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Petar I Petrović-Njegoš (Serbian: Петар I Петровић Његош; 1748 – 31 October 1830) was the ruler of the Prince-Bishopric of Montenegro as the Metropolitan (vladika) of Cetinje, and Exarch (legate) of the Serbian Orthodox Church in Montenegro. He was the most popular spiritual and military leader from the Petrović dynasty. During his long rule, Petar strengthened the state by uniting the often quarreling tribes, consolidating his control over Montenegrin lands, introducing the first laws in Montenegro (Zakonik Petra I). His rule prepared Montenegro for the subsequent introduction of modern institutions of the state: taxes, schools and larger commercial enterprises. He was canonized by the Serbian Orthodox Church as Saint Peter of Cetinje (Свети Петар Цетињски).

He was described as "a man of uncommon size, handsome features, considerable talent, and a highly respected character" by Therese Albertine Luise Robinson.[1]

  • ^ Ferdo Čulinović (1954). Državnopravna historija jugoslavenskih zemalja XIX i XX vijeka: knj. Srbija, Crna Gora, Makedonija, Jugoslavija, 1918-1945. Školska knjiga.
  • ^ a b Barjaktarović 1984, p. 29
  • ^ Boehm, Christopher (1987).

    ... под Мартинићима и 22 септембра исте године у Крусима, недалеко Под- горице, половином црногорске војске командовао владика Петар I, а другом половином гувернадур Јоко. Из овога се јасно види до које висине је доспела ...

  • ^ Ferdo Čulinović (1954). Državnopravna historija jugoslavenskih zemalja XIX i XX vijeka: knj. Srbija, Crna Gora, Makedonija, Jugoslavija, 1918-1945. Školska knjiga.
  • ^ a b Barjaktarović 1984, p. 29
  • ^ Boehm, Christopher (1987). Blood Revenge: The Enactment and Management of Conflict in Montenegro and Other Tribal Societies. University of Pennsylvania Press. p. 138. ISBN 081221241X. Retrieved 27 March 2020.
  • ^ a b Király & Rothenberg 1982, p. 65.
  • ^ Bogunović.
  • ^ Dositej Obradović (1899). Domaća pisma. Srpska književna zadruga. p. 203.
  • ^ Morison, W. A. (1942). The Revolt of the Serbs Against the Turks 1804-1913. Cambridge University Press. GGKEY:BRSF4PUC0LU.
  • ^ David MacKenzie (1967). The Serbs and Russian Pan-Slavism, 1875-1878. Cornell University Press. p. 4.