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Mortlake
Mortlake
is a suburban[2] district of the London
London
Borough of Richmond upon Thames on the south bank of the River Thames
River Thames
between Kew
Kew
and Barnes. Historically it was part of Surrey
Surrey
and until 1965 was in the Municipal Borough of Barnes. For many centuries it had village status and extended far to the south, to include East Sheen
East Sheen
and part of what is now Richmond Park. Its Stuart and Georgian history was economically one of malting, brewing, farming, watermen and a great tapestry works. A London
London
landmark, the former Mortlake
Mortlake
Brewery or Stag Brewery, is on the edge of Mortlake. The Waterloo to Reading railway line runs through Mortlake, which has a pedestrianised riverside, two riverside pubs and a village green. The Boat Race
The Boat Race
finishes at Mortlake
Mortlake
every March/April.

Contents

1 Governance 2 History 3 People

3.1 Living people 3.2 Historical figures

4 Economy 5 Stag Brewery or Mortlake
Mortlake
Brewery 6 Mortlake
Mortlake
Railway Station – Queen Victoria's Waiting Room 7 Amenities 8 Transport

8.1 Adjoining districts 8.2 Nearest railway stations

9 Demography and housing 10 References 11 External links

Governance[edit] The Mortlake
Mortlake
and Barnes Common ward of the London
London
Borough of Richmond upon Thames has proved highly marginal. In the 2010 local elections local Liberal Democrats lost all three seats to local Conservatives to form an administration on the Council. Richmond Park, the constituency which includes Mortlake, also changed from Liberal Democrat to Conservative in the 2010 general election. The London
London
Assembly constituency South West, which includes Mortlake, includes among its representatives Tony Arbour
Tony Arbour
( Conservative). History[edit]

This is a contemporary bust of Sir John Barnard who lived much of his adult life as MP in one of a few Georgian mansions built in Mortlake for London's upper class. It is kept at Stowe House, Buckinghamshire.

The place-name 'Mortlake' is first attested in the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
of 1086, where it appears as Mortelaga and Mortelage, a name with two possible derivations. If the second element is the Old English
Old English
lacu meaning a stream, then the first element is very likely the fish-name mort meaning a young salmon, hence 'salmon stream'. If the second element is the dialect lag meaning a long, narrow marshy meadow, then the name means 'Morta's meadow'.[3] Mortlake
Mortlake
lay in the hundred of Brixton, which faded into obscurity.[4] According to the Domesday Book, the manor and parish of Mortlage [5] was held by Archbishop Lanfranc
Lanfranc
of Canterbury when its assets were: 25 hides; 1 church, 2 mills worth £5, 1 fishery, 33 ploughs, 20 acres (81,000 m2) of meadow, wood worth 55 hogs. It rendered a large £38 plus 4s 4d from 17 houses in London, 2s 3d from houses in Southwark
Southwark
and £1 from tolls at Putney
Putney
per year to its feudal system overlords.[5] The manor belonged to the Archbishops of Canterbury until the time of Henry VIII, when it passed by exchange to the Crown. From the early part of the 17th century until after the English Civil War, Mortlake
Mortlake
was celebrated for the manufacture of tapestry, founded during the reign of James I at the Mortlake
Mortlake
Tapestry
Tapestry
Works. Mortlake
Mortlake
was reduced by 732 acres when Richmond Park
Richmond Park
was created by Charles I in 1637. Other parishes also lost smaller amounts of land to the new deer park.[6] Colston House's forebear was built by Thomas Cromwell, Earl of Essex then acquired by Edward Colston, major benefactor and investor to the port city of Bristol. This was pulled down in 1860. John Barber, Lord Mayor in 1733, a suspected Jacobite opposed to the 'Georgian' House of Hanover but Member of Parliament for the City on the strength of his opposition to Walpole's protectionist excise scheme, was buried in Mortlake
Mortlake
in 1741. He had given land to extend the churchyard. Sir Henry Taylor, KCMG, the dramatic poet, lived in Mortlake
Mortlake
in the 19th century.[7] Sir John Barnard, Lord Mayor of London
London
in the year 1737 and also an MP, used public addresses and private campaigns to outstanding effect in supporting the government against the Jacobite movement in 1745.[7] Since 1845, the Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race
Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race
has had its finish point at Mortlake, marked by the University Boat Race stone just downstream of Chiswick
Chiswick
Bridge. Several other important rowing races over the Championship Course also either start or finish at the stone. The first National School in Mortlake
Mortlake
was built providing compulsory education at primary level in 1869, followed by an infants school in 1890 and county level, into secondary level school in 1906.

