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The Ottoman dynasty
Ottoman dynasty
(Turkish: Osmanlı Hanedanı) was made up of the members of the imperial House of Osman
House of Osman
(Ottoman Turkish: خاندان آل عثمان‎ Ḫānedān-ı Āl-ı ʿOsmān). Also known as the Ottomans (Turkish: Osmanlılar). According to Ottoman tradition, the family originated from the Kayı tribe[nb 1] branch of the Oghuz Turks,[2] under Osman I
Osman I
in northwestern Anatolia
Anatolia
in the district of Bilecik
Bilecik
Söğüt. The Ottoman dynasty, named after Osman I, ruled the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
from c. 1299 to 1922. During much of the Empire's history, the sultan was the absolute regent, head of state, and head of government, though much of the power often shifted to other officials such as the Grand Vizier. During the First (1876–78) and Second Constitutional Eras (1908–20) of the late Empire, a shift to constitutional monarchy was enacted, with the Grand Vizier
Vizier
taking on a prime ministerial role as head of government and heading an elected General Assembly. The imperial family was deposed from power and the sultanate was abolished on 1 November 1922 after the Turkish War of Independence. The Republic of Turkey
Republic of Turkey
was declared the following year. The living members of the dynasty were initially sent into exile as personae non gratae, though some have been allowed to return and live as private citizens in Turkey. In its current form, the family is known as the Osmanoğlu family.

Ottoman Ceremonial Barbering Cape (detail), early 18th century, Turkey. Each day, the Sultan
Sultan
wore a different elaborately embroidered cape for his daily barbering.[citation needed] Public displays of extraordinary splendor were considered essential to the maintenance of Ottoman imperial authority.[citation needed] LACMA
LACMA
textile collection.

Contents

1 Origin 2 History 3 Succession practices

3.1 Chronology of Sultans

4 Titles 5 List of heirs since 1922 6 Current line of succession 7 Line of succession in November 1922 8 Excluded from the Imperial House 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 External links

Origin[edit] Main article: Rise of the Ottoman Empire Fleeing the Mongol
Mongol
onslaught, Suleyman Shah, Baig
Baig
of the Kayı tribe and the father of Ertuğrul, who was, in turn, the father of Osman I, the founder of the Ottoman Empire, immigrated from Central Asia
Asia
with his tribe to settle in Anatolia
Anatolia
with their Turkic kindred, the Anatolian Seljuks. Later on, Ertuğrul
Ertuğrul
pledged allegiance to the Sultan
Sultan
of the Anatolian Seljuks, who granted him dominion over the town of Söğüt
Söğüt
on the Byzantine
Byzantine
frontier.[3] History[edit] The Ottoman dynasty
Ottoman dynasty
operated under several basic premises: that the Sultan
Sultan
governed the empire’s entire territory, that every male member of the dynastic family was hypothetically eligible to become Sultan, and that only one person at a time could be the Sultan.[4] Such rules were fairly standard for monarchic empires of the time. The certain processes through which men rose to the Sultanate, however, were very specific to the Ottoman Empire. To go into greater detail about these processes, the history of succession between Sultans can be divided into two eras: the period between the reign of Orhan (1323-1362), the first person to inherit the Ottoman sultanate, and the reign of Ahmed I
Ahmed I
(1603-1617); and the period following Ahmed I’s reign. The succession process during the first period was dominated by violence and intra-familial conflict, in which the various sons of the deceased Sultan
Sultan
fought until only one remained alive and, thus, inherited the throne. This tradition was known as fratricide in the Ottoman Empire, but may have evolved from tanistry, a similar succession procedure that existed in many Turco-Mongolian dynasties predating the Ottomans.[5] Sons of the Sultan
Sultan
were often given provincial territories to govern until the Sultan’s death, at which point they would each vie for the throne.[6] Each son had to, according to historian "H. Erdem Cipa", “demonstrate that his fortune was superior to the fortunes of his rivals,” a demonstration that often took the form of military accomplishment and ruthlessness.[7] This violence was not considered particularly unexpected or unusual. As Cipa has noted, the Ottoman words for “successor” and “conflict” share the same Arabic root,[8] and indeed, all but one of the successions in this roughly 200-year period involved a resolution by combat.[9] Over time, the combat became increasingly prevalent and recognized, especially after a Jannissary uprising negated Murad II’s attempt to abdicate the throne peacefully to his son, Mehmed II, in 1444. During the eventual reign of Mehmed II
Mehmed II
(1451-1481), fratricide was legalized as an official practice; during the reign of Bayezid II
Bayezid II
(1481-1512), fratricide between Bayezid II’s sons occurred before Bayezid II
Bayezid II
himself died;[10] and after the reign of Murad III
Murad III
(1574-1595), successor Mehmed III
Mehmed III
executed a whopping 19 relatives in order to claim the throne.[11] During the second period, the tradition of fratricide was replaced by a simpler and less violent procedure. Starting with the succession from Ahmed I
Ahmed I
to Mustafa I
Mustafa I
