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Andreas Nikolaus "Niki" Lauda (born 22 February 1949) is an Austrian former Formula One
Formula One
driver and a three-time F1 World Drivers' Champion, winning in 1975, 1977 and 1984. He is currently the only driver to have been champion for both Ferrari and McLaren, the sport's two most successful constructors. He is considered by some as one of the greatest F1 drivers of all time. More recently an aviation entrepreneur, he has founded and run two airlines ( Lauda Air
Lauda Air
and Niki). He is also Bombardier Business Aircraft brand ambassador. He was also a consultant for Scuderia Ferrari
Scuderia Ferrari
and team manager of the Jaguar Formula One
Formula One
racing team for two years. He is currently working as a pundit for German TV during Grand Prix weekends and acts as non-executive chairman of the Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 Team. Lauda owns 10% of the team.[1] Lauda was seriously injured in a crash at the 1976 German Grand Prix at the Nürburgring, during which his Ferrari burst into flames and he came close to death after inhaling hot toxic fumes and suffering severe burns. However, he survived, and recovered enough to race again just six weeks later at the Italian Grand Prix.

Contents

1 Early years in racing 2 Ferrari (1974–1977)

2.1 1976 Nürburgring
Nürburgring
crash 2.2 Return to racing

3 Brabham
Brabham
and first retirement (1978–1979) 4 McLaren
McLaren
comeback, third world title and second retirement (1982–1985) 5 Later management roles 6 Helmet 7 Roles beyond F1 8 Personal life 9 Film and television 10 Racing record

10.1 Complete European Formula Two
Formula Two
Championship results 10.2 Complete Formula One
Formula One
World Championship results 10.3 Complete Formula One
Formula One
Non-Championship results

11 References 12 Further reading

Early years in racing[edit] Niki Lauda
Niki Lauda
was born on 22 February 1949 in Vienna, Austria, to a wealthy family. His paternal grandfather was the Viennese-born businessman Hans Lauda.[2][3] Lauda became a racing driver despite his family's disapproval. After starting out with a Mini, Lauda moved on into Formula Vee, as was normal in Central Europe, but rapidly moved up to drive in private Porsche and Chevron sports cars. With his career stalled, he took out a £30,000 bank loan,[4] secured by a life insurance policy, to buy his way into the fledgling March team as a Formula Two
Formula Two
(F2) driver in 1971. Because of his family's disapproval he had an ongoing feud with them over his racing ambitions and abandoned further contact.[5] He was quickly promoted to the F1 team, but drove for March in F1 and F2 in 1972. Although the F2 cars were good (and Lauda's driving skills impressed March principal Robin Herd), March's 1972 F1 season was catastrophic. Perhaps the lowest point of the team's season came at the Canadian Grand Prix at Mosport Park, where both March cars were disqualified within 3 laps of each other after just past 3/4 race distance. Lauda took out another bank loan to buy his way into the BRM team in 1973. Lauda was instantly quick, but the team was in decline; his big break came when his BRM
BRM
teammate Clay Regazzoni
Clay Regazzoni
left to rejoin Ferrari in 1974 and team owner Enzo Ferrari
Enzo Ferrari
asked him what he thought of Lauda. Regazzoni spoke so favourably of Lauda that Ferrari promptly signed him, paying him enough to clear his debts. Ferrari (1974–1977)[edit]

Niki Lauda
Niki Lauda
in 1974.

Niki Lauda
Niki Lauda
practicing at the Nürburgring
Nürburgring
during the 1976 German Grand Prix.

