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The Memphis–Forrest City Combined Statistical Area, TN–MS–AR (CSA) is the commercial and cultural hub of The Mid-South or Ark-Miss-Tenn. The census defined combined statistical area covers ten counties in three states – Tennessee, Mississippi, and Arkansas. As of census 2010 the MSA had a population of 1,324,108 [2]. The Forrest City Micropolitan area was added to the Memphis area in 2012 to form the Memphis–Forrest City Combined Statistical area and had a population of 1,369,548 according to census estimates.[2] The greater Mid-South area as a whole has a population of 2.4 million according to 2013 census estimates.[3] This area is covered by Memphis local news channels and includes the Missouri Bootheel, Northeast Arkansas, West Tennessee, and North Mississippi.[3]

Contents

1 Regional identity 2 Economy 3 Colleges and Universities 4 Transportation 5 Greater Memphis (Mid-South) Counties By State 6 Cities and towns

6.1 Places with more than 100,000 inhabitants 6.2 Places with 50,000 to 100,000 inhabitants 6.3 Places with 25,000 to 50,000 inhabitants 6.4 Places with 5,000 to 25,000 inhabitants 6.5 Places with 500 to 5,000 inhabitants 6.6 Places with fewer than 500 inhabitants 6.7 Unincorporated places

7 Demographics 8 See also 9 External links 10 References

Regional identity[edit] The Memphis Metro area is known locally as the Mid-South. Culturally the Mid-South is more associated with the Deep South
Deep South
and even more specifically the Mississippi
Mississippi
Delta than it is the Upland South, which is the case with Tennessee's other large cities. Memphis is the largest city in the Deep South, third largest in the Southeastern United States, and eighth largest in the Southern United States
Southern United States
as a whole. African-Americans make up nearly half the population of the metro area. The Mid-South has the highest percentage of African-Americans of all large metro areas with at least a million people. It is second when metro areas of under a million people are factored in after the Jackson-Vicksburg-Brookhaven, MS Combined Statistical Area. The metro area is blue collar in nature and most of its growth can be attributed to its logistical infrastructure. Recently, however, more companies with technology backgrounds such as Electrolux and Mitsubishi have begun making inroads in the Memphis area.[4] Economy[edit] Main article: Economy of Memphis, Tennessee The Memphis area enjoys a diverse and robust economy. Well positioned on America's largest river and located near the population center of the United States; Memphis is known as America's distribution hub. FedEx
FedEx
is headquartered in Memphis and uses the Memphis International Airport as its global superhub facility making the airport the busiest cargo airport in the United States. UPS also uses Memphis as a major hub. The area is also home to one of the United States largest intermodal logistics centers. This includes being the third largest trucking corridor, fourth largest inland port, and third largest in class I railroad services. The Mid-South has the largest percentage of people employed in logistics in the U.S. The Mid-South is also home to many fortune 500 and 1000 companies such as FedEx, AutoZone, Regions Bank, ServiceMaster, BUPERS, First Tennessee
Tennessee
and International Paper. Furthermore, companies such as Nike, Baskin Robbins, Sharp, and Hewlett Packard operate large distribution centers out of Memphis.[5] Healthcare has begun to play a major role in the Mid-south's economy accounting for one in nine jobs. There are nineteen hospitals with over 4,100 beds in the Mid-South. The area is also home to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital which is a nobel prize winning hospital with over 1,200 scientist working there and the University of Tennessee
Tennessee
Health Science Center.[5] Main article: Tourism in Memphis, Tennessee Tourism is also a major contributor to the Mid-South's economy with the region being known as the birthplace of Rock and Roll and Blues. Over eight million people visit the Memphis metropolitan area
Memphis metropolitan area
every year for tourist related activities. Over four million people visit Beale Street
Beale Street
every year making it the most visited attraction in Tennessee. The Memphis Zoo
Memphis Zoo
is one of only four zoos in the U.S. to feature a giant panda and is routinely ranked as one of the best zoos in America. The Tunica casino resort area in Mississippi
Mississippi
has over twelve million visitors annually and is the third largest gaming area in the U.S. after Las Vegas and Atlantic City.[5] It also contains a lake beach at Lake Sardis near Batesville, Mississippi. Colleges and Universities[edit] Four Year Colleges and Graduate Schools