in 1617, the Ottoman throne was inherited by the eldest male family member — not necessarily son — of the Sultan, regardless of how many eligible family members were alive.[12] The change in succession procedure was likely instigated by numerous factors, including fratricide’s decline in popularity among Ottoman elites[13] and Ahmed I’s decision not to kill Mustafa when inheriting the throne from Mehmed III
Mehmed III
in 1603. With the door opened for a change in policy, a political debate arose between those who supported unrestricted Sultan
Sultan
privilege and those who supported a stronger, centralized law system that would supersede even the Sultan’s power to an extent, and historian "Baki Tezcan" has argued that the latter faction — with the help of influential grand mufti "Sa’deddinzade Es’ad" — was able to prevail in this instance.[14] The blood-free succession from Ahmed I
Ahmed I
to Mustafa I
Mustafa I
in 1617 “provided a reference for the eventual stabilization of the rule of Ottoman succession, the very regulation of which by an outside force was in effect a constitutional check on the dynastic prerogative,” Tezcan has written.[15] The precedent set in 1617 stuck, as the eldest living family member successfully inherited the throne in each of the following 21 successions, with relatively few instances of a son inheriting the throne.[16] Succession practices[edit] See also: List of sultans of the Ottoman Empire From the fourteenth through the late sixteenth centuries, the Ottomans practiced open succession – something historian Donald Quataert has described as "survival of the fittest, not eldest, son." During their father's lifetime, all adult sons of the reigning sultan obtained provincial governorships. Accompanied and mentored by their mothers, they would gather supporters while ostensibly following a Ghazi ethos. Upon the death of the reigning sultan, his sons would fight amongst themselves until one emerged triumphant. A prince's proximity to Constantinople
Constantinople
improved his chances of succession, simply because he would hear of his father's death and declare himself Sultan
Sultan
first. A sultan could thus hint at his preferred successor by giving a favourite son a closer governorship. Bayezid II, for instance, had to fight his brother Cem Sultan
Sultan
in the 1480s for the right to rule. Occasionally, the half-brothers would begin the struggle even before the death of their father. Under Suleiman the Magnificent (1520–1566), strife between his sons Mustafa and Selim caused such internal turmoil that Suleiman ordered the deaths of both Mustafa and another son, Bayezid, leaving Selim the sole heir. During the reigns of Suleiman and Selim II, the Haseki Sultan
Sultan
(Ottoman Turkish: حسکي سلطان) or chief consort rose to greater prominence. Gaining power within the Imperial Harem, the favourite was able to manoeuvre to ensure the succession for one of her sons. This led to a short period of effective primogeniture. However, unlike the earlier period, when the sultan had already defeated his brothers and potential rivals for the throne in battle, these sultans had the problem of many half-brothers who could act as the focus for rival factions. Thus, to prevent attempts at seizing the throne, reigning sultans practiced fratricide upon accession, starting with Murat I
Murat I
in 1362.[17] Both Murad III
Murad III
and his son Mehmed III
Mehmed III
had their half-brothers murdered. The killing of all the new sultan's brothers and half-brothers (which were usually quite numerous) was traditionally done by manual strangling with a silk cord. As the centuries passed, the ritual killing was gradually replaced by lifetime solitary confinement in the "Golden Cage" or kafes, a room in the harem from where the sultan's brothers could never escape, unless perchance they became heir presumptive. Some had already become mentally unstable by the time they were asked to reign. Mehmed III
Mehmed III
was the last sultan to have previously held a provincial governorship. Sons now remained within the harem until the death of their father. This not only denied them the ability to form powerful factions capable of usurping their father, but also denied them the opportunity to have children while their father remained alive. Thus, when Mehmet's son came to the throne as Ahmed I, he had no children of his own. Moreover, as a minor, there was no evidence he could have children. This had the potential to create a crisis of succession and led to a gradual end to fratricide. Ahmed had some of his brothers killed, but not Mustafa (later Mustafa I). Similarly, Osman II
Osman II
allowed his half-brothers Murad and Ibrahim to live. This led to a shift in the 17th century from a system of primogeniture to one based on agnatic seniority, in which the eldest male within the dynasty succeeded, also to guarantee adult sultans and prevent both fratricides as well as the sultanate of women. Thus, Mustafa succeeded his brother Ahmed; Suleiman II
Suleiman II
and Ahmed II
Ahmed II
succeeded their brother Mehmed IV
Mehmed IV
before being succeeded in turn by Mehmed's son Mustafa II. Agnatic seniority explains why from the 17th century onwards a deceased sultan was rarely succeeded by his own son, but usually by an uncle or brother. It also meant that potential rulers had to wait a long time in the kafes before ascending the throne, hence the old age of certain sultans upon their enthronement.[18] Although attempts were made in the 19th century to replace agnatic seniority with primogeniture, they were unsuccessful, and seniority was retained until the abolition of the sultanate in 1922.[19] Chronology of Sultans[edit]

