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Oomathurai (real name Duraisingam), died 16 November 1801) was an Indian Poligar
Poligar
(Palaiyakkarar) from Tamil Nadu, who fought against the British East India
India
Company in the Polygar Wars. He was the younger brother of Veerapandiya Kattabomman.

Contents

1 Biography 2 In popular culture 3 References 4 Further reading

Biography[edit] Oomathurai was born to the Poligar
Poligar
of Panchalankurichi - Adi Kattabomman and Arumugattammal. His birth name was Duraisingam. He was nicknamed as Ooomaithurai (lit. the dumb prince). Different reasons are given for this nickname. While contemporary Tamil accounts say he was nicknamed as the dumb one as a parody of his oratorical ability, European accounts refer to him as "dumby" or "dumb brother" because of his speech impairment. His elder brothers were Veerapandiya Kattabomman and Dalavai Kumarasami (Sivathiah). Oomaithurai was involved in the Polygar Wars against the East India
India
Company. In the first Poligar
Poligar
war, he was captured and imprisoned in Palayamkottai prison. In February 1801, he escaped from Palayamkottai
Palayamkottai
and rebuilt the Panchalankurichi fort which had been razed in the first war. In the second Poligar
Poligar
war that followed, he allied himself with Maruthu brothers (who ruled Sivagangai) and was part of a grand alliance against the Company which included Dheeran Chinnamalai
Dheeran Chinnamalai
and Kerala Verma. The Company forces led by Lt. Colonel Agnew laid siege to the Panchalankurichi fort and captured it in May 1801 after a prolonged siege and artillery bombardment. Oomaithurai escaped the fall of the fort and joined Marudu brothers at their jungle fort at Kalayar Kovil. The Company forces pursued him there and eventually captured Kalayar Kovil in October 1801. Oomaithurai along with the Marudu brothers was hanged on 16 November 1801. In popular culture[edit] In the 1959 Tamil film
Tamil film
Veerapandiya Kattabomman
Veerapandiya Kattabomman
Oomaithurai was portrayed by O. A. K. Thevar. References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Dirks, Nicholas B. (1987). The Hollow Crown: Ethnohistory of an Indian Kingdom. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-

.