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Mary Teresa Slaney (formerly Tabb, née Decker; born August 4, 1958) is a retired American middle-distance runner. During her career, she won gold medals in the 1500 meters and 3000 meters at the 1983 World Championships, and was the world record holder in the mile, 5000 meters and 10,000 meters. In total, she set 17 official and unofficial world records, including being the first woman in history to break 4:20 for the mile. She also set 36 US national records at distances ranging from 800 meters to 10,000 meters, and has held the US record in the mile, 2000 meters and 3000 meters since the early 1980s, while her 1500 meters record stood for 32 years. In 2003, she was inducted into the National Track and Field Hall of Fame.[3]

Contents

1 Biography 2 Career

2.1 Career peak

3 The 1984 Olympic incident 4 Doping controversy 5 Later life 6 ElliptiGO
ElliptiGO
Racing 7 International competitions 8 See also 9 References 10 External links

Biography[edit] Mary Decker
Mary Decker
was born in Bunnvale, New Jersey. A decade later her family moved to Garden Grove in Southern California, where Decker started running. A year later, aged 11, she won her first local competition.[4] She joined her school athletics club and a local track club, and completely immersed herself in running, for which she would pay an injury-laden price later in her career. At age 12, she completed a marathon and four middle- and long-distance races in one week, ending the week with an appendectomy operation.[4] Career[edit] In her early teens, Decker was already recognized as a world-class runner. Unable to attend the 1972 Olympics as she was too young, the pigtailed 89 pounds (40 kg) 14-year-old nicknamed "Little Mary Decker," won international acclaim in 1973 with a win in the 800 meters at a US-Soviet meet in Minsk, beating the later Olympic silver medallist.[4] By the end of 1972, Decker was ranked first in the United States
United States
and fourth in the world in the 800 meters.[4] In 1973 she gained her first world record, running an indoor mile in 4:40.1. By 1974, Decker was the world Indoor record holder with 2:02.4 for 880 yards, and 2:01.8 for 800 meters. By the end of 1974, she had developed a case of the muscle condition compartment syndrome. This resulted in a series of injuries, which meant that she did not compete in the 1976 Olympics, because of stress fractures in her lower leg. In 1978 she had an operation to try to cure compartment syndrome, which kept her out of competition for a period.[4] After recovering from surgery, she spent two seasons at the University of Colorado at Boulder
University of Colorado at Boulder
on a track scholarship.[5][6] In 1979, she became the second American woman (the first was Francie Larrieu) to break the 4:30 mile in American record time.[7] Decker was the first woman to break the 4:20 barrier for the mile in 1980 when she ran it in 4:17.55. However, this time was never ratified by the IAAF.[8] In 1981 she married fellow American distance runner Ron Tabb. The couple divorced in 1983.[9] In 1982, under the name Mary Tabb, she ran the mile in 4:18.08, breaking the official record of 4:20.89 by the Soviet Lyudmila Veselkova This time was ratified. She did not compete for an Olympic medal due to the U.S.-led 1980 Summer Olympics boycott. She did however receive one of 461 Congressional Gold Medals created especially for the spurned athletes.[10] Career peak[edit] In 1982 Decker-Tabb set six world records, at distances ranging from the mile run to 10,000 meters. She received the James E. Sullivan Award as the top amateur athlete in the United States. The following year she achieved the "Double Decker,"[11] winning both the 1500 meters and 3000 meters events at the World Championships in Helsinki, Finland. Her history of relatively easy wins in the United States left her tactical abilities suspect in Helsinki, as she would not choose to run in close order because so few athletes could keep up with her, a situation that the Soviet runners hoped to use to their advantage. Her wins against Soviet World Record holders proved a redemption of her competitive guile. After her double win she won the Jesse Owens Award
Jesse Owens Award
from USA Track and Field
USA Track and Field
and Sports Illustrated magazine named her Sportsperson of the Year.[1] Shortly before her World Championship victories, Decker improved her U.S. 1500 meters record to 3:57.12 in Stockholm on July 26, 1983. This record stood for 32 years until Shannon Rowbury
Shannon Rowbury
ran 3:56.29 on July 17, 2015. The 1984 Olympic incident[edit] Decker was heavily favored to win a gold medal in the 3000 meters run at the 1984 Summer Olympics, held at Los Angeles. In the final, Zola Budd, representing Great Britain, had been running barefoot side by side with Decker for three laps and moved ahead. In an attempt to put pressure on Budd, Decker remained close by in a crowded space. Decker stood on Budd, then shortly after, collided with the barefoot runner and fell spectacularly to the curb. As a result, Mary Decker
Mary Decker
did not finish the race, which was won by Maricica Puica
Maricica Puica
of Romania
Romania