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v t e

The Ottoman Dynasty
Ottoman Dynasty
had unusual succession practices compared to other monarchies.[20] Those succession practices changed over time, and ultimately the sultanate was abolished in 1922. Later, the House of Osman (Turkish: Osmanoğlu Ailesi) continued the latest succession practice for the head of the family. Titles[edit]

This section is too long. Consider splitting it into new pages, adding subheadings, or condensing it. (October 2016)

Before Orhan's proclamation of the dynasty, the tribe was known as the Bilecik
Bilecik
Söğüt
Söğüt
Beylik or Beys but was renamed Osmanlı in honor of Osman.[citation needed] The Ottoman dynasty
Ottoman dynasty
is known in modern Turkish as Osmanlı Hanedanı, meaning "House of Osman"; in Ottoman Turkish it was known as Hanedan-ı Âl-i Osman, meaning " Dynasty
Dynasty
of the Family Osman". The first rulers of the dynasty did not take the title of Sultan, but rather Bey, a title roughly the Turkic equivalent of Lord, which would itself become a gubernatorial title and even a common military or honorific rank. Thus they still formally acknowledged the sovereignty of the Seljuk Empire
Seljuk Empire
and its successor, the Seljuk Sultanate of Rûm. The first Ottoman ruler to actually claim the title of Sultan
Sultan
was Murad I, who ruled from 1362 to 1389. The holder of the title Sultan (سلطان in Arabic) was in Arabic-Islamic dynasties originally the power behind the throne of the Caliph
Caliph
in Bagdad and it was later used for various independent Muslim Monarchs. This title was senior to and more prestigious than that of Amir; it was not comparable to the title of Malik
Malik
'King', a secular title not yet common among Muslim rulers, or the Persian title of Shah, which was used mostly among Persian or Iranian related rulers. The Ottoman sultans also claimed the title of Caliph
Caliph
starting with Murad I,[21] who transformed the Ottoman state into a transcontinental empire. With the Conquest of Constantinople
Constantinople
in 1453, Sultan
Sultan
Mehmed II
Mehmed II
Fatih (1451 - 1481) claimed the title Kaysar-i-Rûm "Emperor of Rome" and proclaimed himself the protector of the Orthodox Church. He appointed the Patriarch of Constantinople
Constantinople
Gennadius Scholarius, whom he protected and whose status he elevated into leader of all the Eastern Orthodox Christians. As Emperor of Rome he laid claim to all Roman territories, which at the time before the Fall of Constantinople, however, extended to little more than the city itself plus some areas in Morea
Morea
(Peloponnese). Sultan
Sultan
Mehmed II
Mehmed II
also took the title of Padishah
Padishah
(in Turkish 'Padişah') (پادشاه), a Persian title meaning "Master of Kings" and ranking as "Emperor", claiming superiority among the other kings. His full style was Sultan
Sultan
Mehmed II
Mehmed II
Khan, Fatih Ghazi 'Abu'l Fath (Victorious Conqueror, Father of Conquest), Padishah, Sovereign of the House of Osman, Emperor of Rome, Grand Sultan
Sultan
of Anatolia
Anatolia
and Rumelia, Khan of Khans of the Two Lands and the Two Seas, Emperor of the three Cities of Constantinople, Edirne
Edirne
and Bursa. He was the first Ottoman ruler to adopt the imperial title of Padishah.[citation needed] The Ottoman claim to caliphate was strengthened when they defeated the Mamluks in 1517 and annexed Egypt during the rule of Selim I. Selim also received the title "Custodian of the Two Noble Sanctuaries", Khadim al-Haramayn ash-Sharifayn in Arabic, from Barakat Effendi Grand Sharif of Mecca when conquering Hijaz
Hijaz
and with it the Muslim Holy Cities of Mecca and Medina. Selim I
Selim I
full style was: Sovereign of the House of Osman, Khan of Khans of the Two Lands and the Two Seas, Commander of the Faithful and Successor of the Prophet of the Lord of the Universe, Custodian of the Two Noble Sanctuaries, Emperor of the Three Cities of Constantinople, Adrianople and Bursa, Conqueror of the two Armies (i.e. the European and Persian armies).[citation needed] In Europe, all Ottoman Emperors were commonly referred to by the title of Sultan, rather than by those of Padishah
Padishah
or Caliph, which had a higher rank than that of Sultan, and were also often informally referred to by such terms unrelated to the Ottoman protocol as the Grand Turk and the Grand Seigneur or Gran Signore. The sultans further adopted in time many secondary formal titles as well, such as "Sovereign of the House of Osman", " Sultan
Sultan
of Sultans", and "Khan of Khans", these two meaning King of Kings and roughly ranking as "Emperor". These titles were known in Ottoman Turkish respectively as Hünkar-i Khanedan-i Âl-i Osman, Sultan
Sultan
us-Salatin and Khakan (the latter enlarged as Khakan ül-Berreyn vel-Bahreyn by Mehmet II, Bayezid II
Bayezid II
and Selim I, meaning "Khan of Khans of the Two Lands (Europe and Asia) and the Two Seas (Mediterranean and Indian)".[citation needed] As the empire grew, sultans adopted secondary titles expressing the empire's claim to be the legitimate successor of the absorbed states. Furthermore, they tended to enumerate even regular provinces, not unlike the long lists of -mainly inherited- feudal titles in the full style of many Christian European monarchs. Some early Ottoman Sultans even had to accept the vassal status in the eyes of a foreign overlord. For example, Tamerlane
Tamerlane
appointed in 1402 the Ottoman Sultan
Sultan
Süleyman Çelebi
Süleyman Çelebi
(deposed in 1411), who was styled as- Sultan
Sultan
ul-Azam, Sayyid
Sayyid
us-Saladin ul-Arab wal Ajam, Malik
Malik
ur-Rikaab ul-Umam, Ghiyas ud-Daula wa ud-Dunya, Sultan
Sultan
ul-Islam wal-Muslimin, as- Sultan
Sultan
ibni us-Sultan, Hasib-i-Nasib-I-Zaman, Amir
Amir
ul-Rumelia (Grand Sultan, Righteous Lord of Arabs, Helper of the State and the People, Sultan
Sultan
of Islam and the Muslims, Sultan
Sultan
son of Sultans, Prince of Rumelia). Again his brother, Mehmed I, who ended the Ottoman Interregnum, also held his post with a fief from Tamerlane; he took the title Sovereign of the House of Osman, Khan of Khans, Grand Sultan of Anatolia
Anatolia
and Rumelia, and of the Cities of Adrianople and Philipopolis. However, the vassalage of the Ottoman Sultanate ended with the death of Tamerlane
Tamerlane
during the reign of the next Ottoman ruler, Sultan
Sultan
Murad II, who took the style Sultan
Sultan
ul-Mujahidin, Sovereign of the House of Osman, Khan of Khans, Grand Sultan
Sultan
of Anatolia
Anatolia
and Rumelia, and of the Cities of Adrianople and Philipopolis.[citation needed] After the fall of the Ottoman dynasty
Ottoman dynasty
as Emperors of the Ottoman State (Padishah-ı Devlet-i Aliyye-i Osmaniyye in Ottoman Turkish), Abdulmecid II (1922) was still proclaimed Caliph
Caliph
with the title Caliph ("Halife", in modern Turkish) by the republican Government of the Grand National Assembly of the city of Ankara on November 19, 1922. However, the Ottoman Caliphate
Ottoman Caliphate
too was abolished soon afterwards, and Abdulmecid II was utterly deposed and expelled from Turkey
Turkey
with the rest of the Ottoman dynasty
Ottoman dynasty
on 3 March 1924. He officially continued to hold the title of the throne as the Head of the House of Osman ("Osmanlı Hanedanı Reisi", in modern Turkish) until his death. List of heirs since 1922[edit] The Ottoman dynasty
Ottoman dynasty
was expelled from Turkey
Turkey
in 1924 and most members took on the surname Osmanoğlu, meaning "son of Osman."[22] The female members of the dynasty were allowed to return after 1951,[22] and the male members after 1973.[23] Below is a list of people who would have been heirs to the Ottoman throne following the abolition of the sultanate on 1 November 1922.[23] These people have not necessarily made any claim to the throne; for example, Ertuğrul
Ertuğrul
Osman said "Democracy works well in Turkey."[24]