After an unsuccessful start to the 1970s culminating in a disastrous start to the 1973 season, Ferrari regrouped completely under Luca di Montezemolo and were resurgent in 1974. The team's faith in the little-known Lauda was quickly rewarded by a second-place finish in his début race for the team, the season-opening Argentine Grand Prix. His first Grand Prix (GP) victory – and the first for Ferrari since 1972 – followed only three races later in the Spanish Grand Prix. Although Lauda became the season's pacesetter, achieving six consecutive pole positions, a mixture of inexperience and mechanical unreliability meant Lauda won only one more race that year, the Dutch GP. He finished fourth in the Drivers' Championship and demonstrated immense commitment to testing and improving the car. The 1975 F1 season started slowly for Lauda; after no better than a fifth-place finish in the first four races, he won four of the next five driving the new Ferrari 312T. His first World Championship was confirmed with a third-place finish at the Italian Grand Prix at Monza; Lauda's teammate Regazzoni won the race and Ferrari clinched their first Constructors' Championship in 11 years; Lauda then picked up a fifth win at the last race of the year, the United States
United States
GP at Watkins Glen. He also became the first driver to lap the Nürburgring Nordschleife in under seven minutes, which was considered a huge feat as the Nordschleife section of the Nürburgring
Nürburgring
was two miles longer than it is today. Lauda famously gave away any trophies he won to his local garage in exchange for his car to be washed and serviced.[6] Unlike 1975 and despite tensions between Lauda and Montezemolo's successor, Daniele Audetto, Lauda dominated the start of the 1976 F1 season, winning four of the first six races and finishing second in the other two. By the time of his fifth win of the year at the British GP, he had more than double the points of his closest challengers Jody Scheckter and James Hunt, and a second consecutive World Championship appeared a formality. It would be a feat not achieved since Jack Brabham's victories in 1959 and 1960. He also looked set to win the most races in a season, a record held by the late Jim Clark
Jim Clark
since 1963. 1976 Nürburgring
Nürburgring
crash[edit] A week before the 1976 German Grand Prix
1976 German Grand Prix
at the Nürburgring, even though he was the fastest driver on that circuit at the time, Lauda urged his fellow drivers to boycott the race, largely because of the 23-kilometre (14 mi) circuit's safety arrangements, citing the organisers' lack of resources to properly manage such a huge circuit- i.e. the lack of fire marshals; fire and safety equipment and safety vehicles. Most of the other drivers voted against the boycott and the race went ahead. On 1 August 1976 during the second lap at the very fast left kink before Bergwerk, Lauda was involved in an accident where his Ferrari swerved off the track, hit an embankment, burst into flames and made contact with Brett Lunger's Surtees-Ford car. Unlike Lunger, Lauda was trapped in the wreckage. Drivers Arturo Merzario, Lunger, Guy Edwards and Harald Ertl arrived at the scene a few moments later, but before they were able to pull Lauda from his car, he suffered severe burns to his head and inhaled hot toxic gases that damaged his lungs and blood. As Lauda was wearing a modified helmet, the foam had compressed and it slid off his head after the accident, leaving his face exposed to the fire.[7] Although Lauda was conscious and able to stand immediately after the accident, he later lapsed into a coma.[8] Lauda suffered extensive scarring from the burns to his head, losing most of his right ear as well as the hair on the right side of his head, his eyebrows and his eyelids. He chose to limit reconstructive surgery to replacing the eyelids and getting them to work properly. Since the accident he has always worn a cap to cover the scars on his head. He has arranged for sponsors to use the cap for advertising. With Lauda out of the contest, Carlos Reutemann
Carlos Reutemann
was taken on as his replacement. Ferrari boycotted the Austrian Grand Prix in protest at what they saw as preferential treatment shown towards McLaren
McLaren
driver James Hunt
James Hunt
at the Spanish and British Grands Prix. Return to racing[edit] Lauda returned to race only six weeks (three races) later, appearing at the Monza press conference with his fresh burns still bandaged. He finished fourth in the Italian GP, despite being, by his own admission, absolutely petrified. F1 journalist Nigel Roebuck recalls seeing Lauda in the pits, peeling the blood-soaked bandages off his scarred scalp. He also had to wear a specially adapted AGV crash helmet so as to not be in too much discomfort. In Lauda's absence, Hunt had mounted a late charge to reduce Lauda's lead in the World Championship standings. Hunt and Lauda were close friends away from the circuit, and their personal on-track rivalry, while intense, was cleanly contested and fair. Following wins in the Canadian and United States Grands Prix, Hunt stood only three points behind Lauda before the final race of the season, the Japanese Grand Prix. Lauda qualified third, one place behind Hunt, but on race day there was torrential rain and Lauda retired after two laps. He later said that he felt it was unsafe to continue under these conditions, especially since his eyes were watering excessively because of his fire-damaged tear ducts and inability to blink. Hunt led much of the race before his tires blistered and an inevitable pit stop dropped him down the order. He recovered to third, thus winning the title by a single point. Lauda's previously good relationship with Ferrari was severely affected by his decision to withdraw from the Japanese Grand Prix, and he endured a difficult 1977 season, despite easily winning the championship through consistency rather than outright pace. Lauda disliked his new teammate, Reutemann, who had served as his replacement driver. Lauda was not comfortable with this move and felt he had been let down by Ferrari. "We never could stand each other, and instead of taking pressure off me, they put on even more by bringing Carlos Reutemann
Carlos Reutemann
into the team."[9] Having announced his decision to quit Ferrari at season's end, Lauda left earlier after he won the Drivers' Championship at the United States
United States
Grand Prix because of the team's decision to run the unknown Gilles Villeneuve
Gilles Villeneuve
in a third car at the Canadian Grand Prix. Brabham
Brabham
and first retirement (1978–1979)[edit]

Lauda in the Brabham-Alfa Romeo (1978)

Having joined Parmalat-sponsored Brabham-Alfa Romeo in 1978 for a $1 million salary, Lauda endured two unsuccessful seasons, notable mainly for his one race in the Brabham
Brabham
BT46B, a radical design known as the Fan Car: it won its first and only race at the Swedish GP, but Brabham did not use the car in F1 again; other teams vigorously protested the fan car's legality and Brabham
Brabham
team owner Bernie Ecclestone, who at the time was maneuvering for acquisition of Formula One's commercial rights, did not want to fight a protracted battle over the car, but the victory in Sweden remained official. The Brabham
Brabham
BT46 Alfa Romeo flat-12 began the 1978 season at the third race in South Africa. It suffered from a variety of troubles that forced Lauda to retire the car 9 out of 14 races. Lauda's best results, apart from the wins in Sweden and Italy
Italy
after the penalization of Mario Andretti
Mario Andretti
and Gilles Villeneuve, were 2nd in Montreal and Great Britain, and a 3rd in the Netherlands. As the Alfa flat-12 engine was too wide for effective wing cars designs, Alfa provided a V12 for 1979. It was the fourth 12cyl engine design that propelled the Austrian in F1 since 1973. Lauda's 1979 F1 season was again marred by retirements and poor pace, even though he won the non-championship 1979 Dino Ferrari Grand Prix with the Brabham-Alfa. In the single make BMW M1 Procar Championship, driving for the British Formula Two
Formula Two
team Project Four Racing (led by Ron Dennis) when not in a factory entry, Lauda won three races for P4 plus the series. Decades later, Lauda won a BMW Procar exhibition race event before the 2008 German Grand Prix. In September, Lauda finished 4th in Monza, and won the non-WC Imola event, still with the Alfa V12 engine. After that, Brabham
Brabham
returned to the familiar Cosworth
Cosworth
V8. In late September, during practice for the 1979 Canadian Grand Prix, Lauda informed Brabham
Brabham
that he wished to retire immediately, as he had no more desire to "drive around in circles". Lauda, who in the meantime had founded Lauda Air, a charter airline, returned to Austria
Austria
to run the company full-time. McLaren
McLaren
comeback, third world title and second retirement (1982–1985)[edit]

Five years after his first retirement, Lauda won his third title driving a McLaren
McLaren
MP4/2.

