HOME
        TheInfoList






Natural resources are resources that exist without any actions of humankind. This includes all valued characteristics such as commercial and industrial use, aesthetic value, scientific interest and cultural value. On Earth, it includes sunlight, atmosphere, water, land (includes all minerals) along with all vegetation, and animal life.[1][2][3][4]

Particular areas such as the rainforest in Fatu-Hiva are often characterized by the biodiversity and geodiversity existent in their ecosystems. Natural resources may be further classified in different ways. Natural resources are materials and components (something that can be used) that can be found within the environment. Every man-made product is composed of natural resources (at its fundamental level). A natural resource may exist as a separate entity such as fresh water, air, as well as any living organism such as a fish, or it may exist in an alternate form that must be processed to obtain the resource such as metal ores, rare-earth elements, petroleum, and most forms of energy.

There is much debate worldwide over natural resource allocations. This is particularly true during periods of increasing scarcity and shortages (depletion and overconsumption of resources).

Theodo

Theodore Roosevelt[14]

Depletion of natural resources is associated with social inequity. Considering most biodiversity are located in developing countries,[15] depletion of this resource could result in losses of ecosystem services for these countries.[16] Some view this depletion as a major source of social unrest and conflicts in developing nations.[17]

At present, there is a particular concern for rainforest regions that hold most of the Earth's biodiversity.[18] According to Nelson,[19] deforestation and degradation affect 8.5% of the world's forests with 30% of the Earth's surface already cropped. If we consider that 80% of people rely on medicines obtained from plants and ​34 of the world's prescription medicines have ingredients taken from plants,[16]Depletion of natural resources is associated with social inequity. Considering most biodiversity are located in developing countries,[15] depletion of this resource could result in losses of ecosystem services for these countries.[16] Some view this depletion as a major source of social unrest and conflicts in developing nations.[17]

At pr

At present, there is a particular concern for rainforest regions that hold most of the Earth's biodiversity.[18] According to Nelson,[19] deforestation and degradation affect 8.5% of the world's forests with 30% of the Earth's surface already cropped. If we consider that 80% of people rely on medicines obtained from plants and ​34 of the world's prescription medicines have ingredients taken from plants,[16] loss of the world's rainforests could result in a loss of finding more potential life-saving medicines.[20]

The depletion of natural resources is caused by 'direct drivers of change'[19] such as Mining, petroleum extraction, fishing, and forestry as well as 'indirect drivers of change' such as demography (e.g. population growth), economy, society, politics, and technology.[19] The current practice of Agriculture is another factor causing depletion of natural resources. For example, the depletion of nutrients in the soil due to excessive use of nitrogen[19] and desertification.[10] The depletion of natural resources is a continuing concern for society. This is seen in the cited quote given by Theodore Roosevelt, a well-known conservationist and former United States president, who was opposed to unregulated natural resource extraction.

In 1982, the United Nations developed the World Charter for Nature, which recognized the need to protect nature from further depletion due to human activity. It states that measures must be taken at all societal levels, from international to individual, to protect nature. It outlines the need for sustainable use of natural resources and suggests that the protection of resources should be incorporated into national and international systems of law.[21] To look at the importance of protecting natural resources further, the World Ethic of Sustainability, developed by the IUCN, WWF and the UNEP in 1990,[22] set out eight values for sustainability, including the need to protect natural resources from depletion. Since the development of these documents, many measures have been taken to protect natural resources including establishment of the scientific field and practice of conservation biology and habitat conservation, respectively.

Conservation biology is the scientific study of the nature and status of Earth's biodiversity with the aim of protecting species, their habitats, and ecosystems from excessive rates of extinction.Conservation biology is the scientific study of the nature and status of Earth's biodiversity with the aim of protecting species, their habitats, and ecosystems from excessive rates of extinction.[23][24] It is an interdisciplinary subject drawing on science, economics and the practice of natural resource management.[25][26][27][28] The term conservation biology was introduced as the title of a conference held at the University of California, San Diego, in La Jolla, California, in 1978, organized by biologists Bruce A. Wilcox and Michael E. Soulé.

Habitat conservation is a land management practice that seeks to conserve, protect and restore habitat areas for wild plants and animals, especially conservation reliant species, and prevent their extinction, fragmentation or reduction in range.[29]

Natural resource management is a discipline in the management of natural resources such as land, water, soil, plants, and animals—with a particular focus on how management affects quality of life for present and future generations. Hence, sustainable development is followed according to judicial use of resources to supply both the present generation and future generations. The disciplines of fisheries, forestry, and wildlife are examples of large subdisciplines of natural resource management.

Management of natural resources involves identifying who has the right to use the resources, and who does not, for defining the boundaries of the resource.[30] The resources may be managed by the users according to the rules governing when and how the resource is used depending on local condition[30] The resources may be managed by the users according to the rules governing when and how the resource is used depending on local condition[31] or the resources may be managed by a governmental organization or other central authority.[32]

A "...successful management of natural resources depends on freedom of speech, a dynamic and wide-ranging public debate through multiple independent media channels and an active civil society engaged in natural resource issues...",[33] because of the nature of the shared resources the individuals who are affected by the rules can participate in setting or changing them.[30] The users have rights to devise their own management institutions and plans under the recognition by the government. The right to resources includes land, water, fisheries and pastoral rights.[31] The users or parties accountable to the users have to actively monitor and ensure the utilisation of the resource compliance with the rules and to impose penalty on those peoples who violate the rules.[30] These conflicts are resolved in a quick and low cost manner by the local institution according to the seriousness and context of the offence.[31] The global science-based platform to discuss natural resources management is the World Resources Forum, based in Switzerland.

Normal Exit PeriodicService.php