(Budd finished seventh). Decker was carried off the track in tears by her boyfriend (and later, husband), British discus thrower Richard Slaney. At a press conference she said that Budd was to blame for the collision. While it is generally the trailing athlete's responsibility to avoid contact with the runner ahead, it is also an accepted convention among most distance runners that the leader be a full stride ahead before cutting in. Track officials initially disqualified Budd for obstruction, but she was reinstated just one hour later once officials had viewed films of the race. Despite being behind Budd, Decker's claim that Budd had bumped into her leg was supported by a number of U.S. sports journalists, and Budd was hounded constantly in the press as a result, receiving a number of death threats. The claim was never accepted by the director of the games or the IAAF.[12] Decker and Budd next met in July 1985, in a 3000 meters race at Crystal Palace National Sports Centre
Crystal Palace National Sports Centre
in London, England. Decker won the race, and Budd finished in fourth place. After the race, the two women shook hands and made up. Decker later went on record as claiming that she was unfairly robbed of the LA 3000 meters gold medal by Budd, but said many years after the event "The reason I fell, some people think she tripped me deliberately. I happen to know that wasn't the case at all. The reason I fell is because I am and was very inexperienced in running in a pack."[13] Decker had a successful 1985 season, winning twelve mile and 3000 meters races in the European athletics calendar, which included a new official world record for the women's mile of 4:16.71 in Zurich (Natalya Artyomova's 4:15.8 in 1984, not being ratified by the IAAF). Since that race in 1985, her time has only been bettered on four occasions. That race in Zurich also matched her with both of the other principle athletes from the Olympic race, Slaney vanquishing both Puica and Budd who themselves ran times that until July 9, 2017 also ranked in the top 10 of all time.[14] She sat out the 1986 season to give birth to her only child, daughter Ashley Lynn (born May 30, 1986), but missed the 1987 season due to injury. She qualified for the 1988 Summer Olympics
1988 Summer Olympics
in Seoul, South Korea, but failed to win a medal. She did not qualify for the 1992 Games. Doping controversy[edit] In 1996, at the age of 37, as she qualified for the 5000 meters at the Atlanta
Atlanta
Olympics, Decker became involved in controversy. A urine test taken in June at the Olympic Trials showed a testosterone to epitestosterone (T/E) ratio greater than the allowable maximum of six to one.[15] At the time of the positive test Decker was being coached by Alberto Salazar.[16] Decker and her lawyers contended that the T/E ratio test is unreliable for women, especially women in their late 30s or older who are taking birth control pills. In the meantime, Decker was eliminated in the heats at the Olympics.[5] In June 1997, the IAAF
IAAF
banned Decker from competition. In September 1999, a USATF panel reinstated her.[17][18] The IAAF
IAAF
cleared her to compete but took the case to arbitration. In April 1999, the arbitration panel ruled against her, after which the IAAF
IAAF
– through a retroactive ban, even though she was cleared to compete – stripped her of a silver medal she had won in the 1500 meters at the 1997 World Indoor Championships.[19][20] In April 1999, Decker filed suit against both the IAAF
IAAF
and the U.S. Olympic Committee which administered the test, arguing that the test is flawed and cannot distinguish between androgens caused by the use of banned substances and androgens resulting from the use of birth control pills.[21] The court ruled that it had no jurisdiction, a decision that was upheld on appeal.[22] The (T/E) ratio test has seen its standards tightened to a 4:1 ratio, instead of the previous 6:1 ratio, and laboratories now also run a carbon isotope ratio test (CIR) if the ratio is unusually high.[23] Later life[edit] Throughout her later career, Decker had suffered a series of stress induced fractures. After the loss of her 1999 legal case, she agreed to have a series of 30+ orthopedic procedures. Mainly on her legs and feet, they were an attempt to enable her to run competitively in marathons. However, the surgery increased the occurrence of the problems. As a result, she retired with her husband to a 55-acre (22 ha) property in Eugene, Oregon, where she can now jog every other day.[24] Her other hobbies include sewing, quilting, gardening, renovating the property, and walking her three Weimaraner
Weimaraner
dogs.[24] ElliptiGO
ElliptiGO
Racing[edit] In 2012, Decker's injuries led her to start riding the ElliptiGO elliptical bicycle, saying that it gave her the same feeling as her hard running workouts used to.[25] In September 2012, she competed in the ElliptiGO
ElliptiGO
World Championships race up Palomar Mountain
Palomar Mountain
in San Diego County, coming in second place.[26] The following year, Decker took 6 minutes off her previous time and placed third at the 2013 ElliptiGO
ElliptiGO
World Championships.[27] International competitions[edit]

