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The Info List - Oscar Robertson


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Oscar Palmer Robertson (born November 24, 1938), nicknamed "The Big O", is an American former National Basketball
Basketball
Association player who played for the Cincinnati Royals
Cincinnati Royals
and Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Bucks.[1] The 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m), 205 lb (93 kg)[2] Robertson played point guard and was a 12-time All-Star, 11-time member of the All-NBA Team, and one-time winner of the MVP award in 14 professional seasons. In 1962, he became the first player in NBA history to average a triple-double for a season.[3] In the 1970–71 NBA season, he was a key player on the team that brought the Bucks their only NBA title. His playing career, especially during high school and college, was plagued by racism.[3] Robertson is a two-time Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame inductee, having been inducted in 1980 for his individual career, and in 2010 as a member of the 1960 United States men's Olympic basketball team and president of the National Basketball
Basketball
Players Association. He also was voted one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History
50 Greatest Players in NBA History
in 1996.[4] The United States Basketball
Basketball
Writers Association renamed their College Player of the Year Award the Oscar Robertson Trophy
Oscar Robertson Trophy
in his honor in 1998, and he was one of five people chosen to represent the inaugural National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame class in 2006.[5] He was ranked as the 36th best American athlete of the 20th century by ESPN.[6][7] Robertson was also an integral part of Robertson v. National Basketball
Basketball
Ass'n of 1970.[8] The landmark NBA antitrust suit, named after the then-president of the NBA Players' Association, led to an extensive reform of the league's strict free agency and draft rules and, subsequently, to higher salaries for all players.[3]

Contents

1 Early years 2 Crispus Attucks High School 3 University of Cincinnati
University of Cincinnati
(1957–1960) 4 1960 Olympics 5 Professional career

5.1 Cincinnati Royals 5.2 Milwaukee Bucks
Milwaukee Bucks
and the ' Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
suit' 5.3 Post-NBA career

6 Legacy 7 NBA career statistics

7.1 Regular season 7.2 Playoffs 7.3 Career highs

7.3.1 40 point games 7.3.2 Top assist games 7.3.3 Regular season 7.3.4 Playoffs

8 Personal life 9 See also 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External links

Early years Robertson was born in poverty in Charlotte, Tennessee, and grew up in a segregated housing project in Indianapolis. In contrast to many other boys who preferred to play baseball, he was drawn to basketball because it was "a poor kids' game." Because his family could not afford to buy a basketball, he learned how to shoot by tossing tennis balls and rags bound with rubber bands into a peach basket behind his family's home.[3] Robertson attended Crispus Attucks High School, an all-black high school. Crispus Attucks High School At Crispus Attucks, Robertson was coached by Ray Crowe, whose emphasis on a fundamentally sound game had a positive effect on Robertson's style of play. As a sophomore in 1954, he starred on an Attucks team that lost in the semi-state finals (state quarterfinals) to eventual state champions Milan, whose story would later be the basis of the classic 1986 movie Hoosiers. When Robertson was a junior, Crispus Attucks dominated its opposition, going 31–1 and winning the 1955 state championship, the first for any all-black school in the nation. The following year the team finished with a perfect 31–0 record and won a second straight Indiana state title, becoming the first team in Indiana to secure a perfect season and compiling a state-record 45 straight victories. The state championships were also the first ever by an Indianapolis
Indianapolis
team in the Hoosier tourney. After their championship game wins, the team was paraded through town in a regular tradition, but they were then taken to a park outside downtown to continue their celebration, unlike other teams. Robertson stated, "[Officials] thought the blacks were going to tear the town up, and they thought the whites wouldn't like it."[9] Robertson scored 24.0 points per game in his senior season and was named Indiana "Mr. Basketball" in 1956.[3] After his graduation that year, Robertson enrolled at the University of Cincinnati. University of Cincinnati
University of Cincinnati
(1957–1960) Robertson continued to excel while at the University of Cincinnati, recording an incredible scoring average of 33.8 points per game, the third highest in college history. In each of his three years, he won the national scoring title, was named an All-American, and was chosen College Player of the Year, while setting 14 NCAA
NCAA
and 19 school records.[4] Robertson's stellar play led the Bearcats to a 79–9 overall record during his three varsity seasons, including two Final Four appearances. However, a championship eluded Robertson, something that would become a repeated occurrence in his professional career. When Robertson left college he was the all-time leading NCAA
NCAA
scorer until fellow Hall of Fame player Pete Maravich
Pete Maravich
topped him in 1970.[3] It is interesting to note that Robertson took Cincinnati to national prominence during his time there, but the university's greatest success in basketball took place immediately after his departure, when the team won national titles in 1961, 1962, and just missed a third title in 1963. He continues to stand atop the Bearcats' record book. The many records he still holds include: points in one game, 62 (one of his six games of 50 points or more); career triple-doubles, 10; career rebounds per game, 15.2; and career points, 2,973.[10] Robertson had many outstanding individual game performances, including 10 triple-doubles. His personal best might have been his line of 45 points, 23 rebounds and 10 assists vs. Indiana State
Indiana State
in 1959. Despite his success on the court, Robertson's college career was soured by racism. In those days, southern university programs such as those of Kentucky, Duke, and North Carolina did not recruit black athletes, and road trips to segregated cities were especially difficult, with Robertson often sleeping in college dorms instead of hotels. "I'll never forgive them", he told The Indianapolis
Indianapolis
Star years later.[3] Decades after his college days, Robertson's stellar NCAA career was rewarded by the United States Basketball
Basketball
Writers Association when, in 1998, they renamed the trophy awarded to the NCAA Division I Player of the Year the Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
Trophy. This honor brought the award full circle for Robertson since he had won the first two awards ever presented.[11] 1960 Olympics After college, Robertson and Jerry West
Jerry West
co-captained the U.S. basketball team at the 1960 Summer Olympics. The team, described as the greatest assemblage of amateur basketball talent ever, steamrollered the competition to win the gold medal. Robertson was a starting forward along with Purdue's Terry Dischinger, but played point guard as well. He was the co-leading scorer with fellow NBA legend Jerry Lucas, as the U.S. team won its nine games by a margin of 42.4 points. Ten of the twelve college players on the American squad later played in the NBA, including Robertson as well as future Hall-of-Famers West, Lucas, and Walt Bellamy.[12] Professional career Cincinnati Royals

