HOME
        TheInfoList






Capri (later Mercury Capri) is a nameplate marketed by the Lincoln-Mercury division of Ford Motor Company on three distinct series of automobiles between 1970 and 1994. From 1970 to 1978, the Capri was a sport compact marketed without any Ford divisional branding[1], sourced as a captive import from Ford of Europe. From 1979 to 1986, the Capri became part of the Mercury model line as a pony car. From 1991 to 1994, the Mercury Capri was a roadster, sourced as a captive import by Ford of Australia.

In North America, the Capri was marketed without a direct Ford-brand counterpart for its first and third generations, although sold elsewhere under the Ford brand.

Origin of name

The Capri nameplate is derived from the namesake Italian island, in automotive use, it has been used by all three Ford divisions. In 1952, the Lincoln Capri marked the first use of the nameplate, serving as its premium trim level during the early 1950s. From 1962 to 1964, Ford of Britain introduced a Ford Consul Capri two-door hardtop coupe. For 1966 and 1967, the Capri name was first used by Mercury, denoting the standard trim of the Mercury Comet.

For 1968, Ford of Europe developed the Ford Capri two-door coupé as its counterpart to the Mustang. In line with the Mustang, the Capri was styled with a long hood and a short deck (trunklid; later hatchback) with a fastback-style roofline.

First generation (1970–1978)

See also Ford Capri

First generation
1973 Capri 2600 Enhanced.jpg
1973 Capri 2600
Overview
Also calledFord Capri
Production1970–1978
AssemblyCologne, Germany
Saarlouis, Germany[2]
Body and chassis
Body style2-door coupe (1970–1974)
2-door hatchback (1976–1978)
LayoutFR layout
RelatedFord Cortina
Powertrain
Engine1.6 L Kent I4
2.0 L OHC I4
2.3 L OHC I4
2.6 L OHV V6
2.8 L OHV V6
Dimensions
Wheelbase100.7 in (2,560 mm)
Length167.8–174.8 in (4,260–4,440 mm)
Width64.8–66.9 in (1,650–1,700 mm)
Height52.0–53.4 in (1,320–1,360 mm)
Curb weight2,250–2,734 lb (1,021–1,240 kg)

Capri (1970–1975)

See also Ford Capri

First generation
1973 Capri 2600 Enhanced.jpg
1973 Capri 2600
Overview
Also calledFord Capri
Production1970–1978
AssemblyCologne, Germany
Saarlouis, Germany[2]
Body and chassis
Body style2-door coupe (1970–1974)
2-door hatchback (1976–1978)
LayoutFR layout
RelatedFord Cortina
Powertrain
Engine1.6 L Kent I4
2.0 L OHC I4
2.3 L OHC I4
2.6 L OHV V6
2.8 L OHV V6
Dimensions
Wheelbase100.7 in (

For 1968, Ford of Europe developed the Ford Capri two-door coupé as its counterpart to the Mustang. In line with the Mustang, the Capri was styled with a long hood and a short deck (trunklid; later hatchback) with a fastback-style roofline.

See also Ford Capri

First generation
1973 Capri 2600 Enhanced.jpgcaptive import produced by Ford of Europe in Cologne, Germany. Introduced in Europe for 1968 (and designed by Ford of Britain using local sourced components from the Cortina MkII and Escort with plans dating back to 1964 when development of a European variant of the Mustang commenced), the Ford Capri was marketed by the Lincoln-Mercury Division starting in April 1970. While marketed as part of the Mercury model line, the Capri did not carry any divisional identification.[1] Priced at $2,300 at the time of its launch, the Capri was marketed as an economical sporty coupe (with no upscale trim levels unlike its European market variants e.g. the GT, RS, L, XL, and XLR which were trim levels), far smaller than the Mercury Cougar and Montego.[1]

In its adaptation to the American market, the Capri saw several minor revisions, with the two rectangular headlights of the Ford Capri replaced by four circular headlamps (shared with some upscale Capri models sold for the European market eg the RS or GT - the rectangular lighting did not meet FMVSS 108), grille-mounted turn signals, and side marker lights; Rostyle wheels were fitted as standard equipment. While produced in Germany as a variant of the Ford Cortina, the Capri adopted powertrain commonality with the newly introduced Ford Pinto. Originally powered by a 1.6L Kent "crossflow" inline-four, the Capri received a 2.0L "OHC" inline-4 for 1971. As an option, for 1972, Mercury introduced a 2.6L Cologne V6, becoming the first American-market vehicle marketed by Ford Motor Company with a V6 engine. For 1974, the V6 was enlarged to 2.8L, as Ford revised castings for both the engine block and cylinder heads.

For 1973, the front bumper underwent a revision to comply with 5-mph bumper standards. The previous chrome bumper was reinforced with a steel tube and attached to the frame with shock absorbers (extending the length of the body several inches). As part of the change, the Capri saw revisions to the grille, taillamps, and its rear quarter trim grilles. As part of an interior revision, the Capri was given a new steering wheel, dashboard, and seat trim along with a redesigned wiring harness. For 1974, 5 mph bumpers were fitted to both front and rear, replacing the previous chrome tube bumpers with reinforced body-colored plastic bumpers.

ReceptionCapri II S

Reception