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New Year's Day, also called simply New Year's or New Year, is observed on January
January
1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar. In pre-Christian Rome under the Julian calendar, the day was dedicated to Janus, god of gateways and beginnings, for whom January
January
is also named. As a date in the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
of Christendom, New Year's Day liturgically marked the Feast of the Naming and Circumcision
Circumcision
of Jesus, which is still observed as such in the Anglican Church
Anglican Church
and Lutheran Church.[2][3] In present day, with most countries now using the Gregorian calendar as their de facto calendar, New Year's Day
New Year's Day
is probably the most celebrated public holiday, often observed with fireworks at the stroke of midnight as the new year starts in each time zone. Other global New Year's Day traditions include making New Year's resolutions and calling one's friends and family.[1]

Fireworks
Fireworks
in London
London
on New Year's Day
New Year's Day
at the stroke of midnight.

Contents

1 History 2 New Year's Days in other calendars

2.1 African 2.2 East Asian 2.3 Southeast Asian 2.4 South Asian 2.5 European 2.6 Middle Eastern

3 Traditional and modern celebrations and customs

3.1 New Year's Eve 3.2 Regional celebrations 3.3 National celebrations 3.4 New Year's Day 3.5 Music 3.6 New Year's babies

4 Other celebrations on January
January
1 5 See also 6 References

6.1 Citations 6.2 Bibliography

7 External links

History[edit]

In Christendom, under which the Gregorian Calendar
Calendar
developed, New Year's Day traditionally marks the Feast of the Circumcision
Feast of the Circumcision
of Christ, which is still observed as such by the Anglican Church
Anglican Church
and the Lutheran Church.

Mesopotamia (Iraq) instituted the concept of celebrating the new year in 2000 BC and celebrated new year around the time of the vernal equinox, in mid-March.[4][5] The early Roman calendar designated March 1 as the new year. The calendar had just ten months, beginning with March. That the new year once began with the month of March is still reflected in some of the names of the months. September
September
through December, our ninth through twelfth months, were originally positioned as the seventh through tenth months. (Septem is Latin
Latin
for "seven"; octo, "eight"; novem, "nine"; and decem, "ten".) Roman legend
Roman legend
usually credited their second king Numa with the establishment of the months of January
January
and February. These were first placed at the end of the year, but at some point came to be considered the first two months instead. The January
January
Kalends (Latin: Kalendae Ianuariae) came to be celebrated as the new year at some point after it became the day for the inaugurating new consuls in 153 BC. Romans had long dated their years by these consulships, rather than sequentially, and making the kalends of January
January
start the new year aligned this dating. Still, private and religious celebrations around the March new year continued for some time and there is no consensus on the question of the timing for January
January
1's new status.[6] Once it became the new year, however, it became a time for family gatherings and celebrations. A series of disasters, notably including the failed rebellion of M. Aemilius Lepidus in 78 BC, established a superstition against allowing Rome's market days to fall on the kalends of January
January
and the pontiffs employed intercalation to avoid its occurrence.[7][8] In AD 567, the Council of Tours formally abolished January 1 as the beginning of the year. At various times and in various places throughout medieval Christian Europe, the new year was celebrated on December
December
25 in honor of the birth of Jesus; March 1 in the old Roman style; March 25 in honor of Lady Day
Lady Day
and the Feast of the Annunciation; and on the movable feast of Easter. These days were also astronomically and astrologically significant since, at the time of the Julian reform, March 25 had been understood as the spring equinox and December
December
25 as the winter solstice. (The Julian calendar's small disagreement with the solar year, however, shifted these days earlier before the Council of Nicaea which formed the basis of the calculations used during the Gregorian reform of the calendar.) Medieval calendars nonetheless often continued to display the months running from January
January
to December, despite their readers reckoning the transition from one year to the next on a different day. Among the 7th century pagans of Flanders
Flanders
and the Netherlands, it was the custom to exchange gifts on the first day of the new year. This custom was deplored by Saint Eligius
Saint Eligius
(died 659 or 660), who warned the Flemish and Dutch: "(Do not) make vetulas, [little figures of the Old Woman], little deer or iotticos or set tables [for the house-elf, compare Puck] at night or exchange New Year gifts or supply superfluous drinks [another Yule
Yule
custom]."[9] However, on the date that European Christians
Christians
celebrated the New Year, they exchanged Christmas
Christmas
presents because New Year's Day
New Year's Day
fell within the twelve days of the Christmas
Christmas
season in the Western Christian liturgical calendar;[10] the custom of exchanging Christmas
Christmas
gifts in a Christian context is traced back to the Biblical Magi
Biblical Magi
who gave gifts to the Child Jesus.[11][12] Because of the leap year error in the Julian calendar, the date of Easter
Easter
had drifted backward since the First Council of Nicaea
First Council of Nicaea
decided the computation of the date of Easter
Easter
in 325. By the sixteenth century, the drift from the observed equinox had become unacceptable. In 1582, Pope Gregory XIII
Pope Gregory XIII
declared the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
widely used today, correcting the error by a deletion of 10 days. The Gregorian calendar reform also (in effect) restored January 1 as New Year's Day. Although most Catholic countries adopted the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
almost immediately, it was only gradually adopted among Protestant countries. The British, for example, did not adopt the reformed calendar until 1752. Until then, the British Empire
British Empire
 – and its American colonies  – still celebrated the new year on 25 March. Most nations of Western Europe
Western Europe
officially adopted 1 January
January
as New Year's Day somewhat before they adopted the Gregorian Calendar. In Tudor England, New Year's Day, along with Christmas
Christmas
Day and Twelfth Night, was celebrated as one of three main festivities among the twelve days of Christmastide.[13] There, until the adoption of the Gregorian Calendar
Calendar
in 1752, the first day of the new year was the Western Christian Feast of the Annunciation, on 25 March, also called "Lady Day". Dates predicated on the year beginning on 25 March became known as Annunciation Style dates, while dates of the Gregorian Calendar
Calendar
commencing on 1 January
January
were distinguished as Circumcision Style dates,[14] because this was the date of the Feast of the Circumcision, the observed memorial of the eighth day of Jesus Christ's life after his birth, counted from the latter's observation on Christmas, 25 December. Pope Gregory acknowledged 1 January
January
as the beginning of the new year according to his reform of the Catholic Liturgical Calendar.[15] New Year's Days in other calendars[edit] In cultures which traditionally or currently use calendars other than the Gregorian, New Year's Day
New Year's Day
is often also an important celebration. Some countries concurrently use the Gregorian and another calendar. New Year's Day
New Year's Day
in the alternative calendar attracts alternative celebrations of that new year: African[edit]

Sep

11

37 Tue

Nayrouz
Nayrouz
and Enkutatash are the New Year's Days of the Coptic Egyptians and the Ethiopians, respectively. Between AD 1900 and 2100, both occur on September
September
11 in most years and on September
September
12 in the years before Gregorian leap years. They preserve the legacy of the ancient Egyptian new year Wepet Renpet, which originally marked the onset of the Nile
Nile
flood but which wandered through the seasons until the introduction of leap years to the traditional calendar by Augustus
Augustus
in the 20s BC.[16] In Ethiopia, the new year is held to mark the end of the summer rainy season.