Mehmed VI, last Ottoman Sultan
Sultan
(1918–1922) then 36th Head of the House of Osman
House of Osman
in exile (1922–1926).[23] Abdülmecid II, last Ottoman Caliph
Caliph
(1922–1924) then 37th Head of the House of Osman
House of Osman
following Mehmed VI's death (1926–1944).[23] Ahmed Nihad, 38th Head of the House of Osman
House of Osman
(1944–1954), grandson of Sultan
Sultan
Murad V.[23] Osman Fuad, 39th Head of the House of Osman
House of Osman
(1954–1973), half-brother of Ahmed Nihad.[23] Mehmed Abdulaziz, 40th Head of the House of Osman
House of Osman
(1973–1977), grandson of Sultan
Sultan
Abdülaziz
Abdülaziz
I.[23] Ali Vâsib
Ali Vâsib
Efendi, 41st Head of the House of Osman
House of Osman
(1977–1983), son of Ahmed IV Nihad.[23] Mehmed Orhan
Orhan
Osmanoğlu, 42nd Head of the House of Osman (1983–1994), grandson of Sultan
Sultan
Abdul Hamid II.[25] Osman Ertuğrul
Ertuğrul
Osmanoğlu, 43rd Head of the House of Osman (1994–2009), grandson of Sultan
Sultan
Abdul Hamid II.[24] Osman Bayezid Osmanoğlu, 44th Head of the House of Osman (2009–2017), great-grandson of Sultan
Sultan
Abdülmecid I.[26] Dündar Ali Osman Osmanoğlu, 45th Head of the House of Osman (2017–present), great-grandson of Sultan
Sultan
Abdul Hamid II.

Current line of succession[edit] According to genealogies of the House of Osman, there would hypothetically be 24 princes now in the line of succession after Dündar Aliosman, if the sultanate had not been abolished.[27][28][29] They are listed as follows; the succession law used is agnatic seniority, with the succession passing to eldest male dynast.[30]

Mahmud II
Mahmud II
(1785-1839; 30th Sultan
Sultan
and 23rd Ottoman Caliph: 1808-1839)

Abdülmecid I
Abdülmecid I
(1823-1861; 31st Sultan
Sultan
and 24th Ottoman Caliph: 1839-1861)

Murad V
Murad V
(1840-1904; 33rd Sultan
Sultan
and 26th Ottoman Caliph: 1876)

Şehzade Mehmed Selaheddin
Mehmed Selaheddin
Efendi (1861-1915)

Ahmed Nihad (1883-1954; 38th Head of the House of Osman: 1944-1954)[23]

Ali Vâsib
Ali Vâsib
(1903-1983; 41st Head of the House of Osman: 1977-1983)[23]

(2) Osman Selaheddin Osmanoğlu
Osman Selaheddin Osmanoğlu
(born 1940)[27][28][29][30][31][32][33]

(10) Orhan
Orhan
Murad Osmanoğlu (born 1972)[27][28][29][30][31][32][33]

(18) Turan Cem Osmanoğlu (born 2004)[27][28][29][32][33] (19) Tamer Nihad Osmanoğlu (born 2006)[27][28][29][32][33]

(15) Selim Süleyman Osmanoğlu
Selim Süleyman Osmanoğlu
(born 1979)[27][28][29][30][32][33]

(21) Batu Bayezid Osmanoğlu (born 2008)[27][28][29][32][33]

Osman Fuad
Osman Fuad
(1895-1973; 39th Head of the House of Osman: 1954-1973)[23]

Abdul Hamid II
Abdul Hamid II
(1842-1918; 34th Sultan
Sultan
and 27th Ottoman Caliph: 1876-1909)

Şehzade Mehmed Selim Efendi (1870-1937)[33]

Şehzade Mehmed Abdülkarim Efendi (1906-1935)[33]

Dündar Aliosman (born 1930: 45th Head of the House of Osman: 2017–)[27][28][29][30][31][32][33] (1) Harun Osmanoğlu (born 1932)[27][28][29][30][31][32][33]

(8) Orhan
Orhan
Osmanoğlu(born 1963)[27][28][29][30][32]

(17) Yavuz Selim Osmanoğlu (born 1989)[27][28][29][30][32][33]

(14) Abdulhamid Kayıhan Osmanoğlu (born 1979)[27][28][29][30][32][33]

(20) Muhammed Harun Osmanoğlu (born 2007)[27][28][29][33] (24) Abdülaziz
Abdülaziz
Osmanoğlu (born 2016)[27][28][29][33]

Şehzade Mehmed Abdülkadir Efendi (1878-1944)[33]

(Mehmed) Orhan
Orhan
II (1909-1994; 42nd Head of the House of Osman: 1983-1994)[25] Şehzade Necib Ertuğrul
Ertuğrul
Efendi (1914-1994)[33]

(5) Roland Selim Kadir (born 1949)[27][28][29][30][32][33]

(12) René Osman Abdul Kadir (born 1975)[27][28][29][30][32][33] (13) Daniel Adrian Hamid Kadir (born 1977)[27][28][29][30][32][33]

Şehzade Mehmed Burhaneddin Efendi (1885-1949)[33]

Ertuğrul
Ertuğrul
Osman V (1912-2009; 43rd Head of the House of Osman: 1994-2009)[24]

Mehmed V
Mehmed V
(1844-1918; 35th Sultan
Sultan
and 28th Ottoman Caliph: 1909-1918)

Şehzade Mehmed Ziayeddin Efendi (1873-1938)[33]

Şehzade Mehmed Nazim Efendi (1910-1984)[33]

Cengiz Nazim (1939-2015)[33][34]

(9) Eric Mehmed Ziyaeddin Nazim (born 1966)[27][28][29][32][33]

(4) Mehmed Ziyaeddin (born 1947)[27][28][29][31][32][33]

(16) Nazım Osmanoğlu (born 1985)[27][28][29][32][33]

