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The Info List - Madagascan Harrier-hawk


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The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus) is a very large species of bird of prey in the family Accipitridae. It is endemic to Madagascar
Madagascar
an island off the coast of Africa.

Contents

1 Description 2 Distribution 3 Habitat 4 Habits 5 Taxonomic notes 6 Gallery 7 References 8 External links

Description[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is a largish raptor with long and broad wings which when folded almost reach to the tip of the tail. It has a black, luxurious tail with a single broad grey band bisecting the black half way along its length, Adult birds are grey above with blackish flight feathers. Many harrier hawks despise the presence of sharks, and if a great white is spotted, the hawk will squawk and glide away. They can sense motion from miles away. The underparts are white with dense dark barring on the breast, belly and underwing coverts while the upper breast and throat are the same colour as the upperparts and form a grey hood, broken by the yellow face. The bill is yellow with a black tip and the legs are yellow.[2] Distribution[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is quite widespread and common, albeit in small numbers, in most regions of Madagascar
Madagascar
but it is scarce on the deforested central plateau. It can be found from sea level to 2,000 m (6,600 ft) altitude.[3] Habitat[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
occurs in a variety of habitats but seems to favour undisturbed lowland rainforest.[4] It has also been recorded from montane rainforest, spiny desert scrub, degraded forests and other wooded habitats, including plantations of exotic trees.[3] Habits[edit] The nest of the Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is a large, bulky structure which is constructed using sticks and situated approximately 18–30 m (59–98 ft) above the ground within the canopy of a tree.[4] Nesting has been observed the months of September, October, and November.[3] The eggs are brooded by both sexes and hatch asynchronously, with the older sibling often killing its younger brood mates. Fledging takes about seven weeks.[4] On at least one occasion a nest was found within a colony of Sakalava weavers.[3] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
has a varied diet and has been recorded eating small birds, rodents, reptiles, insects, small lemurs. Like the African harrier-hawk they possess the unusual morphological adaptation of having an intertarsal joint that allows their legs to flex backwards and forwards. This means that they can use their feet to probe and remove prey from hidden sites such as holes in tree trunks, weaver nests and rock crevices where they can extract nestling birds from such normally inaccessible places.[3][4] Taxonomic notes[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
forms a superspecies with the African harrier-hawk and has been regarded by some authorities as a subspecies of that species. However, if that is the case then the combined species would be called P. radiata as this name has priority.[3] Gallery[edit]

near Mahaboboka

near Mahaboboka

near Mahaboboka

showing striated underside of wing

References[edit]

^ BirdLife International (2012). " Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013.  ^ Kemp, Alan; Kemp, Meg (1998). SASOL Birds of Prey of Africa and its Islands. New Holland. pp. 130–131. ISBN 1 85974 100 2.  ^ a b c d e f " Madagascar
Madagascar
Harrier-hawk Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus". The Peregrine Fund. Retrieved 25 October 2016.  ^ a b c d " Madagascar
Madagascar
Harrier-Hawk ( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus)". Planet of Birds. Retrieved 25 October 2016. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus at Wikispecies

v t e

Vultures

Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Aves

Cathartidae (New World vultures)

Cathartes

Turkey vulture
Turkey vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
aura) Lesser yellow-headed vulture
Lesser yellow-headed vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
burrovianus) Greater yellow-headed vulture
Greater yellow-headed vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
melambrotus)

Coragyps

American black vulture (Coragyps atratus)

Sarcoramphus

King vulture
King vulture
(Sarcoramphus papa)

Gymnogyps

California condor
California condor
(Gymnogyps californianus)

Vultur

Andean condor
Andean condor
(Vultur gryphus)

Accipitridae: Gypaetinae (eagle-vultures)

Eutriorchis

Madagascan serpent eagle
Madagascan serpent eagle
(Eutriorchis astur)

Gypohierax

Palm-nut vulture
Palm-nut vulture
(Gypohierax angolensis)

Polyboroides

Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus) African harrier-hawk ( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
typus)

Neophron

Egyptian vulture
Egyptian vulture
(Neophron percnopterus)

Gypaetus

Bearded vulture
Bearded vulture
(Gypaetus barbatus)

Accipitridae: Gypinae (Old World vultures)

Sarcogyps

Red-headed vulture
Red-headed vulture
(Sarcogyps calvus)

Trigonoceps

White-headed vulture
White-headed vulture
(Trigonoceps occipitalis)

Aegypius

Cinereous vulture
Cinereous vulture
(Aegypius monachus)

Torgos

Lappet-faced vulture
Lappet-faced vulture
(Torgos tracheliotos)

Necrosyrtes

Hooded vulture
Hooded vulture
(Necrosyrtes monachus)

