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The Info List - Pat Riley


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As player:

NBA champion (1972) First-team All-American – USBWA (1966) Third-team All-American – AP, UPI (1966) SEC Player of the Year – AP (1966) No. 42 retired by Kentucky

As assistant coach:

NBA champion (1980)

As head coach:

NBA champion (1982, 1985, 1987, 1988, 2006) 3× NBA Coach of the Year
NBA Coach of the Year
(1990, 1993, 1997) 9× NBA All-Star Game head coach (1982, 1983, 1985–1990, 1993) Top 10 Coaches in NBA History

As executive:

NBA champion (2006, 2012, 2013) NBA Executive of the Year (2011)

Career NBA statistics

Points 3,906 (7.4 ppg)

Rebounds 855 (1.6 rpg)

Assists 913 (1.7 apg)

Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Basketball Hall of Fame
Basketball Hall of Fame
as coach

Patrick James Riley (born March 20, 1945) is an American professional basketball executive, and a former coach and player in the National Basketball Association (NBA). He has been the team president of the Miami Heat
Miami Heat
since 1995 and head coach in two separate tenures (1995 through 2003, and 2005 through 2008). Regarded as one of the greatest NBA coaches of all time, Riley has served as the head coach of five championship teams. He won four with the Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
during their Showtime era in the 1980s, and one with the Heat in 2006. He was named NBA Coach of the Year
NBA Coach of the Year
three times (1989–90, 1992–93 and 1996–97, as head coach of the Lakers, New York Knicks
New York Knicks
and Heat, respectively). He was head coach of an NBA All-Star Game team nine times: eight times with the Western Conference team (1982, 1983, 1985–1990, all as head coach of the Lakers) and once with the Eastern team (1993, as head coach of the Knicks). He is the first North American sports figure to win a championship as a player, assistant coach, head coach, and as an executive. In 1996, he was named one of the 10 Greatest Coaches in NBA history. As a player, he played for the Lakers' championship team in 1972. Riley most recently won the 2012 and 2013 NBA championships with the Heat as their team president. He received the Chuck Daly Lifetime Achievement Award from the NBA Coaches Association on June 20, 2012.

Contents

1 Biography 2 Playing career 3 Post-playing career

3.1 Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers 3.2 New York Knicks 3.3 Miami
Miami
Heat