John Dee memorial plaque in the church of St Mary the Virgin Mortlake

Sir Richard Burton's tomb at St Mary Magdalen’s Roman Catholic Church cemetery

People[edit] Main article: List of people from Richmond upon Thames Living people[edit] Katherine Jenkins, classical singer, lives in Mortlake.[8] Historical figures[edit] Mortlake's most famous former resident is John Dee (1527–1608/09), mathematician, astronomer, astrologer, alchemist and adviser to Queen Elizabeth I. He lived at Mortlake
Mortlake
from 1565 to 1595 except for the six years between 1583 and 1589 when he was travelling in Europe. His house no longer exists but it became the Mortlake Tapestry Works
Mortlake Tapestry Works
and at the end of the 18th century was a girls' school.[9] Sir Christopher Packe (1593?–1682), Lord Mayor of London, lived in Mortlake
Mortlake
in about 1655–60.[10] John Partridge (astrologer) (1644–c.1714) was born at East Sheen
East Sheen
and apprenticed to a local shoemaker. He died in Mortlake
Mortlake
and is buried there.[10] The cemetery of St Mary Magdalen’s Roman Catholic Church Mortlake contains the tomb of the Victorian explorer and orientalist Sir Richard Burton.[11] Former British Prime Minister Henry Addington
Henry Addington
who, as Lord Sidmouth, was Ranger of Richmond Park, and after whom the park's Sidmouth Plantation is named, is buried at St Mary the Virgin Mortlake.[11][12] Economy[edit] The town is mostly residential commuter town with a strong history of self-employed trades as it has traditionally centred its commerce on its foreshortened boundary, the Upper Richmond Road, arguably half part of East Sheen. Some businesses on the north side of the Upper Richmond Road make reference to the old ecclesiastical and ward boundaries supported by their still Mortlake
Mortlake
side streets.[13] East Sheen was once a manor in the parish of Mortlake
Mortlake
and since early times an economic forum, and now a dining and convenience hub of the two districts. The Victoria County History's volume on Surrey, written from 1910 to 1912, does not list East Sheen
East Sheen
as a parish, describes its detailed history under Mortlake
Mortlake
and states the parish was "now connected with Barnes on one side and with New Richmond on the other".[7][14] With the advent of motor transport, the buildings on Mortlake's winding high street, also known as the Lower Mortlake
Mortlake
Road, have been mostly residential or used by the brewery. Stag Brewery or Mortlake
Mortlake
Brewery[edit]

The former Budweiser Stag Brewery

123 Mortlake
Mortlake
High Street, built in 1720 and, from 1895 until 1940, was the seat of local government for the Municipal Borough of Barnes (which was abolished in 1965).

In the 1840s Charles James Philips and James Wigan acquired Mortlake Brewery, which had existed since the 15th century.[15] In 1889 the brewery was acquired by James Watney & Co., which in 1898 became Watney Combe & Reid after acquiring Messrs. Combe Delafield and Co. and Messrs. Reid and Co. When Watney's Stag Brewery in Victoria, London, was demolished in 1959, the name was 30 years later, applied to Mortlake
Mortlake
Brewery. Being the last phase of The Boat Race which refers to all the traditional local names, it is still widely referred to as the Mortlake
Mortlake
Brewery.[15] The brewery became part of Scottish Courage, briefly part of Heineken and was then divested to Anheuser-Busch Europe Ltd as it produced the company's Budweiser pale lager. In January 2009, Anheuser-Busch InBev said that the company was proposing to close the Stag Brewery in 2010 as a result of a merger between InBev and Anheuser-Busch.[16] In November 2015, it was announced that the site had been sold for £158m to Reselton – part of Singapore’s City Developments, which also bought the former Teddington
Teddington
Studios. The brewery closed in December 2015.[17] Anheuser-Busch InBev
Anheuser-Busch InBev
plans to vacate the site in 2016, which could see 850 apartments built on the 22-acre location.[18] Mortlake
Mortlake
Railway Station – Queen Victoria's Waiting Room[edit] The building next to Mortlake
Mortlake
Railway Station, now occupied by a classic car showroom, contains Queen Victoria's old waiting room which was built for her and Prince Albert to use due to their frequent visits to White Lodge
White Lodge
in Richmond Park
Richmond Park
where their family and latterly their son the Prince of Wales (later Edward VII) were living. Amenities[edit] Mortlake
Mortlake
affords an undistracted view of the river as its riverside promenade is set by its buildings including the former brewery, unlike the embankment style roads along other London
London
banks such as in Barnes until Barnes Bridge. The two large pubs at either end of the riverside promenade are not listed buildings:

