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ABU TALEB ROSTAM (Persian : 'ابو طالب رستم‎‎), known as MAJD AL-DAWLA, was the Buyid emir of Rayy , a city in Iran (997–1029). He was the eldest son of Fakhr al-Dawla . His reign saw the removal of the Buyids as a power in central Iran
Iran
.

CONTENTS

* 1 Biography * 2 Death * 3 Notes * 4 References

BIOGRAPHY

Abu Taleb Rostam succeeded his father upon the latter's death in 997, and was given the laqab of "Majd al-Dawla". At the time he was four years old. His younger brother, Abu Taher ("Shams al-Dawla"), meanwhile, became the ruler of Hamadan
Hamadan
. Since both brothers were in the age of minority, power was assumed by their mother Sayyida Shirin . Both sons initially declared themselves independent and assumed the title of Shâhanshâh , but by 1009 or 1010 at the latest had recognized the authority of Baha\' al-Dawla , who controlled Fars and Iraq
Iraq
, and abandoned the title.

According to Persian traditions , he was suffering from an illusion that he is a cow , and he was cured by Avicenna
Avicenna
.

In 1006 or 1007, with the assistance of his vizier Abu 'Ali ibn 'Ali, Majd al-Dawla
Majd al-Dawla
attempted to throw off the regency of his mother. Sayyida, however, escaped to the Kurd Abu Najr Badr ibn Hasanuya, and together with Shams al-Dawla they put Ray under siege. After several battles, the city was taken and Majd al-Dawla
Majd al-Dawla
was captured. He was imprisoned by his mother in the fort of Tabarak, while Shams al-Dawla took to power in Ray. After a year, Majd al-Dawla
Majd al-Dawla
was released and reinstated in Ray; Shams al-Dawla returned to Hamadan. Power continued to be held by his mother.

Majd al-Dawla's reign saw the gradual shriking of Buyid holdings in central Iran; Gorgan and Tabaristan
Tabaristan
had been lost to the Ziyarids in 997, while several of the western towns were seized by the Sallarids of Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
. Sayyida later prevented Shams al-Dawla from seizing Ray from Majd al-Dawla. In ca. 1015, Majd al-Dawla, who was suffering melancholia , was treated by the famous Persian scholar Avicenna
Avicenna
.

Ibn Fuladh , a Dailamite military officer, who claimed Qazvin
Qazvin
for himself, revolted against Majd al-Dawla
Majd al-Dawla
in 1016. Majd al-Dawla, however, refused to make him governor of Qazvin, which made Ibn Fuladh threaten him around the countryside of his capital in Ray . Majd al-Dawla then requested the aid of his vassal, the Bavandid ruler Abu Ja\'far Muhammad , who managed to defeat Ibn Fuladh and repel him from Ray. Ibn Fuladh then requested aid from the Ziyarid ruler Manuchihr
Manuchihr
. Ibn Fuladh agreed to become Manuchihr's vassal in return for his aid. The following year, a combined army of Ibn Fuladh and Manuchihr besieged Ray, which forced Majd al-Dawla
Majd al-Dawla
to make Ibn Fuladh the governor of Isfahan
Isfahan
. However, the Kakuyid ruler Muhammad ibn Rustam Dushmanziyar , who was a Buyid vassal king of Isfahan, defeated Ibn Fuladh, possibly killing him during the battle. Shams al-Dawla later died in 1021 and was succeeded by his son Sama\' al-Dawla .

The fragility of Majd al-Dawla's kingdom later encouraged Muhammad to extend his domains in the Kurdish held mountains of Iran. In 1023, Muhammad seized Hamadan
Hamadan
from Sama' al-Dawla, and then proceeded to capture Dinavar and Khorramabad
Khorramabad
from its Kurdish leaders. He spent the following years in protecting his realm from invasions by the Kurds and princes (ispahbadh ) from Tabaristan.

Five years later, Majd al-Dawla
Majd al-Dawla
sent a combined Buyid-Bavand army under Abu Ja'far Muhammad and his two sons against Muhammad. Muhammad, however, managed win a great victory over the Buyid-Bavand army at Nahavand , and managed to capture Abu Ja'far including his two sons. After this great victory, Muhammad consolidated his position as the strongest ruler of Jibal , even though Majd al-Dawla
Majd al-Dawla
was his overlord, Muhammad minted coins in his own name. He was later personally awarded, and without the intervention of the Buyids, from the Caliph Abbasid Al-Qadir , the title of "Ḥusām Amīr-al-muʾmenīn" (Sword of the Commander of the Faithful).

