HOME
The Info List - Merton Thesis


--- Advertisement ---



The Merton thesis is an argument about the nature of early experimental science proposed by Robert K. Merton. Similar to Max Weber's famous claim on the link between Protestant work ethic
Protestant work ethic
and the capitalist economy, Merton argued for a similar positive correlation between the rise of Protestant
Protestant
Pietism
Pietism
and early experimental science.[1] The Merton thesis has resulted in continuous debates.[2] Although scholars are still debating it, Merton's 1936 doctoral dissertation (and two years later his first monograph by the same title) Science, Technology and Society in 17th-Century England
England
raised important issues on the connections between religion and the rise of modern science, became a significant work in the realm of the sociology of science and continues to be cited in new scholarship.[3] Merton further developed this thesis in other publications.

Contents

1 Thesis 2 Criticism 3 Support 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further reading

Thesis[edit] The Merton thesis has two separate parts: firstly, it presents a theory that science changes due to an accumulation of observations and improvement in experimental technique and methodology; secondly, it puts forward the argument that the popularity of science in England
England
in the 17th century, and the religious demography of the Royal Society (English scientists of that time were predominantly Puritans
Puritans
or other Protestants) can be explained by a correlation between Protestantism and the scientific values.[4] Merton focuses on English Puritanism and German Pietism
Pietism
as being responsible for the development of the scientific revolution of the 17th and 18th centuries. He explains that the connection between religious affiliation and interest in science is a result of a significant synergy between the ascetic Protestant
Protestant
values and those of modern science.[5] Protestant
Protestant
values encouraged scientific research by allowing science to identify God's influence on the world and thus providing religious justification for scientific research.[1] Criticism[edit] The first part of Merton's thesis has been criticized for insufficient consideration of the roles of mathematics and the mechanical philosophy in the scientific revolution. The second part has been criticized for the difficulty involved in defining who counts as a Protestant
Protestant
of the "right type" without making arbitrary distinctions. It is also criticized for failing to explain why non- Protestants
Protestants
do science (consider the Catholics Copernicus, da Vinci, Descartes, or Galileo) and conversely why Protestants
Protestants
of the "right type" are not all interested in science.[4][6][7] Merton, acknowledging the criticism, replied that the Puritan ethos was not necessary, although it did facilitate development of science.[8] He also noted that when science had acquired institutional legitimacy, it no longer needed religion, eventually becoming a counterforce, leading to religious decline. Nonetheless, early on, in Merton's view religion was a major factor that allowed the scientific revolution to occur.[1] While the Merton thesis does not explain all the causes of the scientific revolution, it does illuminate possible reasons why England
England
was one of its driving motors and the structure of the English scientific community.[9] Support[edit] In 1958, American sociologist Gerhard Lenski's empirical inquiry into The Religious Factor: A Sociological Study of Religion's Impact on Politics, Economics, and Family Life in the Detroit
Detroit
area (Michigan) revealed, among other insights, that there were significant differences between Catholics on the one hand and (white) Protestants and Jews
Jews
on the other hand with regard to economics and the sciences. Lenski's data supported the basic hypotheses of Max Weber's work The Protestant
Protestant
Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. According to Lenski, the "contributions of Protestantism to material progress have been largely unintended by-products of certain distinctive Protestant traits. This was a central point in Weber's theory." Lenski noted that more than a hundred years prior to Weber, John Wesley, one of the founders of the Methodist church, had observed that "diligence and frugality" made Methodists wealthy. "In an early era, Protestant asceticism and dedication to work, as noted both by Wesley and Weber, seem to have been important patterns of action contributing to economic progress." However, Lenski said, asceticism was rare among modern Protestants, and the distinctive Protestant
Protestant
doctrine of "the calling" was largely forgotten. Instead, modern (white) Protestants and Jews
Jews
had a high degree of "intellectual autonomy" that facilitated scientific and technical advance.[10] By contrast, Lenski pointed out, Catholics developed an intellectual orientation which valued "obedience" to the teachings of their church above intellectual autonomy, which made them less inclined to enter scientific careers. Catholic sociologists[11][12] had come to the same conclusions.[13] Lenski traced these differences back to the Reformation
Reformation
and the Catholic church's reaction to it. In Lenski's view, the Reformation encouraged intellectual autonomy among Protestants, in particular the Anabaptists, Puritans, Pietists, Methodists, and Presbyterians. In the Middle Ages, there had been tendencies toward intellectual autonomy, as exemplified in men like Erasmus. But after the Reformation, the Catholic leaders increasingly identified these tendencies with Protestantism and heresy and demanded that Catholics be obedient and faithful to ecclesiastical discipline. In Lenski's opinion, his study showed that these differences between Protestants
Protestants
and Catholics survived to the present day. As a consequence, "none of the predominantly and devoutly Catholic nations in the modern world can be classified as a leading industrial nation. Some Catholic nations – such as France, Italy, Argentina, Brazil, and Chile
Chile
– are quite highly industrialized, but none of them are leaders in the technological and scientific fields, nor do they seem likely to become so. Recently [1963] some Brazilian Catholic social scientists compared their country's progress with that of the United States and concluded that the chief factor responsible for the differential rates of development is the religious heritage of the two nations."[14] Puritans
Puritans
and Pietists both contributed to intellectual autonomy and provided intellectual tools and values important for science.[15] As an example, pietism challenged the orthodoxy via new media and formats: Periodical journals gained importance versus the former pasquills and single thesis, traditional disputation was replaced by competitive debating, which tried to gain new knowledge instead of defending orthodox scholarship.[16] It is a part of the forces that lead to modernity.[17] According to Scientific Elite: Nobel Laureates in the United States by Harriet Zuckerman, a review of American Nobel prizes awarded between 1901 and 1972, 72% of American Nobel Prize laureates identified a Protestant
Protestant
background.[18] Overall, 84.2% of all the Nobel Prizes awarded to Americans in Chemistry,[18] 60% in Medicine,[18] and 58.6% in Physics[18] between 1901 and 1972 were won by Protestants. According to 100 Years of Nobel Prize (2005), a review of Nobel prizes awarded between 1901 and 2000, 65.4% of Nobel Prize Laureates, have identified Christianity in its various forms as their religious preference (423 prizes).[19] While 32% of Nobel prize winners have identified with Protestantism in its various forms (208 prizes),[19] Protestants
Protestants
comprise 11.6–13% of the world's population but most[quantify] of those selecting the prize winners[citation needed]. Notes[edit]

