HOME
The Info List - Neriidae


--- Advertisement ---



The Neriidae
Neriidae
are a family of true flies (Diptera) closely related to the Micropezidae. Some species are known as cactus flies, while others have been called banana stalk flies and the family was earlier treated as subfamily of the Micropezidae
Micropezidae
which are often called stilt-legged flies. Neriids differ from micropezids in having no significant reduction of the fore legs. Neriids breed in rotting vegetation, such as decaying tree bark or rotting fruit. About 100 species are placed in 20 genera. Neriidae
Neriidae
are found mainly in tropical regions, but two North American genera occur, each with one species, and one species of Telostylinus occurs in temperate regions of eastern Australia.

Contents

1 Family characteristics 2 Ecology and evolution of neriid flies 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External links

Family characteristics[edit] Most species of Neriidae
Neriidae
are slender, long-legged flies. Many exhibit striped patterns that appear to provide camouflage against tree bark. Many neriids are sexually dimorphic, with males having more elongated bodies, heads, antennae, and legs than females. In some species, the male fore-tibia is greatly thickened distally. Neriid flies are saprophagous. Larvae develop in rotting vegetable matter, including bark and fruit. Neriid adults tend to aggregate on rotting vegetable matter or damaged tree trunks. Neriid adults are also attracted to flowers or other sources of sugar. The upper face has a medial division and the antennae are porrect. The arista on the antenna arises at the tip (not dorsally, as in the Micropezidae). The fore legs are long with prominent coxae. In the Micropezidae, the fore legs are reduced. The fore femora (and sometimes all femora) bear ventral spines in males. The fore tibia of males may have rows of spines or tubercles. The third and fourth veins of the wing converge at the tip and the first vein is not setulose.[1] Neriids have 1-5 frontal bristles, no ocellar bristles and some have reduced postvertical bristles. For terms see Morphology of Diptera Ecology and evolution of neriid flies[edit]

Pair in copula

Males of some species engage in spectacular combat for territory or access to females. The rivals elevate their bodies to an almost vertical posture, and pound each other with the ventral surfaces of their heads, strike each other with their forelegs, or try to place each other in a head-lock.[2] Photos of mating and combat can be seen here. Research on the Australian neriid Telostylinus angusticollis has shown that adult body size and shape are extremely sensitive to larval diet: larvae reared in nutrient-rich substrates exhibit greater body size as adults, and males have more elongated bodies, compared to flies reared in nutrient-poor substrates.[3] The expression of male secondary sexual traits is particularly sensitive to the protein content of the larval diet.[4] Developmental plasticity in response to variation in larval diet quality has diversified among populations of Telostylinus angusticollis along the east coast of Australia.[5] Research on Telostylinus angusticollis has also shown that a male's larval diet can influence the body size of his offspring. Males reared on a nutrient-rich larval diet produce larger offspring than their brothers reared on a nutrient-poor larval diet,[6] and this paternal effect appears to be sensitive to the male's social environment.[7] In addition, recent research on this species has led to the discovery of a new form of nonparental transgenerational effect, whereby a male's larval diet quality can influence the body size of offspring sired by a subsequent male that mates as much as two weeks later with the same female.[8] This effect is a form of telegony.

Female at left oviposits while a male stands by

As in some tephritoid flies, neriid larvae in their final instar are capable of skipping. To skip, a maggot bends its body into a 'C', grasps its posterior end with its mouth-hooks, tightens the muscles in its body wall, and then releases its hold, causing its posterior end to recoil against the substrate. Although their skipping abilities are not as impressive as those of piophilid maggots, neriid maggots can skip distances > 20 cm.[citation needed] References[edit]