University of Memphis Rhodes College Christian Brothers University Memphis College of Art LeMoyne–Owen College Baptist College of Health Sciences University of Tennessee
Tennessee
Health Science Center Southern College of Optometry Rust College University of Mississippi Union University Arkansas
Arkansas
State University University of Tennessee
Tennessee
at Martin Harding School of Theology

Two Year Colleges

Southwest Tennessee
Tennessee
Community College Dyersburg State Community College Jackson State Community College Mid-South Community College Phillips Community College of the University of Arkansas Crowley's Ridge
Crowley's Ridge
College Northwest Mississippi
Mississippi
Community College Coahoma Community College Northeast Mississippi
Mississippi
Community College Itawamba Community College

Transportation[edit] Airports:

Memphis International Airport General DeWitt Spain Airport Olive Branch Airport University-Oxford Airport Jonesboro Municipal Airport McKellar-Sipes Regional Airport Millington Municipal Airport

Freeways:

Interstate 40 Interstate 240 (Inner Beltway) Interstate 55 Interstate 69 Interstate 269
Interstate 269
(Outer Beltway connecting Shelby County to Fayette and DeSoto Counties) Interstate 22
Interstate 22
(Connects Hickory Hill and DeSoto County, Mississippi, to Birmingham, Alabama, and Atlanta, Georgia) Bill Morris Parkway (Connects Piperton, Collierville, Germantown, Southwind, and Hickory Hill to I-240) Sam Cooper Blvd
Sam Cooper Blvd
(Connects East Memphis and Bartlett to Midtown) Tennessee
Tennessee
State Route 300 (Located in the Frayser area, connects Watkins and the I-240 loop to U.S. Route 51) Interstate 555
Interstate 555
(Connects Memphis to Jonesboro, Arkansas) Tennessee
Tennessee
State Route 14 (Connects Raleigh to Memphis)

Greater Memphis (Mid-South) Counties By State[edit] Arkansas

Crittenden County* Pop. 49,746 St. Francis County* Pop. 27,260 Lee County, Arkansas
Arkansas
Pop. 10,015 Phillips County, Arkansas
Arkansas
Pop. 20,399 Cross County, Arkansas
Arkansas
Pop. 17,548 Poinsett County, Arkansas
Arkansas
Pop. 24,145 Mississippi
Mississippi
County, Arkansas
Arkansas
Pop. 44,765 Craighead County, Arkansas
Arkansas
Pop. 101,488 Greene County, Arkansas
Arkansas
Pop. 43,097 Clay County, Arkansas
Arkansas
Pop. 15,402

Mississippi

Benton County* Pop. 8,571 Desoto County* Pop. 168,240 Tunica County* Pop. 10,560 Tate County* Pop. 28,373 Marshall County* Pop. 36,515 Panola County, Mississippi
Mississippi
Pop. 34,402 Lafayette County, Mississippi
Mississippi
Pop. 51,318 Alcorn County, Mississippi
Mississippi
Pop. 37,316 Tippah County, Mississippi
Mississippi
Pop. 22,084 Quitman County, Mississippi
Mississippi
Pop. 8,223 Coahoma County, Mississippi
Mississippi
Pop. 25,182 Union County, Mississippi
Mississippi
Pop. 27,754 Lee County, Mississippi
Mississippi
Pop. 85,340 Pontotoc County, Mississippi
Mississippi
Pop. 30,897 Prentiss County, Mississippi
Mississippi
Pop. 25,388

Tennessee

Tipton County* Pop. 61,586 Shelby County* Pop. 939,465 Fayette County* Pop. 38,690 Hardeman County, Tennessee
Tennessee
Pop. 26,306 McNairy County, Tennessee
Tennessee
Pop. 26,140 Madison County, Tennessee
Tennessee
Pop. 98,733 Haywood County, Tennessee
Tennessee
Pop. 18,224 Chester County, Tennessee
Tennessee
Pop. 17,321 Crockett County, Tennessee
Tennessee
Pop. 14,591 Gibson County, Tennessee
Tennessee
Pop. 49,457 Dyer County, Tennessee
Tennessee
Pop. 38,213 Weakley County, Tennessee
Tennessee
Pop. 34,450 Obion County, Tennessee
Tennessee
Pop. 31,131 Lake County, Tennessee
Tennessee
Pop. 7,731

