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The palm-nut vulture (Gypohierax angolensis) or vulturine fish eagle, is a large bird of prey in the family Accipitridae
Accipitridae
(which also includes many other diurnal raptors such as kites, buzzards and harriers, vultures, and eagles). It is the only member of the genus Gypohierax. Unusual for birds of prey, it feeds mainly on the fruit of the oil palm, though it also feeds on crabs, molluscs, locusts, and fish, and has been known to occasionally attack domestic poultry and bats.[2][3] This bird is an Old World vulture
Old World vulture
(only distantly related to the New World vultures, which are in a separate family, the Cathartidae). It breeds in forest and savannah across sub-Saharan Africa, usually near water, its range coinciding with that of the oil palm. It is quite approachable, like many African vultures, and can be seen near habitation, even on large hotel lawns in the tourist areas of countries such as the Gambia.

Contents

1 Description 2 Nesting 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External links

Description[edit] This is an unmistakable bird as an adult. At 1.3–1.7 kg (2.9–3.7 lb), 60 cm (24 in) long and 150 cm (59 in) across the wings, this is the smallest Old World vulture.[4][5] Its plumage is all white except for black areas in its wings and tail. It has a red patch around the eye. The immature, which takes 3–4 years to mature, is brown with a yellow eye patch. In flight, this species resembles an eagle more than a typical vulture, and it can sustain flapping flight, so it does not depend on thermals.

Juvenile

Semliki Wildlife Reserve, Uganda

Kazinga Channel, Uganda

Nesting[edit]

Gypohierax angolensis

Birds may form loose colonies. A single egg is incubated in a bulky stick nest in a tree for about six weeks. References[edit]

^ IUCN Red List
IUCN Red List
2013. ^ Mikula, P.; Morelli, F.; Lučan, R. K.; Jones, D. N.; Tryjanowski, P. (2016). "Bats as prey of diurnal birds: a global perspective". Mammal Review. doi:10.1111/mam.12060.  ^ Carneiro, Camilo; Henriques, Mohamed; Barbosa, Castro; Tchantchalam, Quintino; Regalla, Aissa; Patrício, Ana R.; Catry, Paulo (2017-04-10). "Ecology and behaviour of Palm-nut Vultures Gypohierax angolensis in the Bijagós Archipelago, Guinea-Bissau". Ostrich. 0 (0): 1–9. doi:10.2989/00306525.2017.1291540. ISSN 0030-6525.  ^ " Palm-nut vulture
Palm-nut vulture
videos, photos and facts — Gypohierax angolensis". ARKive. Retrieved 2011-05-29.  ^ "Palm-nut Vulture — Gypohierax angolensis". oiseaux-birds.com. Retrieved 2011-05-29. 

Further reading[edit]

BirdLife International (2013). "Gypohierax angolensis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013.  Thomson, A. L.; Moreau, R. E. (1957). "Feeding Habits of the Palm-Nut Vulture
Vulture
Gypohierax". Ibis. 99 (4): 608–613. doi:10.1111/j.1474-919X.1957.tb03053.x. 

External links[edit]

Palmnut Vulture
Vulture
- Species text in The Atlas of Southern African Birds.

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Gypohierax angolensis.

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Vultures

Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Aves

Cathartidae
Cathartidae
(New World vultures)

Cathartes

Turkey vulture
Turkey vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
aura) Lesser yellow-headed vulture
Lesser yellow-headed vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
burrovianus) Greater yellow-headed vulture
Greater yellow-headed vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
melambrotus)

Coragyps

American black vulture (Coragyps atratus)

Sarcoramphus

King vulture
King vulture
(Sarcoramphus papa)

Gymnogyps

California condor
California condor
(Gymnogyps californianus)

Vultur

Andean condor
Andean condor
(Vultur gryphus)

Accipitridae: Gypaetinae (eagle-vultures)

Eutriorchis

Madagascan serpent eagle
Madagascan serpent eagle
(Eutriorchis astur)

Gypohierax

Palm-nut vulture
Palm-nut vulture
(Gypohierax angolensis)

Polyboroides

Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus) African harrier-hawk ( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
typus)

Neophron

Egyptian vulture
Egyptian vulture
(Neophron percnopterus)

Gypaetus

Bearded vulture
Bearded vulture
(Gypaetus barbatus)

Accipitridae: Gypinae (Old World vultures)

Sarcogyps

Red-headed vulture
Red-headed vulture
(Sarcogyps calvus)

Trigonoceps

White-headed vulture
White-headed vulture
(Trigonoceps occipitalis)

Aegypius

Cinereous vulture
Cinereous vulture
(Aegypius monachus)

Torgos

Lappet-faced vulture
Lappet-faced vulture
(Torgos tracheliotos)

Necrosyrtes

Hooded vulture
Hooded vulture
(Necrosyrtes monachus)

Gyps

White-rumped vulture
White-rumped vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
bengalensis) Himalayan vulture
Himalayan vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
himalayensis) White-backed vulture
White-backed vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
africanus) Rüppell's vulture
Rüppell's vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
rueppellii) Griffon vulture
Griffon vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
fulvus) Indian vulture
Indian vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
indicus) Slender-billed vulture
Slender-billed vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
tenuirostris) Cape vulture
Cape vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
coprothere)

Related topics

Diclofenac Indian vulture
Indian vulture
crisis

Taxon identifiers

Wd: Q732523 ADW: Gypohierax_angolensis ARKive: gypohierax-angolensis eBird: panvul1 EoL: 914576 GBIF: 2480393 iNaturalist: 5418 ITIS: 175478 IUCN: 22695170 NCBI: 321074 Species+:

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