Year Competition Venue Position Event Notes

Representing  United States

1979 Pan American Games San Juan, Puerto Rico 1st 1500 m 4:05.7

1983 World Championships Helsinki, Finland 1st 1500 m 4:00.90

1st 3000 m 8:34.62

1984 Olympic Games Los Angeles, United States DNF 3000 m 8:44.32 (heat)

1985 Grand Prix Final Rome, Italy 1st 3000 m 8:46.38

1988 Olympic Games Seoul, South Korea 8th 1500 m 4:02.49

10th 3000 m 8:47.13

1991 Grand Prix Final Barcelona, Spain 2nd Mile 4:28.35

1996 Olympic Games Atlanta, United States 21st (h) 5000 m 15:41.30

1997 World Indoor Championships Paris, France DQ (2nd) 1500 m 4:05.22

Elliptical Cycling

2012 World Championships San Diego, United States 2nd Palomar Mountain 1:51.34

2013 World Championships San Diego, United States 3rd 1:45.27

2014 World Championships San Diego, United States 3rd 1:31.22

2015 World Championships San Diego, United States 2nd 1:30.54

(h) Indicates overall position in qualifying heats. DNF = did not finish. DQ = disqualified.

See also[edit]

List of sportspeople sanctioned for doping offences

References[edit]

^ a b c d Mary Decker-Slaney. Sports Reference ^ Mary Slaney
Mary Slaney
profile at IAAF ^ Mary Slaney
Mary Slaney
(Decker) at USA Track & Field Hall of Fame ^ a b c d e " Mary Decker
Mary Decker
– Little Mary". sports.jrank.org. Retrieved May 27, 2010.  ^ a b MacDonald, Jamie (November 29, 1999). " Mary Decker
Mary Decker
Slaney, Track and Field". Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
for Women. CNNsi.com. Retrieved December 19, 2009.  ^ Taylor, Susan Champli (September 29, 1986). " Mary Decker
Mary Decker
Takes a Run at Happiness with Husband Richard Slaney". Retrieved June 13, 2010.  ^ Chronological Listing of U.S. Women Who Have Broken 4:30 in the Mile as of May 5, 2013[permanent dead link]. bringbackthemile.com ^ " Mary Decker
Mary Decker
– Repairing The Damage". jrank.org. Retrieved May 1, 2015.  ^ " Mary Decker
Mary Decker
Takes a Run at Happiness with Husband Richard Slaney". PEOPLE.com. Retrieved May 1, 2015.  ^ Caroccioli, Tom; Caroccioli, Jerry. Boycott: Stolen Dreams of the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games. Highland Park, IL: New Chapter Press. pp. 243–253. ISBN 978-0942257403.  ^ "Covers". CNN.  ^ Athletics at the 1984 Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Summer Games: Women's 3,000 metres. sports-reference.com ^ Parker-Pope, Tara (August 1, 2008). "An Olympic Blast From the Past". The New York Times. Retrieved May 12, 2010.  ^ One Mile – women – senior – outdoor. iaaf.org. Retrieved on October 9, 2016. ^ Litsky, Frank (April 14, 1999). "TRACK AND FIELD; Slaney Suing the I.A.A.F. In Dispute Over a Drug Test". New York Times. Retrieved December 19, 2009.  ^ LONGMAN, JERE (May 1, 1996). "TRACK AND FIELD; Slaney Tries New Approach to Olympic Quest". New York Times. Retrieved August 14, 2012.  ^ "Athletes Unretiring: The Comeback Kids". Business Week. Retrieved December 19, 2009.  ^ "Runner still feels regret over 1984 Olympics wipeout". Reuters. Taipei Times. July 25, 2009. Retrieved December 19, 2009.  ^ Rowbottom, Mike (April 27, 1999). "Athletics: Slaney doping ban upheld at IAAF
IAAF
hearing". The Independent. London. Retrieved December 19, 2009.  ^ Mark Butler (ed.), "DOPING VIOLATIONS AT IAAF
IAAF
WORLD INDOOR CHAMPIONSHIPS", IAAF
IAAF
Statistics Book – World Indoor Championships SOPOT 2014 (PDF), IAAF, pp. 47–48, retrieved September 27, 2015  ^ Yesalis, Charles (2000). Anabolic steroids in sport and exercise (2nd ed.). Human Kinetics. p. 367. ISBN 978-0-88011-786-9.  ^ " Mary Decker
Mary Decker
Slaney, Plaintiff-appellant, v. the International Amateur Athletic Federation and the United States
United States
Olympic Committee, Defendants-appellees, 244 F.3d 580 (7th Cir. 2001)". Retrieved August 31, 2016.  ^ "EiC Mar 2010 – Feature – Five rings good, four rings bad". rsc.org. Retrieved May 1, 2015.  ^ a b Gene Cherry (July 28, 2009). " Mary Slaney
Mary Slaney
still yearns to run". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved May 27, 2010.  ^ Amby Burfoot
Amby Burfoot
(October 18, 2012). "Pioneer Women: Doris Heritage And Mary Slaney". Runner's World. Retrieved February 11, 2014.  ^ Caitlyn Pilkington (September 10, 2012). "Rusty Snow Wins ElliptiGO World Championship". competitor.com. Retrieved February 11, 2014.  ^ Caitlyn Pilkington (October 13, 2013). "Sara Slattery Shatters Course Record At ElliptiGO
ElliptiGO
World Championships". competitor.com. Retrieved February 11, 2014. 

External links[edit]

California State Records before 2000[permanent dead link]

Awards and achievements

Preceded by Martina Navratilova United Press International Athlete of the Year 1985 Succeeded by Heike Drechsler

Sporting positions

Preceded by Paula Fudge Women's 5.000m Best Year Performance 1982 Succeeded by Zola Budd

Preceded by Tatyana Kazankina Women's 3.000m Best Year Performance 1985 Succeeded by Olga Bondarenko

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National Distance Running Hall of Fame
National Distance Running Hall of Fame
inductees

1998: Joan Benoit Ted Corbitt Bill Rodgers Frank Shorter Kathrine Switzer 1999: Johnny Kelley Nina Kuscsik Francie Larrieu Smith Billy Mills 2000: Clarence DeMar Steve Prefontaine Alberto Salazar Grete Waitz 2001: Bill Dellinger Lynn Jennings Fred Lebow Craig Virgin 2002: Bill Bowerman Doris Brown
Doris Brown
Heritage John J. Kelley Browning Ross 2003: Mary Decker Jim Ryun George Young 2004: None 2005: Don Kardong Greg Meyer Bob Schul 2006: Patti Catalano Gerry Lindgren Marty Liquori 2007: None 2008: Amby Burfoot Johnny Hayes Priscilla Welch 2009: None 2010: Dick Beardsley Miki Gorman 2011:       2012: Horace Ashenfelter Glenn Cunningham Jacqueline Hansen 2013:       2014: Tom Fleming Kim Merritt