In 1982 Lauda returned to racing. After a successful test with McLaren, the only problem was in convincing then team sponsor Marlboro that he was still capable of winning. Lauda proved he was still quite capable when, in his third race back, he won the Long Beach Grand Prix. Before the opening race of the season at Kyalami
Kyalami
race track in South Africa, Lauda was the organiser of the so-called "drivers' strike"; Lauda had seen that the new Super Licence required the drivers to commit themselves to their present teams and realised that this could hinder a driver's negotiating position. The drivers, with the exception of Teo Fabi, barricaded themselves in a banqueting suite at Sunnyside Park Hotel until they had won the day.[10] 1983 proved to be a transitional year for the McLaren
McLaren
team as they were making a change from Ford- Cosworth
Cosworth
power to TAG-badged Porsche turbo power, and Lauda did not win a race that season, with his best finish being 2nd at Long Beach behind his teammate John Watson. Some political maneuvering by Lauda forced a furious chief designer John Barnard to design an interim car earlier than expected to get the TAG-Porsche engine some much needed race testing; Lauda nearly won the last race of the season in South Africa. Lauda won a third world championship in 1984 by half a point over teammate Alain Prost, due only to half points being awarded for the shortened 1984 Monaco
Monaco
Grand Prix. His Austrian Grand Prix victory that year is so far the only time an Austrian has won his home Grand Prix. Initially, Lauda did not want Prost to become his teammate, as he presented a much faster rival. However, during the two seasons together, they had a good relationship and Lauda later admitted that beating the talented Frenchman was a big motivator for him.[11] The whole season continued to be dominated by Lauda and Prost, who won 12 of 16 races. Lauda won five races, while Prost was able to win seven. However, Lauda, who set a record for the most pole positions in a season during the 1975 season, rarely matched his teammate in qualifying. Despite this, Lauda's championship win came in Portugal, when he had to start in eleventh place on the grid, while Prost qualified on the front row. Prost did everything he could, starting from second and winning his 7th race of the season, but Lauda's calculating drive (which included setting the fastest race lap), passing car after car, saw him finish second behind his teammate which gave him enough points to win his third title. His second place was a lucky one though as Nigel Mansell
Nigel Mansell
was in second for much of the race. However, as it was his last race with Lotus before joining Williams in 1985, Lotus boss Peter Warr
Peter Warr
refused to give Mansell the brakes he wanted for his car and the Englishman retired with brake failure on lap 52. As Lauda had passed the Toleman of F1 rookie Ayrton Senna
Ayrton Senna
for third place only a few laps earlier, Mansell's retirement elevated him to second behind Prost. 1985 was a poor season for Lauda, with eleven retirements from the fourteen races he started. He did not start the Belgian Grand Prix at Spa-Francorchamps after crashing and breaking his wrist during practice, and he later missed the European Grand Prix at Brands Hatch; John Watson replaced him for that race. He did manage 4th at the San Marino Grand Prix, 5th at the German Grand Prix, and a single race win at the Dutch Grand Prix where he held off a fast finishing Prost late in the race. This proved to be his last Grand Prix victory and also the last Formula One
Formula One
Grand Prix held in the Netherlands. After announcing his impending retirement at the 1985 Austrian Grand Prix, he retired for good at the end of that season. Niki Lauda's final Formula One
Formula One
Grand Prix drive was the inaugural Australian Grand Prix
Australian Grand Prix
in Adelaide, South Australia. After qualifying 16th, a steady drive saw him leading by lap 53. However, the McLaren's ceramic brakes suffered on the street circuit and he crashed out of the lead at the end of the long Brabham
Brabham
Straight on lap 57 when his brakes finally failed. He was one of only two drivers in the race who had actually driven in the non-championship 1984 Australian Grand Prix, the other being the man who would not only win in Adelaide
Adelaide
in 1985 but would take Lauda's place at McLaren
McLaren
in 1986, 1982 World Champion Keke Rosberg. Later management roles[edit] In 1993 Lauda returned to Formula One
Formula One
in a managerial position when Luca di Montezemolo
Luca di Montezemolo
offered him a consulting role at Ferrari. Halfway through the 2001 season Lauda assumed the role of team principal of the Jaguar Formula One
Formula One
team. The team, however, failed to improve and Lauda was made redundant, together with 70 other key figures, at the end of 2002. In September 2012 he was appointed non-executive chairman of the Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 Team.[12] He took part in the negotiations of signing Lewis Hamilton
Lewis Hamilton
to a three-year deal with AMG Mercedes.[13] Helmet[edit] Lauda's helmet was originally a plain red with his full name written on both sides and the Raiffeisen Bank logo in the chin area. He wore a modified AGV helmet in the weeks following his Nürburgring
Nürburgring
accident so as the lining would not aggravate his burned scalp too badly. In 1982, upon his return to McLaren, his helmet was white and featured the red "L" logo of Lauda Air
Lauda Air
instead of his name on both sides, complete with branding from his personal sponsor Parmalat
Parmalat
on the top. From 1983–1985, the red and white were reversed to evoke memories of his earlier helmet design. Roles beyond F1[edit]

