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Nancy Hatch Dupree (October 3, 1927 – September 10, 2017) was an American historian whose work primarily focused on the history of modern Afghanistan. She was the director of the Afghanistan
Afghanistan
Center at Kabul
Kabul
University and author of five books that she compiled while studying the history of Afghanistan
Afghanistan
from 1962 until the late 1970s, writing about tourism and history of Kabul, Bamiyan
Bamiyan
and Balkh. She was fondly called the “grandmother of Afghanistan”, having spent more of her life there or with Afghans abroad.[1]

Contents

1 Biography 2 Louis and Nancy Hatch Dupree Foundation 3 Death 4 Bibliography 5 Further reading 6 References 7 External links

Biography[edit] Nancy Dupree
Nancy Dupree
was born as Nancy Hatch in Cooperstown, New York.[2] She spent most of her childhood in India. Her parents were working in Kerala, where her father was an adviser to the Maharaja of Travancore, Kerala. Her mother, a Broadway actress, was drawn to Indian art and theatrical dance forms and embarked on the first PhD on Kathakali
Kathakali
by a foreign scholar. Hatch graduated from Barnard College
Barnard College
in 1949. She then went to Columbia University
Columbia University
to study Chinese.[3] She did her mastery in Chinese Art at Columbia University, but her life was linked to southern Asia in an inexorable manner. First married to an American intelligence officer, Alan D. Wolfe, posted in what was then called Ceylon, she later moved with her husband to Iraq, then Pakistan, and finally Afghanistan
Afghanistan
in 1962. Dupree first arrived in Afghanistan
Afghanistan
in 1962 as a diplomat's wife.[4] Shortly after she wrote the first-ever guide to the Bamiyan Buddhas.[1] Several years later, she met Louis Duprée, who was a renowned archaeologist and scholar of Afghan culture and history. The two fell in love and got married after divorcing their former spouses, marrying in the Bagh-e Bala Palace[5] in 1966.[6][7] After the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan
Afghanistan
in 1979, Nancy was forced to leave the country, while Louis remained. Rather than return to the United States, she moved to a refugee camp in Peshawar, Pakistan.[8] Louis was eventually arrested under suspicion of working for the Central Intelligence Agency
Central Intelligence Agency
as a spy[9]. He then joined Nancy in Peshawar. While in the refugee camp, Nancy realized the potential for the loss of unique documents about Afghanistan
Afghanistan
to be lost or destroyed forever. In order to preserve these works and to teach them to a new generation, she and Louis formed the Agency Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief (ACBAR). They began to collect both government and non-government documents that related to the country's history, culture, the Soviet-Afghan War, the Mujahedeen, and the Taliban.[8] Nancy said that in the looting that began after the Soviet invasion, many priceless books were sold to be used for fuel. A large number of books were also sold by weight to be used to wrap food. According to The Economist, "her networking prowess was so notorious that she was once approached, to see if she could help with permits to dig tunnels in Kabul, by the young Osama bin Laden."[1] After the Coalition forces moved into Afghanistan
Afghanistan
in 2001, Nancy and Louis did not immediately move back, since Louis passed away in 1989. They were concerned for their own safety and that of ACBAR's collection, which by 1999 consisted of 7,739 titles written in Pashto, Dari (Persian), French, German, Norwegian, and Swedish.[8] In 2005, Nancy moved back to Kabul
Kabul
and worked with the Afghan government to find a place to house ACBAR's collection. The collection was moved to Kabul
Kabul
University and the name was changed to the Afghan Collection at Kabul
Kabul
University. A $2 million building was completed to house the collection in 2012. Dupree divided her time between Afghanistan
Afghanistan
and her other home in North Carolina.[10] Louis and Nancy Hatch Dupree Foundation[edit]

Dupree with Afghan finance minister Omar Zakhilwal in 2010

In 2007, Nancy Hatch Dupree established the Louis and Nancy Hatch Dupree Foundation. It is a charitable organization that promotes research and raises awareness of the history and culture of Afghanistan. In addition, this organization also preserves Afghan cultural heritage. The organization's primary goal is to ensure the sustainability of the Afghanistan
Afghanistan
Center at Kabul
Kabul
University (ACKU). Programs offer Afghans from all walks of life, especially youth, incentives to acquire and employ information that will help them address the challenges of rebuilding their nation.[citation needed] The organization has been able to achieve its overall goal by purchasing books and providing them to the schools in parts of Afghanistan
Afghanistan
that have never had a library. Due to regional instability, the organization has not been able to achieve all of its goals as an active NGO.[citation needed] Death[edit] Dupree died after battling an illness in Kabul, Afghanistan, at the age of 89.[2][11] President Ashraf Ghani
Ashraf Ghani
and CEO Abdullah Abdullah offered their condolences. Ghani added that Nancy "considered Afghanistan
Afghanistan
her real home and willed to be buried in Kabul
Kabul
next to the tomb of her husband."[12] Former President Hamid Karzai
Hamid Karzai
said "Nancy Dupree, a loving daughter of Afghanistan, is no more with us. May God bless her soul." and " Afghanistan
Afghanistan
will keep her in affectionate memory." [13] Bibliography[edit]