Gyps

White-rumped vulture
White-rumped vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
bengalensis) Himalayan vulture
Himalayan vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
himalayensis) White-backed vulture
White-backed vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
africanus) Rüppell's vulture
Rüppell's vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
rueppellii) Griffon vulture
Griffon vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
fulvus) Indian vulture
Indian vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
indicus) Slender-billed vulture
Slender-billed vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
tenuirostris) Cape vulture
Cape vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
coprothere)

Related topics

Diclofenac Indian vulture
Indian vulture
crisis

Taxon identifiers

Wd: Q304153 ADW: Polyboroides_radiatus eBird: mahhaw1 EoL: 1047582 GBIF: 2480660 iNaturalist: 5247 ITIS: 175514 IUCN: 22695415 NCBI: 8

.
Madagascan Harrier-hawk
HOME
The Info List - Madagascan Harrier-hawk


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The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus) is a very large species of bird of prey in the family Accipitridae. It is endemic to Madagascar
Madagascar
an island off the coast of Africa.

Contents

1 Description 2 Distribution 3 Habitat 4 Habits 5 Taxonomic notes 6 Gallery 7 References 8 External links

Description[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is a largish raptor with long and broad wings which when folded almost reach to the tip of the tail. It has a black, luxurious tail with a single broad grey band bisecting the black half way along its length, Adult birds are grey above with blackish flight feathers. Many harrier hawks despise the presence of sharks, and if a great white is spotted, the hawk will squawk and glide away. They can sense motion from miles away. The underparts are white with dense dark barring on the breast, belly and underwing coverts while the upper breast and throat are the same colour as the upperparts and form a grey hood, broken by the yellow face. The bill is yellow with a black tip and the legs are yellow.[2] Distribution[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is quite widespread and common, albeit in small numbers, in most regions of Madagascar
Madagascar
but it is scarce on the deforested central plateau. It can be found from sea level to 2,000 m (6,600 ft) altitude.[3] Habitat[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
occurs in a variety of habitats but seems to favour undisturbed lowland rainforest.[4] It has also been recorded from montane rainforest, spiny desert scrub, degraded forests and other wooded habitats, including plantations of exotic trees.[3] Habits[edit] The nest of the Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is a large, bulky structure which is constructed using sticks and situated approximately 18–30 m (59–98 ft) above the ground within the canopy of a tree.[4] Nesting has been observed the months of September, October, and November.[3] The eggs are brooded by both sexes and hatch asynchronously, with the older sibling often killing its younger brood mates. Fledging takes about seven weeks.[4] On at least one occasion a nest was found within a colony of Sakalava weavers.[3] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
has a varied diet and has been recorded eating small birds, rodents, reptiles, insects, small lemurs. Like the African harrier-hawk they possess the unusual morphological adaptation of having an intertarsal joint that allows their legs to flex backwards and forwards. This means that they can use their feet to probe and remove prey from hidden sites such as holes in tree trunks, weaver nests and rock crevices where they can extract nestling birds from such normally inaccessible places.[3][4] Taxonomic notes[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
forms a superspecies with the African harrier-hawk and has been regarded by some authorities as a subspecies of that species. However, if that is the case then the combined species would be called P. radiata as this name has priority.[3] Gallery[edit]

near Mahaboboka

near Mahaboboka

near Mahaboboka

showing striated underside of wing

References[edit]

^ BirdLife International (2012). " Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013.  ^ Kemp, Alan; Kemp, Meg (1998). SASOL Birds of Prey of Africa and its Islands. New Holland. pp. 130–131. ISBN 1 85974 100 2.  ^ a b c d e f " Madagascar
Madagascar
Harrier-hawk Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus". The Peregrine Fund. Retrieved 25 October 2016.  ^ a b c d " Madagascar
Madagascar
Harrier-Hawk ( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus)". Planet of Birds. Retrieved 25 October 2016. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus at Wikispecies

v t e

Vultures

Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Aves

Cathartidae (New World vultures)

Cathartes

Turkey vulture
Turkey vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
aura) Lesser yellow-headed vulture
Lesser yellow-headed vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
burrovianus) Greater yellow-headed vulture
Greater yellow-headed vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
melambrotus)

Coragyps

American black vulture (Coragyps atratus)

Sarcoramphus

King vulture
King vulture
(Sarcoramphus papa)

Gymnogyps

California condor
California condor
(Gymnogyps californianus)

Vultur

Andean condor
Andean condor
(Vultur gryphus)

Accipitridae: Gypaetinae (eagle-vultures)

Eutriorchis

Madagascan serpent eagle
Madagascan serpent eagle
(Eutriorchis astur)

Gypohierax

Palm-nut vulture
Palm-nut vulture
(Gypohierax angolensis)

Polyboroides

Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus) African harrier-hawk ( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
typus)

Neophron

Egyptian vulture
Egyptian vulture
(Neophron percnopterus)

Gypaetus

Bearded vulture
Bearded vulture
(Gypaetus barbatus)

