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The Info List - Panhard Rod


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A Panhard
Panhard
rod (also called Panhard
Panhard
bar, track bar, or track rod) is a suspension link that provides lateral location of the axle.[1] Originally invented by the Panhard
Panhard
automobile company of France
France
in the early twentieth century, this device has been widely used ever since.

Contents

1 Overview 2 Advantages and disadvantages 3 Applications 4 See also 5 References

Overview[edit] While the purpose of automobile suspension is to let the wheels move vertically with respect to the body, it is undesirable to allow them to move forward and backwards (longitudinally), or side to side (laterally). The Panhard
Panhard
rod prevents lateral movement.[2] The Panhard bar is a simple device, consisting of a rigid bar running sideways in the same plane as the axle, connecting one end of the axle to the car body or chassis on the opposite side of the vehicle. The bar attaches on either end with pivots that let it swivel upwards and downwards only, so that the axle can move in the vertical plane only. This does not effectively locate the axle longitudinally, therefore it is usually used in conjunction with trailing arms that stabilize the axle in the longitudinal direction. This arrangement is not usually used with a leaf spring suspension, where the springs themselves supply enough lateral rigidity, but only with coil spring suspensions. However, Ford used a similar connected rear axle damper (5th shock) on some Explorers and light trucks with rear leaf springs. Advantages and disadvantages[edit]

Solid axle
Solid axle
and Panhard
Panhard
rod on a 2002 Mazda MPV

The advantage of the Panhard
Panhard
rod is its simplicity. Its major disadvantage is that the axle must necessarily move in an arc relative to the body, with the radius equal to the length of the Panhard
Panhard
rod. If the rod is too short, it allows excessive sideways movement between the axle and the body at the ends of the spring travel. Therefore, the Panhard
Panhard
rod is less desirable on smaller cars than larger ones. A suspension design that is similar but dramatically reduces the sideways component of the axle's vertical travel is Watt's linkage. Applications[edit] Some vehicles with live-axle suspensions, where Watt's linkage
Watt's linkage
is not an option, e.g. a number of Land Rover models use a Panhard
Panhard
rod as a component of the front suspension. See also[edit]

Scott Russell linkage Watt's linkage

References[edit]

^ panhard bar ^ RPM Net Tech Articles: Understanding Coil Springs - Powered by: AFCO Archived December 26, 2007, at the Wayback Machine.

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