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Sidney Aaron "Paddy" Chayefsky (January 29, 1923 – August 1, 1981) was an American playwright, screenwriter and novelist. He is the only person to have won three solo Academy Awards
Academy Awards
for Best Screenplay (the other three-time winners, Francis Ford Coppola, Charles Brackett, Woody Allen, and Billy Wilder, have all shared their awards with co-writers).[2] He was considered one of the most renowned dramatists of the so-called Golden Age of Television. His intimate, realistic scripts provided a naturalistic style of television drama for the 1950s, and he was regarded as the central figure in the "kitchen sink realism" movement of American television.[3] Martin Gottfried wrote in All His Jazz that Chayefsky "was a successful writer, the most successful graduate of television's slice of life school of naturalism."[4] Following his critically acclaimed teleplays, Chayefsky continued to succeed as a playwright and novelist. As a screenwriter, he received three Academy Awards
Academy Awards
for Marty (1955), The Hospital
The Hospital
(1971) and Network (1976). The movie Marty was based on his own television drama about two lonely people finding love. Network was his scathing satire of the television industry and The Hospital
The Hospital
was also satiric. Film historian David Thomson called The Hospital
The Hospital
"years ahead of its time. […] Few films capture the disaster of America's self-destructive idealism so well."[5] His screenplay for Network is often regarded as his masterpiece,[6] and has been hailed as "the kind of literate, darkly funny and breathtakingly prescient material that prompts many to claim it as the greatest screenplay of the 20th century."[7] Chayefsky's early stories were frequently influenced by the author's childhood in The Bronx. Chayefsky was part of the inaugural class of inductees into the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences' Television Hall of Fame. He received this honor three years after his death, in 1984.[8]

Contents

1 Early life

1.1 Military service 1.2 Post-war

2 Television 3 Broadway 4 Novels 5 Personal traits 6 Family 7 Death 8 Filmography 9 Television and stage plays 10 Academy Awards 11 References 12 External links

Early life[edit]

Chayefsky as a senior in high school, 1939.

Chayefsky was born in The Bronx, New York City
New York City
to Russian Jewish immigrants Harry and Gussie Stuchevsky Chayefsky who came from Moscow to New York in 1907.[9] He had two older brothers, William and Isidor.[10] He spent part of his youth in Mount Vernon, New York.[11] He attended DeWitt Clinton High School,[12] where he served as an editor-in-chief of the school's literary magazine, "The Magpie" and wrote for the school newspaper.[13] He went to the City College of New York. While there, he played for the semi-professional football team Kingsbridge Trojans. He graduated with a degree in accounting in 1943, and then studied languages at Fordham University.[14] Military service[edit] During World War II, Chayefsky joined the United States Army, where he received both a Purple Heart
Purple Heart
and the nickname "Paddy". The nickname was given spontaneously when he was awakened at dawn for kitchen duty. Although actually Jewish, he asked to be excused to attend Mass. "Okay, Paddy," said the officer, and the name stuck.[15] Serving with the 104th Infantry Division in the European Theatre, he was near Aachen, Germany
Germany
when he was wounded, reportedly by a land mine. While recovering from his injuries in the Army Hospital near Cirencester, England, he wrote the book and lyrics to a musical comedy, No T.O. for Love. First produced in 1945 by the Special Services Unit, the show toured European Army bases for two years.[14] The London opening of No T.O. for Love at the Scala Theatre in the West End was the beginning of Chayefsky's theatrical career. During the London production of this musical, Chayefsky encountered Joshua Logan, a future collaborator, and Garson Kanin, who invited Chayefsky to collaborate with him on a documentary of the Allied invasion, The True Glory.[15] Post-war[edit] Returning to the United States, Chayefsky worked in his uncle's print shop, Regal Press, an experience which provided a background for his later teleplay, Printer's Measure (1953), as well as his story for the movie As Young as You Feel
As Young as You Feel
(1951). Kanin enabled Chayefsky to spend time working on his second play, Put Them All Together (later known as M is for Mother), but it was never produced. Producers Mike Gordon and Jerry Bressler gave him a junior writer's contract. He wrote a story, The Great American Hoax, which sold to Good Housekeeping
Good Housekeeping
but was never published. He relocated to Hollywood, where he met his future wife Susan Sackler, and the couple married in February 1949. Failing to find work on the West Coast, Chayefsky returned to New York. During the late 1940s, he began working full-time on short stories and radio scripts, and during that period, he was a gagwriter for radio host Robert Q. Lewis. Chayefsky later recalled, "I sold some plays to men who had an uncanny ability not to raise money."[16] During 1951–52, Chayefsky wrote adaptations for radio's Theater Guild on the Air: The Meanest Man in the World (with James Stewart), Cavalcade of America, Tommy (with Van Heflin
Van Heflin
and Ruth Gordon) and Over 21 (with Wally Cox). His play The Man Who Made the Mountain Shake was noticed by Elia Kazan, and his wife, Molly Kazan, helped Chayefsky with revisions. It was retitled Fifth From Garibaldi but was never produced. In 1951, the movie As Young as You Feel
As Young as You Feel
was adapted from a Chayefsky story. Television[edit]

