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Manchuria
Manchuria
(simplified Chinese: 满洲; traditional Chinese: 滿洲; pinyin: Mǎnzhōu) was a name first used in the 17th century by Chinese people to refer to a large geographic region in Northeast Asia. Depending on the context, Manchuria
Manchuria
can either refer to a region that falls entirely within the People's Republic of China[1][2][3] or a larger region divided between China
China
and Russia. The region that falls entirely within modern China
China
is now usually referred to as Northeast (Dongbei) (simplified Chinese: 东北; traditional Chinese: 東北; pinyin: Dōngběi) in China, although "Manchuria" is widely used outside China
China
to denote the geographical and historical region. This region is the traditional homeland of the Xianbei, Khitan, and Jurchen (later called Manchu) peoples, who built several states within the area historically (however, no term for "Manchuria" exists in the Manchu language,[4] which originally referred to the area as the "Three Eastern Provinces").[5]

Contents

1 Definition 2 Etymology and names 3 Geography and climate 4 History

4.1 Early history 4.2 History after 1860

5 See also 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External links

Definition[edit]

Inner Manchuria: Northeast China
Northeast China
= red, Eastern Inner Mongolia
Inner Mongolia
= pink

The definition of Manchuria
Manchuria
can be any one of several regions of various size. These are, from smallest to largest:

Northeast China
Northeast China
(Dōngběi): consisting of Heilongjiang, Jilin, and Liaoning. This is the area referred to as "Manchuria" in the World Geographical Scheme for Recording Plant Distributions.[6] Inner Manchuria: the above, plus parts of modern Inner Mongolia (Hulunbuir, Hinggan, Tongliao, and Chifeng
Chifeng
divisions), plus Chengde. The above, plus Outer Manchuria
Outer Manchuria
(Outer Northeast China
Northeast China
or Russian Manchuria): the area from the Amur and Ussuri
Ussuri
rivers to the Stanovoy Mountains and the Sea of Japan. In Russian administrative terms, Ussuri
Ussuri
krai, southern Harbin
Harbin
oblast', Primorskiy kray. These were part of the Qing dynasty
Qing dynasty
China
China
according to the Treaty of Nerchinsk
Treaty of Nerchinsk
(1689) that defined the border in the region between China
China
and Russia, but were ceded to Russia
Russia
by the unequal treaties of the Treaty of Aigun (1858) and the Treaty of Peking
Treaty of Peking
(1860). The above, plus Sakhalin
Sakhalin
Island, which is generally included on Qing dynasty maps as part of Outer Manchuria
Outer Manchuria
even though it is not explicitly mentioned in the Treaty of Nerchinsk. The island was also included in Manchuria
Manchuria
on maps made by the Japanese Shogunate and Russian Empire. Despite lines on maps and empires' political claims, the island was inhabited by Ainu people
Ainu people
until the Soviet Union enforced an evacuation policy after 1945.

Etymology and names[edit]

One of the earliest European maps using the term "Manchuria" (Mandchouria) (John Tallis, 1851). Previously, the term "'Chinese Tartary" had been commonly applied in the West to Manchuria
Manchuria
and Mongolia[7]

Three centuries and a half must now pass away before entering upon the next act of the Manchu drama. The Nü-chêns had been scotched, but not killed, by their Mongol conquerors, who, one hundred and thirty-four years later (1368), were themselves driven out of China, a pure native dynasty being re-established under the style of Ming, "Bright." During the ensuing two hundred years the Nü-chêns were scarcely heard of, the House of Ming being busily occupied in other directions. Their warlike spirit, however, found scope and nourishment in the expeditions organised against Japan and Tan-lo, or Quelpart, as named by the Dutch, a large island to the south of the Korean peninsula; while on the other hand the various tribes scattered over a portion of the territory known to Europeans as Manchuria, availed themselves of long immunity from attack by the Chinese to advance in civilization and prosperity. It may be noted here that "Manchuria" is unknown to the Chinese or to the Manchus
Manchus
themselves as a geographical expression. The present extensive home of the Manchus
Manchus
is usually spoken of as the Three Eastern Provinces, namely, (1) Shêngking, or Liao-tung, or Kuan-tung, (2) Kirin, and (3) Heilungchiang or Tsitsihar. – Herbert A. Giles, China
China
and the Manchus, 1912[5]