Robertson displaying his ball-handling talent with the Cincinnati Royals

Prior to the 1960–61 NBA season, Robertson made himself eligible for the 1960 NBA draft. He was drafted by the Cincinnati Royals
Cincinnati Royals
as a territorial pick. The Royals gave Robertson a $33,000 signing bonus, a far cry from his childhood days when he was too poor to afford a basketball.[3] In his rookie season, Robertson averaged 30.5 points, 10.1 rebounds and 9.7 assists (leading the league), almost averaging a triple-double for the entire season. He was named NBA Rookie of the Year, was elected into the All-NBA First Team
All-NBA First Team
– which would happen in each of Robertson's first nine seasons – and made the first of 12 consecutive All-Star Game appearances.[1] In addition, he was named the 1961 NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game MVP following his 23-point, 14-assist, 9-rebound performance in a West victory. However, the Royals finished with a 33–46 record and stayed in the cellar of the Western Division. In the 1961–62 season, Robertson became the first player in NBA history to average a triple-double for an entire season, with 30.8 points, 12.5 rebounds and 11.4 assists.[1] Robertson also set a then-NBA record for the most triple-doubles during the regular season with 41 triple-doubles; the record would stand for over half a century when, in 2016–17, Russell Westbrook
Russell Westbrook
recorded 42 and joined Robertson as the only other player to average a triple-double for an entire season. He broke the assists record by Bob Cousy, who had recorded 715 assists two seasons earlier, by logging 899. The Royals earned a playoff berth; however, they were eliminated in the first round by the Detroit Pistons.[13] In the next season, Robertson further established himself as one of the greatest players of his generation, averaging 28.3 points, 10.4 rebounds and 9.5 assists, narrowly missing out on another triple-double season.[1] The Royals advanced to the Eastern Division Finals, but succumbed in a seven-game series against a Boston Celtics team led by Bill Russell.[14] In the 1963–64 season, the Royals achieved a 55–25 record,[15] which put them second place in the Eastern Division. Under new coach Jack McMahon, Robertson flourished, and for the first time in his career, he had a decent supporting cast: second scoring option Jack Twyman was now supplemented by Jerry Lucas
Jerry Lucas
and Wayne Embry, and fellow guard Adrian Smith helped Robertson in the backcourt. Robertson led the NBA in free-throw percentage, scored a career-high 31.4 points per game, and averaged 9.9 rebounds and 11.0 assists per game.[1] The averages for his first five NBA seasons are a triple-double: 30.3 points, 10.4 rebounds and 10.6 assists per game. He won the NBA MVP award and became the only player other than Bill Russell
Bill Russell
and Wilt Chamberlain to win it from 1960 to 1968.[3] Robertson also won his second All-Star Game MVP award that year after scoring 26 points, grabbing 14 rebounds, and dishing off 8 assists in an East victory. In the postseason, the Royals defeated the Philadelphia 76ers, but then were dominated by the Celtics 4 games to 1.[3] Robertson averaged a triple-double for his first five seasons in the NBA with the Royals, recording averages of 30.3 points, 10.4 rebounds, and 10.6 assists per game. From the 1964–65 season on, things began to turn sour for the franchise. Despite Robertson's stellar play, never failing to record averages of at least 24.7 points, 6.0 rebounds and 8.1 assists in the six following seasons,[1] the Royals were eliminated in the first round from 1965 to 1967, then missed the playoffs from 1968 to 1970. In the 1969–70 season, the sixth disappointing season in a row, fan support was waning. To help attract the public, 41-year-old head coach Bob Cousy
Bob Cousy
made a short comeback as a player. For seven games, the former Celtics point guard partnered with Robertson in the Royals' backcourt, but they missed the playoffs.[3] Milwaukee Bucks
Milwaukee Bucks
and the ' Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
suit'

Robertson as a member of the Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Bucks

Prior to the 1970–71 season, the Royals stunned the basketball world by trading Robertson to the Bucks for Flynn Robinson and Charlie Paulk. No reasons were officially given, but many pundits suspected head coach Bob Cousy
Bob Cousy
was jealous of all the attention Robertson was getting.[3] Robertson himself said: "I think he was wrong and I will never forget it."[3] The relationship between Oscar and the Royals had soured to the point that Cincinnati had also approached the Lakers and Knicks about deals involving their star player (the Knicks players who were discussed in those scenarios are unknown, but Los Angeles stated publicly that the Royals asked about Jerry West
Jerry West
and Wilt Chamberlain, with the Lakers saying they would not consider trading either star). However, the trade proved highly beneficial for Robertson. After being stuck with an under-performing team the last six years, he now was paired with the young Lew Alcindor, who would years later become the all-time NBA scoring leader as Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. With Alcindor in the low post and Robertson running the backcourt, the Bucks charged to a league-best 66–16 record, including a then-record 20-game win streak, a dominating 12–2 record in the playoffs, and crowned their season with the NBA title by sweeping the Baltimore Bullets 4–0 in the 1971 NBA Finals. For the first time in his career, Robertson had won an NBA championship.[3] From a historical perspective, however, Robertson's most important contribution was made not on a basketball court, but rather in a court of law. It was the year of the landmark Robertson v. National Basketball
Basketball
Ass'n, an antitrust suit filed by the NBA's Players Association against the league. As Robertson was the president of the Players Association, the case bore his name. In this suit, the proposed merger between the NBA and American Basketball
Basketball
Association was delayed until 1976, and the college draft as well as the free agency clauses were reformed.[3] Robertson himself stated that the main reason was that clubs basically owned their players: players were forbidden to talk to other clubs once their contract was up, because free agency did not exist back then.[16] Six years after the suit was filed, the NBA finally reached a settlement, the ABA–NBA merger
ABA–NBA merger
took place, and the Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
suit encouraged signing of more free agents and eventually led to higher salaries for all players.[3] On the hardwood, the veteran Robertson still proved he was a valuable player. Paired with Abdul-Jabbar, two more division titles with the Bucks followed in the 1971–72 and 1972–73 season. In Robertson's last season, he helped lead Milwaukee
Milwaukee
to a league-best 59–23 record and helped them to reach the 1974 NBA Finals. There, Robertson had the chance to end his stellar career with a second ring. The Bucks were matched up against a Boston Celtics team powered by an inspired Dave Cowens, and the Bucks lost in seven games.[3] As a testament to Robertson's importance to the Bucks, in the season following his retirement the Bucks fell to last place in their division with a 38–44 record in spite of the continued presence of Abdul-Jabbar.[17] Robertson was elected to the Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame
Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame
in 1995. Post-NBA career

Robertson in 2010

After he retired as an active player, Robertson stayed involved in efforts to improve living conditions in his native Indianapolis, especially concerning fellow African-Americans.[3] In addition, he worked as a color commentator with Brent Musburger
Brent Musburger
on games televised by CBS
CBS
during the 1974–75 NBA season.[18] His trademark expression was "Oh, Brent, did you see that!" in reaction to flashy or spectacular situations such as fast breaks, slam dunks, player collisions, etc. After his retirement, the Kansas City Kings (the Royals moved there while Robertson was with the Bucks) retired his #14; the retirement continues to be honored by the Kings in their current home of Sacramento. The Bucks also retired the #1 he wore in Milwaukee. In 1994, a nine-foot bronze statue of Robertson was erected outside the Fifth Third Arena
Fifth Third Arena
at Shoemaker Center, the current home of Cincinnati Bearcats basketball.[4] Robertson attends many of the games there, viewing the Bearcats from a chair at courtside. In 2006, the statue was relocated to the entrance of the Richard E. Lindner Athletics Center at the University of Cincinnati.[19] Starting in 2000, Robertson served as a director for Countrywide Financial Corporation, until the company's sale to Bank of America in 2008.[20] After many years out of the spotlight, Robertson was recognized on November 17, 2006 for his impact on college basketball when he was chosen to be a member of the founding class of the National Collegiate Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame. He was one of five people, along with John Wooden, Bill Russell, Dean Smith
Dean Smith
and Dr. James Naismith, selected to represent the inaugural class.[5] In July 2004, Robertson was named interim head coach of the Cincinnati Bearcats men's basketball team for approximately a month while head coach Bob Huggins
Bob Huggins
served a suspension stemming from a drunk-driving conviction.[21] In January 2011, Robertson joined a class action lawsuit against the NCAA, challenging the organization's use of the images of its former student athletes.[22] In 2015, Robertson was among a group of investors who placed a marijuana legalization initiative on the Ohio ballot.[23] The initiative sought exclusive grow rights for the group members while prohibiting all other cultivation except small amounts for personal use.[24] Robertson appeared in a television advertisement advocating for passage of the initiative,[25] but it was ultimately defeated.[26] Legacy Robertson is regarded as one of the greatest players in NBA history, a triple threat who could score inside, outside and also was a stellar playmaker. His rookie scoring average of 30.5 points per game is the third highest of any rookie in NBA history, and Robertson averaged more than 30 points per game in six of his first seven seasons.[1] Only three other players in the NBA have had more 30+ point per game seasons in their career. Robertson was the first player to average more than 10 assists per game, doing so at a time when the criteria for assists were more stringent than today.[3] Furthermore, Robertson is the first guard in NBA history to ever average more than 10 rebounds per game, doing so three times. It was a feat that would not be repeated until Russell Westbrook
Russell Westbrook
managed to achieve it during the 2016–17 season. In addition to his 1964 regular season MVP award, Robertson won three All-Star Game MVPs in his career (in 1961, 1964, and 1969). He ended his career with 26,710 points (25.7 per game, ninth-highest all time), 9,887 assists (9.5 per game) and 7,804 rebounds (7.5 per game).[1] He led the league in assists six times, and at the time of his retirement, he was the NBA's all-time leader in career assists and free throws made, and was the second all-time leading scorer behind Wilt Chamberlain.[3] Robertson also set yardsticks in versatility. If his first five NBA seasons are strung together, Robertson averaged a triple-double over those, averaging 30.3 points, 10.4 rebounds and 10.6 assists.[27] For his career, Robertson had 181 triple-doubles, a record that has never been approached.[28] These numbers are even more astonishing if it is taken into account that the three-point shot, which benefits sharpshooting backcourt players, did not exist when he played. In 1967–68, Robertson also became the first of only two players in NBA history to lead the league in both scoring average and assists per game in the same season (also achieved by Nate Archibald). The official scoring and assist titles went to other players that season, however, because the NBA based the titles on point and assist totals (not averages) prior to the 1969–70 season. Robertson did, however, win a total of six NBA assist titles during his career. For his career, Robertson shot a high .485 field goal average and led the league in free-throw percentage twice—in the 1963–64 and 1967–68 seasons.[1] Robertson is recognized by the NBA as the first legitimate "big guard", paving the way for other oversized backcourt players like Magic Johnson.[3] Furthermore, he is also credited with having invented the head fake and the fadeaway jump shot, a shot which Michael Jordan
Michael Jordan
later became famous for.[29] For the Cincinnati Royals, now relocated and named the Sacramento Kings, he scored 22,009 points and 7,731 assists, and is all-time leader in both statistics for the combined Royals/Kings teams.[3]

