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The Info List - Ovo-lacto Vegetarianism


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An ovo-lacto vegetarian or lacto-ovo vegetarian is a vegetarian who does not eat meat, but does consume some animal products such as eggs and dairy. Unlike pescatarians, they do not consume fish or other seafood. A typical ovo-lacto vegetarian diet can include fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts, seeds, herbs, roots, fungi, milk, cheese, yogurt, kefir, and eggs.[1]

Contents

1 Etymology 2 Diet 3 Religion 4 Ovo- Vegetarianism
Vegetarianism
in India 5 See also 6 References

Etymology[edit] The terminology stems from the Latin lac meaning "milk" (as in 'lactation'), ovum meaning "egg", and the English term vegetarian, so as giving the definition of a vegetarian diet containing milk and eggs. Diet[edit] In the Western world, ovo-lacto vegetarians are the most common type of vegetarian.[2] Generally speaking, when one uses the term vegetarian an ovo-lacto vegetarian is assumed.[3] Ovo-lacto vegetarians are often well-catered to in restaurants and shops, especially in some parts of Europe
Europe
and metropolitan cities in North America. Religion[edit] Jainism
Jainism
prohibits causing harm to anything with a soul or potential life. Traditionally this includes eggs and certain kinds of vegetables, as well as animals, but dairy products are permitted. Jains are therefore lacto vegetarians, not ovo-lacto vegetarians.[4] In Hinduism, many individuals are either raised as ovo-lacto vegetarians or lacto vegetarians.[5] The Bible Christian Church was a Christian vegetarian sect founded by William Cowherd in 1809.[6] Cowherd was one of the philosophical forerunners of the Vegetarian Society
Vegetarian Society
founded in 1847. The Bible Christian Church promoted the use of eggs, dairy and honey as God's given food per "the promised land flowing with milk and honey" (Exodus 3:8).[7] Many Seventh-day Adventist followers are lacto-ovo vegetarians. For over 130 years, Seventh-day Adventists have recommended a vegetarian diet which may include milk products and eggs.[8] Ovo- Vegetarianism
Vegetarianism
in India[edit] In India, eggs are not universally considered vegetarian; those who do practice ovo-vegetarianism are often described as "eggetarians". To accommodate this, products containing eggs are specially marked to differentiate them from otherwise vegetarian food products. Some manufacturers specifically call out that their products contain eggs but not meat or animal products to avoid diminishing interest among those who practice ovo-vegetarianism. [9] See also[edit]

Lacto vegetarianism Ovo vegetarianism Pescetarianism Sentient foods Veganism List of butter dishes List of cheese dishes List of dairy products List of vegetable dishes List of vegetarian restaurants List of egg dishes

References[edit]

^ http://www.dietitians.ca/Downloads/Factsheets/Guidelines-Lacto-Ovo.aspx ^ "Top 7 Types of Vegetarians".  ^ "Vegetarian (Lacto-ovo vegetarian)".  ^ "Jainpedia". Archived from the original on 2017-05-24. Retrieved 2017-05-24.  ^ Surveys studying food habits of Indians include: "Diary and poultry sector growth in India", Quote:"An analysis of consumption data originating from National Sample Survey (NSS) shows that 42 percent of households are vegetarian, in that they never eat fish, meat or eggs. The remaining 58 percent of households are less strict vegetarians or non-vegetarians." "Indian consumer patterns" and "Agri reform in India". Results indicate that Indians who eat meat do so infrequently with less than 30% consuming non-vegetarian foods regularly, although the reasons may be economical. Archived June 26, 2015, at the Wayback Machine. ^ Julia Twigg (1981). "The Bible Christian Church". International Vegetarian Union.  ^ John Davis. "A History of Veganism
Veganism
from 1806" (PDF). International Vegetarian Union.  ^ "''A Position Statement on The Vegetarian Diet Adapted from the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists Nutrition Council''". SDADA. Retrieved 2011-10-03.  ^ Food Safety and Standards Authority of India. 'Food Safety and standards (Packaging and Labelling) regulations, 2011.'. Index page

v t e

Veganism
Veganism
and vegetarianism

Perspectives

Veganism

Animal-free agriculture Fruitarianism History Juice fasting Low-carbon diet Raw veganism Nutrition Vegan organic gardening