Lauda in 2011

Lauda returned to running his airline, Lauda Air, on his second Formula One
Formula One
retirement in 1985. During his time as airline manager, he was appointed consultant at Ferrari as part of an effort by Montezemolo to rejuvenate the team.[14] After selling his Lauda Air shares to majority partner Austrian Airlines
Austrian Airlines
in 1999, he managed the Jaguar Formula One
Formula One
racing team from 2001 to 2002. In late 2003, he started a new airline, Niki. Similar to Lauda Air, Niki was merged with its major partner Air Berlin
Air Berlin
in 2011. In early 2016, Lauda took over chartered airline, Amira Air and renamed the company LaudaMotion[15]. As a result of Air Berlin
Air Berlin
insolvency in 2017, LaudaMotion took over Niki brand and asset after unsuccessful bid by Lufthansa and IAG. [16] Lauda holds a commercial pilot's licence and from time to time acted as a captain on the flights of his airline.[citation needed] He was inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame
International Motorsports Hall of Fame
in 1993 and since 1996 has provided commentary on Grands Prix for Austrian and German television on RTL. He was, however, criticized for calling Robert Kubica
Robert Kubica
a "polacke" (an ethnic slur for Polish people). It happened on air in May 2010 at the Monaco
Monaco
Grand Prix.[17][18] Niki Lauda
Niki Lauda
has written five books: The Art and Science of Grand Prix Driving (titled Formula 1: The Art and Technicalities of Grand Prix Driving in some markets) (1975); My Years With Ferrari (1978); The New Formula One: A Turbo Age (1984); Meine Story (titled To Hell and Back in some markets) (1986); Das dritte Leben (1996).[19] Lauda credits Austrian journalist Herbert Volker with editing the books. Lauda is sometimes known by the nickname "the rat", "SuperRat" or "King Rat" because of his prominent buck teeth. He has been associated with both Parmalat
Parmalat
and Viessmann, sponsoring the ever-present 'cappy' he has worn since 1976, used to hide the severe burns he sustained in his 1976 accident. Lauda said in a 2009 interview with the German newspaper Die Zeit
Die Zeit
that an advertiser was paying €1.2m for the space on his famous red cap.[20] In 2005 the Austrian post office issued a stamp honouring him.[21] In 2008, American sports television network ESPN
ESPN
ranked him 22nd on their top drivers of all-time.[22] Personal life[edit] Lauda has two sons with first wife, Marlene Knaus (married 1976, divorced 1991): Mathias, a racing driver himself, and Lukas, who also acts as Mathias's manager. Lauda has a son, Christoph, through an extra-marital relationship. In 2008, he married Birgit Wetzinger, who is 30 years his junior and was a flight attendant for his airline. She donated a kidney to Lauda when the kidney he received in a transplant from his brother, years earlier, failed. In September 2009 Birgit gave birth to twins, a boy and a girl: Max and Mia.[23] Film and television[edit]

Daniel Brühl, Niki Lauda
Niki Lauda
and Peter Morgan at the premiere of Rush in Vienna, Austria.

The 1976 F1 battle between Niki Lauda
Niki Lauda
and James Hunt
James Hunt
was dramatized in the 2013 film Rush, where Lauda was played by Daniel Brühl. Lauda himself made a cameo appearance at the end of the film. At this point Lauda said of Hunt's death, "When I heard he'd died age 45 of a heart attack I wasn't surprised, I was just sad." He also said that Hunt was one of the very few he liked, a smaller number of people he respected and the only person he had envied.[24] Lauda appears in an episode of Mayday titled "Niki Lauda: Tragedy in the Air" regarding the events of Lauda Air
Lauda Air
Flight 004. Racing record[edit] Complete European Formula Two
Formula Two
Championship results[edit] (key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Pos. Pts

1971 March Engineering March 712M Cosworth
Cosworth
FVA HOC Ret THR 10 NÜR 6 JAR 7 PAL DNQ ROU 4 MAN Ret TUL Ret ALB Ret VAL 7 VAL

10th 8

1972 March Engineering March 722 Ford BDA MAL 2 THR 3 HOC Ret PAU Ret PAL DNQ HOC Ret ROU Ret ÖST Ret IMO 3 MAN Ret PER SAL 6 ALB HOC 9 5th 25

Complete Formula One
Formula One
World Championship results[edit] (key) (Races in bold indicate pole position, races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 WDC Pts

1971 STP March Racing Team March 711 Ford Cosworth
Cosworth
DFV 3.0 V8 RSA ESP MON NED FRA GBR GER AUT Ret ITA CAN USA

NC 0

1972 STP March Racing Team March 721 Ford Cosworth
Cosworth
DFV 3.0 V8 ARG 11 RSA 7

NC 0

March 721X

ESP Ret MON 16 BEL 12

March 721G

FRA Ret GBR 9 GER Ret AUT 10 ITA 13 CAN DSQ USA NC

1973 Marlboro-BRM BRM
BRM
P160C BRM
BRM
P142 3.0 V12 ARG Ret BRA 8

18th 2

BRM
BRM
P160D

RSA Ret

BRM
BRM
P160E

ESP Ret BEL 5 MON Ret SWE 13 FRA 9 GBR 12 NED Ret GER Ret AUT DNS ITA Ret CAN Ret USA Ret