Counties marked with* are officially included in the Memphis-Forrest City CSA. Cities and towns[edit] Places with more than 100,000 inhabitants[edit]

Memphis, Tennessee
Tennessee
(Principal City)

Places with 50,000 to 100,000 inhabitants[edit]

Bartlett, Tennessee Southaven, Mississippi[6]

Places with 25,000 to 50,000 inhabitants[edit]

Collierville, Tennessee Germantown, Tennessee Olive Branch, Mississippi Horn Lake, Mississippi West Memphis, Arkansas Cordova, Tennessee

Places with 5,000 to 25,000 inhabitants[edit]

Marion, Arkansas Hernando, Mississippi Lakeland, Tennessee Arlington, Tennessee Millington, Tennessee Atoka, Tennessee Covington, Tennessee Senatobia, Mississippi Holly Springs, Mississippi Oakland, Tennessee Munford, Tennessee

Places with 500 to 5,000 inhabitants[edit]

Somerville, Tennessee Brighton, Tennessee Earle, Arkansas Piperton, Tennessee Coldwater, Mississippi Mason, Tennessee Walls, Mississippi Byhalia, Mississippi Tunica, Mississippi Rossville, Tennessee Gallaway, Tennessee Turrell, Arkansas Hickory Flat, Mississippi Ashland, Mississippi Moscow, Tennessee

Places with fewer than 500 inhabitants[edit]

Potts Camp, Mississippi Gilt Edge, Tennessee Crawfordsville, Arkansas Burlison, Tennessee Edmondson, Arkansas Williston, Tennessee Clarkedale, Arkansas Garland, Tennessee Grand Junction, Tennessee Snow Lake Shores, Mississippi Horseshoe Lake, Arkansas Braden, Tennessee Gilmore, Arkansas Sunset, Arkansas Anthonyville, Arkansas La Grange, Tennessee Jericho, Arkansas Jennette, Arkansas

Unincorporated places[edit]

Arkabutla, Mississippi Banks, Mississippi Bethlehem, Mississippi Bruins, Arkansas Brunswick, Tennessee Capleville, Tennessee Chulahoma, Mississippi Cockrum, Mississippi Cordova, Tennessee Drummonds, Tennessee Dubbs, Mississippi Dundee, Mississippi Eads, Tennessee Ellendale, Tennessee Eudora, Mississippi Evansville, Mississippi Fisherville, Tennessee

Hickory Withe, Tennessee Hollywood, Mississippi Hudsonville, Mississippi Kerrville, Tennessee Laconia, Tennessee Lake Cormorant, Mississippi Lake View, Mississippi Looxahoma, Mississippi Macon, Tennessee Mineral Wells, Mississippi Mount Pleasant, Mississippi Nesbit, Mississippi Pleasant Hill, Mississippi Prichard, Mississippi Proctor, Arkansas Red Banks, Mississippi Randolph, Tennessee

Reverie, Tennessee Rosemark, Tennessee Sarah, Mississippi Savage, Mississippi Seyppel, Arkansas Shell Lake, Arkansas Simsboro, Arkansas Slayden, Mississippi Strayhorn, Mississippi Thyatira, Mississippi Tipton, Tennessee Tunica Resorts, Mississippi Tyro, Mississippi Victoria, Mississippi Waterford, Mississippi

Demographics[edit] According to U.S.census estimates for 2013,[7] there were 1,371,110 people residing within the CSA. The racial makeup of the CSA was 45.2% non-Hispanic White, 47.3% African American, 0.5% Native American, 2.2% Asian, <0.1% Pacific Islander, and Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.1% of the population.[7] Memphis is the only metropolitan/combined statistical area in the United States with over a million people to have a plurality/majority African American population.[8] The Jackson, Mississippi
Mississippi
metropolitan area also has this distinction but only has around half a million people. The median income for a household in the MSA was $47,344 and the mean was $65,463. The median income for a family was $57,780 and the mean was $76,126. The per capita income for the MSA was $24,675.[9] See also[edit]

Tennessee
Tennessee
portal Mississippi
Mississippi
portal Arkansas
Arkansas
portal

Tennessee
Tennessee
census statistical areas Mississippi
Mississippi
census statistical areas Arkansas
Arkansas
census statistical areas

External links[edit]

Greater Memphis Chamber

References[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Memphis metropolitan area.