Robertson at the ceremony announcing inclusion in the Old National Bank Sports Legends Avenue of Champions, at The Children's Museum of Indianapolis.

Robertson was enshrined in the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame on April 28, 1980. He received the "Player of the Century" award by the National Association of Basketball
Basketball
Coaches in 2000 and was ranked third on SLAM Magazine's Top 75 NBA Players in 2003, behind fellow NBA legends Michael Jordan
Michael Jordan
and Wilt Chamberlain. Furthermore, in 2006, ESPN
ESPN
named Robertson the second greatest point guard of all time, praising him as the best post-up guard of all time and placing him only behind Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
legend Magic Johnson.[27] In 2017, it was announced that a life-sized bronze sculpture of Robertson would be featured alongside other Indiana sports stars at The Children's Museum of Indianapolis' Old National Bank Sports Legends Avenue of Champions, located in the museum's sports park opening in 2018.[30] In 1959, the Player of the Year Award was established to recognize the best college basketball player of the year by the United States Basketball
Basketball
Writers Association. Five nominees are presented and the individual with the most votes receives the award during the NCAA Final Four. In 1998, it was renamed the Oscar Robertson Trophy
Oscar Robertson Trophy
in honor of the player who won the first two awards because of his outstanding career and his continuing efforts to promote the game of basketball. In 2004, an 18" bronze statue of Robertson was sculpted by world-renowned sculptor Harry Weber.[11] NBA career statistics

Legend

  GP Games played  MPG  Minutes per game

 FG%  Field-goal percentage  FT%  Free-throw percentage

 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game

 PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

† Denotes seasons in which Robertson won an NBA championship

* Led the league

Regular season

Year Team GP MPG FG% FT% RPG APG PPG

1960–61 Cincinnati 71 42.7 .473 .822 10.1 9.7* 30.5

1961–62 Cincinnati 79 44.3 .478 .803 12.5 11.4* 30.8

1962–63 Cincinnati 80* 44.0 .518 .810 10.4 9.5 28.3

1963–64 Cincinnati 79 45.1 .483 .853* 9.9 11.0* 31.4

1964–65 Cincinnati 75 45.6* .480 .839 9.0 11.5* 30.4

1965–66 Cincinnati 76 46.0 .475 .842 7.7 11.1* 31.3

1966–67 Cincinnati 79 43.9 .493 .873 6.2 10.7 30.5

1967–68 Cincinnati 65 42.5 .500 .873* 6.0 9.7* 29.2*

1968–69 Cincinnati 79 43.8 .486 .838 6.4 9.8* 24.7

1969–70 Cincinnati 69 41.5 .511 .809 6.1 8.1 25.3

1970–71† Milwaukee 81 39.4 .496 .850 5.7 8.2 19.4

1971–72 Milwaukee 64 37.3 .472 .836 5.0 7.7 17.4

1972–73 Milwaukee 73 37.5 .454 .847 4.9 7.5 15.5

1973–74 Milwaukee 70 35.4 .438 .835 4.0 6.4 12.7

Career 1040 42.2 .485 .838 7.5 9.5 25.7

Playoffs

Year Team GP MPG FG% FT% RPG APG PPG

1962 Cincinnati 4 46.3 .519 .795 11.0 11.0 28.8

1963 Cincinnati 12 47.5 .470 .864 13.0 9.0 31.8

1964 Cincinnati 10 47.1 .455 .858 8.9 8.4 29.3

1965 Cincinnati 4 48.8 .427 .923 4.8 12.0 28.0

1966 Cincinnati 5 44.8 .408 .897 7.6 7.8 31.8

1967 Cincinnati 4 45.8 .516 .892 4.0 11.3 24.8

1971† Milwaukee 14 37.1 .486 .754 5.0 8.9 18.3

1972 Milwaukee 11 34.5 .407 .833 5.8 7.5 13.1

1973 Milwaukee 6 42.7 .500 .912 4.7 7.5 21.2

1974 Milwaukee 16 43.1 .450 .846 3.4 9.3 14.0

Career 86 42.7 .460 .855 6.7 8.9 22.2

Career highs

Robertson in 1966

40 point games 77 times in the regular season Top assist games

Assists Opponent Home/Away Date

22 Syracuse Nationals Home 000000001961-10-29-0000October 29, 1961

22 (OT) New York Knicks Home 000000001966-03-05-0000March 5, 1966

21 New York Knicks Home 000000001964-02-14-0000February 14, 1964

20 Los Angeles Lakers Home 000000001961-02-19-0000February 19, 1961

20 Chicago Packers Neutral 000000001961-12-11-0000December 11, 1961

20 San Francisco Warriors Home 000000001964-12-28-0000December 28, 1964

20 New York Knicks Neutral 000000001965-02-28-0000February 28, 1965

20 Phoenix Suns Away 000000001969-03-04-0000March 4, 1969

19 St. Louis Hawks Home 000000001961-12-08-0000December 8, 1961

19 Philadelphia Warriors Home 000000001962-01-11-0000January 11, 1962

19 Chicago Zephyrs Neutral 000000001962-12-13-0000December 13, 1962

19 San Francisco Warriors Home 000000001963-01-04-0000January 4, 1963

19 Baltimore Bullets Home 000000001964-01-05-0000January 5, 1964

19 Detroit Pistons Neutral 000000001964-12-01-0000December 1, 1964

19 Baltimore Bullets Home 000000001965-03-18-0000March 18, 1965

19 Los Angeles Lakers Away 000000001966-12-14-0000December 14, 1966

19 Philadelphia 76ers Home 000000001967-12-06-0000December 6, 1967

19 San Diego Rockets Neutral 000000001968-01-18-0000January 18, 1968

Regular season

Stat High Opponent Date

Points 56 vs. Los Angeles Lakers 000000001964-12-18-0000December 18, 1964

Field goals made

Field goal attempts

Free throws made, no misses 18-18 at St. Louis Hawks 000000001962-01-30-0000January 30, 1962

Free throws made, one miss 22-23 vs. Los Angeles Lakers 000000001964-12-18-0000December 18, 1964

Free throws made, one miss 22-23 vs. Baltimore Bullets 000000001966-11-20-0000November 20, 1966

Free throws made 22 vs. Los Angeles Lakers 000000001964-12-18-0000December 18, 1964

Free throws made 22 at Baltimore Bullets 000000001964-12-27-0000December 27, 1964

