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Lyrics
Lyrics
are words that make up a song usually consisting of verses and choruses. The writer of lyrics is a lyricist. The words to an extended musical composition such as an opera are, however, usually known as a "libretto" and their writer, as a "librettist". The meaning of lyrics can either be explicit or implicit. Some lyrics are abstract, almost unintelligible, and, in such cases, their explication emphasizes form, articulation, meter, and symmetry of expression. Rappers can also create lyrics (often with a variation of rhyming words) that are meant to be spoken rhythmically rather than sung.

Contents

1 Etymology 2 Poems 3 Shifter 4 Copyright and royalties 5 Academic study 6 Search engines

6.1 Riskiest search 6.2 Google

7 See also 8 References 9 External links

Etymology[edit]

A lyrist on the Standard of Ur, c. 2500 BC.

"Lyric" derives via Latin
Latin
lyricus from the Greek λυρικός (lyrikós),[1] the adjectival form of lyre.[2] It first appeared in English in the mid-16th century in reference, to the Earl of Surrey's translations of Petrarch
Petrarch
and to his own sonnets.[3] Greek lyric
Greek lyric
poetry had been defined by the manner in which it was sung accompanied by the lyre or cithara,[4] as opposed to the chanted formal epics or the more passionate elegies accompanied by the flute. The personal nature of many of the verses of the Nine Lyric Poets
Nine Lyric Poets
led to the present sense of "lyric poetry" but the original Greek sense—words set to music—eventually led to its use as "lyrics", first attested in Stainer and Barrett's 1876 Dictionary of Musical Terms.[5] Stainer and Barrett used the word as a singular substantive: "Lyric, poetry or blank verse intended to be set to music and sung". By the 1930s, the present use of the plurale tantum "lyrics" had begun; it has been standard since the 1950s.[1] The singular form "lyric" still appears; its present use, however, is to refer to a specific phrase within a song's lyrics. Poems[edit]

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The differences between poem and song may become less meaningful where verse is set to music, to the point that any distinction becomes untenable. This is perhaps recognised in the way popular songs have lyrics. However, the verse may pre-date its tune (in the way that "Rule Britannia" was set to music, and "And did those feet in ancient time" has become the hymn "Jerusalem"), or the tune may be lost over time but the words survive, matched by a number of different tunes (this is particularly common with hymns and ballads). Possible classifications proliferate (under anthem, ballad, blues, carol, folk song, hymn, libretto, lied, lullaby, march, praise song, round, spiritual). Nursery rhymes
Nursery rhymes
may be songs, or doggerel: the term doesn't imply a distinction. The ghazal is a sung form that is considered primarily poetic. See also rapping, roots of hip hop music. Analogously, verse drama might normally be judged (at its best) as poetry, but not consisting of poems (see dramatic verse). In Baroque music, melodies and their lyrics were prose. Rather than paired lines they consist of rhetorical sentences or paragraphs consisting of an opening gesture, an amplification (often featuring sequence), and a close (featuring a cadence); in German Vordersatz-Fortspinnung-Epilog.[6] For example:

When I was a child, [opening gesture] I spake as a child, [amplification...] I understood as a child, [...] I thought as a child; [...] But when I became a man, I put away childish things. [close] - 1 Corinthians 13:11

Shifter[edit] In the lyrics of popular music a "shifter"[7] is a word, often a pronoun, "where reference varies according to who is speaking, when and where",[8] such as "I", "you", "my", "our". For example, who is the "my" of "My Generation"? Copyright and royalties[edit]

