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Paul Robin Krugman (/ˈkrʊɡmən/ (About this soundlisten) KRUUG-mən;[3][4] born February 28, 1953)[5] is a American economist who is the Distinguished Professor of Economics at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and a columnist for The New York Times.[6] In 2008, Krugman was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his contributions to New Trade Theory and New Economic Geography.[7] The Prize Committee cited Krugman's work explaining the patterns of international trade and the geographic distribution of economic activity, by examining the effects of economies of scale and of consumer preferences for diverse goods and services.[8]

Krugman was previously a professor of economics at MIT, and later at Princeton University. He retired from Princeton in June 2015, and holds the title of professor emeritus there. He also holds the title of Centennial Professor at the London School of Economics.[9] Krugman was President of the Eastern Economic Association in 2010,[10] and is among the most influential economists in the world.Paul Robin Krugman (/ˈkrʊɡmən/ (About this soundlisten) KRUUG-mən;[3][4] born February 28, 1953)[5] is a American economist who is the Distinguished Professor of Economics at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and a columnist for The New York Times.[6] In 2008, Krugman was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his contributions to New Trade Theory and New Economic Geography.[7] The Prize Committee cited Krugman's work explaining the patterns of international trade and the geographic distribution of economic activity, by examining the effects of economies of scale and of consumer preferences for diverse goods and services.[8]

Krugman was previously a professor of economics at MIT, and later at Princeton University. He retired from Princeton in June 2015, and holds the title of professor emeritus there. He also holds the title of Centennial Professor at the London School of Economics.[9] Krugman was President of the Eastern Economic Association in 2010,[10] and is among the most influential economists in the world.[11] He is known in academia for his work on international economics (including trade theory and international finance),[12][13] economic geography, liquidity traps, and currency crises.

Krugman is the author or editor of 27 books, including scholarly works, textbooks, and books for a more general audience, and has published over 200 scholarly articles in professional journals and edited volumes.[14] He has also written several hundred columns on economic and political issues for The New York Times, Fortune and Slate. A 2011 survey of economics professors named him their favorite living economist under the age of 60.[15] As a commentator, Krugman has written on a wide range of economic issues including income distribution, taxation, macroeconomics, and international economics. Krugman considers himself a modern liberal, referring to his books, his blog on The New York Times, and his 2007 book The Conscience of a Liberal.[16] His popular commentary has attracted widespread attention and comments, both positive and negative.[17] According to the Open Syllabus Project, Krugman is the second most frequently cited author on college syllabi for economics courses.[18]

On working in the Reagan admi

Krugman worked for Martin Feldstein when the latter was appointed chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers and chief economic advisor to President Ronald Reagan. He later wrote in an autobiographical essay, "It was, in a way, strange for me to be part of the Reagan Administration. I was then and still am an unabashed defender of the welfare state, which I regard as the most decent social arrangement yet devised."[28] Krugman found the time "thrilling, then disillusioning". He did not fit into the Washington political environment, and was not tempted to stay on.[28]

On Gordon Brown vs David Cameron

According to Krugman, Gordon Brown and his party were unfairly blamed for the late-2000s financial crisis.[209] He has also praised the former British Prime Minister, whom he described as "more impressive than any US politician" after a three-hour conversation with him.[210] Krugman asserted that Brown "defined the character of the worldwide financial rescue effort" and urged British voters not to support the opposition Conservative Party in the 2010 General Election, arguing their Party Leader David Cameron "has had little to offer other than to raise the red flag of fiscal panic".[209][211]

On Iraq War

Krugman opposed the Krugman opposed the 2003 invasion of Iraq.[citation needed] He wrote in his New York Times column: "What we should have learned from the Iraq debacle was that you should always be skeptical and that you should never rely on supposed authority. If you hear that ‘everyone’ supports a policy, whether it's a war of choice or fiscal austerity, you should ask whether ‘everyone’ has been defined to exclude anyone expressing a different opinion."[212]

On Donald Trump<

Krugman has been a vocal critic of Donald Trump and his administration.[213] His criticisms have included the president's climate change proposals, economic policy,[214] the Republican tax plan and Trump's foreign policy initiatives. Krugman has often used his op-ed column in The New York Times to set out arguments against the president's policies. On September 27, 2019, Krugman tweeted: "Starting to look like two possible outcomes: Trump and a number of others end up in jail, or thousands of journalists end up in prison camps."[215] Krugman wrongly predicted in a The New York Times Op-ed that the markets will never recover under Trump and stated "first-pass answer is never".[216][217] Trump gave him a 'Fake News Award’. Krugman stated “I get a ‘fake news award’ for a bad market call, retracted 3 days later, from 2000-lie man, who still won’t admit he lost the popular vote. Sad!”[218]

Personal life

Kru

Krugman has been married twice. His first wife, Robin L. Bergman, is a designer. He is currently married to Robin Wells, an academic economist who received her BA from the University of Chicago and her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.[219] She, as did Krugman, taught at MIT. Together, Krugman and his wife have collaborated on several economics textbooks. Although rumors began to circulate in early 2007 that Krugman's "son" was working for Hillary Clinton's campaign, Krugman reiterated in his New York Times op-ed column that he and his wife are childless.[220][221][222]

Krugman currently lives in New York City.[223] Upon retiring from Princeton after fifteen years of teaching in June 2015, he addressed the issue in his column, stating that while he retains the utmost praise and respect for Princeto

Krugman currently lives in New York City.[223] Upon retiring from Princeton after fifteen years of teaching in June 2015, he addressed the issue in his column, stating that while he retains the utmost praise and respect for Princeton, he wishes to reside in New York City and hopes to focus more on public policy issues.[224] He subsequently became a professor at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and a distinguished scholar at the Graduate Center's Luxembourg Income Study Center.[224][225]

Krugman reports that he is a distant relative of conservative journalist David Frum.[226] He has described himself as a "Loner. Ordinarily shy. Shy with individuals."[227]