Free throws made 22 vs. Baltimore Bullets 000000001966-11-20-0000November 20, 1966

Free throw
Free throw
attempts 26 at Baltimore Bullets 000000001964-12-27-0000December 27, 1964

Rebounds

Minutes played

Playoffs

Stat High Opponent Date

Points 43 at Boston Celtics 000000001963-04-10-0000April 10, 1963

Field goals made 17 at Boston Celtics 000000001963-03-28-0000March 28, 1963

Free throws made, 1 miss 21-22 at Boston Celtics 000000001963-04-10-0000April 10, 1963

Free throws made 21 at Boston Celtics 000000001963-04-10-0000April 10, 1963

Free throw
Free throw
attempts 22 at Boston Celtics 000000001963-04-10-0000April 10, 1963

Assists 18 at Philadelphia 76ers 000000001964-03-29-0000March 29, 1964

Minutes played 58 (2OT) at Boston Celtics 000000001974-05-10-0000May 10, 1974

Personal life Robertson is the son of Mazell and Bailey Robertson. He has two brothers, Bailey Jr. and Henry. He remembers a tough childhood, plagued by poverty and racism.[31] When a biography was going to be written about him in the 1990s, Robertson joked that his life had been "dull", and that he had been "married to the same woman for a long time".[29] In 1997, Robertson donated one of his kidneys to his daughter Tia, who suffered lupus-related kidney failure.[29] He has been an honorary spokesman for the National Kidney Foundation ever since. In 2003, he published his own autobiography, The Big O: My Life, My Times, My Game. Robertson also owns the chemical company Orchem, based in Cincinnati, Ohio.[32] Regarding basketball, Robertson has stated that legendary Harlem Globetrotters players Marques Haynes and "clown prince" Goose Tatum were his idols.[16] Now in his seventies, he is long retired from playing basketball, although he still follows it on TV and attends most home games for the University of Cincinnati, his alma mater. He now lists woodworking as his prime hobby.[16] Robertson adds that he still could average a triple-double season in today's basketball, and that he is highly skeptical that anyone else could do it (it was later done by Russell Westbrook
Russell Westbrook
in the 2016–17 season). On June 9, 2007, Oscar received an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from the University of Cincinnati
University of Cincinnati
for both his philanthropic and entrepreneurial efforts.[33] See also

National Basketball
Basketball
Association portal

List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association franchise career scoring leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career scoring leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career assists leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career free throw scoring leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career minutes played leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career playoff assists leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association players with most assists in a game List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association annual minutes leaders List of NCAA
NCAA
Division I men's basketball players with 60 or more points in a game List of NCAA
NCAA
Division I men's basketball players with 2000 points and 1000 rebounds List of NCAA
NCAA
Division I men's basketball season scoring leaders List of NCAA
NCAA
Division I men's basketball career free throw scoring leaders

References

^ a b c d e f g h i " Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
stats". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2007-01-25.  ^ basketball-reference.com, [1], accessed January 25, 2017. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v " Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
nba.com summary". Nba.com. Retrieved 2007-01-25.  ^ a b c " Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame summary". Hoophall.com. Archived from the original on 2007-01-21. Retrieved 2007-01-25.  ^ a b "Wooden, Russell lead founding class into Collegiate Hall of Fame". Abc.com. Retrieved 2007-01-25.  ^ "Top N. American athletes of the century". Espn.go.com. Retrieved 2015-05-08.  ^ "The Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame – Hall of Famers". Hoophall.com. Archived from the original on 2011-02-15. Retrieved 2015-05-08.  ^ "Oscar defined the triple-double". Espn.go.com. Retrieved 2015-05-08.  ^ Patrick Dorsey, Attucks' win helped race relations, ESPN.com, February 27, 2009 ^ "2010-11 Men's basketball Media Supplement" (PDF). Grfx.cstv.com. Retrieved 2015-05-08.  ^ a b " Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
Trophy". Usbwa.com. Archived from the original on 2007-02-13. Retrieved 2007-01-25.  ^ "Games of the XVIIth Olympiad -- 1960". Usabasketball.com. Archived from the original on 2006-12-31. Retrieved 2007-01-31.  ^ "1962 Cincinnati Royals". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2007-01-31.  ^ "1963 Cincinnati Royals". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2007-01-31.  ^ "1964 Cincinnati Royals". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2007-01-31.  ^ a b c " Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
FAQ". Archived from the original on 2007-04-30. Retrieved 2007-01-31.  ^ "1975 Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Bucks". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2007-01-31. [dead link] ^ " Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
Company Information". Archived from the original on 2007-05-01. Retrieved 2007-01-31.  ^ Harris, Gregory. "Varsity Village Hits a Home Run On University Campus". LandscapeOnline.com. Archived from the original on 2012-04-25. Retrieved 2011-11-26.  ^ "Definitive Notice & Proxy Statement". Sec.gov. Retrieved 2015-05-08.  ^ "Hall of Famer will serve until Huggins returns". Sports.espn.go.com. Retrieved 2015-05-08.  ^ Wetzel, Dan (January 26, 2011). "Robertson joins suit vs. NCAA". Yahoo! Sports. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016.  ^ "'The Big O' backs pot legalization". ESPN. Associated Press. January 31, 2015. Retrieved May 26, 2016.  ^ Borchardt, Jackie (September 21, 2015). "What you need to know about Issue 3 -- Ohio's marijuana legalization measure". Northeast Ohio Media Group. Retrieved May 26, 2016.  ^ Saker, Anne (October 27, 2015). "Deters, Big O star in pro-Issue 3 ads". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Retrieved May 26, 2016.  ^ Borchardt, Jackie (November 3, 2015). "Ohio marijuana legalization measure fails". cleveland.com. Retrieved May 26, 2016.  ^ a b "Daily Dime: Special
Special
Edition – The 10 Greatest Point Guards Ever". Retrieved 2007-01-25.  ^ Wojnarowski, Adrian. "Making triple trouble". Retrieved 2007-01-31.  ^ a b c Flatter, Ron. " ESPN
ESPN
Classic – Oscar defined the triple-double". Retrieved 2007-01-31.  ^ "Children's Museum unveils 'sports legends' for new outdoor exhibit". Indiana Business Journal. 2017-09-12.  ^ [2] Archived May 31, 2006, at the Wayback Machine. ^ "Orchem Corporation". Orchemcorp.com. Retrieved 2008-07-20.  ^ "UC Legend Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
to be Honored at Spring Commencement". Uc.edu. 2007-10-04. Retrieved 2015-05-08. 

Further reading

Robertson, Oscar The Art of Basketball: A Guide to Self-Improvement in the Fundamentals of the Game (1998) ISBN 978-0-9662483-0-2 Robertson, Oscar The Big O: My Life, My Times, My Game (2003) ISBN 1-57954-764-8 autobiography Bradsher, Bethany, Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
Goes to Dixie (2011) ISBN 978-0-9836825-3-0, Houston, Texas: Whitecaps Media (e-book) Bradsher, Bethany, The Classic: How Everett Case
Everett Case
and His Tournament Brought Big-Time Basketball
Basketball
to the South (2011) ISBN 978-0-9836825-2-3, Houston, Texas: Whitecaps Media Grace, Kevin. Cincinnati Hoops. Chicago, Illinois: Arcadia, 2003. Grace, Kevin; Hand, Greg; Hathaway, Tom; and Hoffman, Carey. Bearcats! The Story of Basketball
Basketball
at the University of Cincinnati. Louisville, Kentucky: Harmony House, 1998. Robertson, Oscar, Damian Aromando. Parquet Cronicles (2000) Roberts, Randy. But They Can't Beat Us: Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
and the Crispus Attucks Tigers. ISBN 1-57167-257-5

External links

Find more aboutOscar Robertsonat's sister projects

Media from Wikimedia Commons Data from Wikidata

Official website

Career statistics and player information from Basketball-Reference.com NBA bio Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame bio Indiana Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame profile

Links to related articles

v t e

United States men's basketball squad – 1959 Pan American Games
Pan American Games
– Gold medal

