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The name Lycomedes
Lycomedes
/ˌlaɪkəˈmiːdiːz/ (Ancient Greek: Λυκομήδης) may refer to several characters in Greek mythology, of whom the most prominent was the king of Scyros
Scyros
during the Trojan War.

Contents

1 Lycomedes
Lycomedes
of Scyros

1.1 Lycomedes
Lycomedes
and Achilles 1.2 Lycomedes
Lycomedes
and Theseus 1.3 Asteroid

2 Other characters 3 References

Lycomedes
Lycomedes
of Scyros[edit] Lycomedes
Lycomedes
(also known as Lycurgus) was a king of the Dolopians in the island of Scyros
Scyros
near Euboea, father of a number of daughters including Deidameia, and grandfather of Pyrrhus or Neoptolemus. Lycomedes
Lycomedes
and Achilles[edit]

Achilles
Achilles
at the court of King Lycomedes, panel of an Attic sarcophagus, ca. 240 AD, Louvre

Main article: Achilles
Achilles
on Skyros At the request of Thetis, Lycomedes
Lycomedes
concealed Achilles
Achilles
in female disguise among his own daughters. At Lycomedes' court Achilles
Achilles
had an affair with Deidamia, which resulted in the birth of Neoptolemus (Pyrrhus). As Odysseus
Odysseus
drew Achilles
Achilles
out of his disguise and took him to Troy, Neoptolemus
Neoptolemus
stayed with his grandfather until he too was summoned during the later stages of the war.[1] Lycomedes
Lycomedes
and Theseus[edit] Plutarch
