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Ōrora Satoshi (born April 26, 1983 as Anatoliy Valeryevich Mihahanov, Russian: Анатолий Валерьевич Михаханов) is a sumo wrestler. His highest rank has been makushita 43. In 2017, he became the heaviest professional sumo wrestler ever at 288 kilograms (635 lb), surpassing the record previously held by Konishiki.[1]

Career

He was born on April 26, 1983, in the small town of Zaigrayevo, Zaigrayevsky District, Buryatia in what was then the Soviet Union.[2] He had been extraordinarily large since childhood, and after seeing sumo on television for the first time at the age of eight he was inspired to become a sumo wrestler. In 1999 at the age of 16 he moved with his family to St. Petersburg so he could study sumo.[2] There he was scouted by the 55th yokozuna Kitanoumi, joining Kitanoumi stable in March 2000. He was the first Russian to enter professional sumo. He made his debut alongside Ryūō, Hōchiyama and Hitenryu (ja).[3] He was given the shikona of Ōrora, a reference to the Aurora.[2]

Ōrora has spent most of his career in the fourth-highest sandanme division, which he first reached in May 2002.[4] He has spent nine tournaments ranked in the third-highest makushita division, which he first reached in January 2008, peaking at Makushita 43 in November 2011.[4] His last appearance in the division to date was in January 2014.[4] He served as a tsukebito or personal attendant to Kitanoumi for fourteen years until his stablemaster's death in November 2015. His stable was renamed Yamahibiki and his stablemaster is now the former maegashira Ganyū.[5] As of July 2017 he has a career record of 357 wins against 357 losses, with seven absences due to injury, over 104 tournaments.[4] In September 2017 he was demoted to jonidan, a division in which he had not competed since 2003.[4]

Weight

Ōrora already weighed 190 kilograms (420 lb) on his debut in March 2000, and in 2010 reached 262 kg (578 lb), surpassing Yamamotoyama to be the second-heaviest sumo wrestler recorded.[2] He recalled on one occasion ordering 50 pieces of yakiniku, plus six ramen noodles.[1] After reaching 283 kg (624 lb) in the January 2017 health check-up he tried changing his diet, eating only once a day and taking more exercise by walking around his heya.[1] However, he did not check his weight on a scale until the next health check-up on 22 August 2017, and in the seven months since he had, in fact, increased his weight by another five kilograms to reach 288 kg (635 lb), surpassing former ōzeki Konishiki's 285 kg (628 lb) set in 1996 to become the heaviest wrestler ever in professional sumo.[6] Ōrora remarked that he had not been aiming for the record but at least would now have a place in history.[1] He joked that a rice ball eaten as a snack must have put him over.[1] In a Twitter post on April 6, 2018, Orora stated that his weight had increased to 294 kilograms (648 lb).[7]

Fighting style

Ōrora (left) faces Kainowaka in September 2009

Ōrora has a huge weight advantage over nearly all his opponents—his 190 kg (420 lb) advantage over the 83 kg (183 lb) wrestler Ohara in January 2012 was the largest disparity ever in a professional sumo bout, though he was beaten by the smaller wrestler by stepping out of the ring during a throw attempt.[8] On the twelfth day of the September 2001 tournament he won with the extremely rare technique of tsukaminage or lifting throw, which can only be achieved against opponents much lighter than oneself, and had not been seen in a tournament since Tokitsuyama won with it in November 1957.[9] He also enjoys employing the rare kimarite of kimedashi, or arm-barring force-out, and is credited with this technique 41 times as of July 2017, by far the most among active wrestlers.[10] His most common winning technique is a straightforward force out or yori-kiri.[10] However, Ōrora is severely restricted by his lack of speed and agility, and only wins around half his bouts. Many of his opponents simply circle him, waiting for him to tire.

Career record

  • Note: Six official basho or tournaments are held each year—the Hatsu (First), Haru (Spring), Natsu (Summer), Nagoya, Aki (Autumn) and Kyushu. Wrestlers in lower divisions fight seven bouts per tournament.
Ōrora Satoshi[4]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
2000 x (Maezumo) East Jonokuchi #20
3–4
 