Adams Bon Salle Boozer Boushka Byrd Evans Goldstein Haldorson Jeangerard Robertson Smith Swartz Thompson West Coach: Schaus

v t e

United States basketball squad – 1960 Summer Olympics
1960 Summer Olympics
– Gold medal

4 Arnette 5 Bellamy 6 Boozer 7 Dischinger 8 Haldorson 9 Imhoff 10 Kelley 11 Lane 12 Lucas 13 Robertson 14 Smith 15 West Coach: Newell

v t e

1960 NBA Draft

Territorial pick

Oscar Robertson

First round

Oscar Robertson Jerry West Darrall Imhoff Jackie Moreland Lee Shaffer Lenny Wilkens Al Bunge Satch Sanders

Second round

Jay Arnette Dave Budd Kelly Coleman Ron Johnson Wilbur Trosch Frank Radovich Bill Kennedy Leroy Wright

v t e

NBA first overall draft picks

1947: McNeely 1948: Tonkovich 1949: Shannon 1950: Share 1951: Melchiorre 1952: Workman 1953: Felix 1954: Selvy 1955: Ricketts 1956: Green 1957: Hundley 1958: Baylor 1959: Boozer 1960: Robertson 1961: Bellamy 1962: McGill 1963: Heyman 1964: Barnes 1965: Hetzel 1966: Russell 1967: Walker 1968: Hayes 1969: Alcindor 1970: Lanier 1971: Carr 1972: L. Martin 1973: Collins 1974: Walton 1975: D. Thompson 1976: Lucas 1977: Benson 1978: M. Thompson 1979: E. Johnson 1980: Carroll 1981: Aguirre 1982: Worthy 1983: Sampson 1984: Olajuwon 1985: Ewing 1986: Daugherty 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Manning 1989: Ellison 1990: Coleman 1991: L. Johnson 1992: O'Neal 1993: Webber 1994: G. Robinson 1995: Smith 1996: Iverson 1997: Duncan 1998: Olowokandi 1999: Brand 2000: K. Martin 2001: Brown 2002: Yao 2003: James 2004: Howard 2005: Bogut 2006: Bargnani 2007: Oden 2008: Rose 2009: Griffin 2010: Wall 2011: Irving 2012: Davis 2013: Bennett 2014: Wiggins 2015: Towns 2016: Simmons 2017: Fultz

v t e

Milwaukee Bucks
Milwaukee Bucks
1970–71 NBA champions

1 Robertson 4 Smith 5 Winkler 6 Zopf 7 Allen 8 Webb 10 Dandridge 14 McGlocklin 18 Greacen 19 Cunningham 20 Boozer 33 Alcindor (Finals MVP) 35 McLemore

Head coach Costello Assistant coach Nissalke

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame Class of 1980

Players

Jerry Lucas Oscar Robertson Jerry West

Coaches

Everett Shelton

Contributors

Les Harrison

Referees

Dallas Shirley

v t e

Members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame

Players

Guards

R. Allen Archibald Beckman Belov Bing Blazejowski Borgmann Brennan Cervi Cheeks Clayton Cooper-Dyke Cousy Dampier Davies Drexler Dumars Edwards Frazier Friedman Galis Gervin Goodrich Greer Guerin Hanson Haynes Holman Hyatt Isaacs Iverson Jeannette D. Johnson E. Johnson K. Jones S. Jones Jordan Kidd Lieberman Maravich Marcari Marčiulionis Martin McDermott McGrady D. McGuire Meyers R. Miller Monroe C. Murphy Nash Page Payton Petrović Phillip Posey Richmond Robertson Rodgers Roosma J. Russell Schommer Scott Sedran Sharman K. Smith Staley Steinmetz Stockton Swoopes Thomas Thompson Vandivier Wanzer West J. White Wilkens Woodard Wooden

Forwards

Arizin Barkley Barry Baylor Bird Bradley R. Brown Cunningham Curry Dalipagić Dantley DeBusschere Dehnert Endacott English Erving Foster Fulks Gale Gates Gola Hagan Havlicek Hawkins Hayes Haywood Heinsohn Hill Howell G. Johnson King Lucas Luisetti K. Malone McClain B. McCracken J. McCracken McGinnis McHale Mikkelsen C. Miller Mullin Pettit Pippen Pollard Radja Ramsey Rodman Schayes E. Schmidt O. Schmidt Stokes C. Thompson T. Thompson Twyman Walker Washington N. White Wilkes Wilkins Worthy Yardley

Centers

Abdul-Jabbar Barlow Beaty Bellamy Chamberlain Ćosić Cowens Crawford Daniels DeBernardi Donovan Ewing Gallatin Gilmore Gruenig Harris-Stewart Houbregs Issel W. Johnson Johnston M. Krause Kurland Lanier Leslie Lovellette Lapchick Macauley M. Malone McAdoo Meneghin Mikan Mourning S. Murphy Mutombo Olajuwon O'Neal Parish Pereira Reed Risen Robinson B. Russell Sabonis Sampson Semjonova Thurmond Unseld Wachter Walton Yao

Coaches

Alexeeva P. Allen Anderson Auerbach Auriemma Barmore Barry Blood Boeheim L. Brown Calhoun Calipari Cann Carlson Carnesecca Carnevale Carril Case Chancellor Chaney Conradt Crum Daly Dean Díaz-Miguel Diddle Drake Driesell Ferrándiz Gaines Gamba Gardner Gaze Gill Gomelsky Gunter Hannum Harshman Haskins Hatchell Heinsohn Hickey Hobson Holzman Hughes Hurley Iba Izzo P. Jackson Julian Keaney Keogan Knight Krzyzewski Kundla Lambert Leonard Lewis Litwack Loeffler Lonborg Magee McCutchan McGraw A. McGuire F. McGuire McLendon Meanwell Meyer Miller Moore Nelson Nikolić Novosel Olson Pitino Ramsay Richardson Riley Rubini Rupp Rush Sachs Self Sharman Shelton Sloan D. Smith Stringer Summitt Tarkanian Taylor Teague J. Thompson VanDerveer Wade Watts Wilkens G. Williams R. Williams Wooden Woolpert Wootten Yow

Contributors

Abbott Barksdale Bee Biasone H. Brown W. Brown Bunn Buss Clifton Colangelo Cooper Davidson Douglas Duer Embry Fagan Fisher Fleisher Gavitt Gottlieb Granik Gulick Harrison Hearn Henderson Hepp Hickox Hinkle Irish M. Jackson Jernstedt Jones Kennedy Knight J. Krause Lemon Liston Lloyd McLendon Lobo Mokray Morgan Morgenweck Naismith Newell Newton J. O'Brien L. O'Brien Olsen Podoloff Porter Raveling Reid Reinsdorf Ripley Sanders Saperstein Schabinger St. John Stagg Stanković Steitz Stern Taylor Thorn Tower Trester Vitale Wells Welts Wilke Winter Zollner

Referees

Bavetta Enright Garretson Hepbron Hoyt Kennedy Leith Mihalik Nichols Nucatola Quigley Rudolph Shirley Strom Tobey Walsh

Teams

1960 United States Olympic Team 1992 United States Olympic Team All-American Red Heads Buffalo Germans The First Team Harlem Globetrotters Immaculata College New York Renaissance Original Celtics Texas Western

v t e

FIBA Hall of Fame
FIBA Hall of Fame
inductees

Coaches (22)

Alexeyeva Canavesi Díaz-Miguel Donohue Ferrándiz A. Gomelsky E. Gomelsky Gaze Iba Ivković Kondrashin Newell Nikolić Novosel Primo Rubini Smith Soares Stirling Summitt Yow Žeravica

Contributors (35)

Airaldi Rivarola Ashry Atakol Bouffard Busnel Calvo Carneiro Dos Reis Greim Hepp Jones Killian Klieger Kozlowski López Martín Naismith Otto Pitzl Popović Ramsay Samaranch Šaper Saporta Scuri Seguro de Luna Semashko Seye Moreau Stanković Steitz Stern Ueda Vitale Wahby Yoon