4 Outside basketball 5 Statistics as a player

5.1 College 5.2 NBA

5.2.1 Regular season 5.2.2 Playoffs

6 Head coaching record 7 Awards and honors 8 See also 9 References 10 Bibliography 11 External links

Biography[edit] Riley was born in Rome, New York
Rome, New York
and raised in Schenectady. His father, Leon Riley, played twenty-two seasons of minor league baseball as an outfielder and first baseman, and appeared in four games for the 1944 Philadelphia Phillies.[1][2] Playing career[edit] Riley played basketball for Linton High School
Linton High School
in Schenectady, New York under head coach Walt Przybylo and his assistants Bill Rapavy and Ed Catino.[3] Linton High School's 74–68 victory over New York City's Power Memorial on December 29, 1961, is remembered mostly for its two stars: Power Memorial's Lew Alcindor
Lew Alcindor
(who later changed his name to Kareem Abdul-Jabbar); and his future coach with the Los Angeles Lakers, Pat Riley.[4] In 1991, Riley called it, "One of the greatest games in the history of Schenectady basketball." Riley was a versatile athlete in college, participating in both basketball and football. As a junior on the 1965–66 Kentucky Wildcats men's basketball team he was named First Team All-SEC, All-NCAA Tournament Team, NCAA Regional Player of the Year, SEC Player of the Year and AP Third Team All-American, leading the Wildcats to the 1966 NCAA title game. Coached by Adolph Rupp, UK lost to Texas Western (today's UTEP), a game that was reenacted in the movie Glory Road. In his senior year Riley made First Team All-SEC, one of the only players in storied Kentucky Basketball history to make two or more First Team All-SEC teams.[5] He was selected by the San Diego Rockets
San Diego Rockets
in the 1st round of the 1967 NBA draft, and was also drafted as a wide receiver by the Dallas Cowboys in the 11th round of the 1967 NFL Draft. He joined the Rockets and was later selected by the Portland Trail Blazers
Portland Trail Blazers
in the 1970 NBA expansion draft,[6] but was immediately traded to the Los Angeles Lakers, which he helped toward the 1972 NBA Championship both by coming off the bench in games and by guarding friend and Laker guard Jerry West
Jerry West
in practice. He retired after the 1975–76 NBA season as a member of the Western Conference champion Phoenix Suns. Riley finished his NBA playing career with a 7.4 points per game scoring average and a field-goal percentage of 41.4%.[7] Post-playing career[edit] Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers[edit] Riley returned to the NBA in 1977 as a broadcaster for the Lakers. During the 1979–80 season, when the team's head coach, Jack McKinney, was injured during a near fatal bicycle accident, assistant coach Paul Westhead took over the team's head coaching duties. Riley then moved from the broadcast booth to the bench as one of Westhead's assistant coaches. With rookie guard Magic Johnson
Magic Johnson
and longtime star Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, the Lakers won the 1980 NBA Finals, defeating Philadelphia in six games, giving Westhead and Riley championship rings in their first year coaching the team. However, the team lost in the playoffs the next year to the Moses Malone-led Houston Rockets. Six games into the 1981–82 season, Magic Johnson
Magic Johnson
said he wished to be traded because he was unhappy playing for Westhead. Shortly afterward, Lakers' owner Jerry Buss
Jerry Buss
fired Westhead. At an ensuing press conference, with Jerry West
Jerry West
at his side, Buss named West head coach. West, however, balked, and Buss awkwardly tried to name West as "offensive captain" and then named West and Riley as co-coaches.[8] West made it clear during the press conference that he would only assist Riley, and that Riley was the head coach.[9] Thereafter, Riley was the interim head coach, until his status became permanent. Riley ushered in the Lakers' "Showtime" era, along with superstar players Johnson and Abdul-Jabbar with their running game. Riley became a celebrity in his own right, a fashion icon for his Armani
Armani
suits and slicked-back hair which complemented the team's Hollywood
Hollywood
image.[10] Riley led the Lakers to four consecutive NBA Finals
NBA Finals
appearances. His first title came in his first season, against the Philadelphia 76ers. Both teams returned to the Finals the next year, and this time Riley's Lakers were swept by the 76ers. The Lakers lost in the Finals again in 1984, to the Boston Celtics
Boston Celtics
in seven games. The Lakers earned Riley his second NBA title in 1985 in a rematch of the previous year, as the Lakers beat the Celtics in six games. The Lakers' four-year Western Conference streak was broken the following year by the Houston Rockets. In 1987, Riley coached a Lakers team that is considered one of the best teams of all-time. With future Hall of Famers Magic Johnson, James Worthy
James Worthy
and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, plus Michael Cooper, Byron Scott, A. C. Green, Mychal Thompson, and Kurt Rambis, the Lakers finished 65–17 in the regular season, third-best in team history. They met with similar success in the playoffs, dispatching the Celtics in six games to win Riley his third NBA title. One of Riley's most famous moments came when he guaranteed the crowd a repeat championship during the Lakers' championship parade in downtown Los Angeles
Los Angeles
(he first made the guarantee during the post-victory locker room celebration).[11] While the 1988 Lakers did not produce as many wins in the regular season as the 1987 Lakers, they still won the NBA title, becoming the first team in 19 years to repeat as champions. The Lakers beat the Detroit Pistons
Detroit Pistons
in seven games in the 1988 NBA Finals, making good on Riley's promise. Riley's titles with the Lakers make him the fifth man to play for an NBA Championship team and later coach the same NBA team to a championship; the others are Bill Russell, Tom Heinsohn, K. C. Jones
K. C. Jones
and Billy Cunningham. Although Riley would offer no further guarantees, his Lakers embarked upon a quest to obtain a third consecutive championship in 1989. Having successfully claimed a repeat championship the year before, the term used for this new goal was a three-peat championship, and Riley, through his corporate entity, Riles & Co., trademarked the phrase three-peat. However, in a rematch of the previous year's finals series, the Lakers were swept by the Pistons in the 1989 NBA Finals. Riley was named NBA Coach of the Year
NBA Coach of the Year
for the first time in 1989–90, but stepped down as Lakers head coach after they lost to the Phoenix Suns in the playoffs. At the time of his departure, Riley was the foremost coach in the NBA with a level of fame not seen since Red Auerbach.[12] New York Knicks[edit] After stepping down, Riley accepted a job as a television commentator for NBC. However, this job only lasted one year, and he became head coach of the New York Knicks
New York Knicks
starting with the 1991–92 season. Commentators admired Riley's ability to work with the physical, deliberate Knicks, adapting from his style with the fast-paced Laker teams in the 1980s. The Chicago Bulls
Chicago Bulls
had easily swept the Knicks in 1991 en route to their first championship. However, in 1992 with Riley, the Knicks pushed the defending championship Bulls to seven games in the Eastern Conference semifinals. The physical defense of the Knicks against the Chicago Bulls' finesse superstars Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen
Scottie Pippen
during the 1992 playoffs led to a feud between Riley and Bulls head coach Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
regarding the officiating and the Knicks' rough style of play. In 1993, Riley led the Knicks to their best regular season record in team history (tied with the 1969–1970 team) and received his second Coach of the Year award. The Knicks met the Bulls in the playoffs at the Eastern Conference finals where they lost in six games. Ironically, Jackson's Bulls went on to win the finals and accomplish the first "three-peat" in 1993, despite Riley's trademark in 1989.[13] Riley returned to the NBA Finals
NBA Finals
in 1994, en route defeating the three-time defending champions Bulls (without Michael Jordan) in seven games during the Eastern Conference semi-finals. However his Knicks lost in seven games to the Houston Rockets
Houston Rockets
after being up 3–2 in the series. During the 1994 Finals, Riley became the first coach to participate NBA Finals
NBA Finals
Game 7 with two different teams, having been with the Lakers in 1984 and 1988. However, he had the unfortunate distinction of having become the first (and to date, the only) coach to lose an NBA Finals
NBA Finals
Game 7 with two different teams, having lost to the Celtics in 1984. It also denied him the distinction of becoming the first coach to win a Game 7 NBA Finals
NBA Finals
on two different teams, having defeated the Pistons in 1988. Miami
Miami
Heat[edit] In 1995, Riley resigned from the Knicks via fax to become the head coach and team president of the Miami
Miami
Heat. The move caused some controversy, as the Heat were accused by the Knicks of tampering by pursuing Riley while he still had a year remaining on his contract with the Knicks.[14] The matter was settled after the Heat sent their 1996 first-round pick (which the Knicks would use to draft Walter McCarty) and $1 million in cash to the Knicks on September 1, 1995. Riley's coaching of the Heat to playoff contention would later make them bitter rivals with his former team. In 1995–96, Riley led the Heat to a 10-game turnaround to finish 42–40. Miami
Miami
was swept in the first round of the playoffs by the Phil Jackson-coached Chicago Bulls, who had completed the regular season with a record 72 wins. This season was most notable for the ongoing housecleaning that took place, with the arrival of building blocks Alonzo Mourning
Alonzo Mourning
and Tim Hardaway. The off-season would also bring them Nets forward P.J. Brown
P.J. Brown
and Suns swingman Dan Majerle. In 1997, Riley's Heat defeated his old team, the Knicks, in a physical seven game series. Advancing to the Eastern Conference finals for the first time in franchise history, they again proved no match for Jordan and the Bulls. Riley was selected as Coach of the Year for the third time however, after leading Miami
Miami
to a 61–21 regular season record for first place in the Atlantic division. The Heat would compile consecutive seasons over .600. However, the 1998, 1999, and 2000 playoffs would be disappointments as they lost to the arch-rival Knicks; the first two in the opening round and the latter in the second round. In 1999, the Knicks themselves reached the Finals. Riley then traded Brown and Jamal Mashburn
Jamal Mashburn
in exchange for Eddie Jones in one trade and acquired Brian Grant
Brian Grant
in another, although the team suffered a major setback after discovering Alonzo Mourning's kidney condition. After finishing 50–32 in the 2000–01 season, the Heat were swept by the Charlotte Hornets
Charlotte Hornets
in the first round of the NBA playoffs. The Heat then lost two of their best players when guard Tim Hardaway was traded to the Dallas Mavericks
Dallas Mavericks
and Anthony Mason signed with the Milwaukee Bucks. In part because of these departures, the Heat finished 36–46 in 2002. Riley was so disgusted with the Heat's performance that he declared he was about to "fire himself". After finishing the 2002–03 season 25–57, to fully dedicate his attention to his duties as general manager, Riley stepped down as head coach and was succeeded by longtime assistant Stan Van Gundy. Van Gundy and rookie Dwyane Wade, whom Riley drafted 5th overall, led the Heat back into the playoffs with a 42–40 record after starting 0–7. Riley concentrated on improving the team even further before the 2004–2005 season. One of his biggest moves as full-time general manager was to trade Caron Butler, Brian Grant, Lamar Odom
Lamar Odom
and a first-round draft pick to the Lakers for Shaquille O'Neal. O'Neal had just come off a successful stint with the Phil Jackson-coached Lakers winning three straight championships 2000–02 and a 2004 Finals loss. By this time, Riley and Jackson's feud had cooled.[15] Wade and O'Neal led the Heat to the Eastern Conference finals during the 2005 playoffs, although they lost to the defending champions Detroit Pistons after being up 3–2 in the series. Wade had missed game 6 entirely due to injury.[16]