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IAAF World Championships in Athletics
IAAF World Championships in Athletics
champions in women's 1500 metres

1983: Mary Decker
Mary Decker
(USA) 1987: Tetyana Dorovskikh (URS) 1991: Hassiba Boulmerka (ALG) 1993: Liu Dong (CHN) 1995: Hassiba Boulmerka (ALG) 1997: Carla Sacramento (POR) 1999: Svetlana Masterkova (RUS) 2001: Gabriela Szabo
Gabriela Szabo
(ROU) 2003: Tatyana Tomashova
Tatyana Tomashova
(RUS) 2005: Tatyana Tomashova
Tatyana Tomashova
(RUS) 2007: Maryam Yusuf Jamal
Maryam Yusuf Jamal
(BHR) 2009: Maryam Yusuf Jamal
Maryam Yusuf Jamal
(BHR) 2011: Jennifer Simpson
Jennifer Simpson
(USA) 2013: Abeba Aregawi
Abeba Aregawi
(SWE) 2015: Genzebe Dibaba
Genzebe Dibaba
(ETH) 2017: Faith Kipyegon
Faith Kipyegon
(KEN)

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IAAF World Championships in Athletics
IAAF World Championships in Athletics
champions in women's 3000 metres and 5000 metres

1980-1993 3000 metres

1980: Birgit Friedmann (FRG) 1983: Mary Decker
Mary Decker
(USA) 1987: Tetyana Dorovskikh (URS) 1991: Tetyana Dorovskikh (URS) 1993: Qu Yunxia (CHN)

1995-present 5000 metres

1995: Sonia O'Sullivan
Sonia O'Sullivan
(IRL) 1997: Gabriela Szabo
Gabriela Szabo
(ROU) 1999: Gabriela Szabo
Gabriela Szabo
(ROU) 2001: Olga Yegorova (RUS) 2003: Tirunesh Dibaba
Tirunesh Dibaba
(ETH) 2005: Tirunesh Dibaba
Tirunesh Dibaba
(ETH) 2007: Meseret Defar
Meseret Defar
(ETH) 2009: Vivian Cheruiyot
Vivian Cheruiyot
(KEN) 2011: Vivian Cheruiyot
Vivian Cheruiyot
(KEN) 2013: Meseret Defar
Meseret Defar
(ETH) 2015: Almaz Ayana
Almaz Ayana
(ETH) 2017: Hellen Obiri
Hellen Obiri
(KEN)

Note: In 1995, the 3000 m was replaced by the 5000 m.

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Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
Sportsperson of the Year

1954: Roger Bannister 1955: Johnny Podres 1956: Bobby Morrow 1957: Stan Musial 1958: Rafer Johnson 1959: Ingemar Johansson 1960: Arnold Palmer 1961: Jerry Lucas 1962: Terry Baker 1963: Pete Rozelle 1964: Ken Venturi 1965: Sandy Koufax 1966: Jim Ryun 1967: Carl Yastrzemski 1968: Bill Russell 1969: Tom Seaver 1970: Bobby Orr 1971: Lee Trevino 1972: Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
& John Wooden 1973: Jackie Stewart 1974: Muhammad Ali 1975: Pete Rose 1976: Chris Evert 1977: Steve Cauthen 1978: Jack Nicklaus 1979: Terry Bradshaw
Terry Bradshaw
& Willie Stargell 1980: U.S. Olympic Hockey Team 1981: Sugar Ray Leonard 1982: Wayne Gretzky 1983: Mary Decker 1984: Edwin Moses
Edwin Moses
& Mary Lou Retton 1985: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar 1986: Joe Paterno 1987: Bob Bourne, Judi Brown King, Kipchoge Keino, Dale Murphy, Chip Rives, Patty Sheehan, Rory Sparrow, & Reggie Williams 1988: Orel Hershiser 1989: Greg LeMond 1990: Joe Montana 1991: Michael Jordan 1992: Arthur Ashe 1993: Don Shula 1994: Bonnie Blair
Bonnie Blair
& Johann Olav Koss 1995: Cal Ripken Jr. 1996: Tiger Woods 1997: Dean Smith 1998: Mark McGwire
Mark McGwire
& Sammy Sosa 1999: U.S. Women's Soccer Team 2000: Tiger Woods 2001: Curt Schilling
Curt Schilling
& Randy Johnson 2002: Lance Armstrong 2003: David Robinson & Tim Duncan 2004: Boston Red Sox 2005: Tom Brady 2006: Dwyane Wade 2007: Brett Favre 2008: Michael Phelps 2009: Derek Jeter 2010: Drew Brees 2011: Mike Krzyzewski
Mike Krzyzewski
& Pat Summitt 2012: LeBron James 2013: Peyton Manning 2014: Madison Bumgarner 2015: Serena Williams 2016: LeBron James 2017: José Altuve
José Altuve
& J. J. Watt