^ a b c Sztompka, 2003 ^ Cohen, 1990 ^ Merton Awarded Nation's Highest Science Honor ^ a b Gregory, 1998 ^ Becker, 1992 ^ Ferngen, 2002 ^ Porter & Teich 1992 ^ Heddendorf, 1986] ^ Cohen, 1994 ^ Gerhard Lenski (1963), The Religious Factor: A Sociological Study of Religion's Impact on Politics, Economics, and Family Life, Revised Edition, Garden City, N.Y., pp. 350-352 ^ Thomas F. O'Dea (1958), The Catholic Dilemma: An Inquiry into the Intellectual Life, New York, N.Y. ^ Frank L. Christ and Gerard Sherry (Eds.) (1961), American Catholicism and the Intellectual Ideal, New York, N.Y. ^ Gerhard Lenski, The Religious Factor, pp. 283-284 ^ Gerhard Lenski, The Religious Factor, pp. 347-349 ^ Gregory, Andrew (1998). handouts for course 'The Scientific Revolution' at The Scientific Revolution, doc file online Archived 2006-05-13 at the Wayback Machine. ^ Martin Gierl, Pietismus und Aufklärung: theologische Polemik und die Kommunikationsreform der Wissenschaft am Ende des 17. Jahrhunderts, Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1997 ( Pietism
Pietism
and enlightenment, theological polemic and the reform of science communication end of the 17. century). ^ Shantz, Douglas H.; Erb, Peter C. (2013-03-05). An Introduction to German Pietism: Protestant
Protestant
Renewal at the Dawn of Modern Europe. JHU Press. ISBN 9781421408309.  ^ a b c d Harriet Zuckerman, Scientific Elite: Nobel Laureates in the United States New York, The Free Pres, 1977 , p.68: Protestants
Protestants
turn up among the American-reared laureates in slightly greater proportion to their numbers in the general population. Thus 72 percent of the seventy-one laureates but about two thirds of the American population were reared in one or another Protestant
Protestant
denomination-) ^ a b Baruch A. Shalev, 100 Years of Nobel Prizes
Nobel Prizes
(2003),Atlantic Publishers & Distributors , p.57: between 1901 and 2000 reveals that 654 Laureates belong to 28 different religion Most 65.4% have identified Christianity in its various forms as their religious preference. While separating Roman Catholic from Protestants
Protestants
among Christians proved difficult in some cases, available information suggests that more Protestants
Protestants
were involved in the scientific categories and more Catholics were involved in the Literature and Peace categories. Atheists, agnostics, and freethinkers comprise 10.5% of total Nobel Prize winners; but in the category of Literature, these preferences rise sharply to about 35%. A striking fact involving religion is the high number of Laureates of the Jewish faith – over 20% of total Nobel Prizes
Nobel Prizes
(138); including: 17% in Chemistry, 26% in Medicine and Physics, 40% in Economics and 11% in Peace and Literature each. The numbers are especially startling in light of the fact that only some 14 million people (0.02% of the world's population) are Jewish. By contrast, only 5 Nobel Laureates have been of the Muslim faith-0.8% of total number of Nobel prizes awarded – from a population base of about 1.2 billion (20% of the world's population).