^ "Table 1. Annual Estimates of the Population of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013". 2013 Population Estimates. US Census Bureau, Population Division. March 23, 2014. Archived from the original ( XML
XML
webpage) on April 17, 2016. Retrieved July 25, 2015.  ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on July 21, 2014. Retrieved October 28, 2013.  ^ "More than 90,000 Workers Commute from Other Counties to Selby, Census figures show (Commercial Appeal, Apr. 6, 2013)".  ^ New Study Forecasts 4000 Local Manufacturing Jobs through 2016 ^ a b c "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2006. Retrieved June 16, 2013.  ^ "Southaven population pushes above 50,000-mark (May 23, 2013)".  ^ a b 2013 Census Population Estimate Table ^ [1] ^ Profile America Facts for Features, CB12-FF.14, July 24, 2012

v t e

City of Memphis and Memphis metropolitan area
Memphis metropolitan area
(counties in TN, MS and AR)

Topics

History

Timeline

Geography Government Economy Education Culture Tourism Sports Transportation Memphians

Districts

Downtown Midtown North Memphis South Memphis East Memphis

Neighborhoods

Belle Meade Berclair Binghampton Capleville Central Gardens Chickasaw Gardens Cooper-Young Cordova Douglass Evergreen Frayser Glenview Harbor Town Hickory Hill High Point Terrace Hollywood Hyde Park Lenox Medical District Mud Island Normal Station Nutbush Orange Mound Parkway Village Raleigh Riverside Sherwood Forest South Main Uptown Victorian Village Vollintine Hills Whitehaven Wolfchase

Metro area landmarks

Tennessee

A. Schwab's Art Museum of the University of Memphis AutoZone
AutoZone
Stadium Bartlett Museum Beale Street Bellevue Baptist Church Belz Museum Botanic Garden Brooks Museum Burkle Estate Central Station Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception Chickasaw Bluff Children's Museum Chucalissa Museum Cotton Museum Davies Manor Dixon Gallery and Gardens Downtown Trolleys Elmwood Cemetery FedExForum Fire Museum Fort Assumption Fort Wright Graceland Hernando de Soto Bridge Liberty Bowl Stadium Libertyland Lichterman Nature Center Lincoln American Tower Magevney House Mallory–Neely House Meeman-Shelby Forest State Park Memorial Park Cemetery Cotton Exchange Memphis International Airport International Raceway National Cemetery Parkway System Railroad & Trolley Museum Memphis Zoo Mississippi
Mississippi
River Mississippi
Mississippi
River Park Mud Island Monorail National Civil Rights Museum National Ornamental Metal Museum Oaklawn Garden Orpheum Theatre Overton Park Peabody Hotel Pink Palace The Pyramid Rhodes College Rock N' Soul Museum St. Jude Children's Research Hospital St. Mary's Episcopal Cathedral Shelby Farms Stax Museum Sun Studio South Main Arts District Temple Israel Tennessee
Tennessee
Brewery Tipton County Museum T. O. Fuller State Park Tom Lee Park Union Station University of Memphis Victorian Village Wolf River

Mississippi

Arkabutla Lake BankPlus Amphitheater at Snowden Grove DeSoto County Museum 1st Jackpot Casino Gold Strike Casino Holly Springs National Forest Landers Center Horseshoe Casino Mississippi
Mississippi
River Resorts Casino Sam's Town Gambling Hall Southaven Towne Center Tunica Resorts Snowden Grove Park Tanger Outlets Southaven Tunica Roadhouse Casino Wall Doxey State Park

Arkansas

Horseshoe Lake Mississippi
Mississippi
River Southland Park Gaming and Racing Wapanocca National Wildlife Refuge

Metro area suburbs

Tennessee

Arlington Atoka Bartlett Collierville Covington Germantown Lakeland Millington Munford Northaven Oakland Piperton Somerville Shelby Forest

