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The New York World-Telegram, later known as the New York World-Telegram and Sun, was a New York City newspaper from 1867 to 1966.

Contents

1 History 2 Gallery 3 References 4 Related 5 External links

History[edit] Founded by James Gordon Bennett as The Evening Telegram in 1867, the newspaper began as the evening edition of The New York Herald, which itself published its first issue in 1835. Following Bennett’s death, newspaper and magazine owner Frank A. Munsey purchased The Telegram in June 1920. Munsey’s associate Thomas W. Dewart, the late publisher and president of the New York Sun, owned the paper for two years after Munsey died in 1925 before selling it to Scripps for an undisclosed sum in 1927. At the time of the sale, the paper was known as The New York Telegram, and it had a circulation of 200,000.[1] The newspaper became the World-Telegram in 1931, following the sale of the New York World
New York World
by the heirs of Joseph Pulitzer
Joseph Pulitzer
to Scripps Howard.[1] More than 2,000 employees of the morning, evening and Sunday editions of the World lost their jobs in the merger, although some star writers, like Heywood Broun and Westbrook Pegler, were kept on the new paper. The World-Telegram enjoyed a reputation as a liberal paper for some years after the merger, based on memories of the Pulitzer-owned World. However, under Scripps Howard
Scripps Howard
the paper moved steadily to the right, eventually becoming a conservative bastion. In 1950, the paper became the New York World-Telegram
New York World-Telegram
and Sun after Dewart and his family sold Scripps the remnants of another afternoon paper, the New York Sun.[2] (The writer A.J. Liebling
A.J. Liebling
once described the "and Sun" portion of the combined publication's nameplate as resembling the tail feathers of a canary on the chin of a cat.) Early in 1966, a proposal to create New York's first joint operating agreement led to the merger of the World-Telegram and Sun with Hearst's Journal American. The intention was to produce a joint afternoon edition, with a separate morning paper to be produced by the Herald Tribune. The last edition of the World-Telegram and Sun was published on April 23, 1966.[3] But when strikes prevented the JOA from taking effect, the papers instead united in August 1966 to become the short-lived New York World
New York World
Journal Tribune, which lasted only until May 5, 1967. Its closure left New York City with three daily newspapers: The New York Times, the New York Post
New York Post
and the New York Daily News. Gallery[edit]

World-Telegram photo of Albert Einstein
Albert Einstein
receiving his U.S. citizenship papers

World-Telegram photo of Louis Armstrong

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Bayard Rustin
Bayard Rustin
(l) and Cleveland Robinson

References[edit]

^ a b (February 12, 1927).The Telegram Sold to Scripps-Howard, The New York Times ^ (January 4, 1950). World-Telegram and Sun Merged in Transaction, Prescott Evening Courier (Associated Press) ^ (April 24, 1966). New York Newspaper Strike Set, Sarasota Herald=Tribune (Associated Press)

Related[edit]

Media of New York City

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to New York World-Telegram
New York World-Telegram
& Sun.

Library of Congress New York World
New York World
Telegram and Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection

v t e

E. W. Scripps
E. W. Scripps
Company

Radio stations

AM

KFAQ KFFN KFTI KSGF KXSP WTMJ

FM

KBEZ KEZO-FM KFDI-FM KFXJ KHTT KICT-FM KJOT KKCD KMXZ-FM KQCH KQTH KQXR KRVB KRVI KSGF-FM KSPW KSRZ KTGV KTHI KTTS-FM KVOO-FM KXBL KYQQ WCYQ WKHT WKTI WNOX WWST

Television

ABC stations

KERO KGTV KGUN KIVI / KSAW KMGH KNXV KTNV WCPO WEWS WFTS WKBW WMAR WRTV WXYZ

Azteca stations

KZCO-LD
KZCO-LD
/ KZCS-LP / KZFC-LP KZKC-LP

Fox stations

KNIN 1 WFLX
WFLX
1 WFTX WSYMMNT

NBC
NBC
stations

KJRH KSHB WGBA WPTV WTMJ

Other stations

CBS

KMTV WTVF

The CW

KWBA-TV

Independent

KMCI

MeTV

KZSD-LP

MyNetworkTV

WACY WMYD

Programming and subchannel networks

RightThisMinute Katz Broadcasting

Bounce TV Escape Grit Laff

Digital

Cracked.com Midroll Media

Earwolf Stitcher Radio

Newsy

Acquisitions

Journal Communications McGraw-Hill

People

Edward W. Estlow Jack R. Howard Ted Knap Jim G. Lucas Ernie Pyle Al Schottelkotte Charles Scripps E. W. Scripps

Related

National Journalism Awards National Spelling Bee Scripps Howard
Scripps Howard
Foundation Scripps Networks Interactive United Media Zacchini v. Scripps-Howard Broadcasting Co.

1 Scripps operates these stations under a shared services agreement with Raycom Media.

v t e

Pulitzer Prize for Public Service
Pulitzer Prize for Public Service
(1926–1950)

Columbus Enquirer Sun (1926) Canton Daily News (1927) Indianapolis Times (1928) New York Evening World (1929) Atlanta Constitution (1931) Indianapolis News
Indianapolis News
(1932) New York World-Telegram
New York World-Telegram
(1933) Medford Mail Tribune (1934) The Sacramento Bee
The Sacramento Bee
(1935) Cedar Rapids Gazette (1936) St. Louis Post-Dispatch
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
(1937) Bismarck Tribune (1938) Miami Daily News (1939) Waterbury Republican & American (1940) St. Louis Post-Dispatch
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
(1941) Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Times
(1942) Omaha World-Herald
Omaha World-Herald
(1943) New York Times (1944) Detroit Free Press
Detroit Free Press
(1945) Scranton Times (1946) Baltimore Sun (1947) St. Louis Post-Dispatch
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
(1948) Nebraska State Journal (1949) Chicago Daily News
Chicago Daily News
and St. Louis Post-Dispatch
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
(1950)

Complete list (1918–1925) (1926–1950) (1951–1975) (1976–2

.