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Hizb ut-Tahrir Iranian Revolution Jamaat-e-Islami Millî Görüş Muslim
Muslim
Brotherhood List of Islamic
Islamic
political parties

Militant

Militant Islamism
Islamism
based in

MENA region South Asia Southeast Asia Sub-Saharan Africa

Key texts

Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam (Iqbal 1930s)

Principles of State and Government (Asad 1961)

Ma'alim fi al-Tariq
Ma'alim fi al-Tariq
("Milestones") (Qutb 1965)

Islamic
Islamic
Government: Governance of the Jurist ("Velayat-e faqih") (Khomeini 1970)

Heads of state

Ali Khamenei Omar al-Bashir Muammar Gaddafi Ruhollah Khomeini Mohamed Morsi Mohammad Omar House of Saud House of Thani Zia-ul-Haq

Key ideologues

Muhammad Abduh Jamāl al-Dīn al-Afghānī Qazi Hussain Ahmad Muhammad Nasiruddin al-Albani Muhammad Asad Hassan al-Banna Necmettin Erbakan Rached Ghannouchi Safwat Hegazi Muhammad Iqbal Ali Khamenei Ruhollah Khomeini Abul A'la Maududi Taqi al-Din al-Nabhani Yusuf al-Qaradawi Sayyid Qutb Tariq Ramadan Ata Abu Rashta Rashid Rida Navvab Safavi Ali Shariati Haji Shariatullah Hassan Al-Turabi Ahmed Yassin

Related topics

Criticism of Islamism Islam
Islam
and other religions Islamophobia Reform movements Modernity (Modernism)

Islam
Islam
portal Politics portal

v t e

Millî Görüş
Millî Görüş
(Turkish: [milˈliː ɡøˈɾyʃ], "National Outlook" or "National Vision") is a religio-political movement and a series of Islamist
Islamist
parties inspired by Necmettin Erbakan. It has been called one of "the leading Turkish diaspora
Turkish diaspora
organizations in Europe"[1] and also described as the largest Islamic
Islamic
organization operating in the West.[2] Founded in 1969, the movement claimed to have "87,000 members across Europe, including 50,000 in Germany," as of 2005.[3] The term also refers to the "religious vision" of the organization[1] that emphasizes the moral and spiritual strength of Islamic
Islamic
faith (Iman) and explains the Muslim
Muslim
world's decline as a result of its imitation of Western values (such as secularism) and inappropriate use of Western technology.[4] The Movement is active in nearly all European countries and also countries like Australia[5] Canada and the United States.

Head office of the Islamic
Islamic
Community Milli Görüş in Köln, Germany.

Contents

1 Background 2 Islamist
Islamist
rift

2.1 European Turkish diaspora

3 Timeline 4 See also 5 Footnotes

5.1 Literature

Background[edit] In 1969 the Turkish politician Necmettin Erbakan
Necmettin Erbakan
published a manifesto that he gave the title Millî Görüş.[6] It spoke only in the most general terms of Islamic
Islamic
moral and religious education but devoted much attention to industrialization, development and economic independence.[citation needed] It warned against further rapprochement towards Europe, considering the Common Market
Common Market
to be a Zionist
Zionist
and Catholic
Catholic
project for the assimilation and de- Islamization
Islamization
of Turkey and called instead for closer economic co-operation with Muslim
Muslim
countries. According to author Banu Eligur, Erbakan and the party "used the code words national and culture to refer to Islam, and National Vision to refer to the project of Political Islam" as "it is illegal" in Turkey "to use religious symbols for political purposes."[7] The name of Millî Görüş
Millî Görüş
would remain associated with a religio-political movement and a series of Islamist
Islamist
parties inspired by Erbakan, one succeeding the other as they were banned for violating Turkey’s secularist legislation. Islamist
Islamist
rift[edit] Following the ban of the Virtue Party (FP), a rift that had been developing in the movement resulted in two parties taking its place, the Felicity Party
Felicity Party
(SP) representing Erbakan’s old guard, and the Justice and Development Party (AK Party) led by younger and more pragmatic politicians around Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, which claims to have renounced a specifically Islamist
Islamist
agenda. The AK Party convincingly won the 2002 elections and formed a government with a strong popular mandate, that brought Turkey closer to acceptance for membership in the European Union
European Union
than any previous government had done. European Turkish diaspora[edit] Among the Turkish immigrants in Western Europe, Milli Görüş became one of the major, if not the major, religious movements, controlling numerous mosques. Like the movement in Turkey, it went through some remarkable changes, not least because the first generation, which was strongly oriented towards what happened in Turkey, is gradually surrendering leadership to a younger generation that grew up in Europe and is concerned with entirely different matters. Milli Görüş’ public profile shows considerable differences from one country to the next, suggesting that nature of the interaction with the ‘host’ societies may have as much of an impact on its character as a religious movement as the relationship with the ‘mother’ movement in Turkey. Timeline[edit]

See also[edit]

Turks in Europe

Footnotes[edit]

^ a b Religion and politics in Turkey By Ali Çarkŏğlu, Barry Rubin, Barry M. Rubin, p.63 ^ An interview with the President of the IGMG: visit "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-04-02. Retrieved 2015-03-09.  ^ Where next? by Zachary Shore, July 15, 2005 ^ Religion and politics in Turkey By Ali Çarkŏğlu, Barry Rubin, Barry M. Rubin, p.64 ^ Australia Milli Gorus: visit http://www.icmg.org.au ^ Atacan 2005, 187-188. ^ The Mobilization of Political Islam
Islam
in Turkey By Banu Eligur, p.66-7

