HOME
The Info List - Navy Midshipmen Football


--- Advertisement ---



The Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
football team represents the United States Naval Academy in NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision) college football. The Naval Academy completed its final season as an FBS independent school (not in a conference) in 2014, and became a single-sport member of the American Athletic Conference
American Athletic Conference
beginning in the 2015 season.[2] The team has been coached by Ken Niumatalolo
Ken Niumatalolo
since December 2007. Navy has 19 players and three coaches in the College Football Hall of Fame and won the college football national championship in 1926 according to the Boand and Houlgate poll systems. The 1910 team also was undefeated and unscored upon (the lone tie was a 0–0 game).[3] The mascot is Bill the Goat.

Contents

1 History

1.1 Early history (1879–1949) 1.2 Eddie Erdelatz
Eddie Erdelatz
era (1950–1958) 1.3 Wayne Hardin
Wayne Hardin
era (1959–1964) 1.4 Bill Elias era (1965–1968) 1.5 Rick Forzano era (1969–1972) 1.6 George Welsh era (1973–1981) 1.7 Gary Tranquill era (1982–1986) 1.8 Elliot Uzelac era (1987–1989) 1.9 George Chaump era (1990–1994) 1.10 Charlie Weatherbie era (1995–2001) 1.11 Paul Johnson era (2002–2007) 1.12 Ken Niumatalolo
Ken Niumatalolo
era (2008–present)

2 National championships 3 Bowl games 4 Head coaches 5 Rivalries

5.1 Army Black Knights 5.2 Air Force Falcons 5.3 Notre Dame Fighting Irish 5.4 Maryland Terrapins 5.5 Rutgers Scarlet Knights 5.6 SMU Mustangs 5.7 Pittsburgh Panthers

6 Individual award winners

6.1 Heisman Trophy 6.2 Maxwell Award 6.3 Other awards 6.4 College Football Hall of Fame 6.5 CoSIDA Academic All-Americans 6.6 National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame National Scholar-Athlete Awards

7 Athletic Hall of Fame 8 Alumni 9 Facilities 10 Future non-conference opponents 11 References 12 External links

History[edit] See also: List of Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
football seasons Early history (1879–1949)[edit]

Navy's first football team gathered for a team portrait in 1879.

The Naval Academy's football program is one of the nation's oldest, with its history dating back to 1879.[4] There were two separate efforts to establish a Naval Academy football team in 1879. The first was guided by first-classman J.H. Robinson, who developed it as a training regiment to help keep the school's baseball team in shape. The team played the sport under rules that made it much closer to soccer, where the players were permitted only to kick the ball in order to advance it.[5] The second effort, headed by first-classman William John Maxwell
William John Maxwell
was more successful in its efforts. Maxwell met with two of his friends, Tunstall Smith and Henry Woods, who played for the Baltimore
Baltimore
Athletic Club and officially challenged their team to a game with the Naval Academy.[6] A team was formed from academy first-classmen, which Maxwell led as a manager, trainer, and captain. The team would wake up and practice before reveille and following drill and meals. The squad received encouragement from some of the faculty, who allowed them to eat a late dinner and skip final drill for additional practicing. This was against the direct orders of the school superintendent, who had banned football and similar activities.[6][7] The year's sole contest was played on December 11 against the Baltimore
Baltimore
Athletic Club. The opposition's team was reportedly composed of players from Princeton, Yale, Pennsylvania, and Johns Hopkins.[6][8] The Naval Academy hosted the Baltimore
Baltimore
team on a temporary field drawn on part of the superintendent's cow pasture. Rules decided upon between the teams established that the game was to be played under rugby rules.[6][8] The Baltimore
Baltimore
American and Chronicle, which covered the contest, described it as such:[9] The game, played under rugby rules, was a battle from beginning to end—a regular knock down and drag out fight. Both sides became immediately excited and the audience was aroused to the highest pitch of enthusiasm by the spirited contest. The ball oscillated backward and forward over the ground without any material result.[9] The scrimmages were something awful to witness—living, kicking, scrambling masses of humanity surging to and fro, each individual after the leather oval. If a Baltimorean got the ball and started for a run, he was unfailingly caught by one of the brawny Cadets and dashed to earth with five or six men falling on him.[9]

The 1879 team introduced a white canvas jacket uniform (shown being tailored, c. 1892) which is believed to be the first in college football

The game was closely fought and was finally declared a scoreless tie by the referee about an hour after it began. Navy reportedly never gained possession of the ball. However, the Naval Academy managed to keep the Baltimore
Baltimore
Athletic Club from ever being in a scoring position. On three separate occasions, Navy forced Baltimore
Baltimore
back into its own end zone for a safety; these were not worth any points until 1882, however, so they offered Navy no benefit. The American and Chronicle reported that Maxwell, Craven, and Sample of Navy gave the strongest performances, but were also reckless in their play and were repeatedly penalized for jumping offside or kicking the ball out of play, a form of delay of game.[10][11] Some time after the game, Walter Camp, known as the "Father of American Football", credited Maxwell as the inventor of the first football uniform. After he was informed that the Baltimore
Baltimore
team he was playing outweighed his by an average of ten pounds, Maxwell looked for a way to make the teams more evenly matched. Using his knowledge of sailing, he decided to design a sleeveless canvas jacket which would make his players "difficult to grasp when they began to sweat".[9][12] He presented the design to the academy's tailor, who created the double-lined jackets which "were laced down the front and drawn tightly to fit snugly around a player's body".[9][12] The weighted suits were worn by the team, which was confused by the "strangle, heavy, newfangled getups".[12] The Naval Academy would not produce another football team until the 1882 season. The 1882 team would be the first with a coach, being supported by Academy officials. The 1879 season was the last time that a Navy squad would play the Baltimore
Baltimore
Athletic Club. Navy would finish the 1880s with four winning seasons, and an overall record of 14–12–2, with one of those ties being the game against the Baltimore
Baltimore
Athletic Club. Navy would outscore their opponents 292–231, and would finish the 19th century with an overall record of 54–19–3. The lack of a coach for the 1879 season was one of the two times the Naval Academy squad lacked one, the other time being from 1883 through 1891.[13][14] Frank Berrien served as Navy's head football coach from 1908-1910, compiling a record of 21–5–3.[15] He was the thirteenth head coach of the Naval Academy's football program and, under his tutelage, the Midshipmen compiled an undefeated 8–0–1 mark in 1910.[16]