1974 Scuderia Ferrari
Scuderia Ferrari
SpA SEFAC Ferrari 312B3 Ferrari 001/11 3.0 F12 ARG 2 BRA Ret RSA 16 ESP 1 BEL 2 MON Ret SWE Ret NED 1 FRA 2 GBR 5 GER Ret AUT Ret ITA Ret CAN Ret USA Ret

4th 38

1975 Scuderia Ferrari
Scuderia Ferrari
SpA SEFAC Ferrari 312B3 Ferrari 001/11 3.0 F12 ARG 6 BRA 5

1st 64.5

Ferrari 312T Ferrari 015 3.0 F12

RSA 5 ESP Ret MON 1 BEL 1 SWE 1 NED 2 FRA 1 GBR 8 GER 3 AUT 6 ITA 3 USA 1

1976 Scuderia Ferrari
Scuderia Ferrari
SpA SEFAC Ferrari 312T Ferrari 015 3.0 F12 BRA 1 RSA 1 USW 2

2nd 68

Ferrari 312T2

ESP 2 BEL 1 MON 1 SWE 3 FRA Ret GBR 1 GER Ret AUT NED ITA 4 CAN 8 USA 3 JPN Ret

1977 Scuderia Ferrari
Scuderia Ferrari
SpA SEFAC Ferrari 312T2 Ferrari 015 3.0 F12 ARG Ret BRA 3 RSA 1 USW 2 ESP DNS MON 2 BEL 2 SWE Ret FRA 5 GBR 2 GER 1 AUT 2 NED 1 ITA 2 USA 4 CAN JPN 1st 72

1978 Parmalat
Parmalat
Racing Team Brabham
Brabham
BT45C Alfa Romeo 115-12 3.0 F12 ARG 2 BRA 3

4th 44

Brabham
Brabham
BT46

RSA Ret USW Ret MON 2 BEL Ret ESP Ret

FRA Ret GBR 2 GER Ret AUT Ret NED 3 ITA 1 USA Ret CAN Ret

Brabham
Brabham
BT46B

SWE 1

1979 Parmalat
Parmalat
Racing Team Brabham
Brabham
BT48 Alfa Romeo 1260 3.0 V12 ARG Ret BRA Ret RSA 6 USW Ret ESP Ret BEL Ret MON Ret FRA Ret GBR Ret GER Ret AUT Ret NED Ret ITA 4

14th 4

Brabham
Brabham
BT49 Ford Cosworth
Cosworth
DFV 3.0 V8

CAN WD USA

1982 Marlboro McLaren
McLaren
International McLaren
McLaren
MP4B Ford Cosworth
Cosworth
DFV 3.0 V8 RSA 4 BRA Ret USW 1 SMR BEL DSQ MON Ret DET Ret CAN Ret NED 4 GBR 1 FRA 8 GER DNS AUT 5 SUI 3 ITA Ret CPL Ret

5th 30

1983 Marlboro McLaren
McLaren
International McLaren
McLaren
MP4/1C Ford Cosworth
Cosworth
DFV 3.0 V8 BRA 3 USW 2

10th 12

Ford Cosworth
Cosworth
DFY 3.0 V8

FRA Ret SMR Ret MON DNQ BEL Ret DET Ret CAN Ret GBR 6 GER DSQ AUT 6

McLaren
McLaren
MP4/1E TAG TTE PO1 1.5 V6t

NED Ret ITA Ret EUR Ret RSA 11

1984 Marlboro McLaren
McLaren
International McLaren
McLaren
MP4/2 TAG TTE PO1 1.5 V6t BRA Ret RSA 1 BEL Ret SMR Ret FRA 1 MON Ret CAN 2 DET Ret DAL Ret GBR 1 GER 2 AUT 1 NED 2 ITA 1 EUR 4 POR 2

1st 72

1985 Marlboro McLaren
McLaren
International McLaren
McLaren
MP4/2B TAG TTE PO1 1.5 V6t BRA Ret POR Ret SMR 4 MON Ret CAN Ret DET Ret FRA Ret GBR Ret GER 5 AUT Ret NED 1 ITA Ret BEL DNS EUR RSA Ret AUS Ret

10th 14

Complete Formula One
Formula One
Non-Championship results[edit]

Lauda at the 1974 Race of Champions

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6

1972 STP March Racing Team March 711 Ford Cosworth
Cosworth
DFV 3.0 V8 ROC BRA INT OUL REP DNS VIC

1973 Marlboro-BRM BRM
BRM
P160D BRM
BRM
P142 3.0 V12 ROC Ret INT 5

1974 Scuderia Ferrari
Scuderia Ferrari
SpA SEFAC Ferrari 312B3 Ferrari 001/11 3.0 F12 PRE ROC 2 INT

1975 Scuderia Ferrari
Scuderia Ferrari
SpA SEFAC Ferrari 312T Ferrari 015 3.0 F12 ROC INT 1 SUI

1976 Scuderia Ferrari
Scuderia Ferrari
SpA SEFAC Ferrari 312T2 Ferrari 015 3.0 F12 ROC Ret INT

1978 Parmalat
Parmalat
Racing Team Brabham
Brabham
BT45C Alfa Romeo 115-12 3.0 F12 INT DNS

1979 Parmalat
Parmalat
Racing Team Brabham
Brabham
BT48 Alfa Romeo 1260 3.0 V12 ROC 5 GNM DIN 1

References[edit]