Chayefsky in 1958

He moved into television with scripts for Danger, The Gulf Playhouse and Manhunt. Philco Television Playhouse producer Fred Coe saw the Danger and Manhunt episodes and enlisted Chayefsky to adapt the story It Happened on the Brooklyn Subway about a photographer on a New York subway train who reunites a concentration camp survivor with his long-lost wife. Chayefsky's first script to be telecast was a 1949 adaptation of Budd Schulberg's What Makes Sammy Run? for Philco. Since he had always wanted to use a synagogue as backdrop, he wrote Holiday Song, telecast in 1952 and also in 1954. He submitted more work to Philco, including Printer's Measure, The Bachelor Party (1953) and The Big Deal (1953). One of these teleplays, Mother (April 4, 1954), received a new production October 24, 1994 on Great Performances with Anne Bancroft in the title role. Curiously, original teleplays from the 1950s are almost never revived for new TV productions, so the 1994 production of Mother was a conspicuous rarity. In 1953, Chayefsky wrote Marty, which was premiered on The Philco Television Playhouse, with Rod Steiger
Rod Steiger
and Nancy Marchand. Marty is about a decent, hard-working Bronx butcher, pining for the company of a woman in his life but despairing of ever finding true love in a relationship. Fate pairs him with a plain, shy schoolteacher named Clara whom he rescues from the embarrassment of being abandoned by her blind date in a local dance hall. The production, the actors and Chayefsky's naturalistic dialogue received much critical acclaim and influenced subsequent live television dramas. Chayefsky had a unique clause in his Marty contract that stated that only he could write the screenplay, which he did for the 1955 movie. Chayefsky's The Great American Hoax was broadcast May 15, 1957 during the second season of The 20th Century Fox Hour. This was actually a rewrite of his earlier Fox film, As Young as You Feel
As Young as You Feel
(1951) with Monty Woolley
Monty Woolley
and Marilyn Monroe. The Great American Hoax was shown on the FX channel after Fox restored some The 20th Century Fox Hour episodes and telecast them under the new title Fox Hour of Stars beginning in 2002.[17] Broadway[edit] The seventh season of Philco Television Playhouse began September 19, 1954 with E. G. Marshall
E. G. Marshall
and Eva Marie Saint
Eva Marie Saint
in Chayefsky's Middle of the Night, a play which relocated to Broadway theaters 15 months later; In 1956, Middle of the Night
Middle of the Night
opened on Broadway with Edward G. Robinson and Gena Rowlands, and its success led to a national tour. It was filmed by Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures
in 1959 with Kim Novak
Kim Novak
and Fredric March. The Tenth Man (1959) marked Chayefsky's second Broadway theatrical success, garnering 1960 Tony Award
Tony Award
nominations for Best Play, Best Director (Tyrone Guthrie) and Best Scenic Design. Guthrie received another nomination for Chayefsky's Gideon, as did actor Fredric March. Chayefsky's final Broadway theatrical production, a play based on the life of Joseph Stalin, The Passion of Josef D, received unfavorable reviews and ran for only 15 performances.[18] Although Chayefsky was an early writer for the television medium, he eventually abandoned it, "decrying the lack of interest the networks demonstrated toward quality programming". As a result, during the course of his career, he constantly toyed with the idea of lampooning the television industry, which he succeeded in doing with Network.[19] The film is said to have "presaged the advent of reality television by twenty years" and was a "sardonic satire" of the television industry, dealing with the "dehumanization of modern life."[20] Novels[edit] Inspired by the work of John C. Lilly, Chayefsky spent two years in Boston doing research to write his science fiction novel Altered States (HarperCollins, 1978) about a man's search for his primal self through psychotropic drugs and an isolation tank. Chayefsky suffered greatly from stress while working on the novel, resulting in his heart attack in 1977. Subsequent to that misfortune, he was sued by one of the numerous scientific advisors he hired to help him with research.[19] He wrote the screenplay for the 1980 film, but he is credited by his real first and middle name, Sidney Aaron, because of disputes with director Ken Russell.[21] Personal traits[edit]