The White Hart The Ship

Places of worship include:

St Mary Magdalen’s Roman Catholic Church Mortlake St Mary the Virgin Mortlake
St Mary the Virgin Mortlake
(Anglican)

Transport[edit]

The terminus of London
London
Buses route 209 at North Worple Way, Mortlake

Adjoining districts[edit]

Barnes Chiswick
Chiswick
(Grove Park, after which is Old Chiswick
Chiswick
or Strand-on-the-Green, depending on direction) East Sheen Kew

Nearest railway stations[edit]

Mortlake
Mortlake
railway station North Sheen railway station

These are minor stops on the Waterloo to Reading Line
Waterloo to Reading Line
which has four branch lines: to Windsor Riverside station, to Weybridge and back to the London
London
terminus via Kingston upon Thames
Kingston upon Thames
or Brentford. This railway is a narrow bisector of the settlement, being generally on the flat with its streets, which tend to run perpendicular to it. It runs in the middle of Worple Way, separating it into north and south sides. Demography and housing[edit] To ensure that all the local authority wards have electorates of approximately the same size, the ward covering Mortlake
Mortlake
also includes of Barnes.

2011 Census homes

Ward Detached Semi-detached Terraced Flats and apartments Caravans/temporary/mobile homes/houseboats Shared between households[1]

Mortlake
Mortlake
and Barnes Common 167 547 1,765 2,453 1 8

2011 Census households

Ward Population Households % Owned outright % Owned with a loan hectares[1]

Mortlake
Mortlake
and Barnes Common 10,919 4,771 27 32 185

References[edit]

^ a b c Key Statistics; Quick Statistics: Population Density Office for National Statistics ^ A City of Villages: Promoting a sustainable future for London's suburbs (PDF). SDS Technical Report 11. Greater London
Greater London
Authority. August 2002. ISBN 1-85261-393-9. Retrieved 16 January 2014.  ^ Eilert Ekwall, The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place-names, p.331. ^ Malden, H E (editor) (1912). "The hundred of Brixton: Introduction and map". A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 4. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 21 December 2013. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) ^ a b Lysons, Daniel (1792). "Mortlake". The Environs of London: volume 1: County of Surrey. British History Online. Retrieved 27 July 2013.  ^ Brown, Maisie (1997). Barnes and Mortlake
Mortlake
Past, with East Sheen. Historical Publications. p. 18. ISBN 0-948667-46-X.  ^ a b c Malden, H E (editor) (1912). "Parishes: Mortlake". A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 4. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 21 December 2013. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) ^ Ambrose, Tom (31 December 2013). " Katherine Jenkins
Katherine Jenkins
heads list of Richmond residents with honours". Richmond and Twickenham
Twickenham
Times. Retrieved 21 January 2014.  ^ "Dee's House". John Dee of Mortlake
Mortlake
Society. Retrieved 17 December 2015.  ^ a b "People of Mortlake, Barnes and East Sheen: M – S" (PDF). Barnes and Mortlake
Mortlake
History Society. Retrieved 13 October 2012.  ^ a b Historic England. "Mausoleum of Sir Richard and Lady Burton, Churchyard of St Mary Magdalen (1065392)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 November 2013.  ^ " Henry Addington
Henry Addington
(1757–1844) First Viscount Sidmouth". Napoleon & Empire. Retrieved 18 October 2012.  ^ Memories of Mortlake
Mortlake
Retrieved 21 December 2013 ^ Mills, Anthony David, Oxford Dictionary of London
London
Place Names (2001) ^ a b Richmond, Lesley and Turton, Alison (editors) (1990). The Brewing Industry: A Guide to Historical Records. Manchester University Press. CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) ^ "Stag to be first casualty of AB InBev merger". The Grocer. 10 January 2009. Retrieved 9 January 2016.  ^ Ambrose, Tom (17 December 2015). "Historic Stag Brewery closes to make way for new "riverside quarter" including restaurants, shops and cafes". Richmond and Twickenham
Twickenham
Times. Retrieved 17 December 2015.  ^ Bourke, Joanna (27 November 2015). "Stag Brewery facing last orders as luxury flats move in". The Independent. Retrieved 29 November 2015. 