West Jonokuchi #23
6–1
 
East Jonidan #75
2–5
 
East Jonidan #99
4–3
 
2001 East Jonidan #75
3–4
 
East Jonidan #89
4–3
 
West Jonidan #65
3–4
 
West Jonidan #78
3–4
 
East Jonidan #95
6–1
 
East Jonidan #17
3–4
 
2002 West Jonidan #35
4–3
 
East Jonidan #14
4–3
 
West Sandanme #94
2–5
 
West Jonidan #16
2–5
 
East Jonidan #50
6–1
 
East Sandanme #85
5–2
 
2003 West Sandanme #56
3–4
 
West Sandanme #74
Sat out due to injury
0–0–7
West Jonidan #34
5–2
 
West Sandanme #98
2–5
 
West Jonidan #31
5–2
 
West Sandanme #96
4–3
 
2004 East Sandanme #74
3–4
 
West Sandanme #89
4–3
 
West Sandanme #70
4–3
 
West Sandanme #52
1–6
 
West Sandanme #92
6–1
 
East Sandanme #34
3–4
 
2005 West Sandanme #47
4–3
 
East Sandanme #31
4–3
 
East Sandanme #19
4–3
 
East Sandanme #9
2–5
 
East Sandanme #33
4–3
 
West Sandanme #17
4–3
 
2006 East Sandanme #4
2–5
 
East Sandanme #24
2–5
 
West Sandanme #50
5–2
 
East Sandanme #20
2–5
 
West Sandanme #49
5–2
 
East Sandanme #20
4–3
 
2007 West Sandanme #7
3–4
 
East Sandanme #24
4–3
 
East Sandanme #10
3–4
 
West Sandanme #22
3–4
 
East Sandanme #38
5–2
 
West Sandanme #13
5–2
 
2008 East Makushita #53
2–5
 
West Sandanme #10
1–6
 
West Sandanme #44
5–2
 
West Sandanme #19
5–2
 
East Makushita #58
4–3
 
West Makushita #48
1–6
 
2009 West Sandanme #21
5–2
 
West Makushita #58
3–4
 
East Sandanme #12
5–2
 
East Makushita #50
3–4
 
West Sandanme #6
1–6
 
East Sandanme #42
3–4
 
2010 West Sandanme #59
4–2
 
East Sandanme #43
6–1
 
West Makushita #55
1–6
 
West Sandanme #27
4–3
 
West Sandanme #14
2–5
 
West Sandanme #36
4–3
 
2011 West Sandanme #23
3–4
 
East Sandanme #41
Tournament Cancelled
0–0–0
East Sandanme #41
4–3
 
West Sandanme #16
5–2
 
East Makushita #58
5–2
 
East Makushita #43
2–5
 
2012 West Sandanme #4
1–6
 
West Sandanme #39
3–4
 
West Sandanme #56
5–2
 
West Sandanme #26
3–4
 
East Sandanme #43
5–2
 
East Sandanme #16
2–5
 
2013 East Sandanme #42
3–4
 
East Sandanme #57
5–2
 
East Sandanme #29
3–4
 
East Sandanme #43
4–3
 
East Sandanme #30
5–2
 
West Sandanme #5
4–3
 
2014 West Makushita #54
2–5
 
West Sandanme #16
2–5
 
East Sandanme #46
3–4
 
East Sandanme #62
6–1
 
East Sandanme #8
3–4
 
East Sandanme #25
4–3
 
2015 West Sandanme #12
4–3
 
East Sandanme #2
2–5
 
West Sandanme #33
2–5
 
West Sandanme #57
5–2
 
West Sandanme #28
2–5
 
East Sandanme #58
4–3
 
2016 East Sandanme #40
2–5
 
East Sandanme #70
2–5
 
East Sandanme #94
5–2
 
West Sandanme #59
4–3
 
East Sandanme #41
3–4
 
East Sandanme #57
4–3
 
2017 West Sandanme #38
4–3
 
East Sandanme #27
2–5
 
East Sandanme #59
3–4
 
West Sandanme #80
3–4
 
West Jonidan #1
3–4
 
East Jonidan #13
5–2
 
2018 East Sandanme #77
0–2–5
 
East Jonidan #28
2–5
 
East Jonidan #61

 
x x x
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "大露羅やせてるはずが歴代最重量、小錦超えちゃった" (in Japanese). Nikkan Sports. 23 August 2017. Retrieved 23 August 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Japan: Meet Anatoli-San, Russia's home-grown SUMO wrestler". Ruptly. April 2016. Retrieved 23 August 2017. 
  3. ^ "Find Rikishi". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 26 August 2017. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f "Orora Satoshi Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 23 August 2017. 
  5. ^ "All About Sumo – Yamahibiki Beya". Japan Sumo Association. Retrieved 26 August 2017. 
  6. ^ "大露羅、小錦超え歴代最重量の288・8キロ" (in Japanese). Hochi. 23 August 2017. Retrieved 23 August 2017. 
  7. ^ https://twitter.com/Ichiro_SUMO/status/982182591750029312
  8. ^ "Ohara vs Orora Day 8 Sumo Hatsu Basho January 2012". YouTube. Retrieved 26 September 2017. 
  9. ^ "Bout query result". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 25 August 2017. 
  10. ^ a b "Wins of Orora". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 23 August 2017. 

External links