Accipitridae: Gypinae (Old World vultures)

Sarcogyps

Red-headed vulture
Red-headed vulture
(Sarcogyps calvus)

Trigonoceps

White-headed vulture
White-headed vulture
(Trigonoceps occipitalis)

Aegypius

Cinereous vulture
Cinereous vulture
(Aegypius monachus)

Torgos

Lappet-faced vulture
Lappet-faced vulture
(Torgos tracheliotos)

Necrosyrtes

Hooded vulture
Hooded vulture
(Necrosyrtes monachus)

Gyps

White-rumped vulture
White-rumped vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
bengalensis) Himalayan vulture
Himalayan vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
himalayensis) White-backed vulture
White-backed vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
africanus) Rüppell's vulture
Rüppell's vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
rueppellii) Griffon vulture
Griffon vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
fulvus) Indian vulture
Indian vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
indicus) Slender-billed vulture
Slender-billed vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
tenuirostris) Cape vulture
Cape vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
coprothere)

Related topics

Diclofenac Indian vulture
Indian vulture
crisis

Taxon identifiers

Wd: Q304153 ADW: Polyboroides_radiatus eBird: mahhaw1 EoL: 1047582 GBIF: 2480660 iNaturalist: 5247 ITIS: 175514 IUCN: 22695415 NCBI: 8

.
Madagascan Harrier-hawk
HOME
The Info List - Madagascan Harrier-hawk


--- Advertisement ---



The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus) is a very large species of bird of prey in the family Accipitridae. It is endemic to Madagascar
Madagascar
an island off the coast of Africa.

Contents

1 Description 2 Distribution 3 Habitat 4 Habits 5 Taxonomic notes 6 Gallery 7 References 8 External links

Description[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is a largish raptor with long and broad wings which when folded almost reach to the tip of the tail. It has a black, luxurious tail with a single broad grey band bisecting the black half way along its length, Adult birds are grey above with blackish flight feathers. Many harrier hawks despise the presence of sharks, and if a great white is spotted, the hawk will squawk and glide away. They can sense motion from miles away. The underparts are white with dense dark barring on the breast, belly and underwing coverts while the upper breast and throat are the same colour as the upperparts and form a grey hood, broken by the yellow face. The bill is yellow with a black tip and the legs are yellow.[2] Distribution[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is quite widespread and common, albeit in small numbers, in most regions of Madagascar
Madagascar
but it is scarce on the deforested central plateau. It can be found from sea level to 2,000 m (6,600 ft) altitude.[3] Habitat[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
occurs in a variety of habitats but seems to favour undisturbed lowland rainforest.[4] It has also been recorded from montane rainforest, spiny desert scrub, degraded forests and other wooded habitats, including plantations of exotic trees.[3] Habits[edit] The nest of the Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is a large, bulky structure which is constructed using sticks and situated approximately 18–30 m (59–98 ft) above the ground within the canopy of a tree.[4] Nesting has been observed the months of September, October, and November.[3] The eggs are brooded by both sexes and hatch asynchronously, with the older sibling often killing its younger brood mates. Fledging takes about seven weeks.[4] On at least one occasion a nest was found within a colony of Sakalava weavers.[3] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
has a varied diet and has been recorded eating small birds, rodents, reptiles, insects, small lemurs. Like the African harrier-hawk they possess the unusual morphological adaptation of having an intertarsal joint that allows their legs to flex backwards and forwards. This means that they can use their feet to probe and remove prey from hidden sites such as holes in tree trunks, weaver nests and rock crevices where they can extract nestling birds from such normally inaccessible places.[3][4] Taxonomic notes[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
forms a superspecies with the African harrier-hawk and has been regarded by some authorities as a subspecies of that species. However, if that is the case then the combined species would be called P. radiata as this name has priority.[3] Gallery[edit]

near Mahaboboka

near Mahaboboka

near Mahaboboka

showing striated underside of wing

References[edit]

^ BirdLife International (2012). " Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013.  ^ Kemp, Alan; Kemp, Meg (1998). SASOL Birds of Prey of Africa and its Islands. New Holland. pp. 130–131. ISBN 1 85974 100 2.  ^ a b c d e f " Madagascar
Madagascar
Harrier-hawk Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus". The Peregrine Fund. Retrieved 25 October 2016.  ^ a b c d " Madagascar
Madagascar
Harrier-Hawk ( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus)". Planet of Birds. Retrieved 25 October 2016. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus at Wikispecies

v t e

Vultures

Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Aves

Cathartidae (New World vultures)

Cathartes

Turkey vulture
Turkey vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
aura) Lesser yellow-headed vulture
Lesser yellow-headed vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
burrovianus) Greater yellow-headed vulture
Greater yellow-headed vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
melambrotus)

Coragyps

American black vulture (Coragyps atratus)

