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Mont Maudit
Mont Maudit
(4,465 m) is a mountain in the Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
massif in France and Italy. The French name literally means "Cursed Mountain". Until the end of the 18th century, Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
and its satellite peaks were collectively known in French as the Montagne Maudite.

Contents

1 Climbing history 2 2012 avalanche 3 Huts 4 References 5 External links

Climbing history[edit] The first ascent of Mont Maudit
Mont Maudit
was by a British party comprising Henry Seymour King and the lawyer/diplomat William Edward Davidson with guides Johann Jaun and Johann von Bergen on 12 September 1878. The route they took was via the south ridge, during an ascent of Mont Blanc by the Corridor route. The southern side of the mountain is considerably steeper than the gentle snow slopes of the northern side and features the well-known southeast or Frontier ridge (also known as the Kuffner ridge, D). This route was first climbed by Moriz von Kuffner
Moriz von Kuffner
with guides Alexander Burgener and Josef Furrer from 2–4 July 1887. George Mallory, in a party led by R. L. G. Irving, made the third ascent of the route in 1911. Ascents of the ridge start from the hut on the Col du Trident and take at least seven to eight hours. 2012 avalanche[edit] On 12 July 2012, at least nine climbers—three from the United Kingdom (including Roger Payne, a mountain guide and former general secretary of the British Mountaineering
Mountaineering
Council), two from Switzerland, two from Germany, and two from Spain—were killed by an avalanche as they attempted a dawn ascent of the mountain from the Refuge des Cosmiques.[2][3] Nine others were injured and flown to hospital. The avalanche struck at 5 am, as the climbers began their climb up one of the most popular, but dangerous, routes up the mountain. Éric Fournier, the mayor of Chamonix–Mont Blanc, described the snowslide as one of the deadliest in recent years. "There was no weather bulletin giving any avalanche warning," he claimed.[2][4] Huts[edit]

Refuge des Cosmiques
Refuge des Cosmiques
(3,613 m, guarded February–October) Abri Simond Bivouac (beside the Refuge des Cosmiques
Refuge des Cosmiques
and open in winter when the Refuge is closed) Rifugio Torino (3,322 m/3,375 m, 2 huts: a lower and older one and an upper, newer hut, connected by a tunnel) Bivacco Lucia e Piero Ghiglione (3,690 m, guarded 20 June–20 September, also known as the Trident hut) - now not there; this bivouac hut was removed in the 1990s Bivacco Alberico e Brogna (3,679 m, also known as the Bivouac de la Fourche)

References[edit]

^ Swisstopo
Swisstopo
map ^ a b Willsher, Kim (12 July 2012). " Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
Avalanche: Three Britons Among Nine Dead in French Alps". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 12 July 2012.  ^ Siddique, Haroon (13 July 2012). " Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
Avalanche: Dead Britons Named". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 13 July 2012.  ^ "Alps Avalanche: Tributes for British Climber Roger Payne". BBC News. London. 13 July 2012. Retrieved 13 July 2012. 

Dumler, Helmut and Willi P. Burkhardt, The High Mountains of the Alps, London: Diadem, 1994 Mallory, George, 'Pages from a Journal', Alpine Journal XXXII, pp. 142–62. An account of the third ascent of the Frontier ridge.

External links[edit]

Mont Maudit
Mont Maudit
on SummitPost

v t e

Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
massif

Settlements

Argentière Chamonix Champex Courmayeur La Fouly Les Houches Montroc Les Praz Saint-Gervais-les-Bains Trient

Mountains

Aiguille d'Argentière Aiguille de Bionnassay Aiguille de Blaitière Aiguille Blanche de Peuterey Aiguille du Chardonnet Aiguilles du Diable Aiguilles Dorées Aiguille du Dru Aiguille des Glaciers Aiguille du Goûter Aiguille des Grands Charmoz Aiguille des Grands Montets Aiguille du Grépon Aiguille du Jardin Aiguille du Midi Aiguille de l'A Neuve Aiguille Noire de Peuterey Aiguille du Pissoir Aiguille du Plan Aiguille de Rochefort Aiguille du Tour Aiguille de Tré la Tête Aiguille de Triolet Aiguille Verte La Breya Le Catogne Le Châtelet (Mont Blanc) Dent du Géant Dôme du Goûter Dôme de Rochefort Les Droites Le Génépi Grand Capucin Grand Darray Grand Pilier d'Angle Grande Lui Grande Pointe des Planereuses Grande Rocheuse Grandes Jorasses Mont Blanc Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
de Courmayeur Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
du Tacul Mont Brouillard Mont Dolent Mont Mallet Mont Maudit Pic Eccles Picco Luigi Amedeo Pointe Allobrogia Pointe Helbronner Pointe d'Orny Pointe des Plines Pointe Ronde Pointe Walker Le Portalet Punta Baretti Tita Neire Tour Noir Tour Ronde

Cols

Col Ferret Col des Montets

Glaciers

Argentière Bossons Mer de Glace Miage Saleina Tête Rousse Trient

Refuges

Albert Premier A Neuve Argentière Cosmiques Couvercle Durier Elisabetta Francesco Gonella Grands Mulets Leschaux Mont-Blanc Plan de l'Aiguille Quintino Sella Tête Rousse Torino Tré la Tête Trient Saleina Vallot

Mountaineers (first or major ascents)

Allain Almer Anderegg (J.) Anderegg (M.) Balmat Blanchard Blodig Boivin Bonatti Bonington Boulaz Bristow Brown Burgener Cassin Charlet Clough Cordier (H.) Cordier (P.) Couzy Croz Dent Desmaison Destivelle Długosz Eccles Eckenstein Gabarrou Ghirardini Graham Brown Güssfeldt Harlin Heckmair Hemming Hudson Kennedy King Klucker Kuffner Kukuczka Kurtyka Lachenal Lafaille Lambert MacIntyre Maund Mazeaud Messner Middlemore Moore Mummery Paccard Paradis Patey Ratti Rébuffat Rey Robbins Roch Rouse de Saussure Smythe Stephen Terray Twight Vallençant Walker Whillans Whymper Winthrop Young

Other

Arve
Arve
(river) Chemin de fer du Montenvers Giardino Botanico Alpino Saussurea Haute Route Marathon du Mont Blanc Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
glacier flood Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
Tramway Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
Tunnel Saint-Gervais–Vallorcine railway Skyway Monte Bianco Top of the Mont Blanc Tour du Mont Blanc Val d'Aosta Val Ferret Val Veny Vallée Blanche Ae

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