Paddy Chayefsky's monument in Sharon Gardens Division of Kensico Cemetery

Paddy Chayefsky's footstone

Drama critic Martin Gottfried gives a general description of Chayefsky's personal traits as they may have affected his writings:

"Chayefsky was a sturdy man of 42, compact and burly in the bulky way of a schoolyard athlete, with thick dark hair and a bent nose that could pass for a streetfighter's. He was a grown-up with one foot in the boys' clubs of his city youth, a street snob who would not allow the loss of his nostalgia. He was an intellectual competitor, always spoiling for a political argument or a philosophical argument, or any exchange over any issue, changing sides for the fun of the fray. A liberal, he was annoyed by liberals; a proud Jew, he wouldn't let anyone call him a 'Jewish writer'. In short, the life of the mind was a participant sport for Paddy Chayefsky."[22]

Family[edit] Paddy and Susan (née Sackler) Chayefsky's son Dan was born six years after their 1949 marriage. Despite an alleged affair with Kim Novak,[15] Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
remained married to Susan Chayefsky until his death. Death[edit] Chayefsky died in New York City
New York City
of cancer, for which he had declined surgery, in 1981, aged 58, and was interred in the Sharon Gardens Division of Kensico Cemetery
Kensico Cemetery
in Valhalla, Westchester County, New York. His personal papers are at the Wisconsin Historical Society
Wisconsin Historical Society
and the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Billy Rose Theatre Division.[23] Filmography[edit]

The True Glory (1945), uncredited, with Garson Kanin As Young as You Feel
As Young as You Feel
(1951), with Lamar Trotti Marty (1955) The Catered Affair
The Catered Affair
(1956) The Bachelor Party (1957) The Goddess (1958) Middle of the Night
Middle of the Night
(1959) The Americanization of Emily
The Americanization of Emily
(1964) Paint Your Wagon (with Alan Jay Lerner) (1969) The Hospital
The Hospital
(1971) Network (1976) Altered States
Altered States
(1980) The Habakkuk Conspiracy (unproduced) (1983)

Television and stage plays[edit]

Television (selection)

1950–55 Danger 1951–52 Manhunt 1951–60 Goodyear Playhouse 1952–54 Philco Television Playhouse 1952 Holiday Song 1952 The Reluctant Citizen 1953 Printer's Measure 1953 Marty 1953 The Big Deal 1953 The Bachelor Party 1953 The Sixth Year 1953 Catch My Boy On Sunday 1954 The Mother 1954 Middle of the Night 1955 The Catered Affair 1956 The Great American Hoax