"Manchuria" is a translation of the Japanese word Manshū, which dates from the 19th century. The name Manju (Manzhou) was invented and given to the Jurchen people
Jurchen people
by Hong Taiji
Hong Taiji
in 1635 as a new name for their ethnic group; however, the name "Manchuria" was never used by the Manchus
Manchus
or the Qing dynasty
Qing dynasty
itself to refer to their homeland. According to the Japanese scholar Junko Miyawaki-Okada, the Japanese geographer Takahashi Kageyasu was the first to use the term "満州" (Manshū) as a place name in 1809 in the Nippon Henkai Ryakuzu, and it was from that work that Westerners adopted the name.[8][9] According to Mark C. Elliott, Katsuragawa Hoshū's 1794 work, the "Hokusa bunryaku", was where "満州" (Manshū) first appeared as a place name was in two maps included in the work, "Ashia zenzu" and "Chikyū hankyū sōzu" which were also created by Katsuragawa.[10] "満州" (Manshū) then began to appear as a place names in more maps created by Japanese like Kondi Jūzō, Takahashi Kageyasu, Baba Sadayoshi and Yamada Ren, and these maps were brought to Europe
Europe
by the Dutch Philipp von Siebold.[11] According to Nakami Tatsuo, Philip Franz von Siebold was the one who brought the usage of the term Manchuria
Manchuria
to Europeans after borrowing it from the Japanese, who were the first to use it in a geographic manner in the eighteenth century although neither the Manchu nor Chinese languages had a term in their own language equivalent to "Manchuria" as a geographic place name.[12] The Manchu and Chinese languages had no such word as "Manchuria" and the word has imperialist connotations.[13] According to Bill Sewell, it was Europeans who first started using the name Manchuria
Manchuria
to refer to the location and it is "not a genuine geographic term".[14] The historian Gavan McCormack agreed with Robert H. G. Lee's statement that "The term Manchuria
Manchuria
or Man-chou is a modern creation used mainly by westerners and Japanese", with McCormack writing that the term Manchuria
Manchuria
is imperialistic in nature and has no "precise meaning" since the Japanese deliberately promoted the use of "Manchuria" as a geographic name to promote its separation from China
China
at the time they were setting up their puppet state of Manchukuo.[15] The Japanese had their own motive for deliberately spreading the usage of the term Manchuria.[16] The historian Norman Smith wrote that "The term 'Manchuria' is controversial".[17] Professor Mariko Asano Tamanoi said that she "should use the term in quotation marks" when referring to Manchuria.[18] In his 2012 dissertation on the Jurchen people
Jurchen people
to obtain a Doctor of Philosophy degree in History from the University of Washington, Professor Chad D. Garcia noted that usage of the term "Manchuria" is out of favor in "current scholarly practice" and that he had ceased using the term, instead using "the northeast" or referring to specific geographical features.[19]