Riley in 2007 during his second stint as the Heat's coach

During the 2005 off-season, it was widely speculated that Pat Riley was attempting to run Van Gundy out of his coaching job and take over the job himself, now that the team was in a position to contend for the championship.[17] Indeed, Van Gundy would resign from his position as head coach on December 12, 2005, just 21 games into the season, citing a need to spend more time with his family, and Riley resumed coaching the Heat.[18] Riley's Heat team defeated his Los Angeles Lakers-days nemesis, the Detroit Pistons, in the 2006 Eastern Conference Finals on June 2, 2006, making it the first time the Miami Heat reached the finals. Riley's Heat squared off against the Dallas Mavericks in the 2006 NBA Finals. Despite losing the first two games to Dallas, the Heat rallied to win the next four games and their first NBA Championship. After Game Six, Riley commented that he had packed one suit, one shirt and one tie for the trip to Dallas. It was Riley's fifth championship as a head coach, and his first with a team other than the Lakers. Riley became one of only two NBA coaches to take three different teams to the NBA Finals, the other being Alex Hannum. He joined Hannum and Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
as the only head coaches to lead two different teams to NBA titles. He also became the only coach to twice replace a coach in mid-season and take that team to an NBA title.[19] Citing "hip and knee problems", Riley took a leave of absence from coaching from January 3, 2007, through February 19, 2007. Assistant coach Ron Rothstein
Ron Rothstein
assumed interim duties. The Heat finished the season 44–38 and were swept out of the first round of the playoffs by the Chicago Bulls; the first defending champions to be swept in the first round since 1957.[20] The following season, the Heat finished 15–67. The team had lost most of its players to extended injuries, and a disgruntled Shaquille O'Neal was traded mid-season. Two years after leading the Heat to the championship, they now finished with one of the worst records of all-time.[21] On April 28, 2008, Riley announced that he would step down as coach of the Heat. Former Heat assistant Erik Spoelstra
Erik Spoelstra
was announced as his replacement. Riley remains team president.[22] As president, Riley acquired LeBron James
LeBron James
and Chris Bosh
Chris Bosh
to form the Heat's "Big 3" with Dwyane Wade. In 2012, the Miami Heat
Miami Heat
beat the Oklahoma City Thunder
Oklahoma City Thunder
to give Riley his first championship purely as an executive. The Heat repeated the feat in 2013, defeating the San Antonio Spurs. Outside basketball[edit]

Riley and the Miami Heat
Miami Heat
with President George W. Bush

Outside basketball, Riley has developed into a pop-culture figure. This is born out of Riley's signature look, a slicked-back hairstyle, which is often described as gangster-or mafioso-like, and his immaculate tan. He came to the public eye leading the Showtime Lakers of the 1980s, furthering his image by "guaranteeing" a championship. Riley has coached in three American cities well known for popular nightlife and celebrity culture. In 1988, Riley published a book entitled Showtime: Inside the Lakers' Breakthrough Season, a New York Times best seller which recapped the Lakers' successful run to the 1987 NBA Championship. One of the phrases Riley coined in the book was the "Disease of More", stating that "success is often the first step toward disaster" and that defending champions often fail the following season because every player who returns wants more playing time, more shots per game, and more money. The phrase stemmed from the Lakers' disappointing 1980–81 campaign coming off a championship the previous season. Riley's name and likeness were used for a 1990 Sega Genesis
Sega Genesis
video game, Pat Riley
Pat Riley
Basketball. In 1993, while coaching the New York Knicks, Riley published a second New York Times bestseller entitled The Winner Within: A Life Plan for Team Players. Aimed at a business readership as well as basketball enthusiasts, it distilled a lesson in teamwork and leadership from each of Riley's seasons as a coach to that date. Byron Laursen, saluted by Riley as "...a true Showtime Warrior", co-authored both of Riley's books. Riley is known for his friendship with Giorgio Armani, preferring to wear Armani
Armani
suits during basketball games, and modeling once at an Armani
Armani
show. Riley is also a motivational speaker during the off-season. Riley earns in excess of $50,000 for each speaking engagement.[citation needed] Riley and his wife Chris have two children, James Riley and Elisabeth Riley. Riley is a practicing Roman Catholic.[23] On February 27, 2007, the Miami Heat
Miami Heat
were honored for their 2005–2006 NBA Championship at the White House. During the ceremony, Riley presented George W. Bush
George W. Bush
with a jersey before announcing, "I voted for the man. If you don't vote, you don't count." After the ceremony, Riley was questioned by reporters about the political nature of his comments. He responded by saying, "I'm pro-American, pro-democracy, I'm pro-government. I follow my boss. He's my boss."[24] Riley and his wife are Bruce Springsteen
Bruce Springsteen
fans. At his 2008 induction into the Basketball Hall of Fame, he ended his speech with a quote from the Springsteen song "Back in Your Arms Again". Statistics as a player[edit] College[edit]

University of Kentucky[25]

Season Games Played Minutes FG FGA % FT FTA % Total Rebs RPG Asst. APG F Total Points PPG

1964–65 25 825 160 370 43.2 55 89 61.8 212 8.5 27 1.1 98 375 15.0

1965–66 29 1078 265 514 51.6 107 153 69.9 259 8.9 64 2.3 106 637 22.0

1966–67 26 953 165 373 44.2 122 156 78.2 201 7.7 68 2.6 90 452 17.4

Total 80 2856 590 1257 46.9 284 398 71.4 672 8.4 159 2.0 294 1464 18.1

NBA[edit]

Legend

  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game

 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw
Free throw
percentage

 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game

 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

† Denotes seasons in which Riley won an NBA championship

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1967–68 San Diego 80 - 15.8 .379 - .634 2.2 1.7 - - 7.9

1968–69 San Diego 56 - 18.3 .406 - .672 2.0 2.4 - - 8.8

1969–70 San Diego 36 - 13.2 .417 - .727 1.6 2.4 - - 5.3

1970–71 L.A. Lakers 54 - 9.4 .413 - .644 1.0 1.3 - - 4.9

1971–72† L.A. Lakers 67 - 13.8 .447 - .743 1.9 1.1 - - 6.7

1972–73 L.A. Lakers 55 - 14.6 .428 - .793 1.2 1.5 - - 7.3

1973–74 L.A. Lakers 72 - 18.9 .430 - .764 1.8 2.1 0.8 0.0 9.5

1974–75 L.A. Lakers 46 - 22.1 .419 - .742 1.8 2.6 0.8 0.1 11.0

1975–76 L.A. Lakers 2 - 11.5 .385 - .333 1.5 0.0 0.5 0.5 5.5

1975–76 Phoenix 60 - 13.2 .389 - .730 0.8 1.0 0.4 0.1 4.6

Career 528 - 15.5 .414 - .705 1.6 1.7 .6 .1 7.4

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1969 San Diego 5 - 15.2 .432 - .833 2.2 .4 - - 7.4