Sarcoramphus

King vulture
King vulture
(Sarcoramphus papa)

Gymnogyps

California condor
California condor
(Gymnogyps californianus)

Vultur

Andean condor
Andean condor
(Vultur gryphus)

Accipitridae: Gypaetinae (eagle-vultures)

Eutriorchis

Madagascan serpent eagle
Madagascan serpent eagle
(Eutriorchis astur)

Gypohierax

Palm-nut vulture
Palm-nut vulture
(Gypohierax angolensis)

Polyboroides

Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus) African harrier-hawk ( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
typus)

Neophron

Egyptian vulture
Egyptian vulture
(Neophron percnopterus)

Gypaetus

Bearded vulture
Bearded vulture
(Gypaetus barbatus)

Accipitridae: Gypinae (Old World vultures)

Sarcogyps

Red-headed vulture
Red-headed vulture
(Sarcogyps calvus)

Trigonoceps

White-headed vulture
White-headed vulture
(Trigonoceps occipitalis)

Aegypius

Cinereous vulture
Cinereous vulture
(Aegypius monachus)

Torgos

Lappet-faced vulture
Lappet-faced vulture
(Torgos tracheliotos)

Necrosyrtes

Hooded vulture
Hooded vulture
(Necrosyrtes monachus)

Gyps

White-rumped vulture
White-rumped vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
bengalensis) Himalayan vulture
Himalayan vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
himalayensis) White-backed vulture
White-backed vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
africanus) Rüppell's vulture
Rüppell's vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
rueppellii) Griffon vulture
Griffon vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
fulvus) Indian vulture
Indian vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
indicus) Slender-billed vulture
Slender-billed vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
tenuirostris) Cape vulture
Cape vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
coprothere)

Related topics

Diclofenac Indian vulture
Indian vulture
crisis

Taxon identifiers

Wd: Q304153 ADW: Polyboroides_radiatus eBird: mahhaw1 EoL: 1047582 GBIF: 2480660 iNaturalist: 5247 ITIS: 175514 IUCN: 22695415 NCBI: 8

.
Madagascan Harrier-hawk
HOME
The Info List - Madagascan Harrier-hawk


--- Advertisement ---



The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus) is a very large species of bird of prey in the family Accipitridae. It is endemic to Madagascar
Madagascar
an island off the coast of Africa.

Contents

1 Description 2 Distribution 3 Habitat 4 Habits 5 Taxonomic notes 6 Gallery 7 References 8 External links

Description[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is a largish raptor with long and broad wings which when folded almost reach to the tip of the tail. It has a black, luxurious tail with a single broad grey band bisecting the black half way along its length, Adult birds are grey above with blackish flight feathers. Many harrier hawks despise the presence of sharks, and if a great white is spotted, the hawk will squawk and glide away. They can sense motion from miles away. The underparts are white with dense dark barring on the breast, belly and underwing coverts while the upper breast and throat are the same colour as the upperparts and form a grey hood, broken by the yellow face. The bill is yellow with a black tip and the legs are yellow.[2] Distribution[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is quite widespread and common, albeit in small numbers, in most regions of Madagascar
Madagascar
but it is scarce on the deforested central plateau. It can be found from sea level to 2,000 m (6,600 ft) altitude.[3] Habitat[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
occurs in a variety of habitats but seems to favour undisturbed lowland rainforest.[4] It has also been recorded from montane rainforest, spiny desert scrub, degraded forests and other wooded habitats, including plantations of exotic trees.[3] Habits[edit] The nest of the Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is a large, bulky structure which is constructed using sticks and situated approximately 18–30 m (59–98 ft) above the ground within the canopy of a tree.[4] Nesting has been observed the months of September, October, and November.[3] The eggs are brooded by both sexes and hatch asynchronously, with the older sibling often killing its younger brood mates. Fledging takes about seven weeks.[4] On at least one occasion a nest was found within a colony of Sakalava weavers.[3] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
has a varied diet and has been recorded eating small birds, rodents, reptiles, insects, small lemurs. Like the African harrier-hawk they possess the unusual morphological adaptation of having an intertarsal joint that allows their legs to flex backwards and forwards. This means that they can use their feet to probe and remove prey from hidden sites such as holes in tree trunks, weaver nests and rock crevices where they can extract nestling birds from such normally inaccessible places.[3][4] Taxonomic notes[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
forms a superspecies with the African harrier-hawk and has been regarded by some authorities as a subspecies of that species. However, if that is the case then the combined species would be called P. radiata as this name has priority.[3] Gallery[edit]

near Mahaboboka

near Mahaboboka

near Mahaboboka

showing striated underside of wing

References[edit]