Jun

10

23 Sun

The Odunde Festival
Odunde Festival
is also called the African New Year is celebrated in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
in the United States
United States
on the second Sunday of June. While the name was based on the Yoruba African culture, its celebration marks the largest African celebration in the world, which more or less was started by a local tradition.[17]

East Asian[edit]

Jan

28

04 Sat

Chinese New Year
Chinese New Year
is celebrated in many countries around the world. It is the first day of the lunar calendar and is corrected for the solar every three years. The holiday normally falls between January
January
20 and February 20. The holiday is celebrated with food, families, lucky money (usually in a red envelope), and many other red things for good luck. Lion and dragon dances, drums, fireworks, firecrackers, and other types of entertainment fill the streets on this day. Vietnamese New Year
Vietnamese New Year
(Tết Nguyên Đán or Tết), more commonly known by its shortened name Tết or "Vietnamese Lunar New Year", is the most important and popular holiday and festival in Vietnam, the holiday normally falls between 20 January
January
and 20 February. It is the Vietnamese New Year
Vietnamese New Year
marking the arrival of spring based on the Chinese calendar, a lunisolar calendar. The name Tết Nguyên Đán is Sino-Vietnamese for Feast of the First Morning, derived from the Hán nôm characters 節 元 旦.

Jan

1

01 Mon

Japanese New Year
Japanese New Year
is celebrated on January 1 because the Gregorian calendar is now used instead of the Chinese calendar. Korean New Year, called Seollal (설날), is the first day of the lunar calendar. Koreans also celebrate solar New Year's Day
New Year's Day
on January 1 each year, following the Gregorian Calendar. New Year's Day
New Year's Day
is a national holiday, so people get the day off while they have a minimum of three days off on Lunar New Year. Koreans celebrate New Year's Day by preparing food for their ancestors' spirits, visiting ancestors' graves, and playing Korean games such as Yunnori
Yunnori
(윷놀이) with families. Young children give respect to their parents, grandparents, relatives, and other elders by bowing down in a traditional way and are given good wishes and some money by the elders. Families enjoy the New Year also by counting down until 12:00 am on New Year's Eve.

Southeast Asian[edit]

Apr

13

15 Fri

Cambodian New Year
Cambodian New Year
(Chaul Chnam Thmey) is celebrated on April 13 or April 14. There are three days for the Khmer New Year: the first day is called "Moha Songkran", the second is called "Virak Wanabat" and the final day is called "Virak Loeurng Sak". During these periods, Cambodians often go to pagoda or play traditional games. Phnom Penh is usually quiet during Khmer New Year as most of the Cambodians prefer spending it at their respective hometowns. Thai New Year is celebrated on April 13 or April 14 and is called Songkran
Songkran
in the local language. People usually come out to splash water on one another. The throwing of water originated as a blessing. By capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing, this "blessed" water is gently poured on the shoulder of elders and family for good fortune.

South Asian[edit]

Apr

14

15 Sat

Christians
Christians
in India
India
celebrate January 1 as the New Year according to the Gregorian calendar. Catholic Christians
Christians
also celebrate January
January
1 as The Solemnity of Mary, the Mother of God, the liturgical feast of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Diwali
Diwali
related New Year's celebrations include Marwari New Year and Gujrati New Year. Indian New Year's days has several variations depending on the region and is based on the Hindu
Hindu
calendar. Hindu
Hindu
In Hinduism, different regional cultures celebrate new year at different times of the year. In Assam, Bengal, Kerala, Nepal, Odisha, Punjab,Telangana, Andrapradesh and Tamil Nadu households celebrate the new year when the Sun enters Aries on the Hindu
Hindu
calendar. This is normally on April 14 or April 15, depending on the leap year. Elsewhere in northern/central India, the Vikram Samvat
Vikram Samvat
calendar is followed. According to that the new year day is the first day of the Chaitra Month, also known as Chaitra Shukla Pratipada or Gudi Padwa. This basically is the first month of the Hindu
Hindu
calendar, the first shukla paksha (fortnight) and the first day. This normally comes around March 23–24, mostly around the Spring Equinox
Equinox
in Gregorian Calendar. The new year is celebrated by paying respect to elders in the family and by seeking their blessings. They also exchange tokens of good wishes for a healthy and prosperous year ahead. Malayalam
Malayalam
New Year (Puthuvarsham) is celebrated either on the first day of the month of Medam in mid-April which is known as Vishu or the first day of the month of Chingam, in the Malayalam
Malayalam
Calendar
Calendar
in mid-August according to another reckoning. Unlike most other calendar systems in India, the New Year's Day
New Year's Day
on the Malayalam
Malayalam
Calendar
Calendar
is not based on any astronomical event. It is just the first day of the first of the twelve months on the Malayalam
Malayalam
Calendar. The Malayalam
Malayalam
Calendar (called Kollavarsham) originated in 825 CE, based on general agreement among scholars, with the re-opening of the city of Kollam
Kollam
(on Malabar Coast), which had been destroyed by a natural disaster. Nepal
Nepal
Sambat is the Nepalese New Year celebration, which also coincides with the Diwali
Diwali
festival. The Sikh New Year is celebrated as per the Nanakshahi calendar. The epoch of this calendar is the birth of the first Sikh Guru, Guru Nanak in 1469. New Year's Day
New Year's Day
falls annually on what is March 14 in the Gregorian Western calendar.[18] Sinhalese New Year
Sinhalese New Year
is celebrated in Sri Lankan culture predominantly by the Sri Lankan Sinhalese, while the Tamil New Year on the same day is celebrated by Sri Lankan Tamils. The Sinhalese New Year
Sinhalese New Year
(aluth avurudda), marks the end of harvest season, by the month of Bak (April) between April 13 and April 14. There is an astrologically generated time gap between the passing year and the New Year, which is based on the passing of the sun from the Meena Rashiya (House of Pisces) to the Mesha Rashiya (House of Aries) in the celestial sphere. The astrological time difference between the New Year and the passing year (nonagathe) is celebrated with several Buddhist rituals and customs that are to be concentrated on, which are exclusive of all types of 'work'. After Buddhist rituals and traditions are attended to, Sinhala and Tamil New Year-based social gatherings and festive parties with the aid of firecrackers, and fireworks would be organized. The exchange of gifts, cleanliness, the lighting of the oil lamp, making kiribath (Milk rice), and even the Asian Koel are significant aspects of the Sinhalese New Year. Tamil New Year (Puthandu) is celebrated on April 13 or April 14. Traditionally, it is celebrated as Chiththirai Thirunaal in parts of Tamil Nadu to mark the event of the Sun entering Aries. Panchangam (almanac), is read in temples to mark the start of the Year. Telugu New Year (Ugadi), Kannada
Kannada
New Year (Yugadi) is celebrated in March (generally), April (occasionally). Traditionally, it is celebrated as Chaitram Chaitra Shuddha Padyami in parts of Andhra Pradesh, Telangana and Karnataka to mark the event of New Year's Day for the people of the Deccan region of India. It falls on a different day every year because the Hindu calendar
Hindu calendar
is a lunisolar calendar. The Saka calendar begins with the month of Chaitra (March–April) and Ugadi/ Yugadi
Yugadi
marks the first day of the new year. Chaitra is the first month in Panchanga which is the Indian calendar. Panchangam
Panchangam
(almanac), is read in temples to mark the start of the Year.