1971 L.A. Lakers 7 - 19.3 .420 - .727 2.1 2.0 - - 9.4

1972† L.A. Lakers 15 - 16.3 .333 - .750 1.9 0.9 - - 5.2

1973 L.A. Lakers 7 - 7.6 .333 - .000 0.7 1.0 - - 2.6

1974 L.A. Lakers 5 - 21.2 .360 - .750 1.2 2.0 0.8 0.0 7.8

1976 Phoenix 5 - 5.4 .400 - 1.000 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 2.6

Career 44 - 14.6 .374 - .763 1.5 1.2 0.4 0.0 5.7

Head coaching record[edit]

Legend

Regular season G Games coached W Games won L Games lost W–L % Win–loss %

Post season PG Playoff games PW Playoff wins PL Playoff losses PW–L % Playoff win–loss %

Team Year G W L W–L% Finish PG PW PL PW–L% Result

L.A. Lakers 1981–82 71 50 21 .704 1st in Pacific 14 12 2 .857 Won NBA Championship

L.A. Lakers 1982–83 82 58 24 .707 1st in Pacific 15 8 7 .533 Lost in NBA Finals

L.A. Lakers 1983–84 82 54 28 .659 1st in Pacific 21 14 7 .667 Lost in NBA Finals

L.A. Lakers 1984–85 82 62 20 .756 1st in Pacific 19 15 4 .789 Won NBA Championship

L.A. Lakers 1985–86 82 62 20 .756 1st in Pacific 14 8 6 .571 Lost in Conf. Finals

L.A. Lakers 1986–87 82 65 17 .793 1st in Pacific 18 15 3 .833 Won NBA Championship

L.A. Lakers 1987–88 82 62 20 .756 1st in Pacific 25 15 9 .625 Won NBA Championship

L.A. Lakers 1988–89 82 57 25 .695 1st in Pacific 15 11 4 .733 Lost in NBA Finals

L.A. Lakers 1989–90 82 63 19 .768 1st in Pacific 9 4 5 .444 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

New York 1991–92 82 51 31 .622 1st in Atlantic 12 6 6 .500 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

New York 1992–93 82 60 22 .732 1st in Atlantic 15 9 6 .600 Lost in Conf. Finals

New York 1993–94 82 57 25 .695 1st in Atlantic 25 14 11 .560 Lost in NBA Finals

New York 1994–95 82 55 27 .671 2nd in Atlantic 11 6 5 .545 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Miami 1995–96 82 42 40 .512 3rd in Atlantic 3 0 3 .000 Lost in First Round

Miami 1996–97 82 61 21 .744 1st in Atlantic 17 8 9 .471 Lost in Conf. Finals

Miami 1997–98 82 55 27 .671 1st in Atlantic 5 2 3 .400 Lost in First Round

Miami 1998–99 50 33 17 .660 1st in Atlantic 5 2 3 .400 Lost in First Round

Miami 1999–00 82 52 30 .634 1st in Atlantic 10 6 4 .600 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Miami 2000–01 82 50 32 .610 2nd in Atlantic 3 0 3 .000 Lost in First Round

Miami 2001–02 82 36 46 .439 6th in Atlantic — — — — Missed Playoffs

Miami 2002–03 82 25 57 .305 7th in Atlantic — — — — Missed Playoffs

Miami 2005–06 61 41 20 .672 1st in Southeast 23 16 7 .696 Won NBA Championship

Miami 2006–07 82 44 38 .537 1st in Southeast 4 0 4 .000 Lost in First Round

Miami 2007–08 82 15 67 .183 5th in Southeast — — — — Missed Playoffs

Career

1,904 1,210 694 .636

282 171 111 .606

Awards and honors[edit]

Nine-time NBA Champion (one as a player, one as an assistant coach, four as a head coach, two as an executive, and 2006 as executive and head coach) Three-time NBA Coach of the Year Nine-time NBA All-Star Game head coach 2011 NBA Executive of the Year Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame
Basketball Hall of Fame
(class of 2008) 1966 First Team All-American 2012 Chuck Daly
Chuck Daly
Lifetime Achievement Award Number 42 retired by the Kentucky Wildcats

See also[edit]

List of NBA championship head coaches

References[edit]

^ Lee Riley. baseball-reference.com ^ Heisler, Mark (1995-01-09). The fire from within: Pat Riley's relationship with his father provides a window into the life of the NBA's most-celebrated coach. Findarticles.com. Retrieved on 2012-08-28. ^ Schenectady City School District Athletic Hall of Fame and Reunion Dinner Archived 2008-08-04 at the Wayback Machine.. Schenectady.k12.ny.us. Retrieved on 2012-08-28. ^ Amazing photo: Pat Riley
Pat Riley
vs. Kareem in Schenectady, 1961, Times Union ^ Kentucky Greats: #18, Pat Riley
Pat Riley
« UKmadness. Ukmadness.wordpress.com (2008-03-13). Retrieved on 2012-08-28. ^ All-Time Expansion Draft Results Archived 2008-01-16 at the Wayback Machine.. nba.com ^ Pat Riley
Pat Riley
Statistics. Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved on 2012-08-28. ^ Heisler, pp. 58–61 ^ Heisler, p. 61 ^ "Riley and Jackson through the years". Sports.espn.go.com. 2010-02-01. Retrieved 2016-10-02.  ^ Heisler, p. 105 ^ "Riley and Jackson through the years". ESPN.com. February 1, 2010. Archived from the original on June 19, 2014.  ^ "Riley and Jackson through the years". Sports.espn.go.com. 2010-02-01. Retrieved 2016-10-02.  ^ Powell, Shaun (1995-07-24). "The Knicks' tamper tantrums are heating up". The Sporting News. Retrieved 2007-04-21. [permanent dead link] ^ "Riley and Jackson through the years". Sports.espn.go.com. 2010-02-01. Retrieved 2016-10-02.  ^ "No Wade... No Way". NBA.com. Retrieved 2016-10-02.  ^ "Heat coach Van Gundy resigns; Riley returns". sports.espn.go.com. Retrieved October 23, 2015.  ^ Marc Stein (2012-06-20). "Pat Riley: The Miami
Miami
Years". ESPN.  ^ " NBA Finals
NBA Finals
Results". SportingNews.com. Archived from the original on 2007-03-22. Retrieved 2007-04-21.  ^ "Bulls Sweep 2006 Champions". NBA.com. 2007-04-30. Retrieved 2016-10-02.  ^ "NBA Regular Season: Worst 50 Teams in NBA History". Landofbasketball.com. Retrieved 2016-10-02.  ^ Riley Steps Down, Spoelstra Named Head Coach, NBA, April 28, 2008, accessed April 28, 2008. ^ Pat Riley: Just Catholic, Not Quitting. Nba.fanhouse.com (2008-01-10). Retrieved on 2012-08-28. ^ "President Bush Welcomes the 2006 NBA Champion Miami Heat
Miami Heat
to the White House". whitehouse.gov. 2007-02-27.  ^ " Pat Riley
Pat Riley
Statistics". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2007-04-21. 