Şehzade Ömer Hilmi Efendi (1886-1935)[33]

Şehzade Mahmud Namik Efendi (1913-1963)[33]

(3) Ömer Abdülmecid Osmanoğlu
Ömer Abdülmecid Osmanoğlu
(born 1941)[27][28][29][32]

(11) Francis Mahmud Namık Osmanoğlu (born 1975)[27][28][29][32][33]

(22) Ziya Reşad Osmanoğlu (born 2012)[35] (23) Cem Ömer Osmanoğlu (born 2015)[27][28][29][32]

Şehzade Mehmed Burhaneddin Efendi (1849-1876)[33]

Şehzade Ibrahim Tewfik Efendi (1874-1931)[33]

Burhaneddin Cem (1920-2008)[33]

(6) Selim Djem (born 1955)[27][28][29][30][32][33]

Bayezid Osman (1924-2017; 44th Head of the House of Osman: 2009-2017)[26]

Mehmed VI
Mehmed VI
(1861-1926; 36th and last Sultan
Sultan
and 29th Ottoman Caliph: 1918-1922; 36th Head of the House of Osman: 1922-1926)[23]

Abdülaziz
Abdülaziz
I (1830-1876; 32nd Sultan
Sultan
and 25th Ottoman Caliph: 1861-1876)

Abdülmecid II
Abdülmecid II
(1868-1944; 30th and last Ottoman Caliph: 1922-1924; 37th Head of the House of Osman: 1926-1944)[23] Şehzade Mehmed Şevket Efendi (1872-1899)[33]

Şehzade Mehmed Celaleddin Efendi (1890-1946)[33]

Süleyman Sadeddin (1917-1986)[33]

(7) Orhan
Orhan
İbrahim Süleyman Saadeddin (born 1959)[27][28][29][30][32][33]

Şehzade Mehmed Seyfeddin Efendi (1874-1927)[33]

Mehmed Abdulaziz (1901-1977; 40th Head of the House of Osman: 1973-1977)[23]

[33] [36] Line of succession in November 1922[edit]

Mahmud II
Mahmud II
(1785-1839; 30th Sultan
Sultan
and 23rd Ottoman Caliph: 1808-1839)

Abdülmecid I
Abdülmecid I
(1823-1861; 31st Sultan
Sultan
and 24th Ottoman Caliph: 1839-1861)

Murad V
Murad V
(1840-1904; 33rd Sultan
Sultan
and 26th Ottoman Caliph: 1876)

Şehzade Mehmed Selaheddin
Mehmed Selaheddin
Efendi (1861-1915)

(8) Şehzade Ahmed Nihad Efendi (born 6 July 1883)

(19) Şehzade Ali Vâsib
Ali Vâsib
Efendi (born 14 October 1903)[23]

(14) Şehzade Osman Fuad
Osman Fuad
Efendi (born 26 September 1895)[23]

Abdul Hamid II
Abdul Hamid II
(1842-1918; 34th Sultan
Sultan
and 27th Ottoman Caliph: 1876-1909)

(2) Şehzade Mehmed Selim Efendi (born 11 January 1870)

(23) Şehzade Mehmed Abdülkarim Efendi (born 27 June 1906))[33]

(6) Şehzade Mehmed Abdülkadir Efendi (born 16 January 1878)

(25) Şehzade Mehmed Orhan
Orhan
Efendi (born 11 July 1909)[25][37] (32) Şehzade Necib Ertuğrul
Ertuğrul
Efendi (born 1914 (or 27 March 1915))[33][37] (34) Şehzade Alaeddin Kadir Efendi (born 2 January 1917)[37]

(7) Şehzade Mehmed Ahmed Nuri Efendi (born 12 February 1878)[37] (9) Şehzade Mehmed Burhaneddin Efendi (born 19 December 1885)[33]

(27) Şehzade Mehmed Fakhreddin Efendi (born 14 November 1911)[37] (28) Şehzade Ertuğrul
Ertuğrul
Osman Efendi (born 18 August 1912)[24]

(12) Şehzade Abdur Rahim Hayri Efendi (born 15 August 1894)[37] (16) Şehzade Ahmed Nureddin Efendi (born 22 June 1901)[37] (22) Şehzade Mehmed Abid Efendi (born 17 September 1905)

Mehmed V
Mehmed V
(1844-1918; 35th Sultan
Sultan
and 28th Ottoman Caliph: 1909-1918)

(3) Şehzade Mehmed Ziayeddin Efendi (born 26 August 1873)

(26) Şehzade Mehmed Nazim Efendi (born 26 October 1910)[37] (30) Şehzade Ömer Fawzi Efendi (born 13 November 1912)[37]

(10) Şehzade Ömer Hilmi Efendi (born 2 March 1888)

(31) Şehzade Mahmud Namik Efendi (born 1913 (or 25 February 1914))[33][37]

Şehzade Mehmed Burhaneddin Efendi (1849-1876)[33]

(5) Şehzade Ibrahim Tewfik Efendi (born 25 September 1874)[37]

(36) Şehzade Burhaneddin Cem Efendi (born 1920)[33]

Şehzade Selim Süleyman Efendi (1860-1909)[37]

(13) Şehzade Mehmed Abdul-Halim Efendi (born 28 September 1894)[37] (20) Şehzade Damad Mehmed Cerifeddin Efendi (born 19 May 1904)[37]

Mehmed VI
Mehmed VI
(born 2 February 1861)[23]

(29) Şehzade Mehmed Ertuğrul
Ertuğrul
Efendi (born 10 September 1912)[37]

Abdülaziz
Abdülaziz
I (1830-1876; 32nd Sultan
Sultan
and 25th Ottoman Caliph: 1861-1876)

Şehzade Yusef Izzeddin Efendi (1857-1916)[37]

(24) Şehzade Mehmed Nizameddin Efendi (born 18 December 1908)[37]

(1) Devletlû Najabatlu Veli Ahd-i Saltanat Şehzade-i Javanbahd Abdülmecid . (born 29 May 1868)