Mississippi

Byhalia Hernando Holly Springs Horn Lake Olive Branch Senatobia Southaven Tunica Tunica Resorts (Robinsonville) Walls

Arkansas

Earle Marion West Memphis

Metro area counties

Tennessee

Shelby Fayette Tipton

Mississippi

DeSoto Marshall Tate Tunica

Arkansas

Crittenden

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 State of Tennessee

Nashville (capital)

Topics

History Geography Tennesseans African Americans Media

Newspapers Radio TV

Constitution Elections Governors Lieutenant Governors General Assembly Supreme Court Tennessee
Tennessee
National Guard Law Enforcement Tourist attractions

Seal of Tennessee

Grand Divisions

East Tennessee Middle Tennessee West Tennessee

Regions

Blue Ridge Mountains Cumberland Mountains Cumberland Plateau Highland Rim Mississippi
Mississippi
Plain Nashville Basin Ridge-and-Valley Appalachians Tennessee
Tennessee
Valley Tri-Cities

Largest cities

Bartlett Bristol Chattanooga Clarksville Cleveland Franklin Hendersonville Jackson Johnson City Kingsport Knoxville Memphis Murfreesboro Nashville

Counties

Anderson Bedford Benton Bledsoe Blount Bradley Campbell Cannon Carroll Carter Cheatham Chester Claiborne Clay Cocke Coffee Crockett Cumberland Davidson Decatur DeKalb Dickson Dyer Fayette Fentress Franklin Gibson Giles Grainger Greene Grundy Hamblen Hamilton Hancock Hardeman Hardin Hawkins Haywood Henderson Henry Hickman Houston Humphreys Jackson Jefferson Johnson Knox Lake Lauderdale Lawrence Lewis Lincoln Loudon Macon Madison Marion Marshall Maury McMinn McNairy Meigs Monroe Montgomery Moore Morgan Obion Overton Perry Pickett Polk Putnam Rhea Roane Robertson Rutherford Scott Sequatchie Sevier Shelby Smith Stewart Sullivan Sumner Tipton Trousdale Unicoi Union Van Buren Warren Washington Wayne Weakley White Williamson Wilson

v t e

 State of Mississippi

Jackson (capital)

Topics

Mississippians Delegations Governors Lieutenant Governors Legislature State Parks State Landmarks Music History Geography Tourist attractions

Seal of Mississippi

Society

Culture Crime Demographics Economy Education Media

Newspapers Radio TV

Politics

Regions

The Delta Golden Triangle Gulf Coast Mississippi
Mississippi
Plain Natchez District North Mississippi Pine Belt Tennessee
Tennessee
Valley

Metros

Gulfport-Biloxi Hattiesburg Jackson Memphis (TN) Pascagoula

Larger cities

Gulfport Jackson Southaven

Smaller cities

Bay St. Louis Biloxi Brandon Brookhaven Canton Clarksdale Cleveland Clinton Columbus Corinth Gautier Greenville Greenwood Grenada Hattiesburg Horn Lake Indianola Itta Bena Laurel Long Beach Louisville Madison Magee McComb Mendenhall Meridian Moss Point Natchez Ocean Springs Olive Branch Oxford Pascagoula Pass Christian Pearl Picayune Ridgeland Starkville Tunica Tupelo Vicksburg Waveland West Hattiesburg (Oak Grove) West Point Yazoo City

Counties

Adams Alcorn Amite Attala Benton Bolivar Calhoun Carroll Chickasaw Choctaw Claiborne Clarke Clay Coahoma Copiah Covington DeSoto Forrest Franklin George Greene Grenada Hancock Harrison Hinds Holmes Humphreys Issaquena Itawamba Jackson Jasper Jefferson Jefferson Davis Jones Kemper Lafayette Lamar Lauderdale Lawrence Leake Lee Leflore Lincoln Lowndes Madison Marion Marshall Monroe Montgomery Neshoba Newton Noxubee Oktibbeha Panola Pearl River Perry Pike Pontotoc Prentiss Quitman Rankin Scott Sharkey Simpson Smith Stone Sunflower Tallahatchie Tate Tippah Tishomingo Tunica Union Walthall Warren Washington Wayne Webster Wilkinson Winston Yalobusha Yazoo

v t e

 State of Arkansas

Little Rock (capital)