^ BirdLife International (2012). " Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013.  ^ Kemp, Alan; Kemp, Meg (1998). SASOL Birds of Prey of Africa and its Islands. New Holland. pp. 130–131. ISBN 1 85974 100 2.  ^ a b c d e f " Madagascar
Madagascar
Harrier-hawk Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus". The Peregrine Fund. Retrieved 25 October 2016.  ^ a b c d " Madagascar
Madagascar
Harrier-Hawk ( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus)". Planet of Birds. Retrieved 25 October 2016. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus at Wikispecies

v t e

Vultures

Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Aves

Cathartidae (New World vultures)

Cathartes

Turkey vulture
Turkey vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
aura) Lesser yellow-headed vulture
Lesser yellow-headed vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
burrovianus) Greater yellow-headed vulture
Greater yellow-headed vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
melambrotus)

Coragyps

American black vulture (Coragyps atratus)

Sarcoramphus

King vulture
King vulture
(Sarcoramphus papa)

Gymnogyps

California condor
California condor
(Gymnogyps californianus)

Vultur

Andean condor
Andean condor
(Vultur gryphus)

Accipitridae: Gypaetinae (eagle-vultures)

Eutriorchis

Madagascan serpent eagle
Madagascan serpent eagle
(Eutriorchis astur)

Gypohierax

Palm-nut vulture
Palm-nut vulture
(Gypohierax angolensis)

Polyboroides

Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus) African harrier-hawk ( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
typus)

Neophron

Egyptian vulture
Egyptian vulture
(Neophron percnopterus)

Gypaetus

Bearded vulture
Bearded vulture
(Gypaetus barbatus)

Accipitridae: Gypinae (Old World vultures)

Sarcogyps

Red-headed vulture
Red-headed vulture
(Sarcogyps calvus)

Trigonoceps

White-headed vulture
White-headed vulture
(Trigonoceps occipitalis)

Aegypius

Cinereous vulture
Cinereous vulture
(Aegypius monachus)

Torgos

Lappet-faced vulture
Lappet-faced vulture
(Torgos tracheliotos)

Necrosyrtes

Hooded vulture
Hooded vulture
(Necrosyrtes monachus)

Gyps

White-rumped vulture
White-rumped vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
bengalensis) Himalayan vulture
Himalayan vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
himalayensis) White-backed vulture
White-backed vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
africanus) Rüppell's vulture
Rüppell's vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
rueppellii) Griffon vulture
Griffon vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
fulvus) Indian vulture
Indian vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
indicus) Slender-billed vulture
Slender-billed vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
tenuirostris) Cape vulture
Cape vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
coprothere)

Related topics

Diclofenac Indian vulture
Indian vulture
crisis

Taxon identifiers

Wd: Q304153 ADW: Polyboroides_radiatus eBird: mahhaw1 EoL: 1047582 GBIF: 2480660 iNaturalist: 5247 ITIS: 175514 IUCN: 22695415 NCBI: 8

.
Madagascan Harrier-hawk


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The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus) is a very large species of bird of prey in the family Accipitridae. It is endemic to Madagascar
Madagascar
an island off the coast of Africa.

Contents

1 Description 2 Distribution 3 Habitat 4 Habits 5 Taxonomic notes 6 Gallery 7 References 8 External links

Description[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is a largish raptor with long and broad wings which when folded almost reach to the tip of the tail. It has a black, luxurious tail with a single broad grey band bisecting the black half way along its length, Adult birds are grey above with blackish flight feathers. Many harrier hawks despise the presence of sharks, and if a great white is spotted, the hawk will squawk and glide away. They can sense motion from miles away. The underparts are white with dense dark barring on the breast, belly and underwing coverts while the upper breast and throat are the same colour as the upperparts and form a grey hood, broken by the yellow face. The bill is yellow with a black tip and the legs are yellow.[2] Distribution[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is quite widespread and common, albeit in small numbers, in most regions of Madagascar
Madagascar
but it is scarce on the deforested central plateau. It can be found from sea level to 2,000 m (6,600 ft) altitude.[3] Habitat[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
occurs in a variety of habitats but seems to favour undisturbed lowland rainforest.[4] It has also been recorded from montane rainforest, spiny desert scrub, degraded forests and other wooded habitats, including plantations of exotic trees.[3] Habits[edit] The nest of the Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is a large, bulky structure which is constructed using sticks and situated approximately 18–30 m (59–98 ft) above the ground within the canopy of a tree.[4] Nesting has been observed the months of September, October, and November.[3] The eggs are brooded by both sexes and hatch asynchronously, with the older sibling often killing its younger brood mates. Fledging takes about seven weeks.[4] On at least one occasion a nest was found within a colony of Sakalava weavers.[3] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
has a varied diet and has been recorded eating small birds, rodents, reptiles, insects, small lemurs. Like the African harrier-hawk they possess the unusual morphological adaptation of having an intertarsal joint that allows their legs to flex backwards and forwards. This means that they can use their feet to probe and remove prey from hidden sites such as holes in tree trunks, weaver nests and rock crevices where they can extract nestling birds from such normally inaccessible places.[3][4] Taxonomic notes[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
forms a superspecies with the African harrier-hawk and has been regarded by some authorities as a subspecies of that species. However, if that is the case then the combined species would be called P. radiata as this name has priority.[3] Gallery[edit]

near Mahaboboka

near Mahaboboka

near Mahaboboka

showing striated underside of wing

References[edit]