1926 national championship team

Three undefeated teams with nearly identical records would cause a stir among fans and pollsters today, but this was the case when Navy earned its lone national championship in 1926, as the Midshipmen shared the honor with Stanford and Alabama. A 7-7 tie between Alabama and Stanford in the 1926 Rose Bowl gave Stanford a 10-0-1 mark, while the Crimson Tide and the Mids each had identical 9-0-1 records. The Midshipmen opened the '26 season with a new coach, Bill Ingram. A Navy football standout from 1916 through 1918, Ingram took over a Navy team that had only won seven games in the previous two seasons combined. One of the keys to Navy’s 1926 squad was a potent offense led by All-America tackle and team captain Frank Wickhorst, who proved to be a punishing blocker for the Navy offense. One member of the Navy offense that appreciated the blocking of Wickhorst was Tom Hamilton. The quarterback and kicker had a pair of 100-yard rushing games en route to All-America honors. Navy's biggest win that year was against Michigan in front of 80,000 fans in Baltimore. The Mids scored 10 second half points to upset the Wolverines, 10-0. Navy’s offense tallied 165 yards behind the powering attack of Hamilton and Henry Caldwell who scored Navy’s lone touchdown on a one-yard plunge. Jubilation from the victory continued after the game, as the Midshipmen tore down the goal post at each end of the field and carried away all the markers that lined both sides of the field. Navy headed into its season finale against Army with a 9-0 record. The game was to be played in Chicago at Soldier Field, which had been built as a memorial to the men killed in World War I. It was only natural Army and Navy would be invited to play the inaugural contest there. James R. Harrison of the New York Times described the game as "the greatest of its time and as a national spectacle." Over 110,000 people witnessed the Midshipmen open up a 14-0 lead on the Cadets, only to see Army fight back to take a 21-14 lead early in the third quarter. The Navy offense responded behind its strong ground game led by running back Alan Shapley. On fourth down and three yards to go, Shapley ran eight yards for a touchdown to tie the game at 21. As the final quarter concluded, Army mounted a brief threat only to miss a 25-yard field goal. The tie gave the Midshipmen a share of the national championship based on retroactive rankings by both the William Boand and Deke Houlgate mathematical poll systems.[3] Navy was one of the very few programs to field a football team during World War II, with John Whelchel
John Whelchel
leading the Midshipmen from 1942-1943 and Oscar Hagberg serving as head coach from 1944-1945. During those years, three of the four Navy teams finished ranked in the top 10 of the final AP poll.[17][18][19] George Sauer
George Sauer
left his post as Kansas head coach and took over in Annapolis from 1948-1949.[20] The Midshipmen struggled under Sauer's tutelage, posting a 3–13–2 record which included a winless 1948 season.[21] Eddie Erdelatz
Eddie Erdelatz
era (1950–1958)[edit]

Coach Erdelatz

Eddie Erdelatz
Eddie Erdelatz
returned to Navy, where he'd previously served as an assistant coach from 1945–1947, to take over a football program that had won just four games over the previous five seasons.[22] In 1950, Erdelatz led an upset of arch-rival Army.[23] The Black Knights entered the game with an 8–0 record which had not lost in 28 contests.[23] Army also had defeated Navy five times in the last six games.[23] Although Navy had only a 2–6 record, an outstanding defensive effort resulted in a 14–2 victory for the Midshipmen.[23] After two years at Navy, Erdelatz's record stood at 5–12–1, but he would never again have a losing season in his final seven seasons and would finish 5–3–1 in his games against Army. In 1954, the team finished 8–2, losing close games to Pittsburgh and Notre Dame.[24] Erdelatz labeled this squad, "A Team Called Desire" and then went on to shut out Ole in the 1955 Sugar Bowl.[25] Three years later, the Midshipmen competed in the Cotton Bowl Classic, where they knocked off Rice University, 20–7.[26] The latter win came one year after Navy's bid to play in a bowl game was rejected despite having only one loss. After the bowl victory over Rice, Erdelatz was courted by other schools and nearly accepted the task of replacing Bear Bryant
Bear Bryant
at Texas A&M University.[27] After the 1958 season, he was also seen as a candidate for the NFL's San Francisco 49ers
San Francisco 49ers
head coaching job, but began spring practice the following year at Navy.[28] On April 8, 1959, Erdelatz resigned as head coach of the Midshipmen, citing a number of factors, including the desire for an easier schedule.[29] Wayne Hardin
Wayne Hardin
era (1959–1964)[edit]

Roger Staubach
Roger Staubach
(12) won the Heisman Trophy in 1963.

From 1959 to 1964, Wayne Hardin
Wayne Hardin
was the head coach at Navy, where he compiled a 38–22–2 record.[30] His Navy teams posted five consecutive wins against archrival Army, a feat not surpassed until 2007 when Paul Johnson's Navy squad won their sixth consecutive contest in the Army–Navy Game.[31] Hardin coached Navy's two winners of the Heisman Trophy, Joe Bellino, who received the award in 1960,[32] and Roger Staubach, who did so in 1963.[33] Hardin resigned as Navy's head coach following a 3–6–1 record in 1964.[34] Bill Elias era (1965–1968)[edit] Virginia head coach Bill Elias replaced Hardin, and the Midshipmen struggled mightilty under Elias' leadership. Elias' Midshipmen posted a 15–22–3 record in his four seasons,[35] which included three non-winning seasons. Elias was fired following a 2–8 season in 1968.[36] Rick Forzano era (1969–1972)[edit] Former UConn head coach Rick Forzano was hired as Elias' replacement in 1969.[37][38] However, the Midshipmen's struggles continued, with Navy failing to post a single winning season, something that hadn't occurred in Annapolis in decades. Forzano's teams posted yearly records of 1–9,[39] 2–9,[40] 3–8[41] and 4–7.[42] Forzano resigned after the 1972 season.[43] George Welsh era (1973–1981)[edit] Penn State assistant coach and Navy alum George Welsh succeeded Forzano as Navy's head coach.[44] He inherited a Navy Midshipmen football program that had only had one winning season since the days of Roger Staubach. He led the Midshipmen to three bowl game appearances and their first nine-win season in 16 years.[45][46] In nine seasons, Welsh compiled a record of 55–46–1,[45] making him the service academy's most successful coach.[47] In 1982, Welsh left Navy to become the head coach at Virginia.[48] Gary Tranquill era (1982–1986)[edit] West Virginia offensive coordinator Gary Tranquill was hired as Welsh's replacement in 1982.[49] Tranquill's Midshipmen compiled a 6–5 record in 1982,[50] but it was downhill from there. 1983 saw a 3–8 record[51] followed by back-to-back four-win seasons in 1984 and 1985.[52][53] A 3–8 campaign in 1986 ended Tranquill's tenure at Navy as the school declined to renew his contract.[54] One notable assistant coach during this time was Nick Saban, the legendary head coach at Alabama[55][better source needed]. Elliot Uzelac era (1987–1989)[edit] Former Western Michigan head coach Elliot Uzelac was hired by Navy to serve as the school's 34th head football coach in 1987.[56] Navy's struggles continued, with the Midshipmen posting records of 2–9 in 1987[57] followed by back-to-back 3–8 seasons in 1988 and 1989.[58][59] Uzelac was fired following the 1989 season.[60] George Chaump era (1990–1994)[edit] Marshall head coach George Chaump was hired as Uzelac's replacement in 1990.[61] Chaump was unable to revive the Midshipmen football program, compiling a record of 14–41 in five seasons.[62] Chaump's Midshipmen posted back-to-back 1–10 records in 1991 and 1992.[63][64] Navy fired Chaump after the 1994 season in which the Midshipmen finished 3–8.[65][66] Charlie Weatherbie era (1995–2001)[edit] Utah State head coach Charlie Weatherbie was hired to replace Chaump in 1995.[67] Under Weatherbie, Navy did have a couple of winning seasons, the first coming in 1996 with a record of 9–3 with a win in the Aloha Bowl.[68][69] That was followed with a 7–4 campaign the following year.[70] After that, however, Navy struggled, failing to post a record better than a 5–7 record. After a 1–10 season in 2000[71] followed by an 0–7 start to the 2001 season,[72] Weatherbie was fired.[73] Paul Johnson era (2002–2007)[edit]