European[edit]

Jan

13

02 Sat

The Old New Year in Serbia
Serbia
is commonly called the Serbian New Year (Српска Нова година / Srpska Nova godina),[19] celebrated on January
January
14 as the start of the New Year by the Julian calendar. The Serbian Orthodox Church, with traditional adherence in Serbia
Serbia
(including Kosovo), Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro
Montenegro
and Croatia, celebrates its feasts and holidays according to the Julian calendar.[19] A part of the population celebrates Serbian New Year in a similar way as the New Year on January
January
1. This time, usually one concert is organized in front of either City Hall or the National Parliament (in Belgrade), while fireworks are prepared by the Serbian Orthodox Church and fired from the Church of Saint Sava, where people also gather. Other cities also organize such celebrations. Restaurants, clubs, cafes and hotels are usually fully booked and organize New Year's celebrations with food and live music.[19] In the Gwaun Valley, Pembrokeshire, Wales
Wales
the new year is celebrated on January
January
13, based on the Julian calendar. See New Year celebrations in Gwaun Valley.

Middle Eastern[edit]

Muharram

1

Fri ( for native Arabs)

Hijri New Year in the Islamic
Islamic
culture is also known as Islamic
Islamic
new year (Arabic: رأس السنة الهجرية Ras as-Sanah al-Hijriyah) is the day that marks the beginning of a new Islamic calendar year. New Year moves from year to year because the Islamic calendar is a lunar calendar. The first day of the year is observed on the first day of Muharram, the first month in the Islamic
Islamic
calendar.

Mar

21±1

Wed equinox

Nowruz
Nowruz
also known as Persian New Year marks the first day of spring and the beginning of the year in Iranian calendar. It is celebrated on the day of the astronomical vernal equinox, which usually occurs on March 21 or the previous/following day depending on where it is observed. Nowruz
Nowruz
has been celebrated for over 3,000 years by the related cultural continent. The holiday is also celebrated and observed by many parts of Central Asia, South Asia, Northwestern China, Crimea
Crimea
and some groups in the Balkans. As well as being a Zoroastrian
Zoroastrian
holiday and having significance amongst the Zoroastrian ancestors of modern Iranians, the same time is celebrated in the Indian sub-continent as the new year. The moment the Sun crosses the celestial equator and equalizes night and day is calculated exactly every year and Iranian families gather together to observe the rituals.

Tishrei

½

Mon

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year, is celebrated by Jews in Israel and throughout the world. The date is not set according to the Gregorian calendar, but it always falls during September
September
or October. The holiday is celebrated by religious services and special meals. The night of December
December
31/ January
January
1, the New Year according to the Gregorian calendar, is also celebrated widely in Israel
Israel
and is referred to as Sylvester or the civil new year.[20]

Traditional and modern celebrations and customs[edit] New Year's Eve[edit] Main article: New Year's Eve

Sydney
Sydney
contributes to some of the major New Year celebrations each year.

January 1 represents the fresh start of a new year after a period of remembrance of the passing year, including on radio, television, and in newspapers, which starts in early December
December
in countries around the world. Publications have year-end articles that review the changes during the previous year. In some cases publications may set their entire year work alight in hope that the smoke emitted from the flame brings new life to the company. There are also articles on planned or expected changes in the coming year. This day is traditionally a religious feast, but since the 1900s has also become an occasion to celebrate the night of December
December
31, called New Year's Eve. There are fireworks at midnight at the moment the new year arrives (a major one is in Sydney, Australia). Watchnight services are also still observed by many.[21] Regional celebrations[edit]

In European countries, the New Year is greeted with private fireworks. On New Year's Day, people in certain countries gather on beaches and run into the water to celebrate the new year. In Canada, the Republic of Ireland, the United Kingdom, the United States, and the Netherlands this is very popular. These events are sometimes known as polar bear plunges, and are sometimes organized by groups to raise money for charity. Polar Bear Clubs
Polar Bear Clubs
in many Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
cities near bodies of water, have a tradition of holding organized plunges on New Year's Day.

National celebrations[edit]

Happy Christmas
Christmas
and New Year card

Throughout Great Britain
Great Britain
there are many celebrations across the island, particularly in Scotland.

In London, thousands gather along the Embankment on the River Thames to watch the fireworks around the London
London
Eye. The New Year officially starts when Big Ben
Big Ben
strikes twelve. In Scotland, there are many unique customs associated with the New Year. These form the Scottish celebration Hogmanay—the Scots name for New Year's Eve. The street party in Princes Street
Princes Street
in Edinburgh
Edinburgh
is one famous example. In Wales, Calennig is celebrated, with celebrations attracting thousands of people to the capital, Cardiff.