See Royalties

Currently, there are many websites featuring song lyrics. This offering, however, is controversial, since some sites include copyrighted lyrics offered without the holder's permission. The U.S. Music
Music
Publishers' Association (MPA), which represents sheet music companies, launched a legal campaign against such websites in December 2005. The MPA's president, Lauren Keiser, said the free lyrics web sites are "completely illegal" and wanted some website operators jailed.[9] Lyrics
Lyrics
licenses could be obtained worldwide through one of the two aggregators: LyricFind and Musixmatch. The first company to provide licensed lyrics was Yahoo!, quickly followed by MetroLyrics and Lyrics.com. More and more lyric websites are beginning to provide licensed lyrics, such as SongMeanings and LyricWiki.[10] Many competing lyrics web sites are still offering unlicensed content, causing challenges around the legality and accuracy of lyrics.[11] In the latest attempt to crack down unlicensed lyrics web sites a federal court has ordered LiveUniverse, a network of websites run by MySpace co-founder Brad Greenspan, to cease operating four sites offering unlicensed song lyrics.[12] Academic study[edit] Lyrics
Lyrics
can be studied from an academic perspective. For example, some lyrics can be considered a form of social commentary. Lyrics
Lyrics
often contain political, social, and economic themes—as well as aesthetic elements—and so can communicate culturally significant messages. These messages can be explicit, or implied through metaphor or symbolism. Lyrics
Lyrics
can also be analyzed with respect to the sense of unity (or lack of unity) it has with its supporting music. Analysis based on tonality and contrast are particular examples. Former Oxford Professor of Poetry
Poetry
Christopher Ricks famously published Dylan's Visions of Sin, an in-depth and characteristically Ricksian analysis of the lyrics of Bob Dylan; Ricks gives the caveat that to have studied the poetry of the lyrics in tandem with the music would have made for a much more complicated critical feat. Search engines[edit] Riskiest search[edit] A 2009 report published by McAfee
McAfee
found that, in terms of potential exposure to malware, lyrics-related searches and searches containing the word "free" are the most likely to have risky results from search engines, both in terms of average risk of all results, and maximum risk of any result.[13] Google[edit] Beginning in late 2014, Google changed its search results pages to include song lyrics. When users search for a name of a song, Google can now display the lyrics directly in the search results page.[14] When search for a specific song's lyrics, most results show the lyrics directly through a Google search by using Google Play.[15] See also[edit]

Poetry
Poetry
portal

Lyricist, a writer of lyrics Libretto, the "little book" of an extended musical piece, written by a librettist "singing in the Spirit", vocal improvisation in a spiritual context scat singing & vocalese, vocal improvisation in jazz bol, kouji, beatbox, forms of vocal mimicry or percussion

References[edit]

^ a b Oxford English Dictionary 1st ed. lyric, adj. and n." 1903. Accessed 15 Jan 2014. ^ Liddell, Henry
Liddell, Henry
& al. A Greek–English Lexicon 9th ed., "λυρικός". Clarendon Press
Clarendon Press
(Oxford), 1996. Hosted at the Perseus Project. Accessed 15 Jan 2014. ^ Sidney, Philip. An Apologie for Poetrie op. cit. OED (1903). ^ Miller, Andrew. Greek Lyric: An Anthology in Translation, pp. xii ff. Hackett Publishing (Indianapolis), 1996. ISBN 978-0872202917. ^ Stainer, John & al. A Dictionary of Musical Terms, p. 276. (London), 1876. ^ Kelly, Thomas Forest (2011). Early Music: A Very Short Introduction, p.53. ISBN 978-0-19-973076-6. ^ Durant (1984). Cited in Middleton, Richard (1990/2002). Studying Popular Music. Philadelphia: Open University Press. ISBN 0-335-15275-9. ^ Middleton (1990), p.167. ^ " Song
Song
sites face legal crackdown". BBC News. 12 December 2005. Retrieved 7 January 2007.  ^ "Advertising on SongMeanings". SongMeanings. Retrieved 21 July 2012. All of our lyrics are legally licensed through LyricFind.  ^ Plambeck, Joseph (May 9, 2010). " Lyrics
Lyrics
Sites at Center of Fight Over Royalties". The New York Times. Retrieved May 9, 2010.  ^ "Court Orders LiveUniverse to Shutter Unlicensed Lyrics
Lyrics
Sites". Digital Media Wire. August 11, 2010. Retrieved September 5, 2010.  ^ Keats, Shane; Koshy, Eipe (2009). "The Web's Most Dangerous Search Terms" (PDF). McAfee. Retrieved 21 July 2012.  ^ Jose, Pagliery (23 December 2014). "Google now displays song lyrics in search results". CNN.com. Retrieved 23 December 2014.  ^ "Google Play". play.google.com. Retrieved 2016-04-15. 

External links[edit]

Look up lyrics or lyric in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

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