Coach Johnson instructs a player during a game against Duke in 2004.

In 2002, Paul Johnson departed Georgia Southern and was hired as the 37th Navy head football coach.[74] Johnson's initial season saw the Midshipmen win only two of 12 games,[75] though the season ended on a high note with his first victory over Army,[76] which would not beat Navy again until 2016.[77] Subsequently, Johnson's teams enjoyed a high degree of success. The 2003 team completed the regular season with an 8–4 mark,[78] including wins over both Air Force and Army, and earned a berth in the Houston Bowl, Navy's first bowl game since 1996. However, the Midshipmen lost to Texas Tech, 38–14.[79] In 2004, Johnson's team posted the program's best record since 1957, finishing the regular season at 9–2[80] and once again earning a bowl berth, this time in the Emerald Bowl. There Johnson coached the Midshipmen to a win over New Mexico, 34–19, the fifth bowl win in the school's history.[81] The win gave Navy 10 wins on the season, tying a school record that had stood since 1905. For his efforts, Johnson received the Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Award.[82] The 2005 Navy squad recorded a mark of 8–4,[83] highlighted by victories over Army, Air Force, and Colorado State in the Poinsettia Bowl. In 2007, Johnson coached the Midshipmen to their first win over rival Notre Dame since 1963, winning 46–44 in triple-overtime.[84] Navy finished the season with an 8–5 record.[85] Johnson dominated the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy
Commander-in-Chief's Trophy
competition, going 11–1 (.917) in his six years, with the only loss against another service academy coming at the hands of Air Force in his first season. He was the first coach in Navy's history to go 6–0 in his first six seasons against Army (Ken Niumatalolo, who followed Johnson at Navy, went 8-0 against Army in his first eight seasons), and his 2006 senior class was the first in Navy history to win the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy all four of their years. Much of Johnson's success at Navy was predicated on his triple option flexbone offense, a run-oriented attack that led NCAA Division I-A/FBS football in rushing yards three of his last four years at Navy. Johnson departed Navy for the head coaching position at Georgia Tech after the end of the 2007 regular season.[86] Ken Niumatalolo
Ken Niumatalolo
era (2008–present)[edit]

Coach Niumatalolo

Ken Niumatalolo
Ken Niumatalolo
was promoted from offensive line coach to head football coach of the Naval Academy on December 8, 2007 after Johnson's departure for Georgia Tech.[87][88] Niumatalolo is the 38th head football coach in Naval Academy history. On January 7, 2009, Niumatalolo was given a contract extension, although terms and length of the extension were not released.[89] With Niumatalolo as Navy's head coach, beginning with the 2008 season, the Mids have continued their run of success. Highlights in 2008 included an upset in Winston-Salem
Winston-Salem
over #16 Wake Forest, 24–17, the Mids' first victory over a ranked team in 23 years,[90] and a 34–0 shutout victory of Army.[91] Other highlights of Niumatalolo's years as head coach at Navy include: Navy defeated Army in each of Niumatalolo's first nine seasons as head coach, not losing to Army until 2016. The 2016 loss ended a streak of 14 Midshipmen wins in the Army–Navy Game,[92] the longest winning streak for either side in the rivalry. The Midshipmen captured the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy
Commander-in-Chief's Trophy
in 2008, 2009 and 2012. They went on to capture the trophy outright in 2013, with a 34–7 win against Army, and recaptured it outright in 2015 with wins over Army and Air Force. The Midshipmen have nine winning seasons during Niumatalolo's 10 full years as head coach. The Mids have played in nine bowl games during Niumatalolo's tenure, winning the 2009 Texas Bowl,[93] 2013 Armed Forces Bowl,[94] 2014 Poinsettia Bowl, and 2015 Military Bowl. Navy defeated longtime rival Notre Dame in consecutive years, 2009 and 2010, for the first time since the early 1960s.[95][96] The Midshipmen also defeated Notre Dame in 2016, when the Midshipmen went on to finish with a 9–5 record.[97][98] Niumatalolo led Navy into the American Athletic Conference
American Athletic Conference
after 134 years as an independent in 2015, the first time Navy joined a conference in the school's history.[99] National championships[edit]