(15) Şehzade Ömer Faruk Efendi (born 29 February 1898)[37]

Şehzade Mehmed Şevket Efendi (1872-1899)[33]

(11) Şehzade Mehmed Celaleddin Efendi (born 1890 (or 1 March 1891))[33][37]

(33) Şehzade Mahmud Hushameddin Efendi (born 25 August 1916)[37] (35) Şehzade Süleyman Sadeddin Efendi (born 20 November 1917)[33][37]

(4) Prince Şehzade Mehmed Seyfeddin Efendi (born 22 September 1874)[37]

(17) Şehzade Mehmed Abdulaziz Efendi (born 26 September 1901)[23] (18) Şehzade Mahmud Shavkat Efendi (born 30 July 1903)[37] (21) Şehzade Ahmed Davut Efendi (born 2 December 1904)[37]

[33] [37] Excluded from the Imperial House[edit]

Mehmed Selim Orhan, (born in Paris, 3. October 1943), was the Biological or adopted Stepson of Prince (Mehmed) Orhan
Orhan
II and the American/French Actress Marguerite Irma Fournier - deprived since birth of title HIH Şehzade, by a Morganatic marriage. The descendants of Cem Sultan, because they are all Catholics.

'NOTE:' Eligibility: A male person born to parents who are not married to each other at the time of birth is not included in the line of succession and passes no rights to their descendants. The subsequent marriage of the parents does not alter this. At the time of accession, the male heir to the throne must be a Muslim. Any Ottoman Prince who has converted from Islam is excluded from the line of succession. See also[edit]

History of the Turkic peoples List of Turkic dynasties and countries Amuca tribe Osmanoğlu family, its current form Ottoman Emperors family tree Ottoman family tree
Ottoman family tree
(more detailed) Line of succession to the Ottoman throne List of admirals in the Ottoman Empire List of sultans of the Ottoman Empire List of the mothers of the Ottoman Sultans List of Ottoman Grand Viziers List of Ottoman Kaptan Pashas List of Valide Sultans Tuğra-Sultan's Signature Ottoman Empire House of Osman, the historical family

Notes[edit]

^ A claim which has come under criticism from many historians, who argue either that the Kayı genealogy was fabricated in the fifteenth century, or that there is otherwise insufficient evidence to believe in it.[1]

References[edit]

^ Kafadar, Cemal (1995). Between Two Worlds: The Construction of the Ottoman State. p. 122. ISBN 978-0-520-20600-7. That they hailed from the Kayı branch of the Oğuz confederacy seems to be a creative "rediscovery" in the genealogical concoction of the fifteenth century. It is missing not only in Ahmedi but also, and more importantly, in the Yahşi Fakih-Aşıkpaşazade narrative, which gives its own version of an elaborate genealogical family tree going back to Noah. If there was a particularly significant claim to Kayı lineage, it is hard to imagine that Yahşi Fakih would not have heard of it 

Lowry, Heath (2003). The Nature of the Early Ottoman State. SUNY Press. p. 78. ISBN 0-7914-5636-6. Based on these charters, all of which were drawn up between 1324 and 1360 (almost one hundred fifty years prior to the emergence of the Ottoman dynastic myth identifying them as members of the Kayı branch of the Oguz federation of Turkish tribes), we may posit that...  Shaw, Stanford (1976). History of the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
and Modern Turkey. Cambridge University Press. p. 13. The problem of Ottoman origins has preoccupied students of history, but because of both the absence of contemporary source materials and conflicting accounts written subsequent to the events there seems to be no basis for a definitive statement. 

^ Shaw, Stanford (1976). History of the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
and Modern Turkey. Cambridge University Press. p. 13.  ^ Stanford Shaw, History of the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
and Modern Turkey (Cambridge: University Press, 1976), vol. 1 ISBN 9780521291637, p. 13 ^ Çıpa, H. Erdem. The Making of Selim: Succession, Legitimacy, and Memory in the Early Modern Ottoman World. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2017. Page 29. ^ Fletcher, Joseph. Turco-Mongolian Monarchic Tradition in the Ottoman Empire. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Ukrainian Research Institute, 1979. Pages 236-251. ^ Tezcan, Baki. The Second Ottoman Empire: Political and Social Transformation in the Early Modern World. Cambridge Studies in Islamic Civilization. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Page 46. ^ Çıpa. The Making of Selim. Page 31. ^ Çıpa. The Making of Selim. Page 29. ^ Peirce, Leslie P. The Imperial Harem: Women and Sovereignty in the Ottoman Empire. Studies in Middle Eastern History. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993. Page 21. ^ Tezcan. The Second Ottoman Empire. Page 46. ^ Çıpa. The Making of Selim. Page 30. ^ Tezcan. The Second Ottoman Empire. Page 47. ^ Peirce. The Imperial Harem. Page 102. ^ Tezcan. The Second Ottoman Empire. Page 47. ^ Tezcan. The Second Ottoman Empire. Page 77. ^ Peirce. The Imperial Harem. Page 22. ^ Quataert 2005, p. 91 ^ Quataert, p. 92 ^ Karateke 2005, p. 37–54 ^ Quataert 2005, p. 90 ^ Lambton, Ann; Lewis, Bernard (1995). The Cambridge History of Islam: The Indian sub-continent, South-East Asia, Africa and the Muslim west. 2. Cambridge University Press. p. 320. ISBN 9780521223102.  ^ a b Brookes, Douglas (2008). The concubine, the princess, and the teacher: voices from the Ottoman harem. University of Texas Press. pp. 278, 285. Retrieved 2011-04-14.  ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Opfell, Olga (2001). Royalty who wait: the 21 heads of formerly regnant houses of Europe. McFarland. pp. 146, 151. Retrieved 2011-04-14.  ^ a b c d Bernstein, Fred. “Ertugrul Osman, Link to Ottoman Dynasty, Dies at 97”, The New York Times
The New York Times
(2009-09-24). ^ a b c Pope, Hugh. "Oldest Ottoman to come home at last", The Independent (1992-07-22). ^ a b "'Osmanoğulları'na insanlık şehadet edecek' Archived 14 March 2012 at the Wayback Machine.", Zaman (newspaper)
Zaman (newspaper)
(2009-09-27). ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y "Hayatta Olan Şehzadeler". Foundation of the Ottoman Dynasty. Archived from the original on 25 February 2011. Retrieved 15 April 2011.  ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y "Osmanlı Hanedanı vakıf çatısı altında toplanıyor". Sabah. 13 September 2010. Archived from the original on 25 March 2012. Retrieved 16 April 2011.  ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y İbrahim Pazan (15 September 2009). "Osmanoğullarının yeni reisi Osman Bayezid Efendi Hazretleri". Netgazete. Retrieved 16 April 2011.  ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Almanach de Gotha
Almanach de Gotha
(184th ed.). Almanach de Gotha. 2000. pp. 365, 912–915.  ^ a b c d e Burke's Royal Families of the World (2 ed.). Burke's Peerage. 1980. p. 247.  ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v "Current Living Şehzades". Official Ottoman Family Website. Archived from the original on 25 February 2011. Retrieved 15 April 2011.  ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw "Hanedan-bu-günkü-Osmanoglu-ailesii". http://tarihvemedeniyet.org.  External link in publisher= (help) ^ "Descendent of Ottoman Dynasty
Ottoman Dynasty
Cengiz Nazım Efendi dies at 76". Daily Sabah. 20 November 2015. Retrieved 27 November 2015.  ^ http://www.turkiyegazetesi.com/haberdetay.aspx?HaberID=538684#.T9tzsLXbCf4 ^ Buyers, Christopher. "The Imperial House of Osman: Genealogy". The Royal Ark. Archived from the original on 15 June 2006.  ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y Buyers, Christopher. "The Imperial House of Osman: Genealogy". The Royal Ark. Archived from the original on 15 June 2006. 