Stage

No T.O. for Love (1945) Middle of the Night
Middle of the Night
(1956) The Tenth Man (1959) Gideon (1961) The Passion of Josef D. (1964) The Latent Heterosexual (originally titled The Accountant's Tale or The Case of the Latent Heterosexual) (1968)

Academy Awards[edit]

Year Category Film Result

1955 Best Adapted Screenplay Marty Won

1958 Best Original Screenplay The Goddess Nominated

1971 Best Original Screenplay The Hospital Won

1976 Best Original Screenplay Network Won

References[edit]

^ Profile, nndb.com; accessed June 29, 2015. ^ IMDB ^ Rutherford, Paul.When Television Was Young. University of Toronto Press, 1990. ^ Quote re Chayefsky, google.com; accessed June 29, 2015. ^ Thomson, David. The New Biographical Dictionary of Film, Alfred A. Knopf (2002), p. 155 ^ "101 Greatest Screenplays". Writers Guild of America, West. Retrieved January 13, 2017.  ^ Lowe, Rob (February 13, 2014). "Anchorman: 'Mad as Hell', by Dave Itzkoff". The New York Times. Retrieved January 13, 2017.  ^ Karol, Michael (2005-12-15). THE COMIC DNA OF LUCILLE BALL: INTERPRETING THE ICON. iUniverse. ISBN 9780595823208.  ^ Brady, John. The Craft of the Screenwriter. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1981. ^ 1930 United Staes Federal Census ^ 1930 United States Federal Census ^ Campbell, Colin (2 August 1981). "PADDY CHAYEFSKY DEAD AT 58; PLAYWRIGHT WON THREE OSCARS". The New York Times. Retrieved 16 July 2016.  ^ Dewitt Clinton High School Yearbook, 1939, p. 32, p. 44 ^ a b Fisher, James (June 2011). Historical Dictionary of Contemporary American Theater: 1930-2010. Lanham, Maryland: Scarecrow Press. p. 146. ISBN 978-0-8108-5532-8.  ^ a b c Considine, Shaun. Mad as Hell: The Life and Work of Paddy Chayefsky, Random House (1995), amazon.com; accessed June 29, 2015. ^ Frank, Sam (1986). American Screenwriters: Second Series. Detroit, Michigan: Gale. ISBN 978-0-8103-1722-2.  ^ Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
on IMDb ^ Internet Broadway Database; accessed June 29, 2015. ^ a b Guide to the Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
Papers, 1907–1998, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, 2006 completion ^ Thompson, David. The Whole Equation: A History of Hollywood, Alfred A. Knopf (2005), p. 328 ^ McDonald, Brian (2010-11-01). "A Lesson from Paddy Cheyefsky". Retrieved 2010-11-06.  ^ Gottfried, Martin. All His Jazz: The Life and Death of Bob Fosse, Da Capo Press (1990) pp. 170–171 ^ Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
papers, 1907–1998 (bulk 1952–1981), held by the Billy Rose Theatre Division, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts

External links[edit]

The Angry Man WNYC: On The Media audio profile of Paddy Chayefsky, October 27, 2006 Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
papers at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
Papers at the Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research. Museum of Broadcast Communications: Paddy Chayefsky

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Works by Paddy Chayefsky

Films written

The True Glory (1945) As Young as You Feel
As Young as You Feel
(1951) Marty (1955) The Catered Affair
The Catered Affair
(1956) The Bachelor Party (1957) The Goddess (1958) Middle of the Night
Middle of the Night
(1959) The Americanization of Emily
The Americanization of Emily
(1964) Paint Your Wagon (1969) The Hospital
The Hospital
(1971) Network (1976) Altered States
Altered States
(1980)