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Pan American Games
Pan American Games
champions in women's 1500 metres

1951–1971: Not held 1975: Jan Merrill
Jan Merrill
(USA) 1979: Mary Decker
Mary Decker
(USA) 1983: Ranza Clark (CAN) 1987: Linda Sheskey (USA) 1991: Alisa Hill (USA) 1995: Sarah Thorsett (USA) 1999: Marla Runyan (USA) 2003: Adriana Muñoz (CUB) 2007: Juliana Paula dos Santos
Juliana Paula dos Santos
(BRA) 2011: Adriana Muñoz (CUB) 2015: Muriel Coneo
Muriel Coneo
(COL)

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World Best Yearly Performance in Women's 1500 metres

1970–71: Karin Burneleit (GDR) 1972: Lyudmila Bragina
Lyudmila Bragina
(URS) 1973: Karin Krebs
Karin Krebs
(GDR) 1974: Gunhild Hoffmeister
Gunhild Hoffmeister
(GDR) 1975: Nina Morgunova (URS) 1976: Tatyana Kazankina (URS) 1977: Natalia Mărășescu
Natalia Mărășescu
(ROM) 1978: Giana Romanova (URS) 1979: Totka Petrova (BUL) 1980: Tatyana Kazankina (URS) 1981–82: Olga Dvirna (URS) 1983: Mary Slaney
Mary Slaney
(USA) 1984: Nadezhda Ralldugina (URS) 1985: Mary Slaney
Mary Slaney
(USA) 1986: Doina Melinte
Doina Melinte
(ROM) 1987: Tetyana Dorovskikh (URS) 1988–89: Paula Ivan
Paula Ivan
(ROU) 1990: Doina Melinte
Doina Melinte
(ROM) 1991: Natalya Artyomova (RUS) 1992: Hassiba Boulmerka (ALG) 1993: Qu Yunxia (CHN) 1994–95: Sonia O'Sullivan
Sonia O'Sullivan
(IRL) 1996: Svetlana Masterkova (RUS) 1997: Jiang Bo (CHN) 1998: Gabriela Szabo
Gabriela Szabo
(ROM) 1999: Violeta Szekely (ROM) 2000: Suzy Favor Hamilton (USA) 2001: Violeta Szekely (ROM) 2002–03: Süreyya Ayhan (TUR) 2004: Kelly Holmes
Kelly Holmes
(GBR) 2005: Maryam Yusuf Jamal
Maryam Yusuf Jamal
(BHR) 2006: Yuliya Fomenko (RUS) 2007–09: Maryam Yusuf Jamal
Maryam Yusuf Jamal
(BHR) 2010: Anna Alminova
Anna Alminova
(RUS) 2011: Morgan Uceny (USA) 2012–13: Abeba Aregawi
Abeba Aregawi
(SWE) 2014: Sifan Hassan
Sifan Hassan
(NED) 2015: Genzebe Dibaba
Genzebe Dibaba
(ETH) 2016: Laura Muir
Laura Muir
(GBR)

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World Best Year Performance in Women's 10,000 m

1975: Christa Vahlensieck (GER) 1976–1977: Peg Neppel (USA) 1978: Natalia Betini (ROM) 1979: Mary Shea (USA) 1980: Kathryn Binns (GBR) 1981: Yelena Sipatova (URS) 1982: Mary Decker-Slaney (USA) 1983: Raisa Sadreydinova (URS) 1984: Olga Bondarenko (URS) 1985–1987: Ingrid Kristiansen
Ingrid Kristiansen
(NOR) 1988: Olga Bondarenko (URS) 1989: Ingrid Kristiansen
Ingrid Kristiansen
(NOR) 1990: Viorica Ghican (ROM) 1991: Liz McColgan (GBR) 1992: Derartu Tulu (ETH) 1993–1994: Wang Junxia (CHN) 1995–1996: Fernanda Ribeiro
Fernanda Ribeiro
(POR) 1997: Dong Yanmei (CHN) 1998: Fernanda Ribeiro
Fernanda Ribeiro
(POR) 1999: Getenesh Wami (ETH) 2000: Derartu Tulu (ETH) 2001–2002: Paula Radcliffe
Paula Radcliffe
(GBR) 2003: Berhane Adere
Berhane Adere
(ETH) 2004: Paula Radcliffe
Paula Radcliffe
(GBR) 2005: Tirunesh Dibaba
Tirunesh Dibaba
(ETH) 2006: Elvan Abeylegesse
Elvan Abeylegesse
(TUR) 2007: Mestawet Tufa (ETH) 2008: Tirunesh Dibaba
Tirunesh Dibaba
(ETH) 2009–2010: Meselech Melkamu
Meselech Melkamu
(ETH) 2011: Sally Kipyego
Sally Kipyego
(KEN) 2012: Tirunesh Dibaba
Tirunesh Dibaba
(ETH) 2013: Meseret Defar
Meseret Defar
(ETH) 2014: Sally Kipyego
Sally Kipyego
(KEN) 2015: Gelete Burka
Gelete Burka
(ETH) 2016: Almaz Ayana
Almaz Ayana
(ETH)

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James E. Sullivan Award
James E. Sullivan Award
winners