Bibliography[edit]

Heisler, Mark (1994). The Lives of Riley, Macmillan General Reference, ISBN 0025506625

External links[edit]

National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
portal

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Pat Riley.

NBA.com Coaches – Pat Riley

v t e

Current heads of basketball operations in the National Basketball Association

Eastern Conference

Atlantic

Danny Ainge
Danny Ainge
(Boston Celtics) Sean Marks
Sean Marks
(Brooklyn Nets) Scott Perry (New York Knicks) Bryan Colangelo
Bryan Colangelo
(Philadelphia 76ers) Masai Ujiri
Masai Ujiri
(Toronto Raptors)

Central

John Paxson (Chicago Bulls) Koby Altman (Cleveland Cavaliers) Stan Van Gundy
Stan Van Gundy
(Detroit Pistons) Kevin Pritchard
Kevin Pritchard
(Indiana Pacers) Jon Horst (Milwaukee Bucks)

Southeast

Travis Schlenk (Atlanta Hawks) Buzz Peterson
Buzz Peterson
(interim) (Charlotte Hornets) Pat Riley
Pat Riley
( Miami
Miami
Heat) John Hammond (Orlando Magic) Ernie Grunfeld
Ernie Grunfeld
(Washington Wizards)

Western Conference

Northwest

Tim Connelly & Artūras Karnišovas (Denver Nuggets) Tom Thibodeau
Tom Thibodeau
(Minnesota Timberwolves) Sam Presti (Oklahoma City Thunder) Neil Olshey (Portland Trail Blazers) Dennis Lindsey (Utah Jazz)

Pacific

Bob Myers
Bob Myers
(Golden State Warriors) Michael Winger ( Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Clippers) Magic Johnson
Magic Johnson
& Rob Pelinka
Rob Pelinka
( Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers) Ryan McDonough (Phoenix Suns) Vlade Divac
Vlade Divac
(Sacramento Kings)

Southwest

Donnie Nelson
Donnie Nelson
(Dallas Mavericks) Daryl Morey
Daryl Morey
(Houston Rockets) Chris Wallace (Memphis Grizzlies) Dell Demps (New Orleans Pelicans) R. C. Buford (San Antonio Spurs)

Note: Those listed here either hold the title President of Basketball Operations or General Manager, or both.

Links to related articles

v t e

Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
head coaches

John Kundla (1948–1958) George Mikan
George Mikan
(1958) John Kundla (1958–1959) John Castellani (1959–1960) Jim Pollard
Jim Pollard
(1960) Fred Schaus
Fred Schaus
(1960–1967) Butch van Breda Kolff (1967–1969) Joe Mullaney (1969–1971) Bill Sharman
Bill Sharman
(1971–1976) Jerry West
Jerry West
(1976–1979) Jack McKinney (1979) Paul Westhead (1979–1981) Pat Riley
Pat Riley
(1981–1990) Mike Dunleavy (1990–1992) Randy Pfund (1992–1994) Bill Bertka # (1994) Magic Johnson
Magic Johnson
# (1994) Del Harris (1994–1999) Bill Bertka # (1999) Kurt Rambis
Kurt Rambis
# (1999) Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
(1999–2004) Rudy Tomjanovich
Rudy Tomjanovich
(2004–2005) Frank Hamblen
Frank Hamblen
# (2005) Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
(2005–2011) Mike Brown (2011–2012) Bernie Bickerstaff
Bernie Bickerstaff
# (2012) Mike D'Antoni
Mike D'Antoni
(2012–2014) Byron Scott
Byron Scott
(2014–2016) Luke Walton
Luke Walton
(2016– )

(#) denotes interim head coach.

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New York Knicks
New York Knicks
head coaches

Neil Cohalan (1946–1947) Joe Lapchick
Joe Lapchick
(1947–1956) Vince Boryla
Vince Boryla
(1956–1958) Andrew Levane (1958–1959) Carl Braun (1959–1961) Eddie Donovan (1961–1965) Harry Gallatin
Harry Gallatin
(1965) Dick McGuire (1965–1967) Red Holzman
Red Holzman
(1967–1977) Willis Reed
Willis Reed
(1977–1978) Red Holzman
Red Holzman
(1978–1982) Hubie Brown
Hubie Brown
(1982–1986) Bob Hill
Bob Hill
(1986–1987) Rick Pitino
Rick Pitino
(1987–1989) Stu Jackson
Stu Jackson
(1989–1990) John MacLeod (1990–1991) Pat Riley
Pat Riley
(1991–1995) Don Nelson
Don Nelson
(1995–1996) Jeff Van Gundy
Jeff Van Gundy
(1996–2001) Don Chaney
Don Chaney
(2001–2004) Herb Williams
Herb Williams
# (2004) Lenny Wilkens
Lenny Wilkens
(2004–2005) Herb Williams
Herb Williams
# (2005) Larry Brown (2005–2006) Isiah Thomas
Isiah Thomas
(2006–2008) Mike D'Antoni
Mike D'Antoni
(2008–2012) Mike Woodson
Mike Woodson
(2012–2014) Derek Fisher
Derek Fisher
(2014–2016) Kurt Rambis
Kurt Rambis
# (2016) Jeff Hornacek
Jeff Hornacek
(2016– )

(#) denotes interim head coach.

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Miami Heat
Miami Heat
head coaches

Ron Rothstein
Ron Rothstein
(1988–1991) Kevin Loughery (1991–1995) Alvin Gentry
Alvin Gentry
# (1995) Pat Riley
Pat Riley
(1995–2003) Stan Van Gundy
Stan Van Gundy
(2003–2005) Pat Riley
Pat Riley
(2005–2008) Erik Spoelstra
Erik Spoelstra
(2008– )

(#) denotes interim head coach.