Television plays

Holiday Song (1952) The Reluctant Citizen (1952) Printer's Measure (1953) Marty (1953) The Big Deal (1953) The Bachelor Party (1953) The Sixth Year (1953) Catch My Boy On Sunday (1953) The Mother (1954) The Middle of the Night
Middle of the Night
(1954) The Catered Affair
The Catered Affair
(1955) The Great American Hoax (1956)

Plays

No T.O. for Love (1945) Middle of the Night
Middle of the Night
(1956) The Tenth Man (1959) Gideon (1961) The Passion of Josef D. (1964) The Latent Heterosexual (1968)

Novels

Altered States
Altered States
(1978)

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Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay

1940–1960

Preston Sturges
Preston Sturges
(1940) Herman J. Mankiewicz
Herman J. Mankiewicz
and Orson Welles
Orson Welles
(1941) Michael Kanin
Michael Kanin
and Ring Lardner Jr.
Ring Lardner Jr.
(1942) Norman Krasna (1943) Lamar Trotti (1944) Richard Schweizer (1945) Muriel Box and Sydney Box (1946) Sidney Sheldon (1947) No award (1948) Robert Pirosh (1949) Charles Brackett, D. M. Marshman Jr. and Billy Wilder
Billy Wilder
(1950) Alan Jay Lerner
Alan Jay Lerner
(1951) T. E. B. Clarke (1952) Charles Brackett, Richard L. Breen and Walter Reisch (1953) Budd Schulberg
Budd Schulberg
(1954) Sonya Levien and William Ludwig (1955) Albert Lamorisse
Albert Lamorisse
(1956) George Wells (1957) Nathan E. Douglas and Harold Jacob Smith (1958) Clarence Greene, Maurice Richlin, Russell Rouse and Stanley Shapiro (1959) I. A. L. Diamond and Billy Wilder
Billy Wilder
(1960)

1961–1980

William Inge
William Inge
(1961) Ennio de Concini, Pietro Germi, and Alfredo Giannetti (1962) James Webb (1963) Peter Stone and Frank Tarloff (1964) Frederic Raphael (1965) Claude Lelouch
Claude Lelouch
and Pierre Uytterhoeven (1966) William Rose (1967) Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
(1968) William Goldman
William Goldman
(1969) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
and Edmund H. North (1970) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1971) Jeremy Larner (1972) David S. Ward
David S. Ward
(1973) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
(1974) Frank Pierson
Frank Pierson
(1975) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1976) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and Marshall Brickman (1977) Robert C. Jones, Waldo Salt, and Nancy Dowd (1978) Steve Tesich
Steve Tesich
(1979) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
(1980)

1981–2000

Colin Welland (1981) John Briley (1982) Horton Foote (1983) Robert Benton (1984) William Kelley, Pamela Wallace and Earl W. Wallace (1985) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1986) John Patrick Shanley
John Patrick Shanley
(1987) Ronald Bass and Barry Morrow (1988) Tom Schulman (1989) Bruce Joel Rubin (1990) Callie Khouri
Callie Khouri
(1991) Neil Jordan
Neil Jordan
(1992) Jane Campion
Jane Campion
(1993) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
and Roger Avary
Roger Avary
(1994) Christopher McQuarrie
Christopher McQuarrie
(1995) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen (1996) Ben Affleck
Ben Affleck
and Matt Damon
Matt Damon
(1997) Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard
Tom Stoppard
(1998) Alan Ball (1999) Cameron Crowe
Cameron Crowe
(2000)

2001–present

Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
(2001) Pedro Almodóvar
Pedro Almodóvar
(2002) Sofia Coppola
Sofia Coppola
(2003) Pierre Bismuth, Michel Gondry
Michel Gondry
and Charlie Kaufman
Charlie Kaufman
(2004) Paul Haggis
Paul Haggis
and Bobby Moresco (2005) Michael Arndt
Michael Arndt
(2006) Diablo Cody
Diablo Cody
(2007) Dustin Lance Black
Dustin Lance Black
(2008) Mark Boal
Mark Boal
(2009) David Seidler (2010) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(2011) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
(2012) Spike Jonze
Spike Jonze
(2013) Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris Jr., and Armando Bo (2014) Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer (2015) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2016) Jordan Peele
Jordan Peele
(2017)