Players (55)

A. Belov S. Belov Berkovich Cameron Chazalon Ćosić Cruz Dalipagić Daneu Delibašić Divac Donovan Edwards Epi Fasoulas Furlong Galis Gaze Gonçalves González Herrera Jean-Jacques Jordan Kićanović Korać Kukoč Maciel Marcari Marčiulionis Martín Marzorati Meneghin Meyers Miller Mujanović Olajuwon O'Neal Pasos Petrović Raga Rigaudeau Robertson Robinson Rodríguez Ronchetti Russell Sabonis Schmidt Semjonova Slavnić Timms Tkachenko Valters Voynova Zasulskaya

Teams (1)

United States Men's 1992 Olympic Dream Team

Technical officials (14)

Arabadjian Bain Belošević Blanchard Dimou Hopenhaym Kassai Kostin Lazarov Pfeuti Rae Reverberi Rigas Righetto

v t e

NBA 35th Anniversary Team

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Elgin Baylor Wilt Chamberlain Bob Cousy Julius Erving John Havlicek George Mikan Bob Pettit Oscar Robertson Bill Russell Jerry West

v t e

National Basketball
Basketball
Association's 50 Greatest Players in NBA History

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Nate Archibald Paul Arizin Charles Barkley Rick Barry Elgin Baylor Dave Bing Larry Bird Wilt Chamberlain Bob Cousy Dave Cowens Billy Cunningham Dave DeBusschere Clyde Drexler Julius Erving Patrick Ewing Walt Frazier George Gervin Hal Greer John Havlicek Elvin Hayes Magic Johnson Sam Jones Michael Jordan Jerry Lucas Karl Malone Moses Malone Pete Maravich Kevin McHale George Mikan Earl Monroe Hakeem Olajuwon Shaquille O'Neal Robert Parish Bob Pettit Scottie Pippen Willis Reed Oscar Robertson David Robinson Bill Russell Dolph Schayes Bill Sharman John Stockton Isiah Thomas Nate Thurmond Wes Unseld Bill Walton Jerry West Lenny Wilkens James Worthy

v t e

NBA Most Valuable Player Award

1956: Pettit 1957: Cousy 1958: Russell 1959: Pettit 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Russell 1962: Russell 1963: Russell 1964: Robertson 1965: Russell 1966: Chamberlain 1967: Chamberlain 1968: Chamberlain 1969: Unseld 1970: Reed 1971: Alcindor 1972: Abdul-Jabbar 1973: Cowens 1974: Abdul-Jabbar 1975: McAdoo 1976: Abdul-Jabbar 1977: Abdul-Jabbar 1978: Walton 1979: M. Malone 1980: Abdul-Jabbar 1981: Erving 1982: M. Malone 1983: M. Malone 1984: Bird 1985: Bird 1986: Bird 1987: Johnson 1988: Jordan 1989: Johnson 1990: Johnson 1991: Jordan 1992: Jordan 1993: Barkley 1994: Olajuwon 1995: Robinson 1996: Jordan 1997: K. Malone 1998: Jordan 1999: K. Malone 2000: O'Neal 2001: Iverson 2002: Duncan 2003: Duncan 2004: Garnett 2005: Nash 2006: Nash 2007: Nowitzki 2008: Bryant 2009: James 2010: James 2011: Rose 2012: James 2013: James 2014: Durant 2015: Curry 2016: Curry 2017: Westbrook

v t e

NBA Rookie of the Year
NBA Rookie of the Year
Award

1953: Meineke 1954: Felix 1955: Pettit 1956: Stokes 1957: Heinsohn 1958: Sauldsberry 1959: Baylor 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Robertson 1962: Bellamy 1963: Dischinger 1964: Lucas 1965: Reed 1966: Barry 1967: Bing 1968: Monroe 1969: Unseld 1970: Alcindor 1971: Cowens & Petrie 1972: Wicks 1973: McAdoo 1974: DiGregorio 1975: Wilkes 1976: Adams 1977: Dantley 1978: Davis 1979: Ford 1980: Bird 1981: Griffith 1982: Williams 1983: Cummings 1984: Sampson 1985: Jordan 1986: Ewing 1987: Person 1988: Jackson 1989: Richmond 1990: Robinson 1991: Coleman 1992: Johnson 1993: O'Neal 1994: Webber 1995: Hill & Kidd 1996: Stoudamire 1997: Iverson 1998: Duncan 1999: Carter 2000: Brand & Francis 2001: Miller 2002: Gasol 2003: Stoudemire 2004: James 2005: Okafor 2006: Paul 2007: Roy 2008: Durant 2009: Rose 2010: Evans 2011: Griffin 2012: Irving 2013: Lillard 2014: Carter-Williams 2015: Wiggins 2016: Towns 2017: Brogdon

v t e

NBA season assists leaders

1947: Calverley 1948: Dallmar 1949: Davies 1950: McGuire 1951: Phillip 1952: Phillip 1953: Cousy 1954: Cousy 1955: Cousy 1956: Cousy 1957: Cousy 1958: Cousy 1959: Cousy 1960: Cousy 1961: Robertson 1962: Robertson 1963: Rodgers 1964: Robertson 1965: Robertson 1966: Robertson 1967: Rodgers 1968: Chamberlain 1969: Robertson 1970: Wilkens 1971: Van Lier 1972: West 1973: Archibald 1974: DiGregorio 1975: Porter 1976: Watts 1977: Buse 1978: Porter 1979: Porter 1980: Richardson 1981: Porter 1982: Moore 1983: Johnson 1984: Johnson 1985: Thomas 1986: Johnson 1987: Johnson 1988: Stockton 1989: Stockton 1990: Stockton 1991: Stockton 1992: Stockton 1993: Stockton 1994: Stockton 1995: Stockton 1996: Stockton 1997: Jackson 1998: Strickland 1999: Kidd 2000: Kidd 2001: Kidd 2002: Miller 2003: Kidd 2004: Kidd 2005: Nash 2006: Nash 2007: Nash 2008: Paul 2009: Paul 2010: Nash 2011: Nash 2012: Rondo 2013: Rondo 2014: Paul 2015: Paul 2016: Rondo 2017: Harden

v t e

NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game Most Valuable Player Award

1951: Macauley 1952: Arizin 1953: Mikan 1954: Cousy 1955: Sharman 1956: Pettit 1957: Cousy 1958: Pettit 1959: Baylor & Pettit 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Robertson 1962: Pettit 1963: Russell 1964: Robertson 1965: Lucas 1966: A. Smith 1967: Barry 1968: Greer 1969: Robertson 1970: Reed 1971: Wilkens 1972: West 1973: Cowens 1974: Lanier 1975: Frazier 1976: Bing 1977: Erving 1978: R. Smith 1979: Thompson 1980: Gervin 1981: Archibald 1982: Bird 1983: Erving 1984: Thomas 1985: Sampson 1986: Thomas 1987: Chambers 1988: Jordan 1989: Malone 1990: Johnson 1991: Barkley 1992: Johnson 1993: Stockton & Malone 1994: Pippen 1995: Richmond 1996: Jordan 1997: Rice 1998: Jordan 1999: No game played 2000: O'Neal & Duncan 2001: Iverson 2002: Bryant 2003: Garnett 2004: O'Neal 2005: Iverson 2006: James 2007: Bryant 2008: James 2009: Bryant & O'Neal 2010: Wade 2011: Bryant 2012: Durant 2013: Paul 2014: Irving 2015: Westbrook 2016: Westbrook 2017: Davis