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NBA on NBC

Related programs

NBA Showtime NBA Inside Stuff NBA on USA

Non-NBA programs

College Basketball on NBC Olympics on NBC

Related articles

Ratings (NBA Finals) NBA Showtime: NBA on NBC Like Mike 2002 FIBA World Championship

NBC Sports Regional Networks Bay Area (Golden State Warriors) Boston (Boston Celtics) California (Sacramento Kings) Chicago (Chicago Bulls) Northwest (Portland Trail Blazers) Philadelphia (Philadelphia 76ers) Washington (Washington Wizards)

Commentators

All-Star Game NBA Finals WNBA Finals

Key figures

Marv Albert Mike Breen Bob Costas Don Criqui Jerry Doggett Dick Enberg Marty Glickman Jim Gordon Curt Gowdy Greg Gumbel Tom Hammond Dan Hicks Jim Lampley Joel Meyers Bob Neal Lindsey Nelson Bill O'Donnell Bud Palmer Paul Sunderland Bob Wolff

Color commentators

Quinn Buckner P. J. Carlesimo Doug Collins Chuck Daly Mike Dunleavy Sr. Cotton Fitzsimmons Mike Fratello Matt Guokas Dan Issel Steve Jones Magic Johnson Joe Lapchick Ron Rothstein Isiah Thomas Bill Walton

Sideline reporters

Jim Gray Lewis Johnson Andrea Joyce Lisa Malosky Ahmad Rashād Hannah Storm

Studio analysts

Pat Croce Julius Erving Kevin Johnson Pat Riley John Salley Tom Tolbert Peter Vecsey Jayson Williams

NBA Finals

1955 (Games 2, 6) 1956 (Game 1) 1957 (Games 1, 7) 1958 (Game 1) 1959 (Games 1-2) 1960 (Games 1, 3-4, 7) 1961 (Games 1, 3-4) 1962 (Games 1-2) 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

WNBA Finals

1997 (Game 1) 1998 (Games 1-2) 1999 (Games 2-3) 2000 (Game 2) 2001 (Game 2) 2002 (Game 2)

All-Star Game

1959 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 2000 2001 2002

Music

"All Fired Up" "An American Symphony" "Cliffhanger Theme" "Crockett's Theme" "Desert Ride" "Fly Away" (1999 NBA Finals) "Gettysburg" (main theme) "How's It Going to Be" "I Believe I Can Fly" (1997 NBA Finals) "Return to Innocence" "Roundball Rock" " The Dream Is Still Alive
The Dream Is Still Alive
(1991 NBA Finals) "These Are Days" "Titan Spirit" "To the Flemish Cap" "Unbelievable" "Winning It All" (1992-1996)

Lore

Christmas Day O.J. Simpson's low-speed freeway chase The Clock Incident Clutch City Game 6 of the 1998 NBA Finals Memorial Day Miracle

Rivalries Bulls–Knicks Jazz–Rockets

Website: NBA - NBC Sports

v t e

Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
1971–72 NBA champions

5 McMillian 11 Cleamons 12 Riley 13 Chamberlain (Finals MVP) 14 Ellis 21 Robinson 25 Goodrich 31 Trapp 44 West 52 Hairston

Head coach Sharman

Assistant coaches Jones Bertka

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
1979–80 NBA champions

7 Byrnes 9 Chones 10 Nixon 14 Holland 15 Lee 21 Cooper 31 Haywood 32 Johnson (Finals MVP) 33 Abdul-Jabbar 52 Wilkes 54 Landsberger

Head coach Westhead

Assistant coaches Thibault Riley

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
1981–82 NBA champions

5 Jordan 8 Brewer 10 Nixon 11 McAdoo 21 Cooper 31 Rambis 32 M. Johnson (Finals MVP) 33 Abdul-Jabbar 34 C. Johnson 40 McGee 52 Wilkes 54 Landsberger

Head coach Riley

Assistant coaches Bertka Thibault

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
1984–85 NBA champions

4 Scott 11 McAdoo 12 Lester 21 Cooper 25 Kupchak 31 Rambis 32 Johnson 33 Abdul-Jabbar (Finals MVP) 35 Spriggs 40 McGee 42 Worthy 43 Nevitt

Head coach Riley

Assistant coaches Bertka Wohl

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
1986–87 NBA champions

1 Matthews 4 Scott 21 Cooper 24 Branch 31 Rambis 32 Johnson (Finals MVP) 33 Abdul-Jabbar 42 Worthy 43 M. Thompson 45 Green 52 Smrek 55 B. Thompson

Head coach Riley

Assistant coaches Bertka Pfund

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
1987–88 NBA champions

1 Matthews 3 Lamp 4 Scott 19 Campbell 20 Wagner 21 Cooper 31 Rambis 32 Johnson 33 Abdul-Jabbar 42 Worthy (Finals MVP) 43 M. Thompson 45 Green 52 Smrek 55 B. Thompson

Head coach Riley

Assistant coaches Bertka Pfund

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

Miami Heat
Miami Heat
2005–06 NBA champions

3 Wade (Finals MVP) 5 D. Anderson 8 Walker 20 Payton 24 Kapono 25 Simien 32 O'Neal 33 Mourning 40 Haslem 42 Posey 49 S. Anderson 51 Doleac 55 Williams

Head coach Riley

Assistant coaches Spoelstra McAdoo Rothstein Askins Coles

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

Southeastern Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

1965: Lee 1966: Lee & Riley 1967: Widby 1968: Maravich 1969: Maravich 1970: Maravich 1971: Neumann 1972: Edwards & Parker 1973: Grevey & Hudson 1974: van Breda Kolff 1975: Grevey & B. King 1976: B. King 1977: Grunfeld & B. King 1978: R. King 1979: R. King 1980: Macy 1981: Wilkins 1982: Ellis 1983: Ellis & Malone 1984: Barkley 1985: Walker 1986: Walker 1987: McKey & White 1988: Perdue 1989: Jackson 1990: Jackson 1991: O'Neal 1992: O'Neal 1993: Mashburn & McCaffrey 1994: Williamson 1995: Williamson 1996: Delk 1997: Mercer 1998: Sesay 1999: Porter 2000: Langhi & Swift 2001: Prince 2002: Dudley 2003: Bogans & Slay 2004: Roberts 2005: Bass 2006: G. Davis 2007: Byars & Lofton 2008: Foster 2009: Thornton 2010: Wall 2011: Parsons 2012: A. Davis 2013: Caldwell-Pope 2014: Wilbekin 2015: Portis 2016: Ulis 2017: Monk & Thornwell 2018: Maten & Williams

v t e

Dallas Cowboys
Dallas Cowboys
1967 NFL draft selections

Phil Clark Curtis Marker Sims Stokes Rayfield Wright Steve Laub Byron Morgan Eugene Bowen Pat Riley Harold Deters Al Kerkian Tommy Boyd Leavie David Paul Brothers George Adams

v t e

1967 NBA draft

First round

Jimmy Walker Earl Monroe Clem Haskins Sonny Dove Walt Frazier Al Tucker Pat Riley Tom Workman Mel Daniels Dave Lattin Mal Graham Craig Raymond