Russian map of Manchuria, in yellow

In the 18th-century Europe, the region later known as "Manchuria" was most commonly referred to as "[Chinese] Tartary". However, the term Manchuria
Manchuria
(Mantchourie, in French) started appearing by the end of the century; French missionaries used it as early as 1800.[20] The French-based geographers Conrad Malte-Brun
Conrad Malte-Brun
and Edme Mentelle
Edme Mentelle
promoted the use of the term Manchuria
Manchuria
(Mantchourie, in French), along with "Mongolia", "Kalmykia", etc., as more precise terms than Tartary, in their world geography work published in 1804.[21] In current Chinese parlance, an inhabitant of "the Northeast", or Northeast China, is a "Northeasterner" (东北人; Dōngběi rén). "The Northeast" is a term that expresses the entire region, encompassing its history, culture, traditions, dialects, cuisines and so forth, as well as the "Three East Provinces" or "Three Northeast Provinces". In China, the term Manchuria
Manchuria
(traditional Chinese: 滿洲; simplified Chinese: 满洲; pinyin: Mǎnzhōu) is rarely used today, and the term is often negatively associated with the Japanese imperial legacy in the puppet state of Manchukuo
Manchukuo
(traditional Chinese: 滿洲國; simplified Chinese: 满洲国; pinyin: Mǎnzhōuguó).[22][23] Manchuria
Manchuria
has also been referred to as Guandong (traditional Chinese: 關東; simplified Chinese: 关东; pinyin: Guāndōng), which literally means "east of the pass", and similarly Guanwai (關外; 关外; Guānwài; "outside the pass"), a reference to Shanhai Pass
Shanhai Pass
in Qinhuangdao
Qinhuangdao
in today's Hebei, at the eastern end of the Great Wall of China. This usage is seen in the expression Chuǎng Guāndōng (literally "Rushing into Guandong") referring to the mass migration of Han Chinese
Han Chinese
to Manchuria
Manchuria
in the 19th and 20th centuries. The name Guandong later came to be used more narrowly for the area of the Kwantung Leased Territory
Kwantung Leased Territory
on the Liaodong Peninsula. It is not to be confused with the southern province of Guangdong. During the Qing dynasty, the region was known as the "three eastern provinces" (traditional Chinese: 東三省; simplified Chinese: 东三省; pinyin: Dōngsānshěng) (dergi ilan golo) since 1683 when Jilin
Jilin
and Heilongjiang
Heilongjiang
were separated even though it was not until 1907 that they were turned into actual provinces.[5][24] The administrators of the three areas were the General of Heilongjiang (Sahaliyan Ula i Jiyanggiyūn), General of Jilin
Jilin
(Girin i Jiyanggiyūn), and General of Shengjing (Mukden i Jiyanggiyūn). The area of Manchuria
Manchuria
was then converted into three provinces by the late Qing government in 1907. Since then, the phrase "Three Northeast Provinces" was officially used by the Qing government in China
China
to refer to this region, and the post of Viceroy of the Three Northeast Provinces (dergi ilan goloi uheri kadalara amban) was established to take charge of these provinces. After the 1911 revolution, which resulted in the collapse of the Manchu-established Qing dynasty, the name of the region where the Manchus
Manchus
originated was known as "the Northeast" in official documents in the newly founded Republic of China, in addition to the "Three Northeast Provinces". During the Ming dynasty
Ming dynasty
the area where the Jurchens
Jurchens
lived was referred to as Nurgan.[25] Nurgan
Nurgan
was the area of modern Jilin
Jilin
in Manchuria. Geography and climate[edit] Manchuria
Manchuria
consists mainly of the northern side of the funnel-shaped North China
China
Craton, a large area of tilled and overlaid Precambrian rocks spanning 100 million hectares. The North China Craton
North China Craton
was an independent continent before the Triassic
Triassic
period and is known to have been the northernmost piece of land in the world during the Carboniferous. The Khingan Mountains
Khingan Mountains
in the west are a Jurassic[26] mountain range formed by the collision of the North China Craton
North China Craton
with the Siberian Craton, which marked the final stage of the formation of the supercontinent Pangaea. No part of Manchuria
Manchuria
was glaciated during the Quaternary, but the surface geology of most of the lower-lying and more fertile parts of Manchuria
Manchuria
consists of very deep layers of loess, which have been formed by wind-borne movement of dust and till particles formed in glaciated parts of the Himalayas, Kunlun Shan
Kunlun Shan
and Tien Shan, as well as the Gobi
Gobi
and Taklamakan
Taklamakan
Deserts.[27] Soils are mostly fertile Mollisols
Mollisols
and Fluvents except in the more mountainous parts where they are poorly developed Orthents, as well as in the extreme north where permafrost occurs and Orthels dominate.[28] The climate of Manchuria
Manchuria
has extreme seasonal contrasts, ranging from humid, almost tropical heat in the summer to windy, dry, Arctic
Arctic
cold in the winter. This pattern occurs because the position of Manchuria on the boundary between the great Eurasian continental landmass and the huge Pacific Ocean
Ocean
causes complete monsoonal wind reversal. In the summer, when the land heats faster than the ocean, low pressure forms over Asia
Asia
and warm, moist south to southeasterly winds bring heavy, thundery rain, yielding annual rainfall ranging from 400 mm (16 in.), or less in the west, to over 1150 mm (45 in.) in the Changbai Mountains.[29] Temperatures in the summer are very warm to hot, with July average maxima ranging from 31 °C (88 °F) in the south to 24 °C (75 °F) in the extreme north.[30] Except in the far north near the Amur River, high humidity causes major discomfort at this time of year. In the winter, however, the vast Siberian High
Siberian High
causes very cold, north to northwesterly winds that bring temperatures as low as −5 °C (23 °F) in the extreme south and −30 °C (−22 °F) in the north[31] where the zone of discontinuous permafrost reaches northern Heilongjiang. However, because the winds from Siberia
Siberia
are exceedingly dry, snow falls only on a few days every winter, and it is never heavy. This explains why corresponding latitudes of North America were fully glaciated during glacial periods of the Quaternary while Manchuria, though even colder, always remained too dry to form glaciers[32] – a state of affairs enhanced by stronger westerly winds from the surface of the ice sheet in Europe. History[edit]