Season Coach Selector Record

1926 Bill Ingram Boand System, Houlgate System 9–0–1

1926 national championship team

Three undefeated teams with nearly identical records would cause a stir among fans and pollsters today, but this was the case when Navy earned its lone national championship in 1926, as the Midshipmen shared the honor with Stanford and Alabama. A 7–7 tie between Alabama and Stanford in the 1926 Rose Bowl gave Stanford a 10–0–1 mark, while the Crimson Tide and the Mids each had identical 9–0–1 records. The Midshipmen opened the '26 season with a new coach, Bill Ingram. A Navy football standout from 1916 through 1918, Ingram took over a Navy team that had only won seven games in the previous two seasons combined. One of the keys to Navy’s 1926 squad was a potent offense led by All-America tackle and team captain Frank Wickhorst, who proved to be a punishing blocker for the Navy offense. One member of the Navy offense that appreciated the blocking of Wickhorst was Tom Hamilton. The quarterback and kicker had a pair of 100-yard rushing games en route to All-America honors. Navy's biggest win that year was against Michigan in front of 80,000 fans in Baltimore. The Mids scored 10 second half points to upset the Wolverines, 10–0. Navy’s offense tallied 165 yards behind the powering attack of Hamilton and Henry Caldwell who scored Navy’s lone touchdown on a one-yard plunge. Jubilation from the victory continued after the game, as the Midshipmen tore down the goal post at each end of the field and carried away all the markers that lined both sides of the field. Navy headed into its season finale against Army with a 9–0 record. The game was to be played in Chicago at Soldier Field, which had been built as a memorial to the men killed in World War I. It was only natural Army and Navy would be invited to play the inaugural contest there. James R. Harrison of the New York Times described the game as "the greatest of its time and as a national spectacle." Over 110,000 people witnessed the Midshipmen open up a 14–0 lead on the Cadets, only to see Army fight back to take a 21–14 lead early in the third quarter. The Navy offense responded behind its strong ground game led by running back Alan Shapley. On fourth down and three yards to go, Shapley ran eight yards for a touchdown to tie the game at 21. As the final quarter concluded, Army mounted a brief threat only to miss a 25-yard field goal. The tie gave the Midshipmen a share of the national championship based on retroactive rankings by both the William Boand and Deke Houlgate mathematical poll systems.[3] This remains Navy's only national championship. Bowl games[edit] See also: List of Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
bowl games Navy has participated in 23 bowl games, garnering a record of 11–11–1.

Season Coach Bowl Opponent Result

1923 Bob Folwell Rose Bowl Washington T 14–14

1954 Eddie Erdelatz Sugar Bowl Ole Miss W 21–0

1957 Eddie Erdelatz Cotton Bowl Classic Rice W 20–7

1960 Wayne Hardin Orange Bowl Missouri L 14–24

1963 Wayne Hardin Cotton Bowl Classic Texas L 6–28

1978 George Welsh Holiday Bowl BYU W 23–16

1980 George Welsh Garden State Bowl Houston L 0–35

1981 George Welsh Liberty Bowl Ohio State L 28–31

1996 Charlie Weatherbie Aloha Bowl California W 43–38

2003 Paul Johnson Houston Bowl Texas Tech L 14–38

2004 Paul Johnson Emerald Bowl New Mexico W 34–19

2005 Paul Johnson Poinsettia Bowl Colorado State W 51–30

2006 Paul Johnson Meineke Car Care Bowl Boston College L 24–25

2007 Ken Niumatalolo Poinsettia Bowl Utah L 32–35

2008 Ken Niumatalolo EagleBank Bowl Wake Forest L 19–29

2009 Ken Niumatalolo Texas Bowl Missouri W 35–13

2010 Ken Niumatalolo Poinsettia Bowl San Diego State L 14–35

2012 Ken Niumatalolo Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl Arizona State L 28–62

2013 Ken Niumatalolo Armed Forces Bowl Middle Tennessee W 24–6

2014 Ken Niumatalolo Poinsettia Bowl San Diego State W 17–16

2015 Ken Niumatalolo Military Bowl Pittsburgh W 44–28

2016 Ken Niumatalolo Armed Forces Bowl Louisiana Tech L 45–48

2017 Ken Niumatalolo Military Bowl Virginia W 49–7

Head coaches[edit] Main article: List of Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
head football coaches

Coach (Alma Mater) Seasons Years Games W L T Pct.

Vaulx Carter
Vaulx Carter
(USNA) 1 1882 1 1 0 0 1.000

Ben Crosby
Ben Crosby
(Yale) 1 1892 7 5 2 0 .714

Josh Hartwell
Josh Hartwell
(Yale) 1 1893 8 5 3 0 .625

Bill Wurtenburg
Bill Wurtenburg
(Yale) 1 1894 7 4 1 2 .714

Matt McClung
Matt McClung
(Lehigh) 1 1895 7 5 2 0 .714

Johnny Poe
Johnny Poe
(Princeton) 1 1896 8 5 3 0 .625

Bill Armstrong (Yale) 3 1897–99 25 19 5 1 .780

Garrett Cochran
Garrett Cochran
(Princeton) 1 1900 9 6 3 0 .667

Doc Hillebrand (Princeton) 2 1901-02 21 8 11 2 .429

Burr Chamberlain
Burr Chamberlain
(Yale) 1 1903 12 4 7 1 .375

Paul Dashiell
Paul Dashiell
(Lehigh) 3 1904 34 25 5 4 .794

Joe Reeves
Joe Reeves
(USNA) 1 1907 12 9 2 1 .741

Frank Berrien (USNA) 3 1908-10 29 21 5 3 .776

Doug Howard (USNA) 4 1911–14 36 25 7 4 .750

Jonas H. Ingram
Jonas H. Ingram
(USNA) 2 1915–16 19 9 8 2 .526

Gil Dobie
Gil Dobie
(Minnesota) 3 1917–19 20 17 3 0 .850

Bob Folwell
Bob Folwell
(Penn) 5 1920–24 38 24 12 2 .658

Jack Owsley
Jack Owsley
(Yale) 1 1925 8 5 2 1 .688

Bill Ingram
Bill Ingram
(USNA) 5 1926–30 49 32 13 4 .694

Rip Miller (Notre Dame) 3 1931–33 29 12 15 2 .448

Tom Hamilton (USNA) 5 1934–36, 46-47 45 21 23 1 .478

Hank Hardwick (USNA) 2 1937–38 18 8 7 3 .528

Swede Larson (USNA) 3 1939–41 27 16 8 3 .648

Billick Whelchel
Billick Whelchel
(USNA) 2 1942–43 18 13 5 0 .722

Oscar Hagberg (USNA) 2 1944–45 18 13 4 1 .750

George Sauer
George Sauer
(Nebraska) 2 1948–49 18 3 13 2 .222

Eddie Erdelatz
Eddie Erdelatz
(St. Mary's) 9 1950–58 84 50 26 8 .643

Wayne Hardin
Wayne Hardin
(Coll. of Pacific) 6 1959–64 62 38 22 2 .629

Bill Elias (Maryland) 4 1965–68 40 15 22 3 .413

Rick Forzano (Kent State) 4 1969–72 43 10 33 0 .233

George Welsh (USNA) 9 1973–81 102 55 46 1 .544

Gary Tranquill (Wittenberg) 5 1982–86 55 20 34 1 .373

Elliot Uzelac (W. Michigan) 3 1987–89 33 8 25 0 .242

George Chaump (Bloomsburg) 5 1990–94 55 14 41 0 .255

Charlie Weatherbie (Okla. St.) 7 1995–2001 75 30 45 0 .400

Rick Lantz (Central Conn. St.) <1 2001 3 0 3 0 .000

Paul Johnson (W. Carolina) 6 2002–2007 74 45 29 0 .608

Ken Niumatalolo
Ken Niumatalolo
(Hawaiʻi) 10 2007–Present 120 78 42 0 .650

Rivalries[edit] Army Black Knights[edit] Main article: Army–Navy Game

Navy celebrates after winning the 2005 Army–Navy Game
Army–Navy Game
on December 3, 2005.