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Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay

1928–1950

Benjamin Glazer (1928) Hanns Kräly (1929) Frances Marion
Frances Marion
(1930) Howard Estabrook
Howard Estabrook
(1931) Edwin J. Burke (1932) Victor Heerman
Victor Heerman
and Sarah Y. Mason
Sarah Y. Mason
(1933) Robert Riskin
Robert Riskin
(1934) Dudley Nichols (1935) Pierre Collings
Pierre Collings
and Sheridan Gibney (1936) Heinz Herald, Geza Herczeg, and Norman Reilly Raine
Norman Reilly Raine
(1937) Ian Dalrymple, Cecil Arthur Lewis, W. P. Lipscomb, and George Bernard Shaw (1938) Sidney Howard
Sidney Howard
(1939) Donald Ogden Stewart
Donald Ogden Stewart
(1940) Sidney Buchman and Seton I. Miller (1941) George Froeschel, James Hilton, Claudine West, and Arthur Wimperis (1942) Philip G. Epstein, Julius J. Epstein, and Howard E. Koch (1943) Frank Butler, and Frank Cavett (1944) Charles Brackett and Billy Wilder
Billy Wilder
(1945) Robert Sherwood (1946) George Seaton
George Seaton
(1947) John Huston
John Huston
(1948) Joseph L. Mankiewicz
Joseph L. Mankiewicz
(1949) Joseph L. Mankiewicz
Joseph L. Mankiewicz
(1950)

1951–1975

Harry Brown and Michael Wilson (1951) Charles Schnee (1952) Daniel Taradash (1953) George Seaton
George Seaton
(1954) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1955) John Farrow, S. J. Perelman, and James Poe (1956) Carl Foreman
Carl Foreman
and Michael Wilson (1957) Alan Jay Lerner
Alan Jay Lerner
(1958) Neil Paterson (1959) Richard Brooks
Richard Brooks
(1960) Abby Mann (1961) Horton Foote (1962) John Osborne
John Osborne
(1963) Edward Anhalt (1964) Robert Bolt (1965) Robert Bolt (1966) Stirling Silliphant (1967) James Goldman (1968) Waldo Salt (1969) Ring Lardner Jr.
Ring Lardner Jr.
(1970) Ernest Tidyman (1971) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
and Mario Puzo
Mario Puzo
(1972) William Peter Blatty
William Peter Blatty
(1973) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
and Mario Puzo
Mario Puzo
(1974) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
and Lawrence Hauben (1975)

1976–2000

William Goldman
William Goldman
(1976) Alvin Sargent (1977) Oliver Stone
Oliver Stone
(1978) Robert Benton (1979) Alvin Sargent (1980) Ernest Thompson
Ernest Thompson
(1981) Costa-Gavras
Costa-Gavras
and Donald E. Stewart (1982) James L. Brooks
James L. Brooks
(1983) Peter Shaffer (1984) Kurt Luedtke (1985) Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
(1986) Bernardo Bertolucci
Bernardo Bertolucci
and Mark Peploe (1987) Christopher Hampton
Christopher Hampton
(1988) Alfred Uhry
Alfred Uhry
(1989) Michael Blake (1990) Ted Tally (1991) Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
(1992) Steven Zaillian (1993) Eric Roth (1994) Emma Thompson
Emma Thompson
(1995) Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
(1996) Curtis Hanson
Curtis Hanson
and Brian Helgeland (1997) Bill Condon (1998) John Irving
John Irving
(1999) Stephen Gaghan
Stephen Gaghan
(2000)