^ McAlpine, David K. (1958). "A key to the Australian families of Acalptrate Diptera (Insecta)". Records of the Australian Museum. 24 (12): 183–190. doi:10.3853/j.0067-1975.24.1958.650. Archived from the original on April 23, 2011. CS1 maint: Unfit url (link) ^ Bonduriansky, R. (2006). "Convergent evolution of sexual shape dimorphism in Diptera". Journal of Morphology. 267: 602–611. doi:10.1002/jmor.10426.  ^ Bonduriansky, R. (January 2007). "The evolution of condition dependent sexual dimorphism". The American Naturalist. 169: 9–19. doi:10.1086/510214. PMID 17206580.  ^ Sentinella, A.T.; Crean, A.J.; Bonduriansky, R. (2013). "Dietary protein mediates a trade-off between larval survival and the development of male secondary sexual traits". Functional Ecology. 27: 1134–1144. doi:10.1111/1365-2435.12104.  ^ Cassidy, E.J.; Bath, E.; Chenoweth, S.F.; Bonduriansky, R. (2013). "Sex-specific patterns of morphological diversification: evolution of reaction norms and static allometries in neriid flies". Evolution. 68: 368–383. doi:10.1111/evo.12276. PMID 24111624.  ^ Bonduriansky, R.; Head, M. (2007). "Maternal and paternal condition effects on offspring phenotype in Telostylinus angusticollis (Diptera: Neriidae)". Journal of Evolutionary Biology. 20: 2379–2388. doi:10.1111/j.1420-9101.2007.01419.x. PMID 17956399.  ^ Adler, M.I.; Bonduriansky, R. (2013). "Paternal effects on offspring fitness reflect father's social environment". Evolutionary Biology. 40: 288–292. doi:10.1007/s11692-012-9211-6.  ^ Crean, A.J.; Kopps, A.; Bonduriansky, R. (2014). "Revisiting telegony: Offspring inherit an acquired characteristic of their mother's previous mate". Ecology Letters. 17: 1545–1552. doi:10.1111/ele.12373. PMC 4282758 . PMID 25270393. 

Further reading[edit]

Phylogeny and identification

Hennig, W. 1937. Übersicht über die Arten der Neriiden und über die Zoogeographie dieser Acalyptraten-Gruppe (Diptera). Stett. Entomol. Ztg. 98: 240–80. World genera, species and review. Aczel, M. L. 1954. Neriidae
Neriidae
von Neuguinea (Diptera). Treubia 22:505-531. Aczel, M. L. (1959). "Diptera: Neriidae
Neriidae
and Micropezidae
Micropezidae
(Tylidae)". Insects of Micronesia. 14: 47–90.  Aczel, M. L. (1961). "A revision of American Neriidae
Neriidae
(Diptera, Acalyptratae)". Studia Entomologica. 4: 257–346.  Steyskal, G. C. 1987. Neriidae. pp. 769–771 in J. F. McAlpine, ed. Manual of Nearctic Diptera. Agriculture Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. Barraclough, D. A. (1993). "The southern African species of Neriidae (Diptera)". Annals of the Natal Museum. 34: 1–17.  Sepúlveda, T.A.; Pereira-Colavite, A.; De Carvalho, C.J.B. (2013). "Revisión del género neotropical cerantichir (Diptera: Neriidae) con nuevos registros y clave de especies". Revista Colombiana de Entomologia. 39: 125–131.  Sepúlveda, T.A.; Wolff, M.I.; De Carvalho, C.J.B. (2014). "Revision of the New World genus Glyphidops Enderlein (Diptera: Neriidae)". Zootaxa. 3785: 139–174. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.3785.2.2.  Mongiardino Koch, N.; Soto, I.M.; Ramirez, M.J. (2015). "First phylogenetic analysis of the family Neriidae
Neriidae
(Diptera), with a study on the issue of scaling continuous characters". Cladistics. 31: 142–165. doi:10.1111/cla.12084. 

Early accounts

de Meijere, J. C. H. 1908. Studien uber sudostasiatische Dipteren II. Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 51:105-180. de Meijere, J. H. C. 1911. Studien uber sudostasiatische Dipteren. VI. Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 54:258-432. de Meijere, J. H. C. 1924. Studien uber sudostasiatische Dipteren. XV. Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 67:1-64. Berg, C.O. 1947. Biology and metamorphosis of some Solomon Islands Diptera. Part I: Micropezidae
Micropezidae
and Neriidae.Occas. Pap. Mus. Zool. Univ. Mich. 503, 14 p Steyskal, G. C. (1966). "Notes on flies captured in treetops in Malaya (Diptera: Empididae, Neriidae, Platystomatidae, Sepsidae, Muscidae)". Proceedings of the U.S. National Museum. 120: 1–16. doi:10.5479/si.00963801.120-3562.1. 

Life history and larval biology

Olsen, L. E.; Ryckman, R. E. (1963). "Studies on Odontoloxozus longicornis (Diptera: Neriidae). Part I. Life history and descriptions of immature stages". Annals of the Entomological Society of America. 56: 454–469. doi:10.1093/aesa/56.4.454.  Ryckman, R. E.; Olsen, L. E. (1963). "Studies on Odontoloxozus longicornis (Diptera: Neriidae). Part II. Distribution and ecology". Annals of the Entomological Society of America. 56: 470–472. doi:10.1093/aesa/56.4.470.  Steyskal, G. C. (1965). "The third larval instar and puparium of Odontoloxozus
Odontoloxozus
longicornis (Coquillett) (Diptera, Neriidae)". Annals of the Entomological Society of America. 58: 936–937. doi:10.1093/aesa/58.6.936a. 