^ BirdLife International (2012). " Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013.  ^ Kemp, Alan; Kemp, Meg (1998). SASOL Birds of Prey of Africa and its Islands. New Holland. pp. 130–131. ISBN 1 85974 100 2.  ^ a b c d e f " Madagascar
Madagascar
Harrier-hawk Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus". The Peregrine Fund. Retrieved 25 October 2016.  ^ a b c d " Madagascar
Madagascar
Harrier-Hawk ( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus)". Planet of Birds. Retrieved 25 October 2016. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus at Wikispecies

v t e

Vultures

Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Aves

Cathartidae (New World vultures)

Cathartes

Turkey vulture
Turkey vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
aura) Lesser yellow-headed vulture
Lesser yellow-headed vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
burrovianus) Greater yellow-headed vulture
Greater yellow-headed vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
melambrotus)

Coragyps

American black vulture (Coragyps atratus)

Sarcoramphus

King vulture
King vulture
(Sarcoramphus papa)

Gymnogyps

California condor
California condor
(Gymnogyps californianus)

Vultur

Andean condor
Andean condor
(Vultur gryphus)

Accipitridae: Gypaetinae (eagle-vultures)

Eutriorchis

Madagascan serpent eagle
Madagascan serpent eagle
(Eutriorchis astur)

Gypohierax

Palm-nut vulture
Palm-nut vulture
(Gypohierax angolensis)

Polyboroides

Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus) African harrier-hawk ( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
typus)

Neophron

Egyptian vulture
Egyptian vulture
(Neophron percnopterus)

Gypaetus

Bearded vulture
Bearded vulture
(Gypaetus barbatus)

Accipitridae: Gypinae (Old World vultures)

Sarcogyps

Red-headed vulture
Red-headed vulture
(Sarcogyps calvus)

Trigonoceps

White-headed vulture
White-headed vulture
(Trigonoceps occipitalis)

Aegypius

Cinereous vulture
Cinereous vulture
(Aegypius monachus)

Torgos

Lappet-faced vulture
Lappet-faced vulture
(Torgos tracheliotos)

Necrosyrtes

Hooded vulture
Hooded vulture
(Necrosyrtes monachus)

Gyps

White-rumped vulture
White-rumped vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
bengalensis) Himalayan vulture
Himalayan vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
himalayensis) White-backed vulture
White-backed vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
africanus) Rüppell's vulture
Rüppell's vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
rueppellii) Griffon vulture
Griffon vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
fulvus) Indian vulture
Indian vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
indicus) Slender-billed vulture
Slender-billed vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
tenuirostris) Cape vulture
Cape vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
coprothere)

Related topics

Diclofenac Indian vulture
Indian vulture
crisis

Taxon identifiers

Wd: Q304153 ADW: Polyboroides_radiatus eBird: mahhaw1 EoL: 1047582 GBIF: 2480660 iNaturalist: 5247 ITIS: 175514 IUCN: 22695415 NCBI: 8

.
Madagascan Harrier-hawk


--- Advertisement ---



The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus) is a very large species of bird of prey in the family Accipitridae. It is endemic to Madagascar
Madagascar
an island off the coast of Africa.

Contents

1 Description 2 Distribution 3 Habitat 4 Habits 5 Taxonomic notes 6 Gallery 7 References 8 External links

Description[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is a largish raptor with long and broad wings which when folded almost reach to the tip of the tail. It has a black, luxurious tail with a single broad grey band bisecting the black half way along its length, Adult birds are grey above with blackish flight feathers. Many harrier hawks despise the presence of sharks, and if a great white is spotted, the hawk will squawk and glide away. They can sense motion from miles away. The underparts are white with dense dark barring on the breast, belly and underwing coverts while the upper breast and throat are the same colour as the upperparts and form a grey hood, broken by the yellow face. The bill is yellow with a black tip and the legs are yellow.[2] Distribution[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is quite widespread and common, albeit in small numbers, in most regions of Madagascar
Madagascar
but it is scarce on the deforested central plateau. It can be found from sea level to 2,000 m (6,600 ft) altitude.[3] Habitat[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
occurs in a variety of habitats but seems to favour undisturbed lowland rainforest.[4] It has also been recorded from montane rainforest, spiny desert scrub, degraded forests and other wooded habitats, including plantations of exotic trees.[3] Habits[edit] The nest of the Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is a large, bulky structure which is constructed using sticks and situated approximately 18–30 m (59–98 ft) above the ground within the canopy of a tree.[4] Nesting has been observed the months of September, October, and November.[3] The eggs are brooded by both sexes and hatch asynchronously, with the older sibling often killing its younger brood mates. Fledging takes about seven weeks.[4] On at least one occasion a nest was found within a colony of Sakalava weavers.[3] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
has a varied diet and has been recorded eating small birds, rodents, reptiles, insects, small lemurs. Like the African harrier-hawk they possess the unusual morphological adaptation of having an intertarsal joint that allows their legs to flex backwards and forwards. This means that they can use their feet to probe and remove prey from hidden sites such as holes in tree trunks, weaver nests and rock crevices where they can extract nestling birds from such normally inaccessible places.[3][4] Taxonomic notes[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
forms a superspecies with the African harrier-hawk and has been regarded by some authorities as a subspecies of that species. However, if that is the case then the combined species would be called P. radiata as this name has priority.[3] Gallery[edit]

