David Robinson Bill Russell Dolph Schayes Bill Sharman John Stockton Isiah Thomas Nate Thurmond Wes Unseld Bill Walton Jerry West Lenny Wilkens James Worthy

v t e

Associated Press Men's College Basketball
Basketball
Player of the Year

1961: Lucas 1962: Lucas 1963: Heyman 1964: Bradds 1965: Bradley 1966: Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Hayes 1969: Alcindor 1970: Maravich 1971: Carr 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Thompson 1975: Thompson 1976: May 1977: Johnson 1978: Lee 1979: Bird 1980: Aguirre 1981: Sampson 1982: Sampson 1983: Sampson 1984: Jordan 1985: Ewing 1986: Berry 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Hawkins 1989: Elliott 1990: Simmons 1991: O'Neal 1992: Laettner 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: Smith 1996: Camby 1997: Duncan 1998: Jamison 1999: Brand 2000: Martin 2001: Battier 2002: Williams 2003: West 2004: Nelson 2005: Bogut 2006: Redick 2007: Durant 2008: Hansbrough 2009: Griffin 2010: Turner 2011: Fredette 2012: Davis 2013: Burke 2014: McDermott 2015: Kaminsky 2016: Valentine 2017: Mason III 2018: Brunson

v t e

Naismith Men's College Player of the Year

1969: Alcindor 1970: Maravich 1971: Carr 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Walton 1975: Thompson 1976: May 1977: M. Johnson 1978: Lee 1979: Bird 1980: Aguirre 1981: Sampson 1982: Sampson 1983: Sampson 1984: Jordan 1985: Ewing 1986: Dawkins 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Manning 1989: Ferry 1990: Simmons 1991: L. Johnson 1992: Laettner 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: Smith 1996: Camby 1997: Duncan 1998: Jamison 1999: Brand 2000: Martin 2001: Battier 2002: Williams 2003: Ford 2004: Nelson 2005: Bogut 2006: Redick 2007: Durant 2008: Hansbrough 2009: Griffin 2010: Turner 2011: Fredette 2012: Davis 2013: Burke 2014: McDermott 2015: Kaminsky 2016: Hield 2017: Mason III 2018: Brunson

v t e

Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
Trophy winners

1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Lucas 1962: Lucas 1963: Heyman 1964: Hazzard 1965: Bradley 1966: Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Alcindor 1969: Maravich 1970: Maravich 1971: Wicks 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Walton 1975: Thompson 1976: Dantley 1977: M. Johnson 1978: Ford 1979: Bird 1980: Aguirre 1981: Sampson 1982: Sampson 1983: Sampson 1984: Jordan 1985: Mullin 1986: Berry 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Hawkins 1989: Ferry 1990: Simmons 1991: L. Johnson 1992: Laettner 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: O'Bannon 1996: Camby 1997: Duncan 1998: Jamison 1999: Brand 2000: Martin 2001: Battier 2002: Williams 2003: West 2004: Nelson 2005: Bogut 2006: Morrison & Redick 2007: Durant 2008: Hansbrough 2009: Griffin 2010: Turner 2011: Fredette 2012: Davis 2013: Burke 2014: McDermott 2015: Kaminsky 2016: Hield 2017: Mason III 2018: Brunson

v t e

Helms Foundation College Basketball
Basketball
Player of the Year

1905: Steinmetz 1906: Grebenstein 1907: Kinney 1908: Keinath 1909: Schommer 1910: Page 1911: Kiendl 1912: Stangel 1913: Calder 1914: Halstead 1915: Houghton 1916: Levis 1917: Woods 1918: Chandler 1919: Platou 1920: Cann 1921: Williams 1922: Carney 1923: Endacott 1924: Black 1925: Mueller 1926: Cobb 1927: Hanson 1928: Holt 1929: C. Thompson 1930: Hyatt 1931: Carlton 1932: Wooden 1933: Sale 1934: Bennett 1935: Edwards 1936: Moir 1937: Luisetti 1938: Luisetti 1939: Jaworski 1940: Glamack 1941: Glamack 1942: Modzelewski 1943: Senesky 1944: Mikan 1945: Mikan 1946: Kurland 1947: Tucker 1948: Macauley 1949: Lavelli 1950: Arizin 1951: Groat 1952: Lovellette 1953: Houbregs 1954: Gola 1955: B. Russell 1956: B. Russell 1957: Rosenbluth 1958: Baylor 1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Lucas 1962: Hogue 1963: Heyman 1964: Hazzard 1965: Bradley & Goodrich 1966: C. Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Alcindor 1969: Alcindor 1970: Maravich & Wicks 1971: Carr & Wicks 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: D. Thompson 1975: D. Thompson 1976: Benson & May 1977: Johnson 1978: Givens 1979: Bird