2001–present

Akiva Goldsman
Akiva Goldsman
(2001) Ronald Harwood (2002) Philippa Boyens, Peter Jackson, and Fran Walsh (2003) Alexander Payne
Alexander Payne
and Jim Taylor (2004) Larry McMurtry
Larry McMurtry
and Diana Ossana (2005) William Monahan
William Monahan
(2006) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen (2007) Simon Beaufoy (2008) Geoffrey S. Fletcher
Geoffrey S. Fletcher
(2009) Aaron Sorkin
Aaron Sorkin
(2010) Alexander Payne, Jim Rash, and Nat Faxon
Nat Faxon
(2011) Chris Terrio (2012) John Ridley
John Ridley
(2013) Graham Moore (2014) Adam McKay
Adam McKay
and Charles Randolph (2015) Barry Jenkins
Barry Jenkins
and Tarell Alvin McCraney
Tarell Alvin McCraney
(2016) James Ivory
James Ivory
(2017)

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BAFTA Award for Best Screenplay

Calder Willingham and Buck Henry
Buck Henry
(1968) Waldo Salt (1969) William Goldman
William Goldman
(1970) Harold Pinter
Harold Pinter
(1971) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
/ Larry McMurtry
Larry McMurtry
and Peter Bogdanovich
Peter Bogdanovich
(1972) Luis Buñuel
Luis Buñuel
and Jean-Claude Carrière
Jean-Claude Carrière
(1973) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
(1974) Robert Getchell (1975) Alan Parker
Alan Parker
(1976) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and Marshall Brickman (1977) Alvin Sargent (1978) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and Marshall Brickman (1979) Jerzy Kosiński
Jerzy Kosiński
(1980) Bill Forsyth
Bill Forsyth
(1981) Costa-Gavras
Costa-Gavras
and Donald E. Stewart (1982)

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Golden Globe Award for Best Screenplay

Robert Bolt (1965) Robert Bolt (1966) Stirling Silliphant (1967) Stirling Silliphant (1968) Bridget Boland, John Hale and Richard Sokolove (1969) Erich Segal
Erich Segal
(1970) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1971) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
and Mario Puzo
Mario Puzo
(1972) William Peter Blatty
William Peter Blatty
(1973) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
(1974) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
and Lawrence Hauben (1975) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1976) Neil Simon
Neil Simon
(1977) Oliver Stone
Oliver Stone
(1978) Robert Benton (1979) William Peter Blatty
William Peter Blatty
(1980) Ernest Thompson
Ernest Thompson
(1981) John Briley (1982) James L. Brooks
James L. Brooks
(1983) Peter Shaffer (1984) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1985) Robert Bolt (1986) Bernardo Bertolucci, Mark Peploe and Enzon Ungari (1987) Naomi Foner (1988) Oliver Stone
Oliver Stone
and Ron Kovic
Ron Kovic
(1989) Michael Blake (1990) Callie Khouri
Callie Khouri
(1991) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
(1992) Steven Zaillian (1993) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
(1994) Emma Thompson
Emma Thompson
(1995) Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski (1996) Ben Affleck
Ben Affleck
and Matt Damon
Matt Damon
(1997) Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard
Tom Stoppard
(1998) Alan Ball (1999) Stephen Gaghan
Stephen Gaghan
(2000) Akiva Goldsman
Akiva Goldsman
(2001) Alexander Payne
Alexander Payne
and Jim Taylor (2002) Sofia Coppola
Sofia Coppola
(2003) Alexander Payne
Alexander Payne
and Jim Taylor (2004) Larry McMurtry
Larry McMurtry
and Diana Ossana (2005) Peter Morgan (2006) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen (2007) Simon Beaufoy (2008) Jason Reitman
Jason Reitman
and Sheldon Turner (2009) Aaron Sorkin
Aaron Sorkin
(2010) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(2011) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
(2012) Spike Jonze
Spike Jonze
(2013) Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris Jr., and Armando Bo (2014) Aaron Sorkin
Aaron Sorkin
(2015) Damien Chazelle
Damien Chazelle
(2016) Martin McDonagh
Martin McDonagh
(2017)