Part of a series on the

History of Manchuria

Ancient period

Early tribes Dangun Joseon Gija Joseon Wiman Joseon Yan Han dynasty Sushen Donghu Wuhuan Xianbei
Xianbei
state Cao Wei Buyeo Goguryeo Sima Jin dynasty Yuwen Former Yan Former Qin Later Yan Northern Yan Kumo Xi Khitan Northern Wei Mohe Shiwei

Medieval period

Tang dynasty Balhae Liao dynasty Jurchen Jin dynasty Yuan rule Northern Yuan dynasty Ming rule Qing rule

Modern period

Republic of China Russian Empire Far Eastern Republic Green Ukraine Manchukuo Soviet Union P.R. China
China
(Northeast China) Russia
Russia
(Outer Manchuria)

v t e

Main article: History of Manchuria Early history[edit]

A 12th-century Jurchen stone tortoise in today's Ussuriysk

Manchuria
Manchuria
was the homeland of several ethnic groups, including the Manchu, Ulchs
Ulchs
and Hezhen. Various ethnic groups and their respective kingdoms, including the Sushen, Donghu, Xianbei, Wuhuan, Mohe, Khitan and Jurchens
Jurchens
have risen to power in Manchuria. At various times, Han dynasty, Cao Wei
Cao Wei
dynasty, Western Jin dynasty, Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
and some other minor kingdoms of China
China
established control in parts of Manchuria
Manchuria
and in some cases tributary relations with peoples in the area.[33] Various kingdoms of Korea such as Gojoseon, Buyeo
Buyeo
and Goguryeo
Goguryeo
were also established in parts of this area. A number of world renowned linguists, including Dr. Bang-han Kim, Dr. Alexander Vovin, and Dr. J. Marshall Unger refer to the Goguryeo
Goguryeo
language and a number of other Koreanic languages
Koreanic languages
as distinctly Old Korean. However, Finnish linguist Juha Janhunen in collaboration with Chinese scholars suggests that a "Tungusic-speaking elite" may have ruled Goguryeo
Goguryeo
and Balhae, describing them as "protohistorical Manchurian states" with part of their population Tungusic, and that the area of southern Manchuria
Manchuria
was the origin of Tungusic peoples
Tungusic peoples
and was inhabited continuously by them since ancient times. Janhunen is opposed to theories of Japonic origins of Goguryeo
Goguryeo
and Balhae's ethnic composition made by Christopher I. Beckwith.[34] With the Song dynasty to the south, the Khitan people
Khitan people
of Inner Mongolia
Inner Mongolia
created the Liao dynasty in the region, which went on to control adjacent parts of Northern China
China
as well. The Liao dynasty
Liao dynasty
was the first state to control all of Manchuria.[35][36] In the early 12th century the Tungusic Jurchen people, who were Liao's tributaries, overthrew the Liao and formed the Jin dynasty, which went on to control parts of Northern China
China
and Mongolia after a series of successful military campaigns. During the Yuan dynasty (1271–1368),[37] Manchuria
Manchuria
was administered under the Liaoyang province. In 1375, Naghachu, a Mongol official of the Mongolia-based Northern Yuan dynasty
Northern Yuan dynasty
in Liaoyang province
Liaoyang province
invaded Liaodong, but later surrendered to the Ming dynasty
Ming dynasty
in 1387. In order to protect the northern border areas, the Ming decided to "pacify" the Jurchens
Jurchens
in order to deal with its problems with Yuan remnants along its northern border. The Ming solidified control over Manchuria
Manchuria
under the Yongle Emperor (1402–1424), establishing the Nurgan
Nurgan
Regional Military Commission. Starting in the 1580s, a Jianzhou Jurchen chieftain, Nurhaci
Nurhaci
(1558–1626), started to unify Jurchen tribes of the region. Over the next several decades, the Jurchen took control of most of Manchuria. In 1616, Nurhaci
Nurhaci
founded the Later Jin dynasty, later became known as the Qing dynasty.