v t e

UPI College Basketball
Basketball
Player of the Year Award winners

1955: Gola 1956: B. Russell 1957: Forte 1958: Robertson 1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Lucas 1962: Lucas 1963: Heyman 1964: Bradds 1965: Bradley 1966: C. Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Hayes 1969: Alcindor 1970: Maravich 1971: Carr 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Walton 1975: Thompson 1976: May 1977: Johnson 1978: Lee 1979: Bird 1980: Aguirre 1981: Sampson 1982: Sampson 1983: Sampson 1984: Jordan 1985: Mullin 1986: Berry 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Hawkins 1989: Ferry 1990: Simmons 1991: O'Neal 1992: Jackson 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: Smith 1996: Allen

v t e

Sporting News Men's College Basketball
Basketball
Player of the Year

1943: Phillip 1944: Hall 1945: Mikan 1946: Kurland 1947–49: None selected 1950: Arizin 1951: White 1952–57: None selected 1958: Robertson 1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Lucas 1962: Lucas 1963: Heyman 1964: Bradley 1965: Bradley 1966: Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Hayes 1969: Alcindor 1970: Maravich 1971: Wicks 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Walton 1975: Thompson 1976: May 1977: M. Johnson 1978: P. Ford 1979: Bird 1980: Griffith 1981: Aguirre 1982: Sampson 1983: Jordan 1984: Jordan 1985: Ewing 1986: Berry 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Hawkins 1989: King 1990: Scott 1991: L. Johnson 1992: Laettner 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: Respert 1996: Camby 1997: Duncan 1998: Jamison 1999: Brand 2000: Martin 2001: Battier 2002: Williams 2003: T. J. Ford 2004: Nelson 2005: Brown 2006: Redick 2007: Durant 2008: Hansbrough 2009: Griffin 2010: Turner 2011: Fredette 2012: Davis 2013: Oladipo 2014: McDermott 2015: Kaminsky 2016: Hield 2017: Mason III 2018: Brunson

v t e

NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
men's basketball season scoring leaders

Unofficial

1936: Luisetti 1937: Luisetti 1938: Jaworski 1939: Jaworski 1940: Modzelewski 1941: Modzelewski 1942: Modzelewski 1943: Senesky 1944: Calverley 1945: Mikan 1946: Mikan 1947: Lacy

Official

1948: Wier 1949: Lavelli 1950: Arizin 1951: Mlkvy 1952: Lovellette 1953: Selvy 1954: Selvy 1955: Floyd 1956: Floyd 1957: Wallace 1958: Robertson 1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Burgess 1962: McGill 1963: Werkman 1964: Komives 1965: Barry 1966: Schellhase 1967: Walker 1968: Maravich 1969: Maravich 1970: Maravich 1971: Neumann 1972: Lamar 1973: Averitt 1974: Fogle 1975: McCurdy 1976: Rogers 1977: F. Williams 1978: F. Williams 1979: Butler 1980: Murphy 1981: Fredrick 1982: Kelly 1983: Kelly 1984: Jakubick 1985: McDaniel 1986: Bailey 1987: Houston 1988: Hawkins 1989: Gathers 1990: Kimble 1991: Bradshaw 1992: Roberts 1993: Guy 1994: Robinson 1995: Thomas 1996: Granger 1997: Jones 1998: Jones 1999: A. Young 2000: Alexander 2001: McCollum 2002: Conley 2003: Douglas 2004: Clark 2005: Clark 2006: Morrison 2007: R. Williams 2008: R. Williams 2009: Curry 2010: Coleman 2011: Fredette 2012: Hamilton 2013: Green 2014: McDermott 2015: Harvey 2016: Daniel 2017: Keene 2018: T. Young

v t e

1968 NCAA
NCAA
Men's Basketball
Basketball
Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Lew Alcindor Elvin Hayes Pete Maravich Larry Miller Wes Unseld