near Mahaboboka

near Mahaboboka

near Mahaboboka

showing striated underside of wing

References[edit]

^ BirdLife International (2012). " Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013.  ^ Kemp, Alan; Kemp, Meg (1998). SASOL Birds of Prey of Africa and its Islands. New Holland. pp. 130–131. ISBN 1 85974 100 2.  ^ a b c d e f " Madagascar
Madagascar
Harrier-hawk Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus". The Peregrine Fund. Retrieved 25 October 2016.  ^ a b c d " Madagascar
Madagascar
Harrier-Hawk ( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus)". Planet of Birds. Retrieved 25 October 2016. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus at Wikispecies

v t e

Vultures

Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Aves

Cathartidae (New World vultures)

Cathartes

Turkey vulture
Turkey vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
aura) Lesser yellow-headed vulture
Lesser yellow-headed vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
burrovianus) Greater yellow-headed vulture
Greater yellow-headed vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
melambrotus)

Coragyps

American black vulture (Coragyps atratus)

Sarcoramphus

King vulture
King vulture
(Sarcoramphus papa)

Gymnogyps

California condor
California condor
(Gymnogyps californianus)

Vultur

Andean condor
Andean condor
(Vultur gryphus)

Accipitridae: Gypaetinae (eagle-vultures)

Eutriorchis

Madagascan serpent eagle
Madagascan serpent eagle
(Eutriorchis astur)

Gypohierax

Palm-nut vulture
Palm-nut vulture
(Gypohierax angolensis)

Polyboroides

Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus) African harrier-hawk ( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
typus)

Neophron

Egyptian vulture
Egyptian vulture
(Neophron percnopterus)

Gypaetus

Bearded vulture
Bearded vulture
(Gypaetus barbatus)

Accipitridae: Gypinae (Old World vultures)

Sarcogyps

Red-headed vulture
Red-headed vulture
(Sarcogyps calvus)

Trigonoceps

White-headed vulture
White-headed vulture
(Trigonoceps occipitalis)

Aegypius

Cinereous vulture
Cinereous vulture
(Aegypius monachus)

Torgos

Lappet-faced vulture
Lappet-faced vulture
(Torgos tracheliotos)

Necrosyrtes

Hooded vulture
Hooded vulture
(Necrosyrtes monachus)

Gyps

White-rumped vulture
White-rumped vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
bengalensis) Himalayan vulture
Himalayan vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
himalayensis) White-backed vulture
White-backed vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
africanus) Rüppell's vulture
Rüppell's vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
rueppellii) Griffon vulture
Griffon vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
fulvus) Indian vulture
Indian vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
indicus) Slender-billed vulture
Slender-billed vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
tenuirostris) Cape vulture
Cape vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
coprothere)

Related topics

Diclofenac Indian vulture
Indian vulture
crisis

Taxon identifiers

Wd: Q304153 ADW: Polyboroides_radiatus eBird: mahhaw1 EoL: 1047582 GBIF: 2480660 iNaturalist: 5247 ITIS: 175514 IUCN: 22695415 NCBI: 8

.
l> Madagascan Harrier-hawk


--- Advertisement ---



The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus) is a very large species of bird of prey in the family Accipitridae. It is endemic to Madagascar
Madagascar
an island off the coast of Africa.