Behaviour

Preston-Mafham, K (2001). "Resource defence mating system in two flies from Sulawesi: Gymnonerius fuscus Wiedemann and Telostylinus sp. near duplicatus Wiedemann (Diptera: Neriidae)". Journal of Natural History. 35: 149–156. doi:10.1080/002229301447916.  Eberhard, W. G. (1998). "Reproductive behavior of Glyphidops flavifrons and Nerius plurivitatus (Diptera: Neriidae)". Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society. 71: 89–107.  Mangan, R. L. (1979). "Reproductive behavior of the cactus fly, Odontoloxozus
Odontoloxozus
longicornis, male territoriality and female guarding as adaptive strategies". Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. 4: 265–278. doi:10.1007/bf00297647.  Wheeler, W. M. (1924). "Courtship of the Calobatas". Journal of Heredity. 15: 485–495. 

Evolutionary ecology

Runagall-McNaull, A.; Bonduriansky, R.; Crean, A. J. (2015). "Dietary protein and lifespan across the metamorphic boundary: protein-restricted larvae develop into short-lived adults". Scientific Reports. 5: 11783. doi:10.1038/srep11783. PMC 4484247 . PMID 26119686.  Nicovich, P.R.; Macartney, E.L.; Whan, R.M.; Crean, A.J. (2015). "Measuring sperm movement within the female reproductive tract using Fourier analysis". Microscopy and Microanalysis. 21: 256–263. doi:10.1017/s1431927614014627.  Fricke, C.; Adler, M.I.; Brooks, R.C.; Bonduriansky, R. "The complexity of male reproductive success: effects of nutrition, morphology and experience". Behavioral Ecology. 26: 617–624. doi:10.1093/beheco/aru240.  Crean, A. J.; Kopps, A.; Bonduriansky, R. (2014). "Revisiting telegony: Offspring inherit an acquired characteristic of their mother's previous mate". Ecology Letters. 17: 1545–1552. doi:10.1111/ele.12373. PMC 4282758 . PMID 25270393.  Cassidy, E.J.; Bath, E.; Chenoweth, S.F.; Bonduriansky, R. (2013). "Sex-specific patterns of morphological diversification: evolution of reaction norms and static allometries in neriid flies". Evolution. 68: 368–383. doi:10.1111/evo.12276. PMID 24111624.  Sentinella, A.T.; Crean, A.J.; Bonduriansky, R. (2013). "Dietary protein mediates a trade-off between larval survival and the development of male secondary sexual traits". Functional Ecology. 27: 1134–1144. doi:10.1111/1365-2435.12104.  Adler, M.I.; Bonduriansky, R. (2013). "Paternal effects on offspring fitness reflect father's social environment". Evolutionary Biology. 40: 288–292. doi:10.1007/s11692-012-9211-6.  Adler, M.I.; Cassidy, E.J.; Fricke, C.; Bonduriansky, R. (2013). "The lifespan-reproduction trade-off under dietary restriction is sex-specific and context-dependent". Experimental Gerontology. 48: 539–548. doi:10.1016/j.exger.2013.03.007.  Bath, E.; Tatarnic, N.; Bonduriansky, R. (2012). "Asymmetric reproductive isolation and interference in neriid flies: the roles of genital morphology and behaviour". Animal
Animal
Behaviour. 84: 1331–1339. doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2012.08.025.  Kopps, A.M.; Bonduriansky, R.; Gilchrist, A.S.; Crean, A.J. (2012). "Isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the neriid fly Telostylinus angusticollis using MiSeq sequencing". Australian Journal of Zoology. 60: 388–391. doi:10.1071/zo13017.  Adler, M.; Bonduriansky, R. (2011). "The dissimilar costs of love and war: Age-specific mortality as a function of the operational sex ratio". Journal of Evolutionary Biology. 24: 1169–1177. doi:10.1111/j.1420-9101.2011.02250.x. PMID 21375650.  Bonduriansky, R (2009). "Condition dependence of developmental stability in the sexually dimorphic fly Telostylinus angusticollis (Diptera: Neriidae)". Journal of Evolutionary Biology. 22: 861–872. doi:10.1111/j.1420-9101.2009.01686.x. PMID 19220651.  Kawasaki, N.; Brassil, C.E.; Brooks, R.; Bonduriansky, R. (2008). "Environmental effects on the expression of lifespan and aging: An extreme contrast between wild and captive cohorts of Telostylinus angusticollis (Diptera: Neriidae)". The American Naturalist. 172: 346–357. doi:10.1086/589519.  Bonduriansky, R.; Head, M. (2007). "Maternal and paternal condition effects on offspring phenotype in Telostylinus angusticollis (Diptera: Neriidae)". Journal of Evolutionary Biology. 20: 2379–2388. doi:10.1111/j.1420-9101.2007.01419.x. PMID 17956399.  Bonduriansky, R (2007). "The evolution of condition dependent sexual dimorphism". The American Naturalist. 169: 9–19. doi:10.1086/510214. PMID 17206580.  Bonduriansky, R (2006). "Convergent evolution of sexual shape dimorphism in Diptera". Journal of Morphology. 267: 602–611. doi:10.1002/jmor.10426. 