A Jurchen man hunting from his horse, from a 15th-century ink and color painting on silk

Chinese cultural and religious influence such as Chinese New Year, the "Chinese god", motifs such as the dragon, spirals, and scrolls, agriculture, husbandry, methods of heating, and material goods such as iron cooking pots, silk, and cotton spread among the Amur natives including the Udeghes, Ulchis, and Nanais.[38] In 1644, after the Ming dynasty's capital of Beijing was sacked by the peasant rebels, the Jurchens
Jurchens
(now called Manchus) allied with Ming general Wu Sangui
Wu Sangui
and seized control of Beijing, overthrowing the short-lived Shun dynasty and establishing Qing dynasty
Qing dynasty
rule (1644–1912) over all of China. The Willow Palisade
Willow Palisade
was a system of ditches and embankments built by the Qing dynasty
Qing dynasty
during the later 17th century to restrict the movement of Han civilians into Jilin
Jilin
and Heilongjiang.[39] Only bannermen, including Chinese bannermen, were allowed to settle in Jilin
Jilin
and Heilongjiang. After conquering the Ming, the Qing often identified their state as "China" (中國, Zhongguo; "Middle Kingdom"), and referred to it as "Dulimbai Gurun" ("Middle Kingdom") in Manchu.[40][41][42] In the Qing shilu the lands of the Qing state (including Manchuria
Manchuria
and present-day Xinjiang, Mongolia, Tibet) are thus identified "the Middle Kingdom" in both the Chinese and Manchu languages in roughly two thirds of the cases, while the term refers to the traditional Chinese provinces populated by the Han in roughly one third of the cases. It was also common to use "China" (Zhongguo, Dulimbai gurun) to refer to the Qing in official documents, international treaties, and foreign affairs. In diplomatic documents, the term "Chinese language" (Dulimbai gurun i bithe) referred to Chinese, Manchu, and Mongol languages, and the term "Chinese people" (中國人 Zhongguo ren; Manchu: Dulimbai gurun i niyalma) referred to all Han, Manchus, and Mongol subjects of the Qing. The lands in Manchuria
Manchuria
were explicitly stated by the Qing to belong to "China" (Zhongguo, Dulimbai gurun) in Qing edicts and in the Treaty of Nerchinsk.[43] However Qing rule saw a massively increasing amount of Han Chinese both illegally and legally streaming into Manchuria
Manchuria
and settling down to cultivate land as Manchu landlords desired Han Chinese
Han Chinese
peasants to rent on their land and grow grain, most Han Chinese
Han Chinese
migrants were not evicted as they went over the Great Wall and Willow Palisade, during the eighteenth century Han Chinese
Han Chinese
farmed 500,000 hectares of privately owned land in Manchuria
Manchuria
and 203,583 hectares of lands which were part of coutrier stations, noble estates, and Banner lands, in garrisons and towns in Manchuria
Manchuria
Han Chinese
Han Chinese
made up 80% of the population.[44] Han Chinese
Han Chinese
farmers were resettled from north China
China
by the Qing to the area along the Liao River in order to restore the land to cultivation.[45] Wasteland was reclaimed by Han Chinese
Han Chinese
squatters in addition to other Han who rented land from Manchu landlords.[46] Despite officially prohibiting Han Chinese
Han Chinese
settlement on Manchu and Mongol lands, by the 18th century the Qing decided to settle Han refugees from northern China
China
who were suffering from famine, floods, and drought into Manchuria
Manchuria
and Inner Mongolia, so that Han Chinese farmed 500,000 hectares in Manchuria
Manchuria
and tens of thousands of hectares in Inner Mongolia
Inner Mongolia
by the 1780s.[47] The Qianlong Emperor
Qianlong Emperor
allowed Han Chinese peasants suffering from drought to move into Manchuria
Manchuria
despite his having issued edicts in favor of banning them from 1740 to 1776.[48] Chinese tenant farmers rented or even claimed title to land from the "imperial estates" and Manchu Bannerlands in the area.[49] Besides moving into the Liao area in southern Manchuria, the path linking Jinzhou, Fengtian, Tieling, Changchun, Hulun, and Ningguta
Ningguta
was settled by Han Chinese
Han Chinese
during the Qianlong Emperor's reign, and Han Chinese were the majority in urban areas of Manchuria
Manchuria
by 1800.[50] To increase the Imperial Treasury's revenue, the Qing sold formerly Manchu-only lands along the Sungari to Han Chinese
Han Chinese
at the beginning of the Daoguang Emperor's reign, and Han Chinese
Han Chinese
filled up most of Manchuria's towns by the 1840s, according to Abbe Huc.[51]