The Navy-Army Game, played annually on the last weekend of the college football regular season in early December,[100] pits the football teams of the U.S. Military Academy
U.S. Military Academy
at West Point, New York
West Point, New York
(Army) against the Navy Midshipmen. It is one of the most traditional and enduring rivalries in college football, and is televised every year by CBS.[101] It was in the 1963 Army–Navy game that instant replay made its television debut.[102] This game has always had inter-service "bragging rights" at stake; in past decades, when both Army and Navy were often national powers, the game occasionally had national championship implications.[103] However, as top-level college football has developed and grown, the high academic entrance requirements, height and weight limits, and the military commitment required of West Point and Annapolis graduates has reduced the overall competitiveness of both academies in comparison with other football programs.[103] While Navy has had a resurgence in recent years, Army has struggled to post winning seasons. However, the tradition of the game has ensured that it remains nationally televised to this day. One of the great appeals of this game to many fans is that its players are largely playing for the love of the game, since almost none will ever play in the NFL. The game is especially emotional for the seniors, called "first classmen" or "firsties" by both academies, since it is typically the last competitive football game they will ever play. During wartime, the game is even more emotional because some seniors may not return once they are deployed. For instance, in the 2004 game, at least one senior from the class of 2003 who was killed in Iraq, Navy's J. P. Blecksmith, was remembered.[104] The players placed their comrade's pads and jerseys on chairs on the sidelines. Much of the sentiment of the game goes out to those who share the uniform and who are overseas. Navy-Army is played in early December, typically in Philadelphia.[105] The game, however, has also been played in other locations such as New York, Baltimore, Chicago, and Pasadena.[106] Air Force Falcons[edit]

The Navy side of the Commander-in-Chief’s trophy

Main article: Commander in Chief's Trophy The Commander-in-Chief's Trophy
Commander-in-Chief's Trophy
is awarded to each season's winner of the triangular college football series among the United States Military Academy (Army), the United States Naval Academy
United States Naval Academy
(Navy), and the United States Air Force Academy (Air Force).[107] Navy controlled the trophy from 2003 to 2009, marking one of the longest times any academy has had possession of the prestigious trophy. Typically, the Navy–Air Force game is played in early October[107] followed by Army-Navy in early December. When Navy has possession of the trophy, it is displayed in a glass case in Bancroft Hall, the Midshipmen's dormitory. Navy has won 15 Commander-in-Chief's Trophies (1973, 1975, 1978, 1979, 1981, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2013, 2015). Notre Dame Fighting Irish[edit] Main article: Navy–Notre Dame football rivalry Navy has played Notre Dame in 87 annual games without interruption since 1927 with a record of 13–76–1.[108] Notre Dame plays this game to repay Navy for helping to keep Notre Dame financially afloat during World War II.[109][110][111] This series is scheduled to continue indefinitely.[112] From 1963, when Navy beat Notre Dame 35–14, to 2006, Notre Dame won 43 consecutive games against Navy, the longest such streak in Division 1-A football.[113] This streak ended on November 3, 2007, when Navy beat Notre Dame 46–44 in triple overtime.[84] Navy also bested Notre Dame in 2009 and 2010, which made the class of 2011 only the third class in Navy history to have beaten Notre Dame three times. Navy won 28-27 in 2016, making Coach Niumatalolo only the second coach in Navy history to defeat Notre Dame three times. When Navy is the home team for this game in even-numbered years, the Midshipmen have hosted the game off-campus at large stadiums used by NFL teams, usually FedExField
FedExField
in Landover, Maryland
Landover, Maryland
or M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore.[114] The Midshipmen have also hosted the Irish at John F. Kennedy Stadium and Veterans Stadium
Veterans Stadium
in Philadelphia.[114] Maryland Terrapins[edit]

A snap during the 2005 Navy-Maryland game.

See also: Crab Bowl Classic The intrastate rivalry between Maryland and Navy is referred to as the "Crab Bowl Classic."[115] Starting in 1905, the two teams have played sporadically over the years. Many of the early games were lopsided and Navy leads the series 14–7. In 2005, the teams renewed their rivalry and Maryland won, 23–20. The teams met again on Labor Day 2010 and Maryland won again, 17–14, after the Terps' goal-line stand with under a minute remaining. As of 2010, the winner of the Crab Bowl Classic is awarded the Crab Bowl Trophy, created by the Touchdown Club of Annapolis with underwriting from the D'Camera Group. [116] Rutgers Scarlet Knights[edit] This rivalry stems from Navy and Rutgers being two of the only three programs (the third is Army) to come out of the original, informal "Ivy League" that are still members of the top tier of NCAA college football (currently Division I-FBS).[117] Although the two teams only began a regular series relatively recently in 1995, the games between the two schools are often close and sometimes have controversy as in the 2004 and 2007 editions of the series. The rivalry dates to 1891, making the two schools each other's oldest active football rivals.[118] The schools have met 25 times, with Rutgers leading the series at 13–11–1 all-time after the 2014 Navy loss. Navy and Rutgers have played most years since 1995, but do not have additional games scheduled at this time with Rutgers' move to the Big Ten
Big Ten
and Navy's move from independents to the American.[119] SMU Mustangs[edit] The Gansz Trophy
Gansz Trophy
was created in 2009 through a collaboration between the athletic departments of the Naval Academy and Southern Methodist University.[120] The trophy is named for Frank Gansz who played linebacker at the Naval Academy from 1957 through 1959. Gansz later served on the coaching staffs at numerous colleges, including all three service academies and Southern Methodist, as well as several professional teams. The two teams have met 18 times with Navy leading the all-time series 11–7, and the trophy series 5–0.[121] Pittsburgh Panthers[edit] Navy and Pittsburgh recently renewed their rivalry, which began in 1912, and was played 26 times in 29 years between 1961 and 1989.[122] The contest was then played consecutively between 2007 and 2009 and again in 2013.[123] After a 44–28 victory for Navy in the 2015 Military Bowl in Annapolis,[124] the series now stands with Pitt leading 22–15–3.[125] Of historic interest, it was during the Pitt-Navy game at Annapolis on October 23, 1976, that Pitt running back Tony Dorsett
Tony Dorsett
broke the NCAA career rushing record.[126] Individual award winners[edit]