Vegetarianism

Economic vegetarianism Environmental vegetarianism History Lacto vegetarianism Ovo vegetarianism Ovo-lacto vegetarianism Cuisine Vegetarian Diet Pyramid Ecofeminism Nutrition By country

Lists

Vegans Vegetarians Vegetarian festivals Vegetarian organizations Vegetarian restaurants

Ethics

Secular

Animal rights Animal welfare Carnism Deep ecology Environmental vegetarianism Ethics of eating meat Meat
Meat
paradox Nonviolence Speciesism Tirukkural

Religious

Buddhism Christianity Hinduism

Sattvic Ahimsa

Jainism Judaism Pythagoreanism Rastafari Sikhism

Food, drink

Agar Agave nectar Meat
Meat
analogue

List of meat substitutes

Miso Mochi Mock duck Nutritional yeast Plant cream Plant milk Quinoa Quorn Seitan Soy yogurt Tempeh Tofu Tofurkey Cheese Hot dog Vegetarian mark Sausage Beer Wine Veggie burger

Groups, events, companies

Vegan

American Vegan Society Beauty Without Cruelty Food Empowerment Project Go Vegan Movement for Compassionate Living Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine Plamil Foods Vegan Awareness Foundation Vegan flag Vegan Ireland Vegan Outreach Vegan Prisoners Support Group The Vegan Society Veganz World Vegan Day

Vegetarian

American Vegetarian Party Boston Vegetarian Society Christian Vegetarian Association European Vegetarian Union Hare Krishna Food for Life International Vegetarian Union Jewish Veg Linda McCartney Foods Meat-free days

Meatless Monday

Swissveg Toronto Vegetarian Association Vegetarian Society Vegetarian Society
Vegetarian Society
(Singapore) Veggie Pride Viva! Health World Esperantist Vegetarian Association World Vegetarian Day

Books, reports

Thirty-nine Reasons Why I Am a Vegetarian
Thirty-nine Reasons Why I Am a Vegetarian
(1903) The Benefits of Vegetarianism
Vegetarianism
(1927) Diet for a Small Planet
Diet for a Small Planet
(1971) Moosewood Cookbook
Moosewood Cookbook
(1977) Fit for Life
Fit for Life
(1985) Diet for a New America (1987) The China Study
The China Study
(2004) Raw Food Made Easy for 1 or 2 People
Raw Food Made Easy for 1 or 2 People
(2005) Skinny Bitch
Skinny Bitch
(2005) Livestock's Long Shadow
Livestock's Long Shadow
(2006) Eating Animals
Eating Animals
(2009) The Kind Diet
The Kind Diet
(2009) Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows
Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows
(2009) Eat & Run (2012) Meat
Meat
Atlas (annual)

Films

Meet Your Meat
Meat
(2002) Peaceable Kingdom (2004) Earthlings (2005) A Sacred Duty
A Sacred Duty
(2007) Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead (2010) Planeat (2010) Forks Over Knives
Forks Over Knives
(2011) Vegucated (2011) Live and Let Live (2013) Cowspiracy
Cowspiracy
(2014) What the Health
What the Health
(2017) Carnage (2017)

Magazines

Naked Food Vegetarian Times VegNews

Physicians, academics

Neal D. Barnard Rynn Berry T. Colin Campbell Caldwell Esselstyn Gary L. Francione Joel Fuhrman Michael Greger Melanie Joy Michael Klaper John A. McDougall Reed Mangels Jack Norris Dean Ornish Richard H. Schwartz

Related

Semi-vegetarianism

Macrobiotic d

.