Russian Orthodox Church building in Harbin, c. 1900

The Russian conquest of Siberia
Siberia
was accompanied by massacres due to indigenous resistance to colonization by the Russian Cossacks, who savagely crushed the natives. At the hands of people like Vasilii Poyarkov in 1645 and Yerofei Khabarov
Yerofei Khabarov
in 1650 some peoples like the Daur were slaughtered by the Russians to the extent that it is now considered to have been genocide.[52] The Daurs initially deserted their villages since they heard about the cruelty of the Russians the first time Khabarov came.[53] The second time he came, the Daurs decided to do battle against the Russians instead but were slaughtered by Russian guns.[54] The indigenous peoples of the Amur region were attacked by Russians who came to be known as "red-beards".[55] The Russian Cossacks were named luocha (羅剎), after Demons found in Buddhist
Buddhist
mythology, by the Amur natives because of their cruelty towards the Amur tribes people, who were subjects of the Qing.[56] The Russian proselytization of Eastern Orthodox Christianity to the indigenous peoples along the Amur River
Amur River
was viewed as a threat by the Qing.[57] In 1858, a weakening Qing Empire was forced to cede Manchuria
Manchuria
north of the Amur to Russia
Russia
under the Treaty of Aigun. In 1860, at the Treaty of Peking, the Russians managed to obtain a further large slice of Manchuria, east of the Ussuri
Ussuri
River. As a result, Manchuria
Manchuria
was divided into a Russian half known as "Outer Manchuria", and a remaining Chinese half known as "Inner Manchuria". In modern literature, "Manchuria" usually refers to Inner (Chinese) Manchuria.[citation needed] As a result of the Treaties of Aigun and Peking, China
China
lost access to the Sea of Japan.

History after 1860[edit]

1940 Manchukuo
Manchukuo
visa issued at Hamburg

Inner Manchuria
Inner Manchuria
also came under strong Russian influence with the building of the Chinese Eastern Railway
Chinese Eastern Railway
through Harbin
Harbin
to Vladivostok. In the Chuang Guandong
Chuang Guandong
movement, many Han farmers, mostly from the Shandong peninsula
Shandong peninsula
moved there. By 1921, Harbin, northern Manchuria's largest city, had a population of 300,000, including 100,000 Russians.[58] Japan replaced Russian influence in the southern half of Inner Manchuria
Inner Manchuria
as a result of the Russo-Japanese War
Russo-Japanese War
in 1904–1905. Most of the southern branch of the Chinese Eastern Railway
Chinese Eastern Railway
was transferred from Russia
Russia
to Japan, and became the South Manchurian Railway. Japanese influence extended into Outer Manchuria
Outer Manchuria
in the wake of the Russian Revolution of 1917, but Outer Manchuria
Outer Manchuria
had reverted to Soviet control by 1925. Manchuria
Manchuria
was an important region due to its rich natural resources including coal, fertile soil, and various minerals. For pre–World War II Japan, Manchuria
Manchuria
was an essential source of raw materials. Without occupying Manchuria, the Japanese probably could not have carried out their plan for conquest over Southeast Asia
Asia
or taken the risk to attack Pearl Harbor and the British Empire
British Empire
in 1941.[59] It was reported that among Banner people, both Manchu and Chinese (Hanjun) in Aihun, Heilongjiang
Heilongjiang
in the 1920s, would seldom marry with Han civilians, but they (Manchu and Chinese Bannermen) would mostly intermarry with each other.[60] Owen Lattimore reported that during his January 1930 visit to Manchuria, he studied a community in Jilin (Kirin), where both Manchu and Chinese bannermen were settled at a town called Wulakai, and eventually the Chinese Bannermen there could not be differentiated from Manchus
Manchus
since they were effectively Manchufied (assimilated). The Han civilian population was in the process of absorbing and mixing with them when Lattimore wrote his article.[61]