Retired football jerseys[127]

Number Player

12 Roger Staubach

19 Keenan Reynolds

27 Joe Bellino

30 Napoleon McCallum

Heisman Trophy[edit]

Joe Bellino – 1960 Roger Staubach
Roger Staubach
– 1963

Maxwell Award[edit]

Ronald Beagle – 1954 Bob Reifsnyder – 1957 Joe Bellino – 1960 Roger Staubach
Roger Staubach
– 1963 Richard "Richie" Peterson - 1991

Other awards[edit]

Percy Northcroft All-American (1906, 1908) Zerbin Singleton – Disney's Wide World of Sports Spirit Award (2007) Keenan Reynolds – Sullivan Award (2016)

College Football Hall of Fame[edit] Navy has 19 players and 3 coaches in the College Football Hall of Fame:

Players (Position, Years Players, Year Inducted, Other School Played at (if any))

Ron Beagle (End, 1953–55, 1986) College HOF Bio Joe Bellino (Halfback, 1958–60, 1977) College HOF Bio Buzz Borries (Halfback, 1932–34, 1960) College HOF Bio George Brown (Guard, 1942–43, 1947, 1985, San Diego State) College HOF Bio John Brown (Guard / Tackle, 1910–13, 1951) College HOF Bio Slade Cutter
Slade Cutter
(Tackle, 1932–34, 1967) College HOF Bio John Dalton (Halfback, 1908–11, 1970) College HOF Bio Dick Duden (End, 1943–45, 2001) College HOF Bio Steve Eisenhauer (Tackle / Guard, 1951–53, 1994) College HOF Bio Tom Hamilton (Halfback, 1924–26, 1965) College HOF Bio Jonas Ingram
Jonas Ingram
(Fullback, 1904, 1906, 1968) College HOF Bio Napoleon McCallum
Napoleon McCallum
(Running Back, 1981–85, 2002) College HOF Bio Skip Minisi
Skip Minisi
(Halfback, 1944–47, 1985, Pennsylvania) College HOF Bio Bob Reifsnyder (Tackle, 1956–58, 1997) College HOF Bio Clyde Scott
Clyde Scott
(Halfback, 1944–48, 1971, Arkansas) College HOF Bio Dick Scott (Center, 1945–47, 1987) College HOF Bio Roger Staubach
Roger Staubach
(Quarterback, 1962–64, 1981) College HOF Bio Don Whitmire (Tackle, 1941–44, 1956, Alabama) College HOF Bio Frank Wickhorst
Frank Wickhorst
(Tackle, 1924–26, 1970) College HOF Bio Chet Moeller (Safety, 1973–75, 2010) College HOF Bio

Coaches (Year Inducted)

George Welsh (2004) College HOF Bio Bill Ingram
Bill Ingram
(1973) College HOF Bio Gil Dobie
Gil Dobie
(1951) College HOF Bio

CoSIDA Academic All-Americans[edit]

Year Player Class Team

1953–54 Steve Eisenhauer '54

1957–58 Tom Forrestal '58

1958–59 Joe Tranchini '60 1st

1969–70 Dan Pike '70

1974–75 Tim Harden '75 2nd

1975–76 Chet Moeller '76 2nd

1979–80 Ted Dumbauld '81 2nd

1980–81 Ted Dumbauld '81 1st

1999-00 Terrence Anderson '00 2nd

2009-10 John Dowd '12 2nd

2010-11 John Dowd '12 1st

National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame National Scholar-Athlete Awards[edit] "The Most Prestigious Scholarships In College Football Since 1959"

Joe Ince – 1963 Alan Roodhouse – 1965 Daniel Pike – 1969 Timothy Harden – 1974 Theodore Dumbauld – 1980 Carl C. Voss – 1991 Terrence Anderson – 1999

Athletic Hall of Fame[edit]

For football players in the USNA Athletic Hall of Fame, see footnote.[128]

The Athletic Hall of Fame is housed in Lejeune Hall. Among the exhibits are two Heisman Trophies, won by Joe Bellino in 1960 and Roger Staubach
Roger Staubach
in 1963.[129] Alumni[edit]

See: Football alumni

Facilities[edit] See also: Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
§ Facilities, and United States Naval Academy § Campus

Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium Ricketts Hall – This building contains the locker room for the varsity football team and offices for football, basketball, and lacrosse.[130] It also contains the Jack Lengyel Sports Conditioning Facility, which is one of three "strength and conditioning facilities" at the academy. The weight-room facility serves football, men's lacrosse, baseball and wrestling.[131] Rip Miller Field – Named for Edgar Miller, who was the Navy head football coach for three seasons (1931–1933). The field is used by both lacrosse and sprint football.[131] Wesley Brown Field House
Wesley Brown Field House
– The field house has a full-length, 76,000-square-foot (7,100 m2), retractable Magic Carpet AstroTurf football field.

Future non-conference opponents[edit] Announced schedules as of June 14, 2017[132]

2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024

at Florida Atlantic at Hawaii vs Holy Cross vs Notre Dame vs Marshall at Marshall

vs Air Force vs Lehigh vs Air Force vs Lafayette vs Air Force at Air Force vs Air Force at Air Force

at Notre Dame at Air Force at Notre Dame at Air Force at Notre Dame vs Notre Dame at Notre Dame vs Notre Dame

vs Army (at Philadelphia, PA) vs Notre Dame (at San Diego, CA) vs Army vs Army vs Army vs Army vs Army vs Army

vs Army

References[edit]