Austria
Austria
portal Biography portal Cars portal Aviation portal

^ "Mercedes give Toto Wolff
Toto Wolff
and Niki Lauda
Niki Lauda
new long-term contracts". skysports.com. Retrieved 22 February 2017.  ^ "Lauda, Hans". www.aeiou.at (in German). Retrieved 16 May 2010.  ^ "Sportreport.at – Hall of Fame – die Besten der Besten". www.die-namenlosen.at (in German). Retrieved 16 May 2010. [permanent dead link] ^ BBC Grandstand tv show, Murray Walker report on Niki Lauda announcing retirement, September 1979. Accessed on YouTube 22 November 2013 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QAUcHWCRNyk ^ Was sind überhaupt Freunde?. In: Süddeutsche Zeitung. 9. Juli 2010. ^ Gerald Donaldson. " Formula One
Formula One
Drivers Hall of Fame - Nikki Lauda". Formula One
Formula One
web site. Retrieved 2013-03-17.  ^ Tom Rubython: In the Name of Glory – 1976 Myrtle Press, 2011, ISBN 978-0-9565656-9-3, p. 163. ^ Lang, Mike (1983). Grand Prix! Vol 3. Haynes Publishing Group. p. 137. ISBN 0-85429-380-9.  ^ Tom Rubython: In the Name of Glory – 1976 Myrtle Press, 2011, ISBN 978-0-9565656-9-3, p. 187 ^ Malcolm Folley: Senna versus Prost Century, 2009, ISBN 978-1-8460-5540-9, p. 79ff ^ Malcolm Folley: Senna versus Prost Century, 2009, ISBN 978-1-8460-5540-9, p. 153 ^ "Lauda to join Mercedes in advisory role". GPUpdate.net. 2012-09-28. Retrieved 2012-10-07.  ^ "Hamilton's Mercedes switch was not motivated by money, insists Lauda". MailOnline. 2012-09-30. Retrieved 2012-10-07.  ^ Zapelloni, Umberto (April 2004). Formula Ferrari. Hodder & Stoughton. p. 17. ISBN 0-340-83471-4.  ^ " Niki Lauda
Niki Lauda
has renamed Amira Air LaudaMotion". austrianwings.info. February 10, 2016.  ^ "Airline Niki goes to founder Niki Lauda". dw.com. January 23, 2018.  ^ "Formel-1-Experte Niki Lauda
Niki Lauda
nennt Robert Kubica
Robert Kubica
"Polacke"". www.shortnews.de (in German). 16 May 2010. Retrieved 16 May 2010.  ^ "Lauda obraził Roberta Kubicę!". sport.wp.pl (in Polish). 16 May 2010. Retrieved 16 May 2010.  ^ Lauda, Niki (1987). To Hell And Back. London: Corgi Books. ISBN 0-552-99294-1.  ^ Kammertöns, Bruno (10 June 2009). "Es ist ein Glück, dass ich schon so viel Unglück erlebt habe". Die Zeit
Die Zeit
(in German).  ^ " Austria
Austria
Post honors Niki Lauda". www.stampnews.com. 20 September 2005. Retrieved 16 May 2010.  ^ "Kinser, Mansell, Garlits, Lauda, and Muldowney set high standards". ESPN. Retrieved 19 May 2008.  ^ "Ex-F1 world champion Niki Lauda
Niki Lauda
is father to twins at 60". MailOnline. 2009-09-19. Retrieved 2010-05-16.  ^ Niki Lauda
Niki Lauda
on James Hunt, Graham Bensinger, 2017-10-11.

Further reading[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Niki Lauda.

Lauda, Niki; Völker, Herbert (1987). To Hell And Back: An Autobiography. Corgi. ISBN 0552992941. 

Awards and achievements

Preceded by Franz Klammer Austrian Sportsman of the year 1977 Succeeded by Sepp Walcher

Preceded by Nadia Comăneci BBC Overseas Sports Personality of the Year 1977 Succeeded by Muhammad Ali

Preceded by Nelson Piquet Autosport International Racing Driver Award 1984 Succeeded by Alain Prost

Sporting positions

Preceded by James Hunt BRDC International Trophy
BRDC International Trophy
winner 1975 Succeeded by James Hunt

Preceded by Emerson Fittipaldi Formula One
Formula One
World Champion 1975 Succeeded by James Hunt

Preceded by James Hunt Formula One
Formula One
World Champion 1977 Succeeded by Mario Andretti

Preceded by None Procar BMW M1 Champion 1979 Succeeded by Nelson Piquet

Preceded by Nelson Piquet Formula One
Formula One
World Champion 1984 Succeeded by Alain Prost

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Formula One
Formula One
World Drivers' Champions

   

1950  G. Farina 1951  J.M. Fangio 1952  A. Ascari 1953  A. Ascari 1954  J.M. Fangio 1955  J.M. Fangio 1956  J.M. Fangio 1957  J.M. Fangio 1958  M. Hawthorn 1959  J. Brabham

1960  J. Brabham 1961  P. Hill 1962  G. Hill 1963  J. Clark 1964  J. Surtees 1965  J. Clark 1966  J. Brabham 1967  D. Hulme 1968  G. Hill 1969  J. Stewart