External links[edit]

Barnes and Mortlake
Mortlake
History Society Mortlake
Mortlake
Brewery Community Group Mortlake
Mortlake
Community Association Mortlake
Mortlake
Online St Mary Magdalen's Church St Mary the Virgin, Mortlake

v t e

London
London
Borough of Richmond upon Thames

Districts

Barnes East Sheen Fulwell Ham Hampton Hampton Hill Hampton Wick Kew Mortlake Petersham Richmond St Margarets Strawberry Hill Teddington Twickenham Whitton

Railway stations

Barnes Barnes Bridge Fulwell Hampton Hampton Wick Kew
Kew
Gardens Mortlake North Sheen Richmond St Margarets Strawberry Hill Teddington Twickenham Whitton

River Thames
River Thames
bridges, islands and river services

Bridges Benn's Island Corporation Island Eel Pie Island Glover's Island Platts Eyot Swan Island Tagg's Island Trowlock Island Hammerton's Ferry Hampton Ferry Kew
Kew
Pier Richmond Lock Teddington
Teddington
Lifeboat Station Teddington
Teddington
Lock former Twickenham
Twickenham
Ferry

Other rivers and streams

Beverley Brook River Crane Duke of Northumberland's River Longford River Sudbrook and Latchmere stream River Thames

Sports venues

Athletic Ground, Richmond Barn Elms Playing Fields The Championship Course Cricket clubs and grounds Golf clubs and courses Hampton Pool The Lensbury Pools on the Park Royal Tennis Court, Hampton Court Teddington
Teddington
Pools and Fitness Centre Thames Young Mariners Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium Twickenham
Twickenham
Stoop former Ranelagh Club former Richmond Ice Rink

Events

Annual sports events Hampton Court Palace
Hampton Court Palace
Festival Hampton Court Palace
Hampton Court Palace
Flower Show IRB Rugby Aid Match

Breweries and pubs

Britannia, Richmond The Bull's Head The Crown, Twickenham Dysart Arms The Fox, Twickenham The George, Twickenham Hare and Hounds, Sheen Jolly Coopers, Hampton Old Ship, Richmond Park Hotel, Teddington Richmond Brewery Stores Sun Inn, Barnes Twickenham
Twickenham
Fine Ales Watney Combe & Reid White Cross, Richmond The White Swan, Twickenham‎

Theatres, cinemas and music venues

The Bull's Head Crawdaddy Club The Exchange Olympic Studios Orange Tree Theatre Puppet Theatre Barge Richmond Theatre TwickFolk Wathen Hall former Eel Pie Island
Eel Pie Island
Hotel

Film and recording studios

Astoria The Boathouse, Twickenham Eel Pie Studios Olympic Studios Teddington
Teddington
Studios Twickenham
Twickenham
Film Studios

Media and publishing

Richmond and Twickenham
Twickenham
Times former Gaydar Radio former Hogarth Press

Historical royal palaces

Hampton Court Palace Kew
Kew
Palace Richmond Palace

Other places of interest

123 Mortlake
Mortlake
High Street 14 The Terrace, Barnes 18 Station Road, Barnes 70 Barnes High Street Asgill House Brinsworth House Bushy House Chapel House Chapel in the Wood Clarence House Diana Fountain, Bushy Park Doughty House Douglas House Downe House East Sheen
East Sheen
Filling Station Fulwell bus garage Garrick's Temple to Shakespeare Garrick's Villa Grove House, Hampton Ham House Hampton Youth Project Harrods Furniture Depository Hogarth House The Homestead, Barnes King's Observatory Kneller Hall Langham House Langham House Close Latchmere House Lichfield Court Marble Hill House Montrose House The Naked Ladies National Physical Laboratory Normansfield Theatre The Old Court House Ormeley Lodge Parkleys The Pavilion, Hampton Court Pembroke Lodge Pope's Urn Pope's Grotto Poppy Factory The Queen's Beasts Royal Military School of Music Royal Star and Garter Home St Leonard's Court Strawberry Hill House Stud House Sudbrook House and Park The Terrace, Barnes Thatched House Lodge University Boat Race Stones Victoria Working Men's Club West Hall, Kew White Lodge The Wick Wick House Yelverton Lodge York House