1930: Jones 1931: Berlinger 1932: Bausch 1933: Cunningham 1934: Bonthron 1935: Little 1936: Morris 1937: Budge 1938: Lash 1939: Burk 1940: Rice 1941: MacMitchell 1942: Warmerdam 1943: Dodds 1944: Curtis 1945: Blanchard 1946: Tucker 1947: Kelly Jr. 1948: Mathias 1949: Button 1950: Wilt 1951: Richards 1952: Ashenfelter 1953: Lee 1954: Whitfield 1955: Dillard 1956: McCormick 1957: Morrow 1958: Davis 1959: O'Brien 1960: R. Johnson 1961: Rudolph 1962: Beatty 1963: Pennel 1964: Schollander 1965: Bradley 1966: Ryun 1967: Matson 1968: Meyer 1969: Toomey 1970: Kinsella 1971: Spitz 1972: Shorter 1973: Walton 1974: Wohlhuter 1975: Shaw 1976: Jenner 1977: Naber 1978: Caulkins 1979: Thomas 1980: Heiden 1981: Lewis 1982: Decker 1983: Moses 1984: Louganis 1985: Benoit 1986: Joyner-Kersee 1987: Abbott 1988: Griffith Joyner 1989: Evans 1990: Smith 1991: Powell 1992: Blair 1993: Ward 1994: Jansen 1995: Baumgartner 1996: M. Johnson 1997: Manning 1998: Holdsclaw 1999: C. Miller & K. Miller 2000: Gardner 2001: Kwan 2002: Hughes 2003: Phelps 2004: Hamm 2005: Redick 2006: Long 2007: Tebow 2008: S. Johnson 2009: Palmeiro-Winters 2010: Lysacek 2011: Rodriguez 2012: Franklin 2013: Urschel 2014: Elliott 2015: Stewart & Reynolds 2016: Carlini

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US National Championship winners in women's 800-meter dash

1927–1979 Amateur Athletic Union

1927: Marcelle Barkley 1928: Rayma Wilson 1958: Flo McArdle 1959: Grace Butcher 1960–1: Pat Connolly 1962: Leah Bennett 1963–4: Sandy Knott 1965: Marie Mulder 1966: Charlette Cooke 1967: Madeline Manning 1968: Doris Brown 1969: Madeline Manning 1970–1: Cheryl Toussaint 1972: Carol Hudson 1973: Wendy Knudson 1974: Mary Decker 1975–6: Madeline Manning 1977: Sue Addison 1978: Ruth Wysocki 1979: Essie Kelley

1980–1992 The Athletics Congress

1980–1: Madeline Manning 1982: Delisa Walton 1983: Robin Campbell 1984: Kim Gallagher 1985–6: Claudette Groenendall 1987: Essie Kelley 1988–9: Joetta Clark 1990: Meredith Rainey 1991: Delisa Walton-Floyd 1992: Joetta Clark

1993–present USA Track & Field

1993–4: Joetta Clark 1995–6: Meredith Rainey 1997: Kathi Rounds 1998–9: Jearl Miles-Clark 2000: Hazel Clark 2001: Regina Jacobs 2002: Nicole Teter 2003–4: Jearl Miles-Clark 2005–6: Hazel Clark 2007: Alysia Johnson 2008–9: Hazel Clark 2010–3: Alysia Montaño 2014: Ajeé Wilson 2015: Alysia Montaño 2016: Kate Grace 2017: Ajeé Wilson

Notes

OT: 1928, and since 1992, championships incorporated the Olympic Trials in Olympic years, otherwise held as a discrete event.

Distance:The event was over 880 yards in 1958, 1961–3, 1965–6, 1969–70 and 1973–4

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US National Championship winners in women's 1500-meter run

1965–1979 Amateur Athletic Union

1965: Marie Mulder 1966: Doris Brown 1967: Natalie Rocha 1968: Jane Hill 1969: Doris Brown 1970: Francie Larrieu 1971: Kathy Gibbons 1972–3: Francie Larrieu 1974: Doris Brown 1975: Julie Brown 1976–7: Francie Larrieu 1978: Jan Merrill 1979: Francie Larrieu

1980–1992 The Athletics Congress

1980: Francie Larrieu 1981: Jan Merrill 1982–3: Mary Slaney 1984: Kim Gallagher 1985: Diana Richburg 1986: Linda Sheskey 1987: Regina Jacobs 1988: Vicki Huber 1989: Regina Jacobs 1990–1: Suzy Favor Hamilton 1992: Regina Jacobs

1993–present USA Track & Field

1993: Annette Peters 1994–7: Regina Jacobs 1998: Suzy Hamilton 1999–2002: Regina Jacobs 2003: Suzy Favor Hamilton 2004: Carrie Tollefson 2005–7: Treniere Clement 2008–9: Shannon Rowbury 2010: Anna Pierce 2011–2: Morgan Uceny 2013: Treniere Moser 2014–7: Jennifer Simpson

Notes

OT: Since 1992, championships incorporated the Olympic Trials in Olympic years, otherwise held as a discrete event.