Map of Manchukuo
Manchukuo
(1933–1945)

Around the time of World War I, Zhang Zuolin
Zhang Zuolin
established himself as a powerful warlord with influence over most of Manchuria. During his rule, the Manchurian economy grew tremendously, backed by immigration of Chinese from other parts of China. The Japanese assassinated him on 2 June 1928, in what is known as the Huanggutun Incident.[62] Following the Mukden Incident
Mukden Incident
in 1931 and the subsequent Japanese invasion of Manchuria, the Japanese declared Inner Manchuria
Inner Manchuria
an "independent state", and appointed the deposed Qing emperor Puyi
Puyi
as puppet emperor of Manchukuo. Under Japanese control Manchuria
Manchuria
was one of the most brutally run regions in the world, with a systematic campaign of terror and intimidation against the local Russian and Chinese populations including arrests, organised riots and other forms of subjugation.[63] Manchukuo
Manchukuo
was used by Japan as a base to invade the rest of China. After the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, Japan in 1945, the Soviet Union invaded from Soviet Outer Manchuria
Outer Manchuria
as part of its declaration of war against Japan. Soon afterwards, the Communist Party of China
China
and Chinese Nationalist Party
Chinese Nationalist Party
(Kuomintang) started fighting for control over Manchuria. The communists won in the Liaoshen Campaign
Liaoshen Campaign
and took complete control over Manchuria. With the encouragement of the Soviet Union, Manchuria
Manchuria
was then used as a staging ground during the Chinese Civil War for the Communist Party of China, which emerged victorious in 1949. Ambiguities in the treaties that ceded Outer Manchuria
Outer Manchuria
to Russia
Russia
led to dispute over the political status of several islands. This led to armed conflict in 1969, called the Sino-Soviet border conflict, resulting in an agreement. In 2004, Russia
Russia
agreed to transfer Yinlong Island
Yinlong Island
and one half of Heixiazi Island
Heixiazi Island
to the PRC, ending an enduring border dispute.

See also[edit]

Tungusic peoples North China Manchukuo Chinese Tartary Religion in Northeast China

References[edit]