History

Adana Printing Machines Admiralty Research Laboratory Alcott House Ashe baronets Barnes rail crash Camp Griffiss Cross Deep House GHQ Liaison Regiment Hampton Court Conference Kew
Kew
Letters Mortlake
Mortlake
Tapestry
Tapestry
Works Mount Ararat, Richmond Murder of Amélie Delagrange Murder of Julia Martha Thomas Petersham Hole Pocock baronets Pope's villa Radnor House Richmond Flyers Richmond, Petersham and Ham Open Spaces Act 1902 Ringway 2 Sheen Priory Star and Garter Hotel, Richmond Towpath murders Treaty of Hampton Court (1562) Twickenham
Twickenham
Park Vandeput baronets Warren-Lambert Wigan baronets

Parliamentary constituencies

Richmond Park Twickenham former Richmond and Barnes former Richmond (Surrey)

Other topics

Almshouses Archives, museums and art galleries Cemeteries, crematoria and memorials Grade I listed buildings Grade II* listed buildings Hospitals Local government People Places of worship Public art Schools, colleges and universities Sports clubs

Parks, open spaces and nature reserves in the London
London
Borough of Richmond upon Thames

v t e

Areas of London

Central activities zone

Bloomsbury City of London
London
wards Holborn Marylebone Mayfair Paddington Pimlico Soho Southwark Vauxhall Waterloo Westminster

Town centre network

International

Belgravia Knightsbridge West End

Metropolitan

Bromley Croydon Ealing Harrow Hounslow Ilford Kingston Romford Shepherd's Bush Stratford Sutton Uxbridge Wood Green

Major

Angel Barking Bexleyheath Brixton Camden Town Canary Wharf Catford Chiswick Clapham
Clapham
Junction Dalston East Ham Edgware Eltham Enfield Town Fulham Hammersmith Holloway Nags Head Kensington High Street Kilburn King's Road
King's Road
East Lewisham Orpington Peckham Putney Queensway/Westbourne Grove Richmond Southall Streatham Tooting Walthamstow Wandsworth Wembley Whitechapel Wimbledon Woolwich

Districts (principal)

Acton Beckenham Bethnal Green Brentford Camberwell Canada Water Carshalton Chadwell Heath Chingford Clapham Crystal Palace Coulsdon Cricklewood Dagenham Deptford Dulwich Edmonton Elephant and Castle Erith Feltham Finchley Forest Gate Forest Hill Golders Green Greenwich Harlesden Hampstead Harringay Hayes (Hillingdon) Hendon Hornchurch Kentish Town Leyton Mill Hill Mitcham Morden Muswell Hill New Cross New Malden Northwood Notting Hill Penge Pinner Purley Ruislip Sidcup Southgate South Norwood Stanmore Stoke Newington Surbiton Sydenham Teddington Thamesmead Tolworth Tulse Hill Twickenham Upminster Upper Norwood Wanstead Wealdstone Welling West Ham West Hampstead West Norwood Willesden
Willesden
Green Woodford

Neighbourhoods (principal)

Abbey Wood Alperton Anerley Barnes Barnsbury Battersea Beckton Bedford Park Bermondsey Bow Brent Cross Brockley Canonbury Charlton Chelsea Chessington Chipping Barnet Chislehurst Clerkenwell Elmers End Gidea Park Greenford Gunnersbury Hackbridge Hackney Ham Hampton Hanwell Hanworth Harold Wood Highams Park Highbury Highgate Hillingdon Hook Holloway Hoxton Ickenham Isle of Dogs Isleworth Islington Kensal Green Kew Lambeth Manor
Manor
Park Mortlake Neasden Northolt Nunhead Plaistow (Newham) Poplar Roehampton Rotherhithe Seven Kings Seven Sisters Shoreditch Stamford Hill Stepney St Helier Surrey
Surrey
Quays Tottenham Upper Clapton Walworth Wapping West Drayton Worcester Park Yiewsley

Lists of areas by borough

Barking
Barking
and Dagenham Barnet Bexley Brent Bromley Camden Croydon Ealing Enfield Greenwich Hackney Hammersmith
Hammersmith
and Fulham Haringey Harrow Havering Hillingdon Hounslow Islington Kensington and Chelsea Kingston upon Thames Lambeth Lewisham Merton Newham Redbridge Richmond upon Thames Southwark Sutton Tower Hamlets Waltham Forest Wandsworth Westminster

Fictional

Canley (borough) (The Bill: TV soap) Charnham (suburb) (Family Affairs: TV soap) Gasforth (town) (The Thin Blue Line: TV series) London
London
Below (magical realm) (Neverwhere: TV series, novel) Walford
Walford
(borough) (EastEnders: TV soap)

The London
London
Plan 2011, Annex Two: London's Town Centre Network – Greate

.