External links[edit]

Family Neriidae
Neriidae
at EOL Diptera.info Images (in Japanese) Behaviour Bug Guide

v t e

Extant Diptera families

Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: Insecta Subclass: Pterygota Infraclass: Neoptera Superorder: Endopterygota

Suborder Nematocera

Axymyiomorpha

Axymyiidae

Culicomorpha

Culicoidea

Dixidae
Dixidae
(meniscus midges) Corethrellidae
Corethrellidae
(frog-biting midges) Chaoboridae
Chaoboridae
(phantom midges) Culicidae (mosquitoes)

Chironomoidea

Thaumaleidae
Thaumaleidae
(solitary midges) Simuliidae (black flies) Ceratopogonidae
Ceratopogonidae
(biting midges) Chironomidae
Chironomidae
(non-biting midges)

Blephariceromorpha

Blephariceridae
Blephariceridae
(net-winged midges) Deuterophlebiidae (mountain midges) Nymphomyiidae

Bibionomorpha

Bibionoidea

Bibionidae
Bibionidae
(march flies, lovebugs)

Anisopodoidea

Anisopodidae
Anisopodidae
(wood gnats)

Sciaroidea (fungus gnats)

Bolitophilidae Diadocidiidae Ditomyiidae Keroplatidae Mycetophilidae Sciaridae
Sciaridae
(dark-winged fungus gnats) Cecidomyiidae
Cecidomyiidae
(gall midges)

Psychodomorpha

Scatopsoidea

Canthyloscelidae Perissommatidae Scatopsidae
Scatopsidae
(minute black scavenger flies, or dung midges)

Psychodoidea

Psychodidae (moth flies)

Ptychopteromorpha

Ptychopteridae
Ptychopteridae
(phantom crane flies) Tanyderidae (primitive crane flies)

Tipulomorpha

Trichoceroidea

Trichoceridae
Trichoceridae
(winter crane flies)

Tipuloidea

Pediciidae
Pediciidae
(hairy-eyed craneflies) Tipulidae (crane flies)

Suborder Brachycera

Asilomorpha

Asiloidea

Apioceridae (flower-loving flies) Apsilocephalidae Apystomyiidae Asilidae
Asilidae
(robber flies) Bombyliidae
Bombyliidae
(bee flies) Evocoidae Hilarimorphidae (hilarimorphid flies) Mydidae (mydas flies) Mythicomyiidae Scenopinidae
Scenopinidae
(window flies) Therevidae
Therevidae
(stiletto flies)

Empidoidea

Atelestidae Hybotidae
Hybotidae
(dance flies) Dolichopodidae
Dolichopodidae
(long-legged flies) Empididae
Empididae
(dagger flies, balloon flies)

Nemestrinoidea

Acroceridae
Acroceridae
(small-headed flies) Nemestrinidae
Nemestrinidae
(tangle-veined flies)

Muscomorpha

Aschiza

Platypezoidea

Phoridae
Phoridae
(scuttle flies, coffin flies, humpbacked flies) Opetiidae
Opetiidae
(flat-footed flies) Ironomyiidae (ironic flies) Lonchopteridae
Lonchopteridae
(spear-winged flies) Platypezidae
Platypezidae
(flat-footed flies)