v t e

Helms Foundation College Basketball
Basketball
Player of the Year

1905: Steinmetz 1906: Grebenstein 1907: Kinney 1908: Keinath 1909: Schommer 1910: Page 1911: Kiendl 1912: Stangel 1913: Calder 1914: Halstead 1915: Houghton 1916: Levis 1917: Woods 1918: Chandler 1919: Platou 1920: Cann 1921: Williams 1922: Carney 1923: Endacott 1924: Black 1925: Mueller 1926: Cobb 1927: Hanson 1928: Holt 1929: C. Thompson 1930: Hyatt 1931: Carlton 1932: Wooden 1933: Sale 1934: Bennett 1935: Edwards 1936: Moir 1937: Luisetti 1938: Luisetti 1939: Jaworski 1940: Glamack 1941: Glamack 1942: Modzelewski 1943: Senesky 1944: Mikan 1945: Mikan 1946: Kurland 1947: Tucker 1948: Macauley 1949: Lavelli 1950: Arizin 1951: Groat 1952: Lovellette 1953: Houbregs 1954: Gola 1955: B. Russell 1956: B. Russell 1957: Rosenbluth 1958: Baylor 1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Lucas 1962: Hogue 1963: Heyman 1964: Hazzard 1965: Bradley & Goodrich 1966: C. Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Alcindor 1969: Alcindor 1970: Maravich & Wicks 1971: Carr & Wicks 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: D. Thompson 1975: D. Thompson 1976: Benson & May 1977: Johnson 1978: Givens 1979: Bird

v t e

UPI College Basketball Player of the Year
UPI College Basketball Player of the Year
Award winners

1955: Gola 1956: B. Russell 1957: Forte 1958: Robertson 1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Lucas 1962: Lucas 1963: Heyman 1964: Bradds 1965: Bradley 1966: C. Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Hayes 1969: Alcindor 1970: Maravich 1971: Carr 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Walton 1975: Thompson 1976: May 1977: Johnson 1978: Lee 1979: Bird 1980: Aguirre 1981: Sampson 1982: Sampson 1983: Sampson 1984: Jordan 1985: Mullin 1986: Berry 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Hawkins 1989: Ferry 1990: Simmons 1991: O'Neal 1992: Jackson 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: Smith 1996: Allen

v t e

Oscar Robertson Trophy
Oscar Robertson Trophy
winners

1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Lucas 1962: Lucas 1963: Heyman 1964: Hazzard 1965: Bradley 1966: Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Alcindor 1969: Maravich 1970: Maravich 1971: Wicks 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Walton 1975: Thompson 1976: Dantley 1977: M. Johnson 1978: Ford 1979: Bird 1980: Aguirre 1981: Sampson 1982: Sampson 1983: Sampson 1984: Jordan 1985: Mullin 1986: Berry 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Hawkins 1989: Ferry 1990: Simmons 1991: L. Johnson 1992: Laettner 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: O'Bannon 1996: Camby 1997: Duncan 1998: Jamison 1999: Brand 2000: Martin 2001: Battier 2002: Williams 2003: West 2004: Nelson 2005: Bogut 2006: Morrison & Redick 2007: Durant 2008: Hansbrough 2009: Griffin 2010: Turner 2011: Fredette 2012: Davis 2013: Burke 2014: McDermott 2015: Kaminsky 2016: Hield 2017: Mason III 2018: Brunson

v t e

Sporting News Men's College Basketball
Basketball
Player of the Year

1943: Phillip 1944: Hall 1945: Mikan 1946: Kurland 1947–49: None selected 1950: Arizin 1951: White 1952–57: None selected 1958: Robertson 1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Lucas 1962: Lucas 1963: Heyman 1964: Bradley 1965: Bradley 1966: Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Hayes 1969: Alcindor 1970: Maravich 1971: Wicks 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Walton 1975: Thompson 1976: May 1977: M. Johnson 1978: P. Ford 1979: Bird 1980: Griffith 1981: Aguirre 1982: Sampson 1983: Jordan 1984: Jordan 1985: Ewing 1986: Berry 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Hawkins 1989: King 1990: Scott 1991: L. Johnson 1992: Laettner 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: Respert 1996: Camby 1997: Duncan 1998: Jamison 1999: Brand 2000: Martin 2001: Battier 2002: Williams 2003: T. J. Ford 2004: Nelson 2005: Brown 2006: Redick 2007: Durant 2008: Hansbrough 2009: Griffin 2010: Turner 2011: Fredette 2012: Davis 2013: Oladipo 2014: McDermott 2015: Kaminsky 2016: Hield 2017: Mason III 2018: Brunson

v t e

NCAA
NCAA
Division I men's basketball season scoring leaders

Unofficial

1936: Luisetti 1937: Luisetti 1938: Jaworski 1939: Jaworski 1940: Modzelewski 1941: Modzelewski 1942: Modzelewski 1943: Senesky 1944: Calverley 1945: Mikan 1946: Mikan 1947: Lacy

Official

1948: Wier 1949: Lavelli 1950: Arizin 1951: Mlkvy 1952: Lovellette 1953: Selvy 1954: Selvy 1955: Floyd 1956: Floyd 1957: Wallace 1958: Robertson 1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Burgess 1962: McGill 1963: Werkman 1964: Komives 1965: Barry 1966: Schellhase 1967: Walker 1968: Maravich 1969: Maravich 1970: Maravich 1971: Neumann 1972: Lamar 1973: Averitt 1974: Fogle 1975: McCurdy 1976: Rogers 1977: F. Williams 1978: F. Williams 1979: Butler 1980: Murphy 1981: Fredrick 1982: Kelly 1983: Kelly 1984: Jakubick 1985: McDaniel 1986: Bailey 1987: Houston 1988: Hawkins 1989: Gathers 1990: Kimble 1991: Bradshaw 1992: Roberts 1993: Guy 1994: Robinson 1995: Thomas 1996: Granger 1997: Jones 1998: Jones 1999: A. Young 2000: Alexander 2001: McCollum 2002: Conley 2003: Douglas 2004: Clark 2005: Clark 2006: Morrison 2007: R. Williams 2008: R. Williams 2009: Curry 2010: Coleman 2011: Fredette 2012: Hamilton 2013: Green 2014: McDermott 2015: Harvey 2016: Daniel 2017: Keene 2018: T. Young

v t e

Mr. Basketball
Basketball
USA winners

1955: Chamberlain 1956: Robertson 1957: Lucas 1958: Lucas 1959: Raftery 1960: Hawkins 1961: Bradley 1962: Russell 1963: Lacy 1964: Alcindor 1965: Alcindor 1966: Murphy 1967: Haywood 1968: Westphal 1969: McGinnis 1970: McMillen 1971: Lucas 1972: Buckner 1973: Dantley 1974: Malone 1975: Cartwright 1976: Griffith 1977: King 1978: Aguirre 1979: Kellogg 1980: Rivers 1981: Ewing 1982: Tisdale 1983: R. Williams 1984: J. Williams 1985: Ferry 1986: Reid 1987: Johnson 1988: Mourning 1989: Anderson 1990: Bailey 1991: Webber 1992: Kidd 1993: Wallace 1994: Lopez 1995: Garnett 1996: Bibby 1997: McGrady 1998: Lewis 1999: Bender 2000: Miles 2001: Wagner 2002: James 2003: James 2004: Telfair 2005: Ellis 2006: Oden 2007: Mayo 2008: Jennings 2009: Favors 2010: Barnes 2011: Kidd-Gilchrist 2012: Muhammad 2013: Wiggins 2014: Alexander 2015: Simmons 2016: Ball 2017: Porter

v t e

1958 NCAA
NCAA
Men's Basketball
Basketball
Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Elgin Baylor Bob Boozer Wilt Chamberlain Don Hennon Oscar Robertson Guy Rodgers

Second Team

Pete Brennan Archie Dees Mike Farmer Dave Gambee Bailey Howell

v t e

1959 NCAA
NCAA
Men's Basketball
Basketball
Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Bob Boozer Johnny Cox Bailey Howell Oscar Robertson Jerry West

Second Team

Leo Byrd Johnny Green Tom Hawkins Don Hennon Al Seiden

v t e

1960 NCAA
NCAA
Men's Basketball
Basketball
Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Darrall Imhoff Jerry Lucas Oscar Robertson Tom Stith Jerry West