References[edit]

Becker, George (December 1992). "The Merton thesis: Oetinger and German Pietism, a significant negative case". Sociological Forum. Springer. 7 (4): 642–660. doi:10.1007/bf01112319.  Cohen, I. (ed.) (1990). Puritanism and the rise of modern science: the Merton thesis. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press. ISBN 0813515300. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) Cohen, H. (1994). The scientific revolution: a historiographical inquiry. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. pp. 320–321. ISBN 9780226112800.  Google Print, pp. 320–321 Ferngren, Gary B. (2002). Science and religion: a historical introduction. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 125. ISBN 9780801870385.  Google Print, p.125 Gregory, Andrew (1998). handouts for course 'The Scientific Revolution' at The Scientific Revolution, doc file online Heddendorf, Russel, (December 1986). Religion, Science, and the Problem of Modernity, JASA 38: 226–231. Lenski, Gerhard (1963), The Religious Factor: A Sociological Study of Religion's Impact on Politics, Economics, and Family Life, Revised Edition, New York, N.Y. Porter, Roy; Teich, Mikuláš (1992). The Scientific revolution
Scientific revolution
in national context. Cambridge New York, New York, USA: Cambridge University Press. p. 179. ISBN 9780521396998.  Google Print, p.179 Sztompka, Piotr (2003), "Robert K. Merton", in Ritzer, George, The Blackwell companion to major contemporary social theorists, Malden, Massachusetts Oxford: Blackwell, p. 13, ISBN 9781405105958. 

Also available as: Sztompka, Piotr (2003). "Chapter 1. Robert K. Merton". Wiley. doi:10.1002/9780470999912.ch2.  Extract.

Further reading[edit]

Steven Shapin, Understanding the Merton Thesis, Isis, Vol. 79, No. 4 (Dec., 1988), pp. 594–605 Robert K. Merton, Science, Technology and Society in Seventeenth Century England

Sociology portal C

.