External links[edit]

Peirce, Leslie P. (1993). The Imperial Harem: Women and Sovereignty in the Ottoman Empire. New York: Oxford University Press US. ISBN 9780195086775. OCLC 243767445. Retrieved 2009-04-19.  Quataert, Donald (2005). The Ottoman Empire, 1700–1922 (2nd ed.). Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9780521839105. OCLC 59280221. Retrieved 2009-04-18.  Karateke, Hakan T. (2005). "Who is the Next Ottoman Sultan? Attempts to Change the Rule of Succession during the Nineteenth Century". In Weismann, Itzchak; Zachs, Fruma. Ottoman Reform and Muslim Regeneration: Studies in Honour of Butrus Abu-Manneb. London: I. B. Tauris. ISBN 9781850437574. OCLC 60416792. Retrieved 2009-05-02. 

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Ulaid Dál Riata Érainn Corcu Loígde Laigin Connachta Uí Néill Ó Gallchobhair Ó Domhnail Ó Néill Ó Máel Sechlainn Mac Murchada Ó Briain Mac Lochlainn Ó Conchobhair

Gaelic Ireland

Laigin Síl Conairi Ulaid Dáirine Osraige Cruthin Dál nAraidi Connachta Uí Fiachrach Uí Briúin Uí Néill Síl nÁedo Sláine Clann Cholmáin Eóganachta Chaisil Glendamnach Raithlind Uí Dúnlainge Uí Ímair
Uí Ímair
(Norse) Uí Ceinnselaig Dál gCais Ó Briain Mac Carthaig Ó Conchobhair Ó Ruairc De Burgh (Norman) FitzGerald (Norman) Ó Domhnaill Ó Néill

Great Britain

Stuart Orange-Nassau Hanover Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Windsor

Eastern Europe

Albania

Angevin Progon Arianiti Thopia Kastrioti Dukagjini Wied Zogu Ottoman Savoy

Armenia2

Orontid Artaxiad Arsacid Bagratid Artsruni Rubenids Hethumids Lusignan Savoy

Bosnia

Boričević Kulinić Kotromanić Kosača Ottoman Habsburg-Lorraine

Bulgaria

Dulo Krum Cometopuli Asen Smilets Terter Shishman Sratsimir Battenberg Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

Croatia

Trpimirović Domagojević Svačić Ottoman Luxembourg Habsburg Habsburg-Lorraine Bonaparte Savoy (disputed)

Cyprus2

Plantagenet Lusignan Ottoman Savoy

Georgia1

Pharnavazid Artaxiad Arsacid Ottoman Chosroid Bagrationi

Greece

Argead Macedonian Doukas Komnenos Angelos Laskaris Palaiologos Ottoman Wittelsbach Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg

Lithuania

Mindaugas Gediminids Jagiellon Valois Báthory Vasa Wiśniowiecki Sobieski Wettin Leszczyński Poniatowski Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov

Moldavia

Dragoș (Drăgoșești) Rossetti Bogdan-Muşat Movilești Drăculeşti Ghica Cantacuzene Cantemirești Racoviță Mavrocordato Ypsilantis Soutzos Mourousi Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen Basarab

Montenegro

Vojislavljević Balšić Ottoman Crnojević Petrović-Njegoš

Romania

House of Basarab Rossetti Bogdan-Mușat Movilești Drăculești Ghica Cantacuzene Cantemirești Romanov Racoviță Ottoman Mavrocordato Ypsilantis Soutzos Mourousi Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen Romania/Royal family

Russia1

Rurik Borjigin Godunov Shuysky Vasa Romanov

Serbia

Vlastimirović Vukanović Nemanjić Lazarević Mrnjavčević Dejanović Branković Ottoman Obrenović Karađorđević

Turkey1

Ottoman

Ukraine

Rurikids Piast Gediminids Olshanski Olelkovich Giray Romanov Habsburg-Lorraine

1 Transcontinental country. 2 Entirely in Southwest Asia
Asia
but having socio-political connections with Europe.

Western Europe

Belgium

Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

France

Merovingian Carolingian Capet Valois Bourbon Bonaparte Orléans

Italy

Aleramici Appiani Bonaparte Bourbon-Parma Bourbon-Two Sicilies Carolingian Della Rovere Este Farnese Flavian Gonzaga Grimaldi Habsburg Julio-Claudian Malatesta Malaspina Medici Montefeltro Nerva–Antonine Ordelaffi Orsini Palaiologos Pallavicini Savoy Severan Sforza Visconti