^ "Manchuria". Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. Encyclopædia Britannica Inc., 2012. Web. 17 Jun. 2012 ^ http://oxforddictionaries.com/view/entry/m_en_gb0496460#m_en_gb0496460 ^ http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/manchuria ^ [1]Giles 1912, p. 8. ^ a b c Clausen 1995, p. 7. ^ Brummitt, R.K. (2001). World Geographical Scheme for Recording Plant Distributions: Edition 2 (PDF). International Working Group on Taxonomic Databases For Plant Sciences (TDWG). p. 12. Retrieved 2006-11-27.  ^ E.g. Proceedings of the Royal Geographical Society, Volumes 11–12, 1867, p. 162 ^ [2]Pozzi 2006, p. 159. ^ [3]Pozzi 2006, p. 167. ^ Elliot 2000, p. 626. ^ Elliot 2000, p. 628. ^ ed. Wolff & Steinberg 2007, p. 514. ^ Philippe Forêt (January 2000). Mapping Chengde: The Qing Landscape Enterprise. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 16–. ISBN 978-0-8248-2293-4.  ^ ed. Edgington 2003, p. 114. ^ McCormack 1977, p. 4. ^ Pʻan 1938, p. 8. ^ Smith 2012, p. 219. ^ Tamanoi 2000, p. 249. ^ Garcia 2012 Archived 11 September 2014 at the Wayback Machine., p. 15. ^ "Mantchourie" appearing among the name of Jesuit missionary districts in China, with 10,000 Christians, in: Annales de l'Oeuvre de la Sainte Enfance, 18, 1800, p. 161  ^ "Les provinces tributaires du nord ou la Mantchourie, la Mongolie, la Kalmouquie, le Sifan, la Petit Bucharie, et autres pays vulgairement compris sous la fausse dénomination de TARTARIE", in: Mentelle, Edme; Brun, Malte (1804), Géographie mathématique, physique & politique de toutes les parties du monde, 12, H. Tardieu, p. 144  ^ Tamanoi, Mariko (2009). Memory Maps: The State and Manchuria
Manchuria
in Postwar Japan. University of Hawaii Press. p. 10.  ^ Nishimura, Hirokazu; Kuroda, Susumu (2009). A Lost Mathematician, Takeo Nakasawa: The Forgotten Father of Matroid Theory. Springer. p. 15.  ^ Oriental Affairs: A Monthly Review. 1935. p. 189.  ^ Crossley 1999, p. 55. ^ Bogatikov, Oleg Alekseevich (2000); Magmatism and Geodynamics: Terrestrial Magmatism throughout the Earth's History; pp. 150–151. ISBN 90-5699-168-X ^ Kropotkin, Prince P.; "Geology and Geo-Botany of Asia"; in Popular Science, May 1904; pp. 68–69 ^ Juo, A. S. R. and Franzlübbers, Kathrin Tropical Soils: Properties and Management for Sustainable Agriculture; pp. 118–119; ISBN 0-19-511598-8 ^ "Average Annual Precipitation in China". Retrieved 2010-05-18.  ^ Kaisha, Tesudo Kabushiki and Manshi, Minami; Manchuria: Land of Opportunities; pp. 1–2. ISBN 1-110-97760-3 ^ Kaisha and Manshi; Manchuria; pp. 1–2 ^ Earth
Earth
History 2001[permanent dead link] (page 15) ^ The Cambridge History of China, Vol. 03: "Sui and T'ang China, 589–906, Part 1," at 32, 33. ^ Pozzi & Janhunen & Weiers 2006, p. 109 ^ Ruins of Identity: Ethnogenesis in the Japanese Islands By Mark Hudson ^ Ledyard, 1983, 323 ^ Patricia Ann Berger – Empire of emptiness: Buddhist
Buddhist
art and political authority in Qing China, p.25 ^ Forsyth 1994, p. 214. ^ Elliott, Mark C. "The Limits of Tartary: Manchuria
Manchuria
in Imperial and National Geographies." Journal of Asian Studies 59, no. 3 (2000): 603–46. ^ Hauer 2007, p. 117. ^ Dvořák 1895, p. 80. ^ Wu 1995, p. 102. ^ Zhao 2006, pp. 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14. ^ Richards 2003, p. 141. ^ Reardon-Anderson 2000, p. 504. ^ Reardon-Anderson 2000, p. 505. ^ Reardon-Anderson 2000, p. 506. ^ Scharping 1998, p. 18. ^ Reardon-Anderson 2000, p. 507. ^ Reardon-Anderson 2000, p. 508. ^ Reardon-Anderson 2000, p. 509. ^ Bisher 2006, p. 6. ^ "The Amur's siren song". The Economist (From the print edition: Christmas Specials ed.). 17 December 2009. Retrieved 15 August 2014.  ^ Forsyth 1994, p. 104. ^ Stephan 1996, p. 64. ^ Kang 2013 Archived 23 May 2014 at the Wayback Machine., p. 1. ^ Kim 2012/2013, p. 169. ^ "Memories of Dr. Wu Lien-teh, plague fighter". Yu-lin Wu (1995). World Scientific. p.68. ISBN 981-02-2287-4 ^ Edward Behr, The Last Emperor, 1987, p. 202 ^ Rhoads 2011, p. 263. ^ Lattimore 1933, p. 272. ^ Edward Behr, ibid, p. 168 ^ Edward Behr, ibid, p. 202

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External links[edit]

Media related to Manchuria
Manchuria
at Wikimedia Commons

Coordinates: 45°00′00″N 125°00′00″E / 45.0000°N 125.0000°E / 45.0000; 125.0000

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