Literature[edit]

Atacan, Fulya (2005). "Explaining Religious Politics at the Crossroad: AKP-SP". Turkish Studies. 6 (2): 187–199. doi:10.1080/14683840500119510.  Werner Schiffauer (27 August 2010). "Compulsory Reading for Germany's Guardians of the Constitution". Qantara.de. Retrieved 26 July 2016. 

v t e

Millî Görüş
Millî Görüş
political parties

Main parties

National Order Party (1970-1971) National Salvation Party (1972-1981) Welfare Party
Welfare Party
(1983-1998) Virtue Party (1998-2001) Felicity Party
Felicity Party
(2001-)

Related parties

Justice and Development Party (2001-) Turkey Party
Turkey Party
(2009-2012) People's Voice Party (2010-2012)

v t e

Islamism

Outline

Islamism Qutbism Salafism

Salafi jihadism

Shia Islamism

Concepts

Guardianship of the Islamic
Islamic
Jurists Islamic
Islamic
democracy Islamic
Islamic
socialism Islamic
Islamic
state

Islamic
Islamic
monarchy Islamic
Islamic
republic

Islamistan Islamization

of knowledge

Pan-Islamism Post-Islamism Sharia Shura Turkish model Two-nation theory Ummah

Movements

Socio- political

Deobandi Hizb ut-Tahrir

in Britain in Central Asia

Islamic
Islamic
Defenders Front Jamaat-e-Islami Millî Görüş Muslim
Muslim
Brotherhood

in Egypt in Syria

Political Party

Freedom and Justice Party Green Algeria Alliance Hadas Hezbollah Islamic
Islamic
Salvation Front Jamaat-e-Islami
Jamaat-e-Islami
Pakistan Jamiat-e Islami Justice and Construction Party Justice and Development Party (Morocco) National Congress National Iraqi Alliance Malaysian Islamic
Islamic
Party Prosperous Justice Party Al Wefaq Welfare Party

Related

Ennahda Movement Gülen movement Islamic
Islamic
Modernism Justice and Development Party (Turkey)

Theorists and political leaders

Muhammad Abduh Jamāl al-Dīn al-Afghānī Qazi Hussain Ahmad Muhammad Asad Hasan al-Banna Necmettin Erbakan Muammar Gaddafi Rached Ghannouchi Safwat Hegazi Muhammad Iqbal Alija Izetbegović Ali Khamenei Ruhollah Khomeini Abul Ala Maududi Taqi al-Din al-Nabhani Yusuf al-Qaradawi Sayyid Qutb Tariq Ramadan Ata Abu Rashta Rashid Rida Navvab Safavi Ali Shariati Haji Shariatullah Hassan al-Turabi Ahmad Yassin Zia-ul-Haq

Salafi movement

Movements

Scholastic

Ahl-i Hadith Madkhalism Sahwa movement Wahhabism

Political

Al Asalah Authenticity Party Al-Islah Al-Nour Party

Islamist
Islamist
Bloc

People Party Young Kashgar Party

Major figures

Muhammad ibn Abd al-Wahhab Nasiruddin Albani Abd al-Aziz ibn Baz Muqbil bin Hadi al-Wadi'i Safar al-Hawali Rabee al-Madkhali Muhammad Al-Munajjid Zakir Naik Salman al-Ouda Ali al-Tamimi Ibn al Uthaymeen

Related

International propagation of Salafism
Salafism
and Wahhabism Islamic
Islamic
religious police Petro-Islam Sufi-Salafi relations

Militant Islamism/Jihadism

Ideology

Qutbism Salafi jihadism

Movements

Islamic
Islamic
Emirate of Afghanistan Militant Islamism
Islamism
based in

MENA region

Egyptian Islamic
Islamic
Jihad Fatah al-Islam Hamas Islamic
Islamic
State of Iraq and the Levant

South Asia

Lashkar-e-Taiba Taliban

Southeast Asia

Abu Sayyaf

Sub-Saharan Africa

Boko Haram al-Shabaab

al-Qaeda

in the Arabian Peninsula in Iraq in North Africa

Major figures

Anwar al-Awlaki Abdullah Yusuf Azzam Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi Osama bin Laden Mohammed Omar Juhayman al-Otaybi Omar Abdel-Rahman Ayman al-Zawahiri

Related

Islamic
Islamic
extremism Islamic
Islamic
terrorism Jihad Slavery Talibanization Worldwide Caliphate

Texts

Reconstruction (Iqbal, 1930s) Forty Hadith (Khomeini, 1940) Principles (Asad, 1961) Milestones (Qutb, 1964) Islamic Government (Khomeini, 1970) Islamic
Islamic
Declaration (Izetbegović, 1969-1970) The Green Book (Gaddafi, 1975)

Historical events

Zia-ul-Haq's Islamization Iranian Revolution Grand Mosque seizure Soviet invasion of Afghanistan Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam Popular Arab and Islamic
Islamic
Congress Algerian Civil War September 11 attacks War on Terror Arab Spring Arab Winter

Influences

Anti-imperialism Anti-Zionism Islamic
Islamic
response to modernity Islamic
Islamic
revival Modern Islamic
Islamic
philosophy

by region

Balkans Gaza Strip United Kingdom

Related topics

Criticism

Ed Husain

Political aspects of Islam Political Islam

Islamism
Islamism
in

South

.