Second round

Jimmy Jones Steve Sullivan Byron Beck Randolph Mahaffey Phil Jackson Bob Netolicky Bob Rule

v t e

NBA Coach of the Year
NBA Coach of the Year
Award

1963: Gallatin 1964: Hannum 1965: Auerbach 1966: Schayes 1967: J. Kerr 1968: Guerin 1969: Shue 1970: Holzman 1971: Motta 1972: Sharman 1973: Heinsohn 1974: R. Scott 1975: P. Johnson 1976: Fitch 1977: Nissalke 1978: H. Brown 1979: Fitzsimmons 1980: Fitch 1981: McKinney 1982: Shue 1983: Nelson 1984: Layden 1985: Nelson 1986: Fratello 1987: Schuler 1988: Moe 1989: Fitzsimmons 1990: Riley 1991: Chaney 1992: Nelson 1993: Riley 1994: Wilkens 1995: Harris 1996: Jackson 1997: Riley 1998: Bird 1999: Dunleavy 2000: Rivers 2001: L. Brown 2002: Carlisle 2003: Popovich 2004: H. Brown 2005: D'Antoni 2006: A. Johnson 2007: Mitchell 2008: B. Scott 2009: M. Brown 2010: Brooks 2011: Thibodeau 2012: Popovich 2013: Karl 2014: Popovich 2015: Budenholzer 2016: S. Kerr 2017: D'Antoni

v t e

NBA Executive of the Year Award

1973: Axelson 1974: Donovan 1975: Vertlieb 1976: J. Colangelo 1977: Patterson 1978: Drossos 1979: Ferry 1980: Auerbach 1981: J. Colangelo 1982: Ferry 1983: Volchok 1984: Layden 1985: Boryla 1986: Kasten 1987: Kasten 1988: Krause 1989: J. Colangelo 1990: Bass 1991: Buckwalter 1992: Embry 1993: J. Colangelo 1994: Whitsitt 1995: West 1996: Krause 1997: Bass 1998: Embry 1999: Petrie 2000: Gabriel 2001: Petrie 2002: Thorn 2003: Dumars 2004: West 2005: B. Colangelo 2006: Baylor 2007: B. Colangelo 2008: Ainge 2009: Warkentien 2010: Hammond 2011: Forman & Riley 2012: Bird 2013: Ujiri 2014: Buford 2015: Myers 2016: Buford 2017: Myers

v t e

National Basketball Association's Top Ten Coaches in NBA History

Red Auerbach Chuck Daly Bill Fitch Red Holzman Phil Jackson John Kundla Don Nelson Jack Ramsay Pat Riley Lenny Wilkens

v t e

Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame
Basketball Hall of Fame
Class of 2008

Players

Adrian Dantley Patrick Ewing Hakeem Olajuwon

Coaches

Pat Riley Cathy Rush

Contributors

Bill Davidson Dick Vitale

v t e

Members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame

Players

Guards

R. Allen Archibald Beckman Belov Bing Blazejowski Borgmann Brennan Cervi Cheeks Clayton Cooper-Dyke Cousy Dampier Davies Drexler Dumars Edwards Frazier Friedman Galis Gervin Goodrich Greer Guerin Hanson Haynes Holman Hyatt Isaacs Iverson Jeannette D. Johnson E. Johnson K. Jones S. Jones Jordan Kidd Lieberman Maravich Marcari Marčiulionis Martin McDermott McGrady D. McGuire Meyers R. Miller Monroe C. Murphy Nash Page Payton Petrović Phillip Posey Richmond Robertson Rodgers Roosma J. Russell Schommer Scott Sedran Sharman K. Smith Staley Steinmetz Stockton Swoopes Thomas Thompson Vandivier Wanzer West J. White Wilkens Woodard Wooden

Forwards

Arizin Barkley Barry Baylor Bird Bradley R. Brown Cunningham Curry Dalipagić Dantley DeBusschere Dehnert Endacott English Erving Foster Fulks Gale Gates Gola Hagan Havlicek Hawkins Hayes Haywood Heinsohn Hill Howell G. Johnson King Lucas Luisetti K. Malone McClain B. McCracken J. McCracken McGinnis McHale Mikkelsen C. Miller Mullin Pettit Pippen Pollard Radja Ramsey Rodman Schayes E. Schmidt O. Schmidt Stokes C. Thompson T. Thompson Twyman Walker Washington N. White Wilkes Wilkins Worthy Yardley

Centers

Abdul-Jabbar Barlow Beaty Bellamy Chamberlain Ćosić Cowens Crawford Daniels DeBernardi Donovan Ewing Gallatin Gilmore Gruenig Harris-Stewart Houbregs Issel W. Johnson Johnston M. Krause Kurland Lanier Leslie Lovellette Lapchick Macauley M. Malone McAdoo Meneghin Mikan Mourning S. Murphy Mutombo Olajuwon O'Neal Parish Pereira Reed Risen Robinson B. Russell Sabonis Sampson Semjonova Thurmond Unseld Wachter Walton Yao

Coaches

Alexeeva P. Allen Anderson Auerbach Auriemma Barmore Barry Blood Boeheim L. Brown Calhoun Calipari Cann Carlson Carnesecca Carnevale Carril Case Chancellor Chaney Conradt Crum Daly Dean Díaz-Miguel Diddle Drake Driesell Ferrándiz Gaines Gamba Gardner Gaze Gill Gomelsky Gunter Hannum Harshman Haskins Hatchell Heinsohn Hickey Hobson Holzman Hughes Hurley Iba Izzo P. Jackson Julian Keaney Keogan Knight Krzyzewski Kundla Lambert Leonard Lewis Litwack Loeffler Lonborg Magee McCutchan McGraw A. McGuire F. McGuire McLendon Meanwell Meyer Miller Moore Nelson Nikolić Novosel Olson Pitino Ramsay Richardson Riley Rubini Rupp Rush Sachs Self Sharman Shelton Sloan D. Smith Stringer Summitt Tarkanian Taylor Teague J. Thompson VanDerveer Wade Watts Wilkens G. Williams R. Williams Wooden Woolpert Wootten Yow

Contributors

Abbott Barksdale Bee Biasone H. Brown W. Brown Bunn Buss Clifton Colangelo Cooper Davidson Douglas Duer Embry Fagan Fisher Fleisher Gavitt Gottlieb Granik Gulick Harrison Hearn Henderson Hepp Hickox Hinkle Irish M. Jackson Jernstedt Jones Kennedy Knight J. Krause Lemon Liston Lloyd McLendon Lobo Mokray Morgan Morgenweck Naismith Newell Newton J. O'Brien L. O'Brien Olsen Podoloff Porter Raveling Reid Reinsdorf Ripley Sanders Saperstein Schabinger St. John Stagg Stanković Steitz Stern Taylor Thorn Tower Trester Vitale Wells Welts Wilke Winter Zollner

Referees

Bavetta Enright Garretson Hepbron Hoyt Kennedy Leith Mihalik Nichols Nucatola Quigley Rudolph Shirley Strom Tobey Walsh