^ " American Athletic Conference
American Athletic Conference
Brand Standards Guide" (PDF). July 11, 2014. Retrieved November 8, 2016.  ^ "Navy football officially joins AAC, ending 134 years as independent". National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). July 1, 2015. Retrieved December 3, 2015.  ^ a b c "OFFICIAL 2007 NCAA DIVISION I FOOTBALL RECORDS BOOK" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 June 2008. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "The Official Web Site of Naval Academy Varsity Athletics". Navysports.Com. 2016-06-27. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ Clary (1997), p. 9 ^ a b c d Clary (1997), p. 10 ^ Clary (1965), p. 9 ^ a b Bealle (1951), p. 7 ^ a b c d e Patterson (2000), p. 21 ^ Cite error: The named reference Bealle 8 was invoked but never defined (see the help page). ^ Clary (1997), p. 11 ^ a b c Anderson (2004), "Chapter 10: The Game" ^ Naval Academy Athletic Association (2005). "Navy: Football History" (PDF). 2005 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Football Media Guide. United States Naval Academy Athletics. p. 154. Retrieved April 29, 2014.  ^ Castle, K.J. (January 5, 2011). "History of Navy Football". Livestrong.com. Early Years. Retrieved April 18, 2013.  ^ " Frank Berrien Coaching Record College Football at". Sports-reference.com. 1970-01-01. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ "1910 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results College Football at". Sports-reference.com. 1970-01-01. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ "1943 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results College Football at". Sports-reference.com. 1970-01-01. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ "1944 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results College Football at". Sports-reference.com. 1970-01-01. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ "1945 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results College Football at". Sports-reference.com. 1970-01-01. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ " George Sauer
George Sauer
Coaching Record College Football at". Sports-reference.com. 1970-01-01. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ "1948 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results College Football at". Sports-reference.com. 1970-01-01. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ "SCOUTING REPORTS ON ARMY-NAVY—SAVE FOR USE SATURDAY, NOV. 27". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ a b c d By. "Navy got Army's goat in 1950". Washington Times. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ "1954 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results College Football at". Sports-reference.com. 1970-01-01. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ "1955 - How They Got There / Allstate Sugar Bowl". www.allstatesugarbowl.org. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ 1 second ago. " Rice University
Rice University
Football :: Official Athletic Site". Riceowls.com. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ Maule, Tex. "A naval disengagement". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "April 21, 1953 - Navy Coach to Aid All-Star Staff Chicago Tribune Archive". Archives.chicagotribune.com. 1953-04-21. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ Special
Special
To The New York Times (1959-04-09). "Erdelatz, Hinting at Disagreement, Resigns as Navy Head Football Coach; ACADEMY FACING 'ACUTE PROBLEM' - NYTimes.com". Mobile.nytimes.com. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ " Wayne Hardin
Wayne Hardin
Coaching Record College Football at". Sports-reference.com. 1970-01-01. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ " Wayne Hardin
Wayne Hardin
To Be Officially Enshrined Into College Football Hall of Fame - Temple University Athletics". Owlsports.com. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ "Heisman Trophy". Heisman.com. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ "Heisman Trophy". Heisman.com. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ Times, Gordon S. White Jr ; Special
Special
To The New York (18 December 1964). "Hardin Resigns After 6 Seasons as Head Football Coach at Naval Academy". Retrieved 19 June 2017 – via NYTimes.com.  ^ "William Elias Coaching Record - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "Lubbock Avalanche-Journal from Lubbock, Texas on December 12, 1968 · Page 38". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "Anderson Herald from Anderson, Indiana on January 16, 1969 · Page 13". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "St. Petersburg Times - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "1969 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "1970 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "1971 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "1972 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ Times, Special
Special
To The New York (2 February 1973). "NAVY COACH QUITS, JOINS LION STAFF". Retrieved 19 June 2017 – via NYTimes.com.  ^ Times, Special
Special
To The New York (16 February 1973). "George Welsh Is Named Football Coach at Navy". Retrieved 19 June 2017 – via NYTimes.com.  ^ a b "George Welsh Coaching Record - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "1978 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "George Welsh Selected to College Football Hall of Fame". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "Navy coach George Welsh has told his football players..." Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "Gary Tranquill, offensive coordinator at West Virginia, was expected..." Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "1982 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "1983 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "1984 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "1985 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ Sell, Dave; Sell, Dave (8 December 1986). "Tranquill's Contract Not Renewed by Navy". Retrieved 19 June 2017 – via washingtonpost.com.  ^ "Nick Saban"..com. Retrieved 8 January 2018.  ^ "Army Vs. Navy: Winning Makes A Season Perfect College Football". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "1987 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "1988 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "1989 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ Cotton, Anthony; Cotton, Anthony (12 December 1989). "NAVAL ACADEMY DISMISSES FOOTBALL COACH UZELAC". Retrieved 19 June 2017 – via washingtonpost.com.  ^ BEMBRY, JERRY (2 September 1990). "Chaump Is Determined to Revive Navy". Retrieved 19 June 2017 – via LA Times.  ^ " George Chaump Coaching Record - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "1991 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "1992 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "1994 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ Nakamura, David; Nakamura, David (5 December 1994). "NAVAL ACADEMY DISMISSES CHAUMP AS FOOTBALL COACH". Retrieved 19 June 2017 – via washingtonpost.com.  ^ "Navy hires Weatherbie from Utah State". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "1996 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "ESPN Classic To Air 1996 Aloha Bowl Game". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "1997 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "2000 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "2001 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "Navy fires Weatherbie in midst of winless season". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "NAVYSPORTS.COM - The Official Web Site of Naval Academy Varsity Athletics - Paul Johnson Bio". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "2002 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ Valkenburg, Kevin Van. "Navy does number on Army as Candeto accounts for 7 TDs". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "Army vs. Navy score: Black Knights power way to win, end 14-year losing streak". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "2003 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "Red Raiders Capsize Navy In Houston Bowl". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "2004 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "New Mexico vs. Navy - Game Recap - December 30, 2004 - ESPN". ESPN.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "Bobbydoddfoundation.com". www.bobbydoddfoundation.com. Archived from the original on 2009-12-09.  ^ "2005 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ a b "Navy vs. Notre Dame - Game Recap - November 3, 2007 - ESPN". ESPN.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "2007 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ The Associated Press (8 December 2007). "Georgia Tech Hires Navy's Johnson". Retrieved 19 June 2017 – via NYTimes.com.  ^ "Navy quickly promotes Niumatalolo to coach". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "Niumatalolo follows Johnson at Navy". SportsIllustrated.com. Associated Press. 2007-12-08. Archived from the original on 2007-12-10. Retrieved 2007-12-13.  ^ Navy coach Niumatalolo gets contract extension Archived 2009-04-05 at the Wayback Machine.. Retrieved on 2009-01-08. ^ "Navy vs. Wake Forest - Game Recap - September 27, 2008 - ESPN". ESPN.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ " Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
vs. Army Black Knights - Box Score - December 6, 2008". www.foxsports.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ Cite error: The named reference Hiring ESPN was invoked but never defined (see the help page). ^ "Navy Vs Missouri". Retrieved 9 March 2014.  ^ Hawkins, Stephen. "Navy wins Armed Forces Bowl 24-6 over MTSU". Retrieved 9 March 2014.  ^ "Navy vs. Notre Dame - Game Recap - November 7, 2009 - ESPN". ESPN.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "Notre Dame vs. Navy - Game Summary - October 23, 2010 - ESPN". ESPN.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "Notre Dame vs. Navy - Game Recap - November 5, 2016 - ESPN". ESPN.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "2016 Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "Navy football officially joins AAC, ending 134 years as independent". 1 July 2015. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "College GameDay Travels to Army/Navy for Third Straight Year - ESPN MediaZone". espnmediazone.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ Walker, Childs. "'Biggest rivalry in sports,' Army-Navy will put spotlight on Baltimore". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ Malinowski, Author: Erik Malinowski Erik. "Dec. 7, 1963: Video Instant Replay Comes to TV". WIRED. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ a b Atkin, Ross (29 November 1994). "That Was the Rivalry That Was: Decline of the Army-Navy Game". Retrieved 19 June 2017 – via Christian Science Monitor.  ^ Horne, Lisa. "JP Blecksmith: College Football's Greatest Pride". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ http://www.bizjournals.com/philadelphia/news/2016/12/09/army-navy-game-location-philadelphia-2017.html ^ "Army-Navy game names three future sites". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ a b "Army hosts rival Air Force for Commander-in-Chief Trophy". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "mcubed.net : NCAAF Football : Series records : Navy vs. Notre Dame". www.mcubed.net. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "The Ties That Bind". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "How Navy saved Notre Dame after World War II
World War II
– the team's shared histories". 31 August 2012. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ Heinz, Matt. "The Intriguing History of Why Notre Dame Plays Navy Every Season". www.rantsports.com. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "Notre Dame and Navy: Why We Play, Part 1". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ Writer, NANCY ARMOUR, AP National. "Notre Dame runs over Navy with 56-14 victory". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ a b "The Notre Dame Navy Football Rivalry // UHND.com". 6 October 2015. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "Crab Bowl Classic: Maryland vs. Navy - Maryland Sports". www.marylandsports.us. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "Crab Bowl Trophy". 28 August 2010. The Capital website. Retrieved 29 August 2010. ^ "Navy-Rutgers is revival meeting". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "mcubed.net : NCAAF Football : Series records : Rutgers vs. Navy". www.mcubed.net. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "B1G East Football Future Non-Conference Schedule Review". Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ Football: "SMU-Navy To Battle For Gansz Trophy: Schools Establish Traveling Trophy To Honor Coaching Legend". October 7, 2009. Naval Academy Varsity Athletics official website. Retrieved 2010-02-20. "SMU-Navy To Battle For Gansz Trophy: Schools Establish Traveling Trophy To Honor Coaching Legend". October 6, 2009. SMUMUSTANGS.com. Retrieved 2010-02-20. ^ "mcubed.net : NCAAF Football : Series records : Navy vs. SMU". www.mcubed.net. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ "mcubed.net : NCAAF Football : Series records : Navy vs. Pittsburgh". www.mcubed.net. Retrieved 19 June 2017.  ^ DiPaola, Jerry. "Pitt vs. Navy matchup played 50 years ago was one for the history books". TribLIVE.com. Retrieved 2017-02-14.  ^ "2015 Military Bowl". Military Bowl presented by Northrop Grumman. Retrieved 2017-02-14.  ^ "Winsipedia - Pittsburgh Panthers vs. Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
football series history games list". Winsipedia. Retrieved 2017-02-14.  ^ "Let's Learn From the Past: The 1976 Pitt Panthers". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved 2017-02-14.  ^ Lamb, p.61 ^ Hall of Fame Index (by sport). Naval Academy Varsity Athletics official website. Retrieved 2010-11-10. ^ Bailey, Steve (August 22, 2008). "In Annapolis, Md., the Past Is Always at Hand". New York Times. Retrieved 2011-01-08.  ^ See United States Naval Academy#Halls and principal buildings. ^ a b See Navy Midshipmen#Facilities. ^ " Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
Football Schedules and Future Schedules". fbschedules.com. Retrieved June 14, 2017. 