Distance:The event was over one mile in 1973–4

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US National Championship winners in women's 3000-meter run/two-mile run

1970: Beth Bonner 1971: Doris Brown
Doris Brown
Heritage 1972: Tena Anex 1973: Eileen Claugus 1974–75: Lynn Bjorklund 1976–78: Jan Merrill 1979: Francie Larrieu Smith 1980: Julie Brown 1981: Brenda Webb 1982: Francie Larrieu Smith 1983: Mary Decker 1984: Jan Merrill 1985: Cathy Branta 1986–87: Mary Knisely 1988: Lynn Jennings 1989: PattiSue Plumer 1990: Lynn Jennings 1991: Shelly Steely 1992: PattiSue Plumer 1993: Annette Peters 1994: Annette Peters

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1984 USA Olympic Track & Field Team

Qualification

1984 United States
United States
Olympic Trials (track and field)

Men's track & road athletes

Ray Armstead Alonzo Babers Kirk Baptiste Ron Brown Tonie Campbell Don Clary Paul Cummings Brian Diemer Marco Evoniuk Greg Foster Sam Graddy Johnny Gray John Gregorek Danny Harris Tranel Hawkins Jim Heiring Thomas Jefferson Earl Jones Roger Kingdom Steve Lacy Carl Lewis Henry Marsh John Marshall Antonio McKay Walter McCoy Edwin Moses Sunder Nix Daniel O'Connor Vince O'Sullivan Doug Padilla Pete Pfitzinger Pat Porter Alberto Salazar Carl Schueler Steve Scott Calvin Smith Willie Smith Jim Spivey John Tuttle Craig Virgin

Men's field athletes

Duncan Atwood Willie Banks Earl Bell Tim Bright Edward Burke Art Burns Michael Carter Mike Conley, Sr. John Crist Milton Goode Bill Green Al Joyner Dave Laut Carl Lewis Jud Logan Doug Lytle Mike McRae Larry Myricks Doug Nordquist Tom Petranoff John Powell Steve Roller Dwight Stones Mike Tully Mac Wilkins Augie Wolf Jim Wooding

Women's track & road athletes

Evelyn Ashford Sharrieffa Barksdale Joan Benoit Jeanette Bolden Cindy Bremser Valerie Brisco-Hooks Alice Brown Judi Brown Julie Brown Robin Campbell Chandra Cheeseborough Mary Decker Diane Dixon Benita Fitzgerald-Brown Kim Gallagher Randy Givens Florence Griffith Joyner Joan Hansen Denean Howard Sherri Howard Julie Isphording Missy Kane Lillie Leatherwood Pam Page Diana Richburg Kim Turner Angela Wright-Scott Ruth Wysocki

Women's field athletes

Jodi Anderson Carol Cady Laura De Snoo Leslie Deniz Cindy Greiner Lorna Griffin Joni Huntley Jackie Joyner Carol Lewis Ramona Pagel Louise Ritter Karin Smith Pam Spencer Lynda Sutfin Cathy Sulinski Angela Thacker

Coaches

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1988 USA Olympic Track & Field Team

Qualification

1988 United States
United States
Olympic Trials (track and field)

Men's track & road athletes

Brian Abshire Jeff Atkinson Tracy Baskin Bruce Bickford Arthur Blake Terry Brahm Tonie Campbell Mark Conover Mark Deady Joe DeLoach Brian Diemer Danny Everett Mark Everett Marco Evoniuk Ed Eyestone Johnny Gray Jim Heiring Andy Kaestner Roger Kingdom Carl Lewis Steve Lewis Tim Lewis Sydney Maree Henry Marsh Roy Martin Antonio McKay (r) Lee McNeill (r) Dennis Mitchell Gary Morgan Edwin Moses Doug Padilla Pete Pfitzinger Andre Phillips Steve Plasencia Pat Porter Butch Reynolds Albert Robinson (r) Kevin Robinzine (r) Carl Schueler Steve Scott Calvin Smith Andrew Valmon (r) Kevin Young

Men's field athletes

Willie Banks Randy Barnes Earl Bell Tim Bright Mike Buncic Robert Cannon Hollis Conway Brian Crouser Lance Deal Jim Doehring Ken Flax Randy Heisler Jim Howard Dave Johnson Gary Kinder Carl Lewis Jud Logan Larry Myricks Billy Olson Tom Petranoff Mike Powell Charles Simpkins Brian Stanton Dave Stephens Gregg Tafralis Kory Tarpenning Mac Wilkins

Women's track & road athletes

Evelyn Ashford Valerie Brisco Alice Brown (r) Joetta Clark Gail Devers-Roberts Nancy Ditz Diane Dixon Sheila Echols (r) Kim Gallagher Margaret Groos Denean Howard-Hill Sherri Howard (r) Vicki Huber Jacqueline Humphrey Regina Jacobs Lynn Jennings Florence Griffith Joyner Francie Larrieu-Smith Lillie Leatherwood (r) Pam Marshall LaVonna Martin Leslie Maxie Lynn Nelson Cathy O'Brien PattiSue Plumer LaTanya Sheffield Mary Decker
Mary Decker
Slaney Gwen Torrence Delisa Walton-Floyd Schowonda Williams Dannette Young (r)

Women's field athletes

Wendy Brown Carol Cady Bonnie Dasse Sheila Echols Cindy Greiner Jackie Joyner-Kersee Trish King Carol Lewis Donna Mayhew Ramona Pagel Connie Price Louise Ritter Karin Smith Coleen Sommer Lynda Sutfin