Teams

1960 United States Olympic Team 1992 United States Olympic Team All-American Red Heads Buffalo Germans The First Team Harlem Globetrotters Immaculata College New York Renaissance Original Celtics Texas Western

v t e

Chuck Daly
Chuck Daly
Lifetime Achievement Award

2009: Tom Heinsohn 2010: Jack Ramsay and Tex Winter 2011: Lenny Wilkens 2012: Pat Riley 2013: Bill Fitch 2014: Bernie Bickerstaff 2015: Dick Motta 2016: K. C. Jones
K. C. Jones
and Jerry Sloan 2017: Hubie Brown
Hubie Brown
and Al Attles

v t e

Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers

Founded in 1947 Played in Minneapolis (1947–1960) Based in Los Angeles, California

Franchise

Franchise Team history All-time roster Draft history Seasons Records Head coaches Current season

Arenas

Minneapolis Auditorium Minneapolis Armory Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Memorial Sports Arena The Forum Staples Center

G League affiliate

South Bay Lakers

Administration

Jeanie, Jim, and Johnny Buss (majority owners) Anschutz Entertainment Group
Anschutz Entertainment Group
(minority owner) Ed Roski Jr. (minority owner) Patrick Soon-Shiong (minority owner) Magic Johnson
Magic Johnson
(President of Basketball Operations) Rob Pelinka
Rob Pelinka
(General manager) Luke Walton
Luke Walton
(Head coach)

Retired numbers

8 13 22 24 25 32 33 34 42 44 52 Chick Hearn
Chick Hearn
(Microphone)

Minneapolis Lakers Hall of Famers Mikan Mikkelsen Martin Lovellette Pollard Coach Kundla

NBA Championships (16)

1949 1950 1952 1953 1954 1972 1980 1982 1985 1987 1988 2000 2001 2002 2009 2010

Western Conference Championships (31)

1949 1950 1952 1953 1954 1959 1962 1963 1965 1966 1968 1969 1970 1972 1973 1980 1982 1983 1984 1985 1987 1988 1989 1991 2000 2001 2002 2004 2008 2009 2010

Rivalries

Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Clippers San Antonio Spurs Boston Celtics Detroit Pistons

Culture and lore

Jack Kent Cooke Jerry Buss Showtime Chick Hearn Shaq–Kobe feud Lawrence Tanter Jack Nicholson "I Love L.A." Laker Girls Laker Band Dancing Barry Celtics/Lakers: Best of Enemies

Media

TV Spectrum SportsNet (Los Angeles) Radio 710 ESPN
ESPN
Radio 1330 ESPN
ESPN
Deportes Announcers Bill Macdonald Stu Lantz John Ireland Mychal Thompson

v t e

Phoenix Suns

Founded in 1968 Based in Phoenix, Arizona

Franchise

Franchise Expansion Draft History Draft history All-time roster Head coaches Seasons Records Current season

Arenas

Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum Talking Stick Resort Arena

General managers

J. Colangelo B. Colangelo D'Antoni Kerr Blanks McDonough

G League affiliate

Northern Arizona Suns

Culture & lore

The Suns Gorilla The Shot 'Heard' Round the World 07 Seconds or Less STAT The Matrix Sir Charles Nashty The Greyhound Thunder Dan Shazam Oklahoma Kid Original Sun Hawk

Rivals

San Antonio Spurs

Ring of Honor & Retired numbers

5 6 7 9 13 24 33 34 42 44 Jerry Colangelo Cotton Fitzsimmons John MacLeod Al McCoy Joe Proski

Hall of Famers

Charles Barkley Jerry Colangelo Gail Goodrich Connie Hawkins Grant Hill
Grant Hill
(To be inducted in September 2018) Dennis Johnson Gus Johnson Jason Kidd
Jason Kidd
(To be inducted in September 2018) Ann Meyers Steve Nash
Steve Nash
(To be inducted in September 2018) Shaquille O'Neal Pat Riley Charlie Scott
Charlie Scott
(To be inducted in September 2018) Rick Welts (To be inducted in September 2018)

Key personnel

Owner Robert Sarver President & CEO Jason Rowley General Manager & President of Basketball Operations Ryan McDonough Vice President of Basketball Operations James Jones Director of Player Personnel Mark West Head Coach Jay Triano
Jay Triano
(interim) Voice of the Suns Al McCoy

Western Conference Championships (2)

1976 1993

Pacific Division Championships (6)

1981 1993 1995 2005 2006 2007

Media

TV FS Arizona Radio Arizona Sports Announcers Tom Leander Tom Chambers Kevin Ray Eddie Johnson Al McCoy Tim Kempton Ann Meyers Casey Jacobsen Jon Bloom

v t e

New York Knicks

Founded in 1946 Based in New York City, New York

Franchise

Franchise All-time roster Draft history Head coaches Seasons Current season

Arenas

Madison Square Garden
Madison Square Garden
III 69th Regiment Armory Madison Square Garden
Madison Square Garden
IV

Personnel

Owner The Madison Square Garden
Madison Square Garden
Company President Steve Mills General manager Scott Perry Head coach Jeff Hornacek

Culture

Dancing Harry Eddie Spike Lee Diedrich Knickerbocker Whatever Happened to Micheal Ray? Mike Walczewski George Kalinsky

Lore

Disputed foul against Scottie Pippen Knicks–Nuggets brawl John Starks' 2-for-18 in Game 7 of the 1994 Finals Linsanity

Rivals

Boston Celtics Brooklyn Nets Chicago Bulls Indiana Pacers Miami
Miami
Heat

Retired numbers

10 12 15 15 19 22 24 33 613

NBA G League affiliate

Westchester Knicks

NBA Championships (2)

1970 1973

Eastern Conference Championships (8)

1951 1952 1953 1970 1972 1973 1994 1999

Division titles (5)

1971 1989 1993 1994 2013

Media

TV MSG Network Radio WEPN-FM Announcers Mike Breen Walt Frazier Kenny Albert Mike Crispino

v t e

Miami
Miami
Heat

Founded in 1988 Based in Miami, Florida

Franchise

Franchise Team history Expansion Draft All-time roster Draft history Seasons Records Broadcasters Head coaches Current season

Arenas

Miami
Miami
Arena American Airlines Arena

G League affiliates

Florida Flame Arkansas RimRockers Albuquerque Thunderbirds Sioux Falls Skyforce

General managers

Schaffel Wohl Pfund Riley Elisburg

NBA Championships (3)

2006 2012 2013

Eastern Conference Championships (5)

2006 2011 2012 2013 2014

Culture and lore

Micky Arison Pat Riley Michael Baiamonte Burnie "The Heat Is On" (Glenn Frey song) Shaq The Decision The Big Three 27 in a row The Shot

Retired numbers

10 23 32 33

Rivals

Chicago Bulls New York Knicks

Media

TV Fox Sports Sun Radio 790 The Ticket Announcers Eric Reid Tony Fiorentino Jason Jackson Mike Inglis

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 40911342 LCCN: n87929716 SUDOC: 09741

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