DEATH

When Sayyida died in 1028, the consequences of the political seclusion of Majd al-Dawla
Majd al-Dawla
became apparent. He was soon faced with a revolt by his Dailamite soldiers, and requested the assistance of Mahmud of Ghazni in dealing with them. Mahmud came to Ray, deposed Majd al-Dawla
Majd al-Dawla
as ruler, and sacked the city, bringing an end to Buyid rule there. One of his sons, Fana-Khusrau , would attempt to restore the power of the Buyids in the following years, but failed.

NOTES

* ^ http://article.tebyan.net/72602/معالجه-کردن-بوعلی-سینا-آن-صاحب-مالیخولیا-را * ^ Gutas 1987 , p. 67–70. * ^ Bosworth 1998 , p. 359-362. * ^ C.E. Bosworth, The Ghaznavids 994-1040, (Edinburgh University Press, 1963), 53,59,234.

REFERENCES

* Bosworth, C. E. (1975). " Iran
Iran
under the Buyids". In Frye, R. N. The Cambridge History of Iran, Volume 4: From the Arab Invasion to the Saljuqs. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 250–305. ISBN 0-521-20093-8 . * Nagel, Tilman (1990). "BUYIDS". Encyclopaedia Iranica, Vol. IV, Fasc. 6. London u.a.: Routledge & Kegan Paul. pp. 578–586. * Madelung, W. (1975). "The Minor Dynasties of Northern Iran". In Frye, R. N. The Cambridge History of Iran, Volume 4: From the Arab Invasion to the Saljuqs. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 198–249. ISBN 978-0-521-20093-6 . * Bosworth, C. Edmund (1997). "EBN FŪLĀD". Encyclopaedia Iranica, Vol. VIII, Fasc. 1. London et al.: C. Edmund Bosworth. pp. 26–27. * Bosworth, C. E. (1968). "The Political and Dynastic History of the Iranian World (A.D. 1000–1217)". In Frye, R. N. The Cambridge History of Iran, Volume 5: The Saljuq and Mongol periods. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 1–202. ISBN 0-521-06936-X . * Bosworth, C. Edmund (1998). "KĀKUYIDS". Encyclopaedia Iranica, Vol. XV, Fasc. 4. London et al.: C. Edmund Bosworth. pp. 359–362. * Gutas, D. (1987). "AVICENNA ii. Biography". Encyclopaedia Iranica, Vol. III, Fasc. 1. pp. 67–70.

Preceded by Fakhr al-Dawla BUYID AMIR (IN RAY) 997–1029 Succeeded by None

* v * t * e

Buyid dynasty

IN FARS (934–1062)

* Imad al-Dawla * \ 'Adud al-Dawla * Sharaf al-Dawla * Samsam al-Dawla * Baha\' al-Dawla * Sultan al-Dawla
Sultan al-Dawla
* Abu Kalijar * Abu Mansur Fulad Sutun
Abu Mansur Fulad Sutun
* Abu Sa\'d Khusrau Shah
Shah
* Abu Mansur Fulad Sutun
Abu Mansur Fulad Sutun

IN KERMAN (940–1048)

* Mu\'izz al-Dawla * \ 'Adud al-Dawla * Sharaf al-Dawla * Samsam al-Dawla * Baha\' al-Dawla * Qawam al-Dawla
Qawam al-Dawla
* Abu Kalijar

IN REY (943–1029)

* Rukn al-Dawla * Fakhr al-Dawla * Mu\'ayyad al-Dawla * Fakhr al-Dawla * Majd al-Dawla

IN IRAQ (945–1055)

* Mu\'izz al-Dawla * Izz al-Dawla * \ 'Adud al-Dawla * Samsam al-Dawla * Sharaf al-Dawla * Baha\' al-Dawla * Sultan al-Dawla
Sultan al-Dawla
* Musharrif al-Dawla
Musharrif al-Dawla
* Jalal al-Dawla
Jalal al-Dawla
* Abu Kalijar * Al-Malik al-Rahim

IN OMAN (966–1048)

* Mu\'izz al-Dawla * \ 'Adud al-Dawla * Samsam al-Dawla * Baha\' al-Dawla * Sultan al-Dawla
Sultan al-Dawla
* Abu Kalijar

In Hamadan
Hamadan
(976–1024), Gorgan and Tabaristan
Tabaristan
(980–997)

* Mu\'ayyad al-Dawla * Fakhr al-Dawla * Shams al-Dawla * Sama\' al-Dawla

IN JAZIRA (978-989)

* \ 'Adud al-Dawla * Samsam al-Dawla * Sharaf al-Dawla * Baha\' al-Dawla

MINOR DOMAINS

* Diya\' al-Dawla ( Basra
Basra
, 980s) * Taj al-Dawla (Khuzest

.