Syrphoidea

Syrphidae (hoverflies) Pipunculidae
Pipunculidae
(big-headed flies)

Schizophora

Acalyptratae

Conopoidea

Conopidae
Conopidae
(thick-headed flies)

Tephritoidea

Pallopteridae
Pallopteridae
(flutter flies) Piophilidae
Piophilidae
(cheese flies) Platystomatidae
Platystomatidae
(signal flies) Pyrgotidae Richardiidae Tephritidae
Tephritidae
(peacock flies) Ulidiidae
Ulidiidae
(picture-winged flies)

Nerioidea

Cypselosomatidae Micropezidae
Micropezidae
(stilt-legged flies) Neriidae
Neriidae
(cactus flies, banana stalk flies)

Diopsoidea

Diopsidae (stalk-eyed flies) Gobryidae Megamerinidae Nothybidae Psilidae
Psilidae
(rust flies) Somatiidae Strongylophthalmyiidae Syringogastridae Tanypezidae

Sciomyzoidea

Coelopidae
Coelopidae
(kelp flies) Dryomyzidae Helosciomyzidae Ropalomeridae Huttoninidae Heterocheilidae Phaeomyiidae Sepsidae
Sepsidae
(black scavenger flies) Sciomyzidae
Sciomyzidae
(marsh flies)

Sphaeroceroidea

Chyromyidae Heleomyzidae Sphaeroceridae
Sphaeroceridae
(small dung flies) Nannodastiidae

Lauxanioidea

Celyphidae
Celyphidae
(beetle-backed flies) Chamaemyiidae
Chamaemyiidae
(aphid flies) Lauxaniidae

Opomyzoidea

Agromyzidae
Agromyzidae
(leaf miner flies) Anthomyzidae Asteiidae Aulacigastridae (sap flies) Clusiidae
Clusiidae
(lekking, or druid flies) Fergusoninidae Marginidae Neminidae Neurochaetidae (upside-down flies) Odiniidae Opomyzidae Periscelididae Teratomyzidae Xenasteiidae

Ephydroidea

Camillidae Curtonotidae
Curtonotidae
(quasimodo flies) Diastatidae
Diastatidae
(bog flies) Ephydridae
Ephydridae
(shore flies) Drosophilidae
Drosophilidae
(vinegar and fruit flies)

Carnoidea

Acartophthalmidae Australimyzidae Braulidae
Braulidae
(bee lice) Canacidae
Canacidae
(beach flies) Carnidae Chloropidae
Chloropidae
(frit flies) Cryptochaetidae Inbiomyiidae Milichiidae
Milichiidae
(freeloader flies)

Lonchaeoidea

Cryptochetidae Lonchaeidae
Lonchaeidae
(lance flies)

Calyptratae

Muscoidea

Anthomyiidae
Anthomyiidae
(cabbage flies) Fanniidae
Fanniidae
(little house flies) Muscidae
Muscidae
(house flies, stable flies) Scathophagidae
Scathophagidae
(dung flies)

Oestroidea

Calliphoridae
Calliphoridae
(blow-flies: bluebottles, greenbottles) Mystacinobiidae (New Zealand batfly) Oestridae (botflies) Rhinophoridae Sarcophagidae (flesh flies) Tachinidae
Tachinidae
(tachina flies)

Hippoboscoidea

Glossinidae (tsetse flies) Hippoboscidae
Hippoboscidae
(louse flies) Mormotomyiidae
Mormotomyiidae
(frightful hairy fly) Nycteribiidae
Nycteribiidae
(bat flies) Streblidae
Streblidae
(bat flies)

Stratiomyomorpha

Stratiomyoidea

Pantophthalmidae
Pantophthalmidae
(timber flies) Stratiomyidae
Stratiomyidae
(soldier flies) Xylomyidae
Xylomyidae
(wood soldier flies)

Tabanomorpha

Rhagionoidea

Austroleptidae Bolbomyiidae Rhagionidae
Rhagionidae
(snipe flies)

Tabanoidea

Athericidae
Athericidae
(water snipe flies) Oreoleptidae Pelecorhynchidae Tabanidae (horse and deer flies)

Vermileonomorpha

Vermileonoidea

Vermileonidae

Xylophagomorpha

Xylophagoidea

Xylophagidae
Xylophagidae
(awl flies)

List of families of Diptera

Taxon identifiers

Wd: Q5320065 BugGuide: 5806 EoL: 8972 GBIF: 5571 iNaturalist: 132101 ITIS: 1

.