In Greece
Greece
and Cyprus, families and relatives switch off the lights at midnight, then celebrate by cutting the vassilopita (Basil's pie) which usually contains one coin or equivalent. Whoever wins expects luck for the whole year.[22] After the pie, a traditional game of cards called triantaena (31) follows. In Nassau, Bahamas, the Junkanoo
Junkanoo
parade takes place. In the Philippines, New Year's is considered part of the Christmas holiday. Noise is made on New Year's Eve
New Year's Eve
with firecrackers and horns (amongst other methods) to dispel evil spirits and to prevent them from bringing bad luck to the coming new year. Tables are laden with food for the Media Noche (midnight meal), and a basket of twelve, different round fruits is displayed to symbolise prosperity in each of the coming twelve months.[23] Public New Year's parties are organised by city governments, and are very well-attended. In Russia
Russia
and the other 14 former republics of the Soviet Union, the celebration of Novi God
Novi God
is greeted by fireworks and drinking champagne. Because religion was suppressed in the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
the New Year holiday took on many attributes associated with Christmas
Christmas
in other countries, including Christmas
Christmas
trees, Ded Moroz
Ded Moroz
(a variant of Santa Claus) and family celebrations with lavish food and gifts. In Moscow, the president of Russia
Russia
counts down the final seconds of the "old year". The Kremlin's landmark Spassky Clock Tower chimes in the new year and then the anthem starts. It is customary to make a wish while the Clock chimes. The Old New Year is celebrated on January
January
13 (equivalent to January 1 in the "old style" Julian calendar). Although not an official holiday, it marks the end of the holiday season and is usually when people take down trees and other decorations. In Davos, Switzerland, the final match of the Spengler Cup
Spengler Cup
ice hockey Tournament is usually held on this day by tradition. In the United States, it is traditional to spend this occasion together with loved ones. A toast is made to the new year, with kisses, fireworks and parties among the customs. It is popular to make a New Year's resolution, although that is optional. In the country's most famous New Year celebration in New York City, the 11,875-pound (5,386-kg), 12-foot-diameter (3.7-m) Times Square Ball
Times Square Ball
located high above One Times Square
One Times Square
is lowered starting at 11:59 pm, with a countdown from sixty seconds until one second, when it reaches the bottom of its tower. The arrival of the new year is announced at the stroke of midnight with fireworks, music and a live celebration that is broadcast worldwide. (Hundreds of local imitations of the ball drop also occur throughout the United States.) In France,[24] some regard the weather as the prediction of that year: wind blowing east, fruit will yield; wind blowing west, fish and livestock will be bumper; wind blowing south, there will be good weather all year round and wind blowing north, there will be crop failure. People would like to toast for the new year. In Spain, it is customary to have 12 grapes at hand when the clock strikes 12 at midnight. One grape is eaten on each stroke. If all the grapes are eaten within the period of the strikes, it means good luck in the new year.[25]

New Year's Day[edit]

The Annual Stoats Loony Dook held in Edinburgh, Scotland
Scotland
on the 1st January.

The celebrations and activities held worldwide on January 1 as part of New Year's Day
New Year's Day
commonly include the following:

Parades American football: In the United States, January 1 is the traditional date for many post-season college football bowl games, which are usually accompanied by parades and other activities to celebrate the events Beginning in the 2010s, it is also the day that First Day Hikes
First Day Hikes
take place in the fifty state park systems of the United States.[26] Football: In England, a full-fixture programme [clarification needed] is usually played throughout the Premier League Ice hockey, most famously the Winter Classic
Winter Classic
in the United States, a National Hockey League game that is played outdoors Concerts Entertainment
Entertainment
- usually enjoyed from the comfort of home Family time Local walks Traditional meals Church services An annual dip in ice-cold water by hearty individuals, most famously by members of the Polar Bear Club in the Southern United States
United States
traditional New Year's Day
New Year's Day
menu includes ham, blackeyed peas or Hoppin' John, cabbage, sweet potatoes, and cornbread.[27] There is horse racing at Cheltenham.

Music[edit] Music associated with New Year's Day
New Year's Day
comes in both classical and popular genres, and there is also Christmas
Christmas
song focus on the arrival of a new year during the Christmas
Christmas
and holiday season.

Johann Sebastian Bach, in the Orgelbüchlein, composed three chorale preludes for the new year: Helft mir Gotts Güte preisen [" Help me to praise God's goodness"] (BWV 613); Das alte Jahr vergangen ist ["The old year has passed"] (BWV 614); and In dir ist freude ["In you is joy"] (BWV 615).[28] The year is gone, beyond recall is a traditional Christian hymn to give thanks for the new year, dating back to 1713.[29] Auld Lang Syne
Auld Lang Syne
by Robert Burns.[30]

The annual Vienna New Year's Concert, primarily featuring music composed by the Strauss family, is broadcast around the world. New Year's babies[edit] A common image used, often as an editorial cartoon, is that of an incarnation of Father Time
Father Time
(or the "Old Year") wearing a sash across his chest with the previous year printed on it passing on his duties to the Baby New Year
Baby New Year
(or the "New Year"), an infant wearing a sash with the new year printed on it.[31] Babies born on New Year's Day
New Year's Day
are commonly called New Year babies. Hospitals, such as the Dyersburg Regional Medical Center[32] in the US, give out prizes to the first baby born in that hospital in the new year. These prizes are often donated by local businesses. Prizes may include various baby-related items such as baby formula, baby blankets, diapers, and gift certificates to stores which specialize in baby-related merchandise. Other celebrations on January
January
1[edit] The Anglican Church
Anglican Church
and the Lutheran Church
Lutheran Church
celebrate the Feast of the Circumcision
Circumcision
of Christ on January
January
1, based on the belief that if Jesus was born on December
December
25, then according to Hebrew tradition, his circumcision would have taken place on the eighth day of his life ( January
January
1). The Roman Catholic Church celebrates on this day the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God, which is also a Holy Day of Obligation. In the United States, New Year's Day
New Year's Day
is a postal holiday.[33] Johann Sebastian Bach
Johann Sebastian Bach
composed several church cantatas for the double occasion:

Singet dem Herrn ein neues Lied, BWV 190, 1 January
January
1724 Jesu, nun sei gepreiset, BWV 41, 1 January
January
1725 Herr Gott, dich loben wir, BWV 16, 1 January
January
1726 Gott, wie dein Name, so ist auch dein Ruhm, BWV 171, 1 January ?1729 Fallt mit Danken, fallt mit Loben 1 January
January
1735 ( Christmas
Christmas
Oratorio Part IV)

See also[edit]

Famous New Year's Babies First Night List of winter festivals Saint Sylvester's Day

References[edit] Citations[edit]

^ a b Mehra, Komal (2006). Festivals Of The World. Sterling Publishers. p. 69. ISBN 9781845575748. In many European countries like Italy, Portugal and Netherlands, families start the new year by attending church services and then calling on friends and relatives. Italian children receive gifts or money on New Year's Day. People in the United States
United States
go to church, give parties and enjoy other forms of entertainment.  ^ McKim, Donald K. (1996). Dictionary of Theological Terms. Westminster John Knox Press. p. 51. ISBN 0664255116.  ^ Hobart, John Henry (1840). A Companion for the festivals and fasts of the Protestant Episcopal Church. Stanford & Co. p. 284.  ^ Brunner, Borgna. "A History of the New Year". Infoplease.com. Retrieved 31 January
January
2014.  ^ Andrews, Evan (31 December
December
2012). "5 Ancient New Year's Celebrations". History News. Retrieved 31 January
January
2014.  ^ Michels, A.K. The Calendar
Calendar
of the Roman Republic (Princeton, 1967), p. 97-8. ^ Macrobius, Book I, Ch. xiii, §17. ^ Kaster (2011), p. 163. ^ Quoting the Vita of St. Eligius written by Ouen. ^ Forbes, Bruce David (1 October 2008). Christmas: A Candid History. University of California Press. p. 114. ISBN 9780520258020. Some people referred to New Year's gifts as " Christmas
Christmas
presents" because New Year's Day
New Year's Day
fell within the twelve days of Christmas, but in spite of the name they still were gifts given on January
January
1.  ^ Collins, Ace (4 May 2010). Stories Behind the Great Traditions of Christmas. Harper Collins. p. 88. ISBN 9780310873884. Most people today trace the practice of giving gifts on Christmas
Christmas
Day to the three gifts that the Magi gave to Jesus.  ^ Berking, Helmuth (30 March 1999). Sociology of Giving. SAGE Publications. p. 14. ISBN 9780857026132. The winter solstice was a time of festivity in every traditional culture, and the Christian Christmas
Christmas
probably took its place within this mythical context of the solar cult. Its core dogma of the Incarnation, however, solidly established the giving and receiving of gifts as the structural principle of that recurrent yet unique event. 'Children were given presents as the Jesus child received gifts from the magi or kings who came from afar to adore him. But in reality it was they, together with all their fellow men, who received the gift of God through man's renewed participation in the divine life' (ibid.: 61).  ^ Sim, Alison (8 November 2011). Pleasures and Pastimes in Tudor England. The History Press. p. 85. ISBN 9780752475783. Most of the twelve days of Christmas
Christmas
were saint's days, but the main three days for celebration were Christmas
Christmas
Day, New Year's Day
New Year's Day
and Epiphany, or Twelfth Night.  ^ Harris, Max (2011-03-17). Sacred Folly: A New History of the Feast of Fools. Cornell University Press. p. 35. ISBN 9780801449567. Retrieved 31 December
December
2012.  ^ Trawicky, Bernard (2000-07-01). Anniversaries and Holidays (5th ed.). American Library Association. p. 222. ISBN 9780838906958. Retrieved 31 December
December
2012.  ^ [1] The Ethiopic Calendar
Calendar
by Dr. Aberra Molla ^ Gregg, Cherri (May 13, 2013). "Oshunbumi Fernandez, Caring Through Culture and Odunde 365". CBS Philadelphia. Retrieved 31 December 2013.  ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2005-11-25. Retrieved 2005-11-30.  Nanakshahi Calendar
Calendar
at SGPC.net ^ a b c "What is 'Serbian New Year'?". Balkan Insight. 13 January 2014. Retrieved 13 January
January
2017.  ^ Mintz, Josh (2 January
January
2012). "The Hypocrisy of Turning New Year's Eve in Israel
Israel
Into a Nonevent". Haaretz. Retrieved 1 January 2016.  ^ "Watch Night services provide spiritual way to bring in New Year". The United Methodist Church. Archived from the original on 1 March 2012. Retrieved 28 December
December
2011. The service is loosely constructed with singing, spontaneous prayers and testimonials, and readings, including the Covenant Renewal service from The United Methodist Book of Worship (pp. 288–294).  ^ Kochilas, Diane. The Glorious Foods of Greece. HarperCollins. p. 828. ISBN 9780061859588. Retrieved 31 December 2012.  ^ World Book (1998-09-01). Christmas
Christmas
in the Philippines. World Book, Inc. p. 61. ISBN 9780716608530. Retrieved 31 December 2012.  ^ Yue Feng, ed. (1991). 世界节 [World Festival]. Amazon.com (in Chinese). ISBN 978-7211058990.  ^ Medina, F. Xavier (2005). Food Culture In Spain. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 46. ISBN 9780313328190. Retrieved 31 December
December
2012.  ^ "History of America's State Parks First Day Hikes". California Department of Parks and Recreation. Retrieved January
January
4, 2018.  ^ "Lucky Foods for the New Year - New Year's Day
New Year's Day
- Epicurious.com".  ^ "Table of Contents: Orgelbüchlein :". libweb.grinnell.edu.  ^ "The Year Is Gone, Beyond Recall". www.hymntime.com.  ^ " Scotland
Scotland
- In the words of the Bard -". Scotland.  ^ Birx, H. James (2009-01-13). Encyclopedia of Time: Science, Philosophy, Theology, & Culture. Sage Publications. p. 510. ISBN 9781412941648. Retrieved 31 December
December
2012.  ^ "DRMC rounds up prizes for New Year's baby, Life Choices". Dyersburg State Gazette. Stategazette.com. 2008-12-31. Retrieved 2012-01-01.  ^ "2011-federal-holidays". 