Topics

Index Outline Arkansans Aviation Colleges and universities Congressional delegations Constitution County government Energy Geography Government Governors High schools Historic Landmarks History Images Lakes Media

Newspapers Radio TV

Music Places Rivers School districts Sports and recreation State parks Territory Tourist attractions Townships Transportation Water

Seal of Arkansas

Society

Crime Culture Demographics Economy Education Politics

Regions

Arkansas
Arkansas
River Valley Ark-La-Tex Bayou Bartholomew Boston Mountains Central Arkansas Crowley's Ridge Delta Four State Area Mississippi
Mississippi
Alluvial Plain New Madrid Seismic Zone Northwest Arkansas Ouachita Mountains Ozarks Piney Woods South Arkansas Timberlands

Metros

Central Arkansas Northwest Arkansas Fort Smith Texarkana Jonesboro Pine Bluff Hot Springs Tri-State

Largest cities

Little Rock Fort Smith Fayetteville Springdale Jonesboro North Little Rock Conway Rogers Pine Bluff Bentonville Hot Springs Benton Texarkana Sherwood Jacksonville Russellville Bella Vista West Memphis Paragould Cabot

Counties

Arkansas Ashley Baxter Benton Boone Bradley Calhoun Carroll Chicot Clark Clay Cleburne Cleveland Columbia Conway Craighead Crawford Crittenden Cross Dallas Desha Drew Faulkner Franklin Fulton Garland Grant Greene Hempstead Hot Spring Howard Independence Izard Jackson Jefferson Johnson Lafayette Lawrence Lee Lincoln Little River Logan Lonoke Madison Marion Miller Mississippi Monroe Montgomery Nevada Newton Ouachita Perry Phillips Pike Poinsett Polk Pope Prairie Pulaski Randolph Saline Scott Searcy Sebastian Sevier Sharp St. Francis Stone Union Van Buren Washington White Woodruff Yell

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The 100 most populous metropolitan statistical areas of the United States of America

   

New York, NY Los Angeles, CA Chicago, IL Dallas, TX Houston, TX Washington, DC Philadelphia, PA Miami, FL Atlanta, GA Boston, MA San Francisco, CA Phoenix, AZ Riverside-San Bernardino, CA Detroit, MI Seattle, WA Minneapolis, MN San Diego, CA Tampa, FL Denver, CO St. Louis, MO

Baltimore, MD Charlotte, NC San Juan, PR Orlando, FL San Antonio, TX Portland, OR Pittsburgh, PA Sacramento, CA Cincinnati, OH Las Vegas, NV Kansas City, MO Austin, TX Columbus, OH Cleveland, OH Indianapolis, IN San Jose, CA Nashville, TN Virginia Beach, VA Providence, RI Milwaukee, WI

Jacksonville, FL Memphis, TN Oklahoma City, OK Louisville, KY Richmond, VA New Orleans, LA Hartford, CT Raleigh, NC Birmingham, AL Buffalo, NY Salt Lake City, UT Rochester, NY Grand Rapids, MI Tucson, AZ Honolulu, HI Tulsa, OK Fresno, CA Bridgeport, CT Worcester, MA Albuquerque, NM

Omaha, NE Albany, NY New Haven, CT Bakersfield, CA Knoxville, TN Greenville, SC Oxnard, CA El Paso, TX Allentown, PA Baton Rouge, LA McAllen, TX Dayton, OH Columbia, SC Greensboro, NC Sarasota, FL Little Rock, AR Stockton, CA Akron, OH Charleston, SC Colorado Springs, CO

Syracuse, NY Winston-Salem, NC Cape Coral, FL Boise, ID Wichita, KS Springfield, MA Madison, WI Lakeland, FL Ogden, UT Toledo, OH Deltona, FL Des Moines, IA Jackson, MS Augusta, GA Scranton, PA Youngstown, OH Harrisburg, PA Provo, UT Palm Bay, FL Chattanooga, TN

United States Census Bureau
United States Census Bureau
population estimate

.