1970  J. Rindt 1971  J. Stewart 1972  E. Fittipaldi 1973  J. Stewart 1974  E. Fittipaldi 1975  N. Lauda 1976  J. Hunt 1977  N. Lauda 1978  M. Andretti 1979  J. Scheckter

1980  A. Jones 1981  N. Piquet 1982  K. Rosberg 1983  N. Piquet 1984  N. Lauda 1985  A. Prost 1986  A. Prost 1987  N. Piquet 1988  A. Senna 1989  A. Prost

1990  A. Senna 1991  A. Senna 1992  N. Mansell 1993  A. Prost 1994  M. Schumacher 1995  M. Schumacher 1996  D. Hill 1997  J. Villeneuve 1998  M. Häkkinen 1999  M. Häkkinen

2000  M. Schumacher 2001  M. Schumacher 2002  M. Schumacher 2003  M. Schumacher 2004  M. Schumacher 2005  F. Alonso 2006  F. Alonso 2007  K. Räikkönen 2008  L. Hamilton 2009  J. Button

2010  S. Vettel 2011  S. Vettel 2012  S. Vettel 2013  S. Vettel 2014  L. Hamilton 2015  L. Hamilton 2016  N. Rosberg 2017  L. Hamilton

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McLaren
McLaren
Racing Ltd.

Founder Bruce McLaren

McLaren
McLaren
Technology Group TAG Group
TAG Group
(25%) Mumtalakat (50%)

Executive management Éric Boullier (Racing Director) Zak Brown
Zak Brown
(Executive Director)

Current personnel Tim Goss Matt Morris Neil Oatley Peter Prodromou Andrea Stella

Former personnel John Barnard Alastair Caldwell Jost Capito Gordon Coppuck Mike Coughlan Ron Dennis Pat Fry Steve Hallam Norbert Haug Robin Herd Paddy Lowe Neil Martin Teddy Mayer Sam Michael Gordon Murray Jonathan Neale Adrian Newey Steve Nichols Jo Ramírez Nicholas Tombazis Martin Whitmarsh

2018 Race drivers 2. Stoffel Vandoorne 14. Fernando Alonso

2018 Test and reserve drivers Lando Norris

McLaren
McLaren
young driver programme Lando Norris Nyck de Vries

Ambassador Mika Häkkinen

World Champions Emerson Fittipaldi Lewis Hamilton James Hunt Mika Häkkinen Niki Lauda Alain Prost Ayrton Senna

Former drivers See category

Drivers' titles 1974 1976 1984 1985 1986 1988 1989 1990 1991 1998 1999 2008

Constructors' titles 1974 1984 1985 1988 1989 1990 1991 1998

Cars:

Formula One M2B M4B M5A M7A M7B M7C M7D M9A M14A M14D M19A M19C M23 M26 M28 M29 M29F M30 MP4 (MP4/1) MP4B (MP4/1B) MP4/1C MP4/1E MP4/2 MP4/2B MP4/2C MP4/3 MP4/4 MP4/5 MP4/5B MP4/6 MP4/6B MP4/7A MP4/8 MP4/9 MP4/10 MP4/10B MP4/10C MP4/11 MP4/11B MP4/12 MP4/13 MP4/14 MP4/15 MP4-16 MP4-17 MP4-17D MP4-18 MP4-19 MP4-19B MP4-20 MP4-21 MP4-22 MP4-23 MP4-24 MP4-25 MP4-26 MP4-27 MP4-28 MP4-29 MP4-30 MP4-31 MCL32 MCL33

Formula Two M4A M21

Sports cars Zerex Special M1A M1B M1C M6A M6B M6GT M8A M8B M8C M8D M8E M8F M8FP M12 M20 F1 GTR 12C GT3 650S GT3 P1 GTR

USAC/IndyCar M15 M16A M16B M16C M16C/D M16E M24

F5000/Libre M3 M10A M10B M18 M22 M25

Development cars M2A MP4-29H/1X1

Related Project Four Racing West Competition

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Scuderia Ferrari

Key personnel

Enzo Ferrari
Enzo Ferrari
(Founder) Sergio Marchionne
Sergio Marchionne
(president) Maurizio Arrivabene
Maurizio Arrivabene
(team principal) Loïc Bigois Mattia Binotto Jock Clear Simone Resta Massimo Rivola Lorenzo Sassi

Current drivers

5. Sebastian Vettel (2018 driver) 7. Kimi Räikkönen
Kimi Räikkönen
(2018 driver) Antonio Giovinazzi
Antonio Giovinazzi
(test driver) Daniil Kvyat
Daniil Kvyat
(test driver)

Ferrari Driver Academy

Giuliano Alesi Marcus Armstrong Enzo Fittipaldi Antonio Fuoco Callum Ilott Charles Leclerc Robert Shwartzman Guanyu Zhou

World champions

Alberto Ascari Juan Manuel Fangio Mike Hawthorn Phil Hill Niki Lauda Kimi Räikkönen Jody Scheckter Michael Schumacher John Surtees

Drivers' titles

1952 1953 1956 1958 1961 1964 1975 1977 1979 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2007

Constructors' titles

1961 1964 1975 1976 1977 1979 1982 1983 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2007 2008

Former personnel

James Allison Mario Almondo Luca Badoer Luca Baldisserri John Barnard Ross Brawn Gustav Brunner Rory Byrne Carlo Chiti Gioacchino Colombo Aldo Costa Stefano Domenicali Chris Dyer Alfredo Ferrari Cesare Fiorio Mauro Forghieri Pat Fry Hirohide Hamashima Vittorio Jano Aurelio Lampredi Claudio Lombardi Luca Marmorini Neil Martin Paolo Martinelli Marco Mattiacci Luca Cordero di Montezemolo Marco Piccinini Harvey Postlethwaite Enrique Scalabroni Michael Schumacher Gilles Simon Rob Smedley Nigel Stepney Jean Todt Nicholas Tombazis