Bibliography[edit]

Macrobius, Saturnaliorum Libri VII . (in Latin) Macrobius
Macrobius
(2011), Kaster, Robert A., ed., Saturnalia, Vol. I, Loeb Classical Library, No. 510, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, ISBN 9780674996496 . (in English) & (in Latin)

External links[edit]

Wikinews has related news: World celebrates new year for gregorian calendar

Media related to New year
New year
celebrations at Wikimedia Commons New Year's Around the World – slideshow by Life magazine  "New Year's Day". New International Encyclopedia. 1905. 

v t e

New Year's Eve
New Year's Eve
and New Year's Day

Events

America's Party First Night Hogmanay New Year's Eve
New Year's Eve
in London Objects dropped on New Year's Eve Peach Drop Pelican Drop Réveillon de Copacabana Sydney
Sydney
New Year's Eve The Possum Drop Times Square Ball Vienna New Year's Concert

Sports

College Football Playoff
College Football Playoff
bowls

Rose Orange Sugar Fiesta Cotton Peach

Citrus Bowl Gator Bowl Outback Bowl Tour de Ski Four Hills Tournament NHL Winter Classic Spengler Cup
Spengler Cup
Final IIHF World U20 Championship Saint Silvester
Silvester
Road Race New Year Sprint Nos Galan road race

Parades

Tournament of Roses Parade London's New Year's Day
New Year's Day
Parade Florida Citrus Parade Mummers Parade

Television

New Year's Rockin' Eve Fox's New Year's Eve
New Year's Eve
with Steve Harvey New Year's Eve
New Year's Eve
with Carson Daly New Year Live CNN New Year's Eve
New Year's Eve
Live ¡Feliz! MTV New Year's The Big Fat Quiz of the Year Bye Bye Dinner for One Happy New Year, America Hogmanay
Hogmanay
Live Hootenanny Kōhaku Uta Gassen Little Blue Light Only an Excuse? Red Bull New Year No Limits Rudolph's Shiny New Year Scotch and Wry Silvesterstadl „Silvesterpunsch“ 2000 Today (US, Ireland) Happy New Year, Charlie Brown! First Night
First Night
2013 with Jamie Kennedy

Music

"Auld Lang Syne" "Happy New Year" "What Are You Doing New Year's Eve?" "Levy-Dew" "New Year's Day"

Related topics

New Year films Gregorian calendar Baby New Year Calennig Hogmanay Holiday season Leap second Guy Lombardo New Year's resolution New Year tree Saint Sylvester's Day Vasilopita Watchnight service

Links to related articles

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Holidays, observances, and celebrations in Algeria

January

New Year's Day
New Year's Day
(1) Yennayer
Yennayer
(12)

February

Valentine's Day
Valentine's Day
(14) Tafsut (28)

March

International Women's Day
International Women's Day
(8) Victory Day (19) World Water Day
World Water Day
(22) Maghrebi Blood Donation Day (30) Spring vacation (2 last weeks)

April

April Fools' Day
April Fools' Day
(1) Knowledge Day (16) Berber Spring (20) Earth Day
Earth Day
(22) Election Day (Thursday)

May

International Workers' Day
International Workers' Day
(1) World Press Freedom Day (3) Mother's Day
Mother's Day
(last Sunday)

June–July–August

Summer vacation (varies)

June

Children's Day
Children's Day
(1) Father's Day
Father's Day
(21)

July

Independence Day (5)

September

International Day of Peace
International Day of Peace
(21)

October

International Day of Non-Violence
International Day of Non-Violence
(2) Halloween
Halloween
(31)

November

Revolution Day (1)

December

Christmas
Christmas
Eve (24) Christmas
Christmas
(25) New Year's Eve
New Year's Eve
(31) Winter vacation (2 last weeks)

Varies (year round)

Hijri New Year's Day
New Year's Day
(Muharram 1) Ashura
Ashura
(Muharram 10) Mawlid
Mawlid
(Rabi' al-Awwal 12) Ramadan
Ramadan
( Ramadan
Ramadan
1) Laylat al-Qadr
Laylat al-Qadr
( Ramadan
Ramadan
27) Eid al-Fitr
Eid al-Fitr
(Shawwal 1) Day of Arafah
Day of Arafah
(Dhu al-Hijjah 9) Eid al-Adha
Eid al-Adha
(Dhu al-Hijjah 10) Holi
Holi
(varies)

Bold indicates major holidays commonly celebrated in Algeria, which often represent the major celebrations of the month. See also: Lists of holidays.

v t e

Public holidays in Australia

New Year's Day Australia Day Good Friday Easter
Easter
Saturday Easter
Easter
Monday Anzac Day Queen's Birthday Labour Day Christmas
Christmas
Day Boxing Day

v t e

Holidays in Canada

Nationwide statutory holidays

New Year's Day Good Friday Canada
Canada
Day Labour Day Christmas
Christmas
Day

Statutory holidays for federal employees

Easter
Easter
Monday Victoria Day Thanksgiving Remembrance Day Boxing Day

Indigenous holidays

Hobiyee National Aboriginal Day

Other common holidays

August Civic Holiday Family Day/Heritage Day/Islander Day/Louis Riel Day Memorial Day
Memorial Day
(Newfoundland and Labrador) Quebec National Holiday

v t e

Public holidays in China

Golden weeks

Spring Festival National Day

Other holidays

New Year's Day Lantern Festival Qingming Festival Workers' Day Duanwu Festival Mid-Autumn Festival

v t e

Public holidays in Hong Kong

New Year's Day Lunar New Year (first 3 days of the period) Ching Ming Festival Good Friday Holy Saturday Easter
Easter
Monday Buddha's Birthday Labour Day Tuen Ng Festival Hong Kong
Hong Kong
SAR Establishment Day Mid-Autumn Festival PRC National Day Chung Yeung Festival Christmas
Christmas
Day Boxing Day

Cancelled

Queen's Birthday Liberation Day Double Ten Day Remembrance Day

v t e

Public holidays in the Republic of Ireland

New Year's Day Saint Patrick's Day Easter
Easter
Monday May Day June Holiday August Holiday October Holiday Christmas
Christmas
Day Saint Stephen's Day

v t e

Public holidays in Mexico

Statutory holidays

Año Nuevo Día de la Constitución Natalicio de Benito Juárez Día del Trabajo Día de Independencia Día de la Revolución Transmisión del Poder Ejecutivo Federal Navidad

Civic holidays

Día del Ejército Día de la Bandera Aniversario de la Expropiación petrolera Heroica Defensa de Veracruz Cinco de Mayo Natalicio de Miguel Hidalgo Día de la Marina Grito de Dolores Día de los Niños Héroes Consumación de la Independencia Natalicio de José Ma. Morelos y Pavón Descubrimiento de América