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Writers Guild of America Award for Best Original Screenplay

Original Drama (1969–1983, retired)

William Goldman
William Goldman
(1969) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
and Edmund H. North (1970) Penelope Gilliatt (1971) Jeremy Larner (1972) Steve Shagan (1973) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
(1974) Frank Pierson
Frank Pierson
(1975) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1976) Arthur Laurents
Arthur Laurents
(1977) Nancy Dowd, Robert C. Jones and Waldo Salt (1978) Mike Gray, T. S. Cook and James Bridges (1979) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
(1980) Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
and Trevor Griffiths (1981) Melissa Mathison
Melissa Mathison
(1982) Horton Foote (1983)

Original Comedy (1969–1983, retired)

Paul Mazursky
Paul Mazursky
and Larry Tucker (1969) Neil Simon
Neil Simon
(1970) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1971) Peter Bogdanovich, Buck Henry, David Newman and Robert Benton (1972) Melvin Frank and Jack Rose (1973) Mel Brooks, Norman Steinberg, Andrew Bergman, Richard Pryor
Richard Pryor
and Alan Uger (1974) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
and Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
(1975) Bill Lancaster
Bill Lancaster
(1976) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and Marshall Brickman (1977) Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
and Sheldon Keller (1978) Steve Tesich
Steve Tesich
(1979) Nancy Meyers, Harvey Miller and Charles Shyer
Charles Shyer
(1980) Steve Gordon (1981) Don McGuire, Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
and Murray Schisgal (1982) Lawrence Kasdan
Lawrence Kasdan
and Barbara Benedek (1983)

Original Screenplay (1984–present)

Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1984) William Kelley and Earl W. Wallace (1985) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1986) John Patrick Shanley
John Patrick Shanley
(1987) Ron Shelton (1988) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1989) Barry Levinson
Barry Levinson
(1990) Callie Khouri
Callie Khouri
(1991) Neil Jordan
Neil Jordan
(1992) Jane Campion
Jane Campion
(1993) Richard Curtis
Richard Curtis
(1994) Randall Wallace (1995) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen (1996) James L. Brooks
James L. Brooks
and Mark Andrus (1997) Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard
Tom Stoppard
(1998) Alan Ball (1999) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2000) Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
(2001) Michael Moore
Michael Moore
(2002) Sofia Coppola
Sofia Coppola
(2003) Charlie Kaufman
Charlie Kaufman
(2004) Paul Haggis
Paul Haggis
and Bobby Moresco (2005) Michael Arndt
Michael Arndt
(2006) Diablo Cody
Diablo Cody
(2007) Dustin Lance Black
Dustin Lance Black
(2008) Mark Boal
Mark Boal
(2009) Christopher Nolan
Christopher Nolan
(2010) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(2011) Mark Boal
Mark Boal
(2012) Spike Jonze
Spike Jonze
(2013) Wes Anderson
Wes Anderson
and Hugo Guinness (2014) Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer (2015) Barry Jenkins
Barry Jenkins
and Tarell Alvin McCraney
Tarell Alvin McCraney
(2016) Jordan Peele
Jordan Peele
(2017)

v t e

Television Hall of Fame Class of 1984

Lucille Ball Milton Berle Paddy Chayefsky Norman Lear Edward R. Murrow William S. Paley David Sarnoff

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 111273695 LCCN: n50036270 ISNI: 0000 0001 1083 2589 GND: 118638351 SUDOC: 026783916 BNF: cb11896460z (data) BIBSYS: 90837388 MusicBrainz: fc637124-22f9-484d-aa3b-8f337fac5ffd NDL: 00435819 BNE: XX831051 SN

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