Formula One
Formula One
cars

125 212 166 275 340 375 500 553 625 555 D50 801 246 246P 156 158 1512 246 F1-66 312 312B 312T 126C 156/85 F1/86 F1/87 640 641 642 643 F92A F93A 412 T1 412 T2 F310 F300 F399 F1-2000 F2001 F2002 F2003-GA F2004 F2005 248 F1 F2007 F2008 F60 F10 150° Italia F2012 F138 F14 T SF15-T SF16-H SF70H SF71H

IndyCar/CART cars

375 Indy 637

Sports racing cars

166 MM 166 MM Le Mans 195 S 340 America 212 Export 225 S & 250 S 250 MM 340 MM 375 MM 250 Monza 750 Monza 860 Monza 118 LM & 121 LM 410 S 500 TR 625 LM 500 TRC 290 MM 315 S 335 S 250 Testa Rossa Ferrari 250 TR 61 250 GT SWB Sperimentale 250 GTO 330 TRI/LM 330 LMB 250 P, 275 P & 330 P 275 P2, 330 P2 & 365 P2 250 LM 330 P2 330 P3 330 P3/4 & P4 212 E 312 P 512 S & 512 M 312 PB

Category:Ferrari

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Mercedes-Benz
Mercedes-Benz
in Formula One

Mercedes-AMG
Mercedes-AMG
Petronas Motorsport (2010–present)

Ownership Daimler AG
Daimler AG
(60%) Toto Wolff
Toto Wolff
(30%) Niki Lauda
Niki Lauda
(10%)

Executive management Toto Wolff
Toto Wolff
(Head of motorsport) Dieter Zetsche
Dieter Zetsche
(Head of Daimler AG/Mercedes-Benz)

Current personnel James Allison Aldo Costa Niki Lauda James Vowles Geoff Willis

Former personnel Bob Bell Loïc Bigois Ross Brawn Jock Clear Nick Fry Norbert Haug Paddy Lowe

2018 Race drivers 44. Lewis Hamilton 77. Valtteri Bottas

2018 Test and reserve drivers TBA

Youth Programme drivers Esteban Ocon George Russell Pascal Wehrlein

World Champions Lewis Hamilton Nico Rosberg

Ambassadors Nico Rosberg Susie Wolff

Notable drivers   Michael Schumacher

Drivers' titles 2014 2015 2016 2017

Constructors' titles 2014 2015 2016 2017

Formula One
Formula One
cars MGP W01 MGP W02 F1 W03 F1 W04 F1 W05 Hybrid F1 W06 Hybrid F1 W07 Hybrid F1 W08 EQ Power+ F1 W09 EQ Power+

Engine division Mercedes AMG High Performance Powertrains

Related Daimler AG Mercedes-Benz Mercedes-AMG

Daimler-Benz AG
Daimler-Benz AG
(1954–1955)

Personnel Fritz Nallinger Alfred Neubauer Max Sailer Rudolf Uhlenhaut

World Champions Juan Manuel Fangio

Notable drivers   Hans Herrmann   Karl Kling   Hermann Lang   Stirling Moss   André Simon   Piero Taruffi

Drivers' titles 1954 1955

Formula One
Formula One
cars W196

Related Daimler-Benz AG Mercedes-Benz Silver Arrows

Success with Mercedes-Benz
Mercedes-Benz
engines

Drivers' titles 1954 1955 1998 1999 2008 2009 2014 2015 2016 2017

Constructors' titles 1998 2009 2014 2015 2016 2017

Related Mercedes AMG High Performance Powertrains Mercedes-AMG

Italics indicate factory team.

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Winners of Autosport's International Racing Driver Award

1982: Keke Rosberg 1983: Nelson Piquet 1984: Niki Lauda 1985: Alain Prost 1986–87: Nigel Mansell 1988: Ayrton Senna 1989: Jean Alesi 1990–91: Ayrton Senna 1992–93: Nigel Mansell 1994: Damon Hill 1995: Michael Schumacher 1996: Damon Hill 1997: Jacques Villeneuve 1998–99: Mika Häkkinen 2000–02: Michael Schumacher 2003: Juan Pablo Montoya 2004: Jenson Button 2005: Kimi Räikkönen 2006: Fernando Alonso 2007–08: Lewis Hamilton 2009: Jenson Button 2010–13: Sebastian Vettel 2014–15: Lewis Hamilton 2016: Nico Rosberg 2017: Lewis Hamilton

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Laureus Lifetime Achievement Award

2000: Pelé 2001: Steve Redgrave 2002: Peter Blake 2003: Gary Player 2004: Arne Næss Jr. 2005: No award 2006: Johan Cruyff 2007: Franz Beckenbauer 2008: Sergey Bubka 2009: No award 2010: Nawal El Moutawakel 2011: Zinedine Zidane 2012: Bobby Charlton 2013: Sebastian Coe 2014: No award 2015: No award 2016: Niki Lauda 2017: No award 2018: Edwin Moses

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 84035271 LCCN: n50039784 ISNI: 0000 0000 7829 058X GND: 118570102 SUDOC: 055274250 BNF: cb12618695s (data) N

.