Luxembourg

Orange-Nassau Nassau-Weilburg Bourbon-Parma

Monaco

Grimaldi

Netherlands

Bonaparte Orange-Nassau (Mecklenburg) (Lippe) (Amsberg)

Portugal

Vímara Peres Burgundy Aviz Habsburg Spanish Braganza

Braganza-Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

Spain

Asturias Barcelona Jiménez Burgundy Champagne Capet Évreux Trastámara Habsburg Bourbon

Bonaparte Savoy

Central Europe

Austria

Babenberg Habsburg Habsburg-Lorraine

Bohemia

Přemyslid Piast Luxembourg Jagiellon Habsburg Habsburg-Lorraine

Germany

Ascania Carolingian Conradines Ottonian Luitpolding Salian Süpplingenburg Hohenstaufen Welf Habsburg Hanover Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Nassau Luxembourg Wittelsbach Schwarzburg Brunswick-Lüneburg House of Pomerania Hohenzollern Württemberg Oldenburg Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg Orange-Nassau Nassau-Weilburg Mecklenburg Vasa Palatine Zweibrücken Hesse Holstein-Gottorp Romanov Bonaparte Wettin Lippe Zähringen

Hungary

Árpád Přemyslid Wittelsbach Angevin Luxembourg Hunyadi Jagiellon Szapolyai Ottoman Habsburg Habsburg-Lorraine

Liechtenstein

Liechtenstein

Poland

Piast Přemyslid Samborides Griffins Jagiellon Valois Báthory Vasa Wiśniowiecki Sobieski Wettin Leszczyński Poniatowski

After partitions:

Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov
Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov
Kingdom of Poland Habsburg Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria Wettin Duchy of Warsaw Lefebvre Duchy of Gdańsk Hohenzollern Duchy of Poznań

v t e

Ottoman Sultans / Caliphs

Dynasty Family tree (detailed) Family tree (simplified) Line of succession

Osman I Orhan Murad I Bayezid I Interregnum Mehmed I Murad II Mehmed II Murad II Mehmed II Bayezid II Selim I Suleiman I Selim II Murad III Mehmed III Ahmed I Mustafa I Osman II Mustafa I Murad IV Ibrahim Mehmed IV Suleiman II Ahmed II Mustafa II Ahmed III Mahmud I Osman III Mustafa III Abdul Hamid I Selim III Mustafa IV Mahmud II Abdulmejid I Abdülaziz Murad V Abdul Hamid II Mehmed V Mehmed VI Abdulmejid II
Abdulmejid II
( Caliph
Caliph
only)

§ First Ottoman caliph

Book Category

Related templates: Claimants Valide Sultans

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Mothers of the Ottoman Sultans

Halime Hatun Malhun Hatun Nilüfer Hatun Gülçiçek Hatun Devlet Hatun Emine Hatun Hüma Hatun Gülbahar Hatun/Sittişah Hatun Gülbahar Hatun Hafsa Sultan Hürrem Sultan Nurbanu Sultan Safiye Sultan Handan Sultan Halime Sultan Mahfiruz Hatun Kösem Sultan Turhan Hatice Sultan Aşub Sultan Muazzez Sultan Emetullah Rabia Gülnuş Sultan Saliha Sultan Şehsuvar Sultan Mihrişah Kadın Şermi Kadın Mihrişah Sultan Sineperver Sultan Nakşidil Sultan Bezmiâlem Sultan Pertevniyal Sultan Şevkefza Kadın Tirimüjgan Kadın Gülcemal Kadın Gülüstü Hanım

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Ottoman princesses

1st generation

2nd generation

3rd generation

Nefise Hatun

4th generation

5th generation

6th generation

7th generation

Gevherhan Hatun

8th generation

Aynışah Hatun Ayşe Hatun

9th generation

Hatice Sultan Fatma Sultan Beyhan Sultan Şah Sultan

10th generation

Mihrimah Sultan Raziye Sultan

11th generation

Fatma Sultan Gevherhan Sultan Ismihan Sultan Şah Sultan

12th generation

Ayşe Sultan Fatma Sultan

13th generation

14th generation

Ayşe Sultan Fatma Sultan Gevherhan Sultan Hanzade Sultan Atike Sultan

15th generation

Kaya Sultan

16th generation

17th generation

Ayşe Sultan Emine Sultan Safiye Sultan Fatma Sultan Ümmügülsüm Sultan Saliha Sultan Ayşe Sultan Zeynep Sultan Esma Sultan Zübeyde Sultan

18th generation

Beyhan Sultan Hatice Sultan Esma Sultan

19th generation

Adile Sultan Atiye Sultan Saliha Sultan

20th generation

Fatma Sultan Refia Sultan Cemile Sultan Münire Sultan Behice Sultan Seniha Sultan Mediha Sultan Naile Sultan Nazime Sultan Esma Sultan

21st generation

Aliye Sultan Fehime Sultan Hamide Ayşe Sultan Hatice Sultan Rukiye Sabiha Sultan

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Ottoman princes fighting for the throne

Against Murad I
Murad I
(1373)

Savcı Bey

Ottoman Interregnum
Ottoman Interregnum
(1402–1413)

Mehmet Çelebi Süleyman Çelebi İsa Çelebi Musa Çelebi

Against Mehmed I
Mehmed I
(1419)

Mustafa Çelebi

Against Murad II
Murad II
(1421–1423)

Mustafa Çelebi Küçük Mustafa

Against Bayezid II
Bayezid II
(1481-1482)

Sultan
Sultan
Cem

Against Bayezid II
Bayezid II
(1511–1512)

Selim Ahmet

Against Selim I
Selim I
(1512–1513)

Ahmet Korkut

Against Suleiman I (1553–1561)

Mustafa Bayezid

Against Ahmed I
Ahmed I
(1603–1617)<

.