Festivities

Día de los Santos Reyes Día de San Valentín Día del Niño Día de las Madres Día del Maestro Día del estudiante Día del Padre Día de Todos los Santos Día de los Fieles Difuntos Día de la Virgen de Guadalupe Las Posadas Nochebuena Dia de los Santos Inocentes

v t e

Public holidays in New Zealand

New Year's Day January
January
2 Waitangi Day Good Friday Easter
Easter
Sunday Easter
Easter
Monday Anzac Day Queen's Birthday Labour Day Christmas
Christmas
Day Boxing Day

v t e

Public holidays in North Korea

New Year's Day Day of the Sun Day of the Shining Star Day of Songun Day of Victory in the Great Fatherland Liberation War Day of the Foundation of the Republic Party Foundation Day International Workers' Day Fatherland Liberation Day Constitution Day

v t e

Public holidays in the Philippines

Regular holidays

New Year's Day Maundy Thursday Good Friday Araw ng Kagitingan Labor Day Independence Day National Heroes' Day Bonifacio Day Christmas Rizal Day

Special
Special
non-working days

Chinese New Year Black Saturday Ninoy Aquino Day All Saints' Day
All Saints' Day
and All Souls' Day Immaculate Conception Noche Buena Last day of the year

Special
Special
holiday (for schools)

EDSA Revolution Anniversary

Italicized: Movable holiday

v t e

Public holidays in Russia

New Year's Day
New Year's Day
(1 Jan) Christmas
Christmas
(7 Jan) Defender of the Fatherland Day
Defender of the Fatherland Day
(23 Feb) International Women's Day
International Women's Day
(8 Mar) International Workers' Day
International Workers' Day
(1 May) Victory Day (9 May) Russia
Russia
Day (12 Jun) Unity Day (4 Nov)

v t e

Public holidays in South Africa

New Year's Day Human Rights Day Good Friday Family Day Freedom Day Workers' Day Youth Day National Women's Day Heritage Day Day of Reconciliation Christmas
Christmas
Day Day of Goodwill

v t e

Public holidays in  Turkey

New Year's Day National Sovereignty and Children's Day Labour and Solidarity Day Commemoration of Atatürk, Youth and Sports Day Democracy and National Unity Day Victory Day Republic Day Ramadan
Ramadan
Feast Sacrifice Feast

v t e

Public holidays in Ukraine

New Year's Day
New Year's Day
(1 Jan) (Julian) Christmas
Christmas
(7 Jan) International Women's Day
International Women's Day
(8 Mar) Orthodox Easter
Easter
(moveable) Orthodox Pentecost
Pentecost
(moveable) Labour Day
Labour Day
(1 May) Victory Day over Nazism (9 May) Constitution Day (28 June) Independence Day (24 Aug) Defender of Ukraine
Ukraine
Day (14 Oct) (Gregorian and Revised Julian) Christmas
Christmas
(25 Dec)

v t e

Public holidays in the United Kingdom

All regions

New Year's Day May Bank Holiday Summer Bank Holiday Christmas
Christmas
Day Boxing Day

England
England
and Wales

Good Friday Easter
Easter
Monday Spring Bank Holiday

Northern Ireland

Saint Patrick's Day Easter
Easter
Monday Easter
Easter
Tuesday Spring Bank Holiday Battle of the Boyne (Orangemen's Day)

Scotland

2nd January Good Friday St Andrew's Day (optional)

v t e

Holidays, observances, and celebrations in the United States

January

New Year's Day
New Year's Day
(federal) Martin Luther King Jr. Day
Martin Luther King Jr. Day
(federal)

Confederate Heroes Day (TX) Fred Korematsu Day
Fred Korematsu Day
(CA, FL, HI, VA) Idaho Human Rights Day
Human Rights Day
(ID) Inauguration Day (federal quadrennial, DC area) Kansas Day (KS) Lee–Jackson Day
Lee–Jackson Day
(formerly Lee–Jackson–King Day) (VA) Robert E. Lee Day
Robert E. Lee Day
(FL) Stephen Foster Memorial Day (36) The Eighth (LA, former federal)

January–February

Super Bowl Sunday

February American Heart Month Black History Month

Washington's Birthday/Presidents' Day (federal) Valentine's Day

Georgia Day (GA) Groundhog Day Lincoln's Birthday
Lincoln's Birthday
(CA, CT, IL, IN, MO, NJ, NY, WV) National Girls and Women in Sports Day National Freedom Day (36) Primary Election Day (WI) Ronald Reagan Day
Ronald Reagan Day
(CA) Rosa Parks Day
Rosa Parks Day
(CA, MO) Susan B. Anthony Day
Susan B. Anthony Day
(CA, FL, NY, WI, WV, proposed federal)

February–March

Mardi Gras

Ash Wednesday
Ash Wednesday
(religious) Courir de Mardi Gras
Mardi Gras
(religious) Super Tuesday

March Irish-American Heritage Month National Colon Cancer Awareness Month Women's History Month

St. Patrick's Day (religious) Spring break
Spring break
(week)

Casimir Pulaski Day
Casimir Pulaski Day
(IL) Cesar Chavez Day
Cesar Chavez Day
(CA, CO, TX, proposed federal) Evacuation Day (Suffolk County, MA) Harriet Tubman Day
Harriet Tubman Day
(NY) Holi
Holi
(NY, religious) Mardi Gras
Mardi Gras
(AL (in two counties), LA) Maryland Day
Maryland Day
(MD) National Poison Prevention Week
National Poison Prevention Week
(week) Prince Jonah Kūhiō Kalanianaʻole Day (HI) Saint Joseph's Day
Saint Joseph's Day
(religious) Seward's Day (AK) Texas Independence Day
Texas Independence Day
(TX) Town Meeting Day (VT)

March–April

Easter
Easter
(religious)

Palm Sunday
Palm Sunday
(religious) Passover
Passover
(religious) Good Friday
Good Friday
(CT, NC, PR, religious) Easter
Easter
Monday (religious)

April Confederate History Month

420 Day April Fools' Day Arbor Day Confederate Memorial Day
Confederate Memorial Day
(AL, MS) Days of Remembrance of the Victims of the Holocaust
Days of Remembrance of the Victims of the Holocaust
(week) Earth Day Emancipation Day
Emancipation Day
(DC) Thomas Jefferson's Birthday
Jefferson's Birthday
(AL) Pascua Florida (FL) Patriots' Day
Patriots' Day
(MA, ME) San Jacinto Day
San Jacinto Day
(TX) Siblings Day Walpurgis Night
Walpurgis Night
(religious)

May Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Jewish American Heritage Month

Memorial Day
Memorial Day
(federal) Mother's Day
Mother's Day
(36) Cinco de Mayo

Harvey Milk Day
Harvey Milk Day
(CA) Law Day (36) Loyalty Day (36) Malcolm X Day
Malcolm X Day
(CA, IL, proposed federal) May Day Military Spouse Day National Day of Prayer
National Day of Prayer
(36) National Defense Transportation Day (36) National Maritime Day (36) Peace Officers Memorial Day
Memorial Day
(36) Truman Day
Truman Day
(MO)

June Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride Month

Father's Day
Father's Day
(36)

Bunker Hill Day
Bunker Hill Day
(Suffolk County, MA) Carolina Day
Carolina Day
(SC) Emancipation Day
Emancipation Day
In Texas / Juneteenth
Juneteenth
(TX) Flag Day (36, proposed federal) Helen Keller Day
Helen Keller Day
(PA) Honor America Days (3 weeks) Jefferson Davis Day
Jefferson Davis Day
(AL, FL) Kamehameha Day
Kamehameha Day
(HI) Odunde Festival
Odunde Festival
(Philadelphia, PA) Senior Week (week) West Virginia Day
West Virginia Day
(WV)

July

Independence Day (federal)

Lā Hoʻihoʻi Ea (HI, unofficial) Parents' Day
Parents' Day
(36) Pioneer Day (UT)

July–August

Summer vacation

August

American Family Day (AZ) Barack Obama Day
Barack Obama Day
(IL) Bennington Battle Day (VT) Hawaii Admission Day / Statehood Day (HI) Lyndon Baines Johnson Day
Lyndon Baines Johnson Day
(TX) National Aviation Day
National Aviation Day
(36) Service Reduction Day (MD) Victory over Japan
Japan
Day (RI, former federal) Women's Equality Day
Women's Equality Day
(36)

September Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

Labor Day
Labor Day
(federal)

California Admission Day
California Admission Day
(CA) Carl Garner Federal Lands Cleanup Day (36) Constitution Day (36) Constitution Week (week) Defenders Day
Defenders Day
(MD) Gold Star Mother's Day
Mother's Day
(36) National Grandparents Day
National Grandparents Day
(36) National Payroll Week (week) Native American Day (CA, TN, proposed federal) Patriot Day
Patriot Day
(36)

September–October Hispanic Heritage Month

Oktoberfest

Rosh Hashanah
Rosh Hashanah
(religious) Yom Kippur
Yom Kippur
(religious)

October Breast Cancer Awareness Month Disability Employment Awareness Month Filipino American History Month LGBT History Month

Columbus Day
Columbus Day
(federal) Halloween

Alaska Day (AK) Child Health Day (36) General Pulaski Memorial Day German-American Day Indigenous Peoples' Day
Indigenous Peoples' Day
(VT) International Day of Non-Violence Leif Erikson Day
Leif Erikson Day
(36) Missouri Day (MO) National School Lunch Week Native American Day (SD) Nevada Day
Nevada Day
(NV) Sweetest Day White Cane Safety Day
White Cane Safety Day
(36)

October–November

Diwali
Diwali
(religious)

November Native American Indian Heritage Month

Veterans Day
Veterans Day
(federal) Thanksgiving (federal)

Day after Thanksgiving (24) Election Day (CA, DE, HI, KY, MT, NJ, NY, OH, PR, WV, proposed federal) Family Day (NV) Hanukkah
Hanukkah
(religious) Lā Kūʻokoʻa (HI, unofficial) Native American Heritage Day (MD, WA) Obama Day
Obama Day
(Perry County, AL)

December

Christmas
Christmas
(religious, federal)

Alabama Day (AL) Christmas
Christmas
Eve (KY, NC, SC) Day after Christmas
Christmas
(KY, NC, SC, TX) Festivus Hanukkah
Hanukkah
(religious, week) Indiana Day
Indiana Day
(IN) Kwanzaa
Kwanzaa
(religious, week) National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day
Remembrance Day
(36) New Year's Eve Pan American Aviation Day (36) Rosa Parks Day
Rosa Parks Day
(OH, OR) Wright Brothers Day (36)

Varies (year round)

Eid al-Adha
Eid al-Adha
(religious) Eid al-Fitr
Eid al-Fitr
(religious) Ramadan
Ramadan
(religious, month)

Legend: (federal) = federal holidays, (state) = state holidays, (religious) = religious holidays, (week) = weeklong holidays, (month) = monthlong holidays, (36) = Title 36 Observances and Ceremonies Bold indicates major holidays commonly celebrated in the United States, which often represent the major celebrations of the month. See also: Lists of holidays, Hallmark holidays, public holidays in the United States, New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico and the United States Virgin Islands.

v t e

Federal holidays in the United States

Current

New Year's Day Birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. Washington's Birthday Memorial Day Independence Day Labor Day Columbus Day Veterans Day Thanksgiving Day Christmas
Christmas
Day

Former

The Eighth (1828–1861) Victory Day (1948–1975)

Proposed

Flag Day (1950) Election Day (1993) Malcolm X Day
Malcolm X Day
(1993–1994) Democracy Day (2005, 2014) Cesar Chavez Day
Cesar Chavez Day
(2008) Susan B. Anthony Day
Susan B. Anthony Day
(2011) Native American Day (2013)

v t e

Official holidays of the New York Stock Exchange

Whole days

New Year's Day Martin Luther King Jr. Day Washington's Birthday Good Friday Memorial Day Independence Day Labor Day Thanksgiving Day Christmas
Christmas
Day

Partial days

Day before Independence Day Day after Thanksgiving Christmas
Christmas
Eve

v t e

Public holidays in Japan

New Year's Day
New Year's Day
(Japanese New Year) Coming of Age Day National Foundation Day Vernal Equinox
Equinox
Day Shōwa Day Constitution Memorial Day Greenery Day Children's Day (Okinawa Memorial Day) Marine Day Mountain Day Respect for the Aged Day Autumnal Equinox
Equinox
Day Health and Sports Day Culture Day Labor Thanksgiving Day The Emperor's Birthday

Culture port

.