Coaches

Stan Huntsman (men's head coach) Dean Hayes (men's assistant coach) Irving "Moon" Mondschein (men's assistant coach) Tom Pagani (men's assistant coach) Russ Rogers (men's assistant coach) Joe Vigil (men's assistant coach) Terry Crawford (women's head coach) Ken Foreman (women's assistant coach) Dave Rodda (women's assistant coach) Fred Thompson (women's assistant coach)

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1996 USA Olympic Track & Field Team

Qualification

1996 United States
United States
Olympic Trials (track and field)

Men's track & road athletes

Derrick Adkins Brad Barquist Keith Brantly Bryan Bronson Andrzej Chylinski Curt Clausen Mark Coogan Mark Crear Mark Croghan Calvin Davis Marc Davis Jon Drummond Robert Gary Johnny Gray Matt Giusto Tim Harden Alvin Harrison Brian Hyde Allen James Allen Johnson Michael Johnson Bob Kempainen Bob Kennedy Michael Marsh Anthuan Maybank Dan Middleman Derek Mills Dennis Mitchell Tim Montgomery Herm Nelson José Parrilla Jason Pyrah Butch Reynolds Brandon Rock Jason Rouser Lamont Smith Jim Spivey Eugene Swift Jeff Williams Todd Williams

Men's field athletes

Charles Austin Randy Barnes Ed Broxterman Mike Conley Sr. Lance Deal Steve Fritz John Godina Joe Greene Kenny Harrison Jeff Hartwig Robert Howard Chris Huffins Scott Huffman C. J. Hunter Lawrence Johnson Carl Lewis Kevin McMahon Dan O'Brien Ken Popejoy Mike Powell Tom Pukstys Todd Riech Adam Setliff Dave Stephens Anthony Washington Cameron Wright

Women's track & road athletes

Olga Appell Kim Batten Tonja Buford-Bailey Joetta Clark Gail Devers Sandra Farmer-Patrick Suzy Favor Hamilton Kate Fonshell Chryste Gaines Kim Graham Carlette Guidry Juli Henner Victoria Herazo D'Andre Hill Vicki Huber Regina Jacobs Lynn Jennings Anne Marie Lauck Debbi Lawrence Maicel Malone Jearl Miles Inger Miller Joan Nesbit Meredith Rainey Michelle Rohl Amy Rudolph Mary Slaney Linda Somers Jenny Spangler Rochelle Stevens Lynda Tolbert-Goode Gwen Torrence Linetta Wilson Dannette Young

Women's field athletes

Amy Acuff Valeyta Althouse Lacy Barnes-Mileham Kelly Blair Nicole Carroll Sharon Hanson Aretha Hill Sheila Hudson Jackie Joyner-Kersee Diana Orrange Ramona Pagel Suzy Powell Connie Price-Smith Cynthea Rhodes Connie Teaberry Marieke Veltman Tisha Waller Erica Wheeler Shana Williams

Coaches

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Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year

1931: Helene Madison 1932: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1933: Helen Jacobs 1934: Virginia Van Wie 1935: Helen Wills 1936: Helen Stephens 1937: Katherine Rawls 1938: Patty Berg 1939: Alice Marble 1940: Alice Marble 1941: Betty Hicks 1942: Gloria Callen 1943: Patty Berg 1944: Ann Curtis 1945: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1946: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1947: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1948: Fanny Blankers-Koen 1949: Marlene Hagge 1950: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1951: Maureen Connolly 1952: Maureen Connolly 1953: Maureen Connolly 1954: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1955: Patty Berg 1956: Pat McCormick 1957: Althea Gibson 1958: Althea Gibson 1959: Maria Bueno 1960: Wilma Rudolph 1961: Wilma Rudolph 1962: Dawn Fraser 1963: Mickey Wright 1964: Mickey Wright 1965: Kathy Whitworth 1966: Kathy Whitworth 1967: Billie Jean King 1968: Peggy Fleming 1969: Debbie Meyer 1970: Chi Cheng 1971: Evonne Goolagong 1972: Olga Korbut 1973: Billie Jean King 1974: Chris Evert 1975: Chris Evert 1976: Nadia Comăneci 1977: Chris Evert 1978: Nancy Lopez 1979: Tracy Austin 1980: Chris Evert 1981: Tracy Austin 1982: Mary Decker 1983: Martina Navratilova 1984: Mary Lou Retton 1985: Nancy Lopez 1986: Martina Navratilova 1987: Jackie Joyner-Kersee 1988: Florence Griffith Joyner 1989: Steffi Graf 1990: Beth Daniel 1991: Monica Seles 1992: Monica Seles 1993: Sheryl Swoopes 1994: Bonnie Blair 1995: Rebecca Lobo 1996: Amy Van Dyken 1997: Martina Hingis 1998: Pak Se-ri 1999: United States
United States
women's national soccer team 2000: Marion Jones 2001: Jennifer Capriati 2002: Serena Williams 2003: Annika Sörenstam 2004: Annika Sörenstam 2005: Annika Sörenstam 2006: Lorena Ochoa 2007: Lorena Ochoa 2008: Candace Parker 2009: Serena Williams 2010: Lindsey Vonn 2011: Abby Wambach 2012: Gabby Douglas 2013: Serena Williams 2014: Mo'ne Davis 2015: Serena Williams 2016: Simone Biles 2017: Katie Ledecky

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 653833

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