Second Team

Terry Dischinger Tony Jackson Roger Kaiser Lee Shaffer Len Wilkens

v t e

Sacramento Kings

Founded in 1923 Formerly the Rochester Seagrams (1923–1942), Rochester Eber Seagrams (1942–1943), Rochester Pros (1943–1945), Rochester Royals (1945–1957), Cincinnati Royals
Cincinnati Royals
(1957–1972); played in Kansas City-Omaha (1972–1975), Kansas City (1975–1985) Based in Sacramento, California

Franchise

Franchise All-time roster Draft history Head coaches Records Seasons Current season

Arenas

Edgerton Park Arena Rochester War Memorial Cincinnati Gardens Kansas City Municipal Auditorium Omaha Civic Auditorium Kemper Arena ARCO Arena Sleep Train Arena Golden 1 Center

G League affiliate

Reno Bighorns

Administration

Vivek Ranadivé (Chairman) Vlade Divac
Vlade Divac
(President of Basketball
Basketball
Operations) Mike Bratz (VP of Basketball
Basketball
Ops.) Dave Joerger
Dave Joerger
(Head Coach)

Retired numbers

1 2 4 6 11 12 14 16 21 27 44

NBA Championships (1)

1951

Culture and lore

Failed relocation attempts Slamson the Lion Maloof family

Media

TV NBC Sports California Radio KHTK-AM Announcers Gary Gerould Grant Napear Carmichael Dave Doug Christie Jerry Reynolds Fat Lever

v t e

Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Bucks

Founded in 1968 Based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Franchise

Franchise 1968 Expansion Draft All-time roster Draft history Seasons Records Head coaches Current season

Arenas

MECCA Arena BMO Harris Bradley Center Wisconsin Entertainment and Sports Center
Wisconsin Entertainment and Sports Center
(planned for 2018)

General managers

Erickson Embry Nelson D. Harris Dunleavy Weinhauer Grunfeld L. Harris Hammond Horst

G League affiliate

Wisconsin Herd

Administration

Owner Wesley Edens & Marc Lasry General Manager Jon Horst Head Coach Joe Prunty (interm)

Retired numbers

1 2 4 10 14 16 32 33

Hall of Famers

Lew Alcindor Nate Archibald Dave Cowens Wayne Embry Alex English Bob Lanier Moses Malone Oscar Robertson

NBA Championships (1)

1971

Conference Championships (2)

1971 1974

Division titles (13)

1971 1972 1973 1974 1976 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 2001

Culture & lore

The Big O Bango The Fastest Expansion Champion MECCA Court Fear the Deer The Greek Freak

Media

TV Fox Sports Wisconsin

Jim Paschke (play-by-play) Gus Johnson (part-time play-by-play) Jon McGlocklin (color) Marques Johnson
Marques Johnson
(part-time color)

Radio WTMJ

Ted Davis Dennis Krause

v t e

NBA on CBS

Related programs

The CBS
CBS
Late Movie College Basketball
Basketball
on CBS

Related articles

Ratings

NBA Finals

Commentators

All-Star Game NBA Finals

Key figures

Gary Bender Tim Brant Bob Costas Don Criqui Eddie Doucette Frank Glieber Greg Gumbel Jim Kelly Verne Lundquist Brent Musburger Andy Musser Jim Nantz Don Robertson Dick Stockton Pat Summerall

Color commentators

John Andariese Rick Barry Hubie Brown Elgin Baylor James Brown Quinn Buckner Doug Collins Billy Cunningham Terry Dischinger Len Elmore Keith Erickson John Havlicek Tom Heinsohn Rod Hundley Gus Johnson Steve Jones Sonny Jurgensen Stu Lantz Kevin Loughery Pete Maravich Jon McGlocklin Dick Motta Jeff Mullins Billy Packer Bill Raftery Cal Ramsey Oscar Robertson Mendy Rudolph Bill Russell Cazzie Russell Larry Steele Lenny Wilkens

Sideline reporters

Charlsie Cantey Jane Chastain Irv Cross Jim Gray Sonny Hill Andrea Joyce Pat O'Brien Lesley Visser

NBA Finals

1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

All-Star Game

1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

Lore

Music "The Bad Boys" Christmas Day "The Greatest Game Ever Played" "The Shot"

Rivalries

Celtics–Lakers Lakers–Pistons

v t e

NBA on ABC

Related programs

NBA Countdown NBA Access with Ahmad Rashad NBA Inside Stuff NBA Saturday Primetime NBA Sunday Showcase

NBA on ESPN

Radio NBA Wednesday NBA Friday WNBA on ESPN

NBA Drafts

2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

Non-NBA programs

ESPN
ESPN
College Basketball
Basketball
on ABC Olympics on ABC

Related articles

Ratings (NBA Finals) Game history

Key figures

All-Star Game ESPN NBA Finals WNBA Finals

Play-by-play

Mike Breen Jim Durham Bill Flemming Chet Forte Jim Gordon Curt Gowdy Chuck Howard Keith Jackson Mark Jones Jim McKay Al Michaels Brent Musburger Brad Nessler Dave Pasch John Saunders Chris Schenkel

Color commentators

Greg Anthony Hubie Brown Bob Cousy Sean Elliott Len Elmore Tim Legler Mark Jackson Steve Jones Johnny Kerr Dan Majerle Jack Ramsay Doc Rivers Bill Russell Tom Tolbert Jack Twyman Jeff Van Gundy Bill Walton Jerry West

Sideline reporters

David Aldridge Doris Burke Howard Cosell Heather Cox Dave Diles Israel Gutierrez Mark Jones Sal Masekela Tom Rinaldi Craig Sager Lisa Salters Michele Tafoya Bob Wolff

Studio hosts

Michelle Beadle Dan Patrick Stuart Scott Sage Steele Hannah Storm Mike Tirico Michael Wilbon

Studio analysts

Jon Barry Chauncey Billups Chris Broussard Doug Collins Steve Javie Avery Johnson Magic Johnson George Karl Scottie Pippen Jalen Rose Byron Scott Bill Simmons

ABC Radio announcers

Marv Albert Dave Barnett Chick Hearn Rod Hundley Steve Jones Fred Manfra Earl Monroe Johnny Most Oscar Robertson Dick Vitale

NBA Finals

1965 (Games 1, 5) 1966 (Games 1, 5) 1967 (Games 2, 5) 1968 (Games 1, 4) 1969 (Games 3, 5-7) 1970 1971 1972 1973 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

ABC Radio's coverage

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

WNBA Finals

2003 (Game 2 on ABC) 2004 2005 (Game 3 on ABC) 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 (Game 1 on ABC) 2011 2012 2013 2014 (Game 1 on ABC) 2015 (Game 1 on ABC) 2016 (Game 1 on ABC) 2017 (Game 1 on ABC)

All-Star Game

1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973

ABC Radio's coverage

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

Lore

Music "I think we see Willis coming out!" "The Block" Christmas Day

Rivalries

Bryant–O'Neal Lakers–Pistons Celtics–Lakers Cavaliers–Warriors

ESPN
ESPN
lore

Pacers–Pistons brawl

v t e

National Basketball
Basketball
Players Association presidents

Bob Cousy
Bob Cousy
(1954–1958) Tom Heinsohn
Tom Heinsohn
(1958–1965) Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
(1965–1974) Paul Silas
Paul Silas
(1974–1980) Bob Lanier (1980–1985) Junior Bridgeman (1985–1988) Alex English
Alex English
(1988) Isiah Thomas
Isiah Thomas
(1988–1994) Buck Williams
Buck Williams
(1994–1997) Patrick Ewing
Patrick Ewing
(1997–2001) Michael Curry (2001–2005) Antonio Davis
Antonio Davis
(2005–2006) Derek Fisher
Derek Fisher
(2006–2013) Chris Paul
Chris Paul
(2013– )

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 28844623 LCCN: n98033544 ISNI: 0000 0000 3794 1

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