Contents

1 Description 2 Distribution 3 Habitat 4 Habits 5 Taxonomic notes 6 Gallery 7 References 8 External links

Description[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is a largish raptor with long and broad wings which when folded almost reach to the tip of the tail. It has a black, luxurious tail with a single broad grey band bisecting the black half way along its length, Adult birds are grey above with blackish flight feathers. Many harrier hawks despise the presence of sharks, and if a great white is spotted, the hawk will squawk and glide away. They can sense motion from miles away. The underparts are white with dense dark barring on the breast, belly and underwing coverts while the upper breast and throat are the same colour as the upperparts and form a grey hood, broken by the yellow face. The bill is yellow with a black tip and the legs are yellow.[2] Distribution[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is quite widespread and common, albeit in small numbers, in most regions of Madagascar
Madagascar
but it is scarce on the deforested central plateau. It can be found from sea level to 2,000 m (6,600 ft) altitude.[3] Habitat[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
occurs in a variety of habitats but seems to favour undisturbed lowland rainforest.[4] It has also been recorded from montane rainforest, spiny desert scrub, degraded forests and other wooded habitats, including plantations of exotic trees.[3] Habits[edit] The nest of the Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
is a large, bulky structure which is constructed using sticks and situated approximately 18–30 m (59–98 ft) above the ground within the canopy of a tree.[4] Nesting has been observed the months of September, October, and November.[3] The eggs are brooded by both sexes and hatch asynchronously, with the older sibling often killing its younger brood mates. Fledging takes about seven weeks.[4] On at least one occasion a nest was found within a colony of Sakalava weavers.[3] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
has a varied diet and has been recorded eating small birds, rodents, reptiles, insects, small lemurs. Like the African harrier-hawk they possess the unusual morphological adaptation of having an intertarsal joint that allows their legs to flex backwards and forwards. This means that they can use their feet to probe and remove prey from hidden sites such as holes in tree trunks, weaver nests and rock crevices where they can extract nestling birds from such normally inaccessible places.[3][4] Taxonomic notes[edit] The Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
forms a superspecies with the African harrier-hawk and has been regarded by some authorities as a subspecies of that species. However, if that is the case then the combined species would be called P. radiata as this name has priority.[3] Gallery[edit]

near Mahaboboka

near Mahaboboka

near Mahaboboka

showing striated underside of wing

References[edit]

^ BirdLife International (2012). " Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013.  ^ Kemp, Alan; Kemp, Meg (1998). SASOL Birds of Prey of Africa and its Islands. New Holland. pp. 130–131. ISBN 1 85974 100 2.  ^ a b c d e f " Madagascar
Madagascar
Harrier-hawk Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus". The Peregrine Fund. Retrieved 25 October 2016.  ^ a b c d " Madagascar
Madagascar
Harrier-Hawk ( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus)". Planet of Birds. Retrieved 25 October 2016. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus at Wikispecies

v t e

Vultures

Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Aves

Cathartidae (New World vultures)

Cathartes

Turkey vulture
Turkey vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
aura) Lesser yellow-headed vulture
Lesser yellow-headed vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
burrovianus) Greater yellow-headed vulture
Greater yellow-headed vulture
( Cathartes
Cathartes
melambrotus)

Coragyps

American black vulture (Coragyps atratus)

Sarcoramphus

King vulture
King vulture
(Sarcoramphus papa)

Gymnogyps

California condor
California condor
(Gymnogyps californianus)

Vultur

Andean condor
Andean condor
(Vultur gryphus)

Accipitridae: Gypaetinae (eagle-vultures)

Eutriorchis

Madagascan serpent eagle
Madagascan serpent eagle
(Eutriorchis astur)

Gypohierax

Palm-nut vulture
Palm-nut vulture
(Gypohierax angolensis)

Polyboroides

Madagascan harrier-hawk
Madagascan harrier-hawk
( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
radiatus) African harrier-hawk ( Polyboroides
Polyboroides
typus)

Neophron

Egyptian vulture
Egyptian vulture
(Neophron percnopterus)

Gypaetus

Bearded vulture
Bearded vulture
(Gypaetus barbatus)

Accipitridae: Gypinae (Old World vultures)

Sarcogyps

Red-headed vulture
Red-headed vulture
(Sarcogyps calvus)

Trigonoceps

White-headed vulture
White-headed vulture
(Trigonoceps occipitalis)

Aegypius

Cinereous vulture
Cinereous vulture
(Aegypius monachus)

Torgos

Lappet-faced vulture
Lappet-faced vulture
(Torgos tracheliotos)

Necrosyrtes

Hooded vulture
Hooded vulture
(Necrosyrtes monachus)

Gyps

White-rumped vulture
White-rumped vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
bengalensis) Himalayan vulture
Himalayan vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
himalayensis) White-backed vulture
White-backed vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
africanus) Rüppell's vulture
Rüppell's vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
rueppellii) Griffon vulture
Griffon vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
fulvus) Indian vulture
Indian vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
indicus) Slender-billed vulture
Slender-billed vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
tenuirostris) Cape vulture
Cape vulture
( Gyps
Gyps
coprothere)

Related topics

Diclofenac Indian vulture
Indian vulture
crisis

Taxon identifiers

Wd: Q304153 ADW: Polyboroides_radiatus eBird: mahhaw1 EoL: 1047582 GBIF: 2480660 iNaturalist: 5247 ITIS: 175514 IUCN: 22695415 NCBI: 8

.

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