Second Team

Lucius Allen Bob Lanier Don May Calvin Murphy Jo Jo White

v t e

1969 NCAA
NCAA
Men's Basketball
Basketball
Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Lew Alcindor Spencer Haywood Pete Maravich Rick Mount Calvin Murphy

Second Team

Dan Issel Mike Maloy Bud Ogden Charlie Scott Jo Jo White

v t e

1970 NCAA
NCAA
Men's Basketball
Basketball
Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Dan Issel Bob Lanier Pete Maravich Rick Mount Calvin Murphy

Second Team

Austin Carr Jim Collins John Roche Charlie Scott Sidney Wicks

v t e

Southeastern Conference Men's Basketball
Basketball
Player of the Year

1965: Lee 1966: Lee & Riley 1967: Widby 1968: Maravich 1969: Maravich 1970: Maravich 1971: Neumann 1972: Edwards & Parker 1973: Grevey & Hudson 1974: van Breda Kolff 1975: Grevey & B. King 1976: B. King 1977: Grunfeld & B. King 1978: R. King 1979: R. King 1980: Macy 1981: Wilkins 1982: Ellis 1983: Ellis & Malone 1984: Barkley 1985: Walker 1986: Walker 1987: McKey & White 1988: Perdue 1989: Jackson 1990: Jackson 1991: O'Neal 1992: O'Neal 1993: Mashburn & McCaffrey 1994: Williamson 1995: Williamson 1996: Delk 1997: Mercer 1998: Sesay 1999: Porter 2000: Langhi & Swift 2001: Prince 2002: Dudley 2003: Bogans & Slay 2004: Roberts 2005: Bass 2006: G. Davis 2007: Byars & Lofton 2008: Foster 2009: Thornton 2010: Wall 2011: Parsons 2012: A. Davis 2013: Caldwell-Pope 2014: Wilbekin 2015: Portis 2016: Ulis 2017: Monk & Thornwell 2018: Maten & Williams

v t e

Atlanta
Atlanta
Hawks

Founded in 1946 Formerly the Buffalo Bisons (1946) and the Tri-Cities Blackhawks (1946–1951); played in Milwaukee (1951–1955) and St. Louis (1955–1968) Based in Atlanta, Georgia

Franchise

Franchise All-time roster Draft history Seasons Head coaches Current season

Arenas

Buffalo Memorial Auditorium Wharton Field House Milwaukee Arena Kiel Auditorium St. Louis Arena Alexander Memorial Coliseum Omni Coliseum Lakefront Arena Georgia Dome Philips Arena

G League affiliate

Erie BayHawks

NBA Championships (1)

1958

Conference Championships (4)

1957 1958 1960 1961

Retired numbers

9 21 23 44 55 59 Ted Turner
Ted Turner
(Hawks Logo)

Lore

The Human Highlight Film Pistol Pete Phantom Buzzer Game

Media

TV Peachtree TV FS South Fox Sports Southeast Radio 790 The Zone Announcers Bob Rathbun Dominique Wilkins Steve Holman

Personnel

Owner(s) Tony Ressler Grant Hill Sara Blakely Jesse Itzler Steven Price Rick Schnall

v t e

Utah Jazz

Founded in 1974 Played in New Orleans
New Orleans
(1974–79) Based in Salt Lake City, Utah

Franchise

Franchise Summer League 1974 Expansion Draft All-time roster Draft history Records Head coaches Seasons Current season

Arenas

Loyola Field House New Orleans
New Orleans
Municipal Auditorium Louisiana
Louisiana
Superdome Salt Palace Vivint Smart Home Arena

Personnel

Checketts Gardner Rigby

G League affiliate

Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
Stars

Administration

Owner: Jazz Basketball
Basketball
Investors, Inc. (represented by Gail Miller, widow of Larry H. Miller) President: Steve Starks Executive VP, Basketball
Basketball
Operations: Kevin O'Connor General Manager: Dennis Lindsey Head coach: Quin Snyder

Retired numbers

1 4 7 9 12 14 32 35 53 1223 Hot Rod Hundley
Hot Rod Hundley
(Microphone)

Hall of Famers

Pete Maravich Adrian Dantley John Stockton Jerry Sloan Hot Rod Hundley Karl Malone

Western Conference Championships (2)

1997 1998

Division titles (9)