Dupree, Nancy Hatch; Kohzad, Ahmad Ali (1972). An Historical Guide to Kabul. Afghan Tourist Organization. ASIN B0006CCCLW.  Dupree, Nancy Hatch; Dupree, Motamedi (1974). The National Museum of Afghanistan : an illustrated guide. The Afghan Tourist Organization. ASIN B000YZI8FK.  Dupree, Nancy Hatch (1977). An Historical Guide to Afghanistan. Afghan Tourist Organization. ASIN B0006DXU30. 

Further reading[edit]

Maley, William. (2013). Afghanistan
Afghanistan
as a cultural crossroads: Lessons from the writings of Ella Maillart, Annemarie Schwarzenbach and Nancy Dupree. Asian Affairs, 44(2), 215. Moustafa, Laila Hussein. (2016). From Peshawar
Peshawar
to Kabul: Preserving Afghanistan's cultural heritage during wartime. RBM: A Journal of Rare Book, Manuscripts, and Cultural History, 17(2), 134-147. Dupree, Nancy Hatch. (2002). Cultural heritage and national identity in Afghanistan. Third World Quarterly, 23(5), 977-989. Dupree, Nancy Hatch. (1996). Museum under siege. Archaeology, 49(2), 42-51. Dupree, Nancy Hatch. (1988). Demographic reporting on Afghan refugees in Pakistan. Modern Asian Studies, 22, 845-865.

References[edit]

^ a b c "Obituary: Nancy Dupree
Nancy Dupree
died on September 10th". The Economist. 14 September 2017.  ^ a b Mashal, Mujib (September 10, 2017). "Nancy Hatch Dupree, Scholar of Afghanistan, Is Dead at 89". The New York Times.  ^ Bohlen, Celestine (July 9, 2002). "A Love Affair With Afghanistan Continues at 74; Her Guidebook Inspired a Play, And She Fights for a Nation's Soul". The New York Times.  ^ Waldman, Amy (May 8, 2004). "A Chronicler of Afghan Culture, Now Its Loyal Guard". The New York Times.  ^ The Best American Magazine Writing 2015 by The American Society of Magazine Editors ^ Graham-Harrison, Emma (March 26, 2013). "From Kabul
Kabul
love affair to Afghanistan's first centre for study of its history". The Guardian. Retrieved 2015-01-12.  ^ https://www.ft.com/content/45a7ebca-f712-11dd-8a1f-0000779fd2ac ^ a b c Moustafa, Laila Hussein (Fall 2016). "From Peshawar
Peshawar
to Kabul: Preserving Afghanistan's Cultural Heritage during Wartime". RBM: A Journal of Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Cultural Heritage. 17 (2): 134–147.  ^ Verini, James (23 February 2014). "Love and Ruin". The Atavist Magazine. The Atavist. Retrieved 16 February 2018.  ^ "American Seeks to Preserve Storied Afghan Past". Daily Mail. Associated Press. December 15, 2014.  ^ "Nancy Dupree: Renowned US historian dies in Afghanistan". Al Jazeera. Al Jazeera
Al Jazeera
Media Network. 10 September 2017. Archived from the original on 10 September 2017. Retrieved 10 September 2017.  ^ https://www.pajhwok.com/en/2017/09/10/renowned-archaeologist-nancy-dupree-passes-away-kabul ^ http://myemail.constantcontact.com/Continue-Nancy-Dupree-s-legacy-by-supporting-ACKU-s-programs-in-Afghanistan.html?soid=1102579682048&aid=Hc_jqPH1iOk

External links[edit]

Louis and Nancy Hatch Dupree Foundation Museum Under Siege: Full Text by Nancy Hatch Dupree Preserving Afghanistan's Cultural Heritage: An Interview with Nancy Hatch Dupree Nancy Dupree's love affair with Kabul
Kabul
at the Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
(archived March 6, 2012) Groundbreaking ceremony for new library at Kabul
Kabul
University: 25 July 2009 "Who is the Historian? A portrait of Nancy Dupree" on YouTube Afghanistan
Afghanistan
Center at Kabul
Kabul
University

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 70220086 LCCN: n80015672 ISNI: 0000 0004 5302 3636 SELIBR: 405512 SUDOC: 05683358X BIBSYS: 90745207 NDL: 00438437 CiNii

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