External links[edit]

Official website

v t e

Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
football

Venues

Worden Field
Worden Field
(1890–1923) Thompson Stadium (1924–1958) Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium
Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium
(1959–present) Memorial Stadium (alternate)

Bowls & rivalries

Bowl games Army: Army–Navy Game
Army–Navy Game
(Commander-in-Chief's Trophy) Air Force (Commander-in-Chief's Trophy) Johns Hopkins Maryland: Crab Bowl Classic Notre Dame (Rip Miller Trophy) SMU (Gansz Trophy)

Culture & lore

Bill the Goat "Anchors Aweigh" "I believe that we will win!" Marching band "Navy ends the drought" 2007 North Texas game

People

Head coaches Statistical leaders

Seasons

1879 1880 1881 1882 1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889 1890 1891 1892 1893 1894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

National championship seasons in bold

v t e

United States Naval Academy

Located in: Annapolis, Maryland

Academics

Prep School Small Satellite Program Naval Academy Foreign Affairs Conference

Athletics

Navy Midshipmen

Teams Baseball Men's Basketball Women's Basketball Football Men's Lacrosse Men's Soccer

Other Navy–Army Cup Navy–Army Game Commander-in-Chief's Trophy

Campus

Alumni Hall Bancroft Hall Cemetery Glenn Warner Soccer Facility Halsey Field House Herndon Monument Hubbard Hall McMullen Hockey Arena Museum

Naval Academy Chapel Naval Academy Jewish Chapel Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium Terwilliger Brothers Field at Max Bishop Stadium Wesley Brown Field House

History

Fort Severn

People

Alumni Superintendents Commandants

Traditions

Bill the Goat Honor Concept Induction day "Navy Blue and Gold" Plebe Summer

Founded: 1845 Students: Approximately 4,500

v t e

American Athletic Conference
American Athletic Conference
football

East Division

Cincinnati Bearcats Connecticut Huskies East Carolina Pirates South Florida Bulls Temple Owls UCF Knights

West Division

Houston Cougars Memphis Tigers Navy Midshipmen SMU Mustangs Tulane Green Wave Tulsa Golden Hurricane

Championships & awards

Conference champions All-time standings Championship Game (2015– ) Awards

Seasons

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2

.