1984 1989 1992 1997 1998 2000 2007 2008 2017

Rivals

Houston Rockets

Culture and lore

Jazz Bear Dan Roberts Game 6 of the 1998 NBA Finals Celtic Pride Tiffany Coyne "Kill Gil, Volumes I & II" (The Simpsons episode)

Media

TV AT&T SportsNet Rocky Mountain (current) KJZZ-TV
KJZZ-TV
(former) Radio Radio Network

KZNS-AM KZNS-FM

Announcers Craig Bolerjack Matt Harpring David Locke Ron Boone

v t e

New Orleans
New Orleans
Pelicans

Founded in 2002 Formerly the New Orleans
New Orleans
Hornets (2002–05, 2007–13) and the New Orleans/Oklahoma City Hornets (2005–07) Based in New Orleans, Louisiana

Franchise

Franchise Records Team history Seasons Draft history All-time roster Head coaches Broadcasters Current season

Arenas

Smoothie King Center Pete Maravich
Pete Maravich
Assembly Center Ford Center Lloyd Noble Center

General Managers

Bower Bass Bristow Bower Demps

Retired numbers

7

Culture and lore

Hurricane Katrina & temporary move to Oklahoma City George Shinn Hugo Boogie and the Brow

D-League affiliate

None

Media

TV Fox Sports New Orleans Radio WWL-FM Announcers Joel Meyers David Wesley Sean Kelley

v t e

NBA season scoring leaders

1947: Fulks 1948: Zaslofsky 1949: Mikan 1950: Mikan 1951: Mikan 1952: Arizin 1953: Johnston 1954: Johnston 1955: Johnston 1956: Pettit 1957: Arizin 1958: Yardley 1959: Pettit 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Chamberlain 1962: Chamberlain 1963: Chamberlain 1964: Chamberlain 1965: Chamberlain 1966: Chamberlain 1967: Barry 1968: Bing 1969: Hayes 1970: West 1971: Alcindor 1972: Abdul-Jabbar 1973: Archibald 1974: McAdoo 1975: McAdoo 1976: McAdoo 1977: Maravich 1978: Gervin 1979: Gervin 1980: Gervin 1981: Dantley 1982: Gervin 1983: English 1984: Dantley 1985: King 1986: Wilkins 1987: Jordan 1988: Jordan 1989: Jordan 1990: Jordan 1991: Jordan 1992: Jordan 1993: Jordan 1994: Robinson 1995: O'Neal 1996: Jordan 1997: Jordan 1998: Jordan 1999: Iverson 2000: O'Neal 2001: Iverson 2002: Iverson 2003: McGrady 2004: McGrady 2005: Iverson 2006: Bryant 2007: Bryant 2008: James 2009: Wade 2010: Durant 2011: Durant 2012: Durant 2013: Anthony 2014: Durant 2015: Westbrook 2016: Curry 2017: Westbrook

v t e

NBA on CBS

Related programs

The CBS Late Movie College Basketball
Basketball
on CBS

Related articles

Ratings

NBA Finals

Commentators

All-Star Game NBA Finals

Key figures

Gary Bender Tim Brant Bob Costas Don Criqui Eddie Doucette Frank Glieber Greg Gumbel Jim Kelly Verne Lundquist Brent Musburger Andy Musser Jim Nantz Don Robertson Dick Stockton Pat Summerall

Color commentators

John Andariese Rick Barry Hubie Brown Elgin Baylor James Brown Quinn Buckner Doug Collins Billy Cunningham Terry Dischinger Len Elmore Keith Erickson John Havlicek Tom Heinsohn Rod Hundley Gus Johnson Steve Jones Sonny Jurgensen Stu Lantz Kevin Loughery Pete Maravich Jon McGlocklin Dick Motta Jeff Mullins Billy Packer Bill Raftery Cal Ramsey Oscar Robertson Mendy Rudolph Bill Russell Cazzie Russell Larry Steele Lenny Wilkens

Sideline reporters

Charlsie Cantey Jane Chastain Irv Cross Jim Gray Sonny Hill Andrea Joyce Pat O'Brien Lesley Visser

NBA Finals

1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

All-Star Game

1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

Lore

Music "The Bad Boys" Christmas Day "The Greatest Game Ever Played" "The Shot"

Rivalries

Celtics–Lakers Lakers–Pistons

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 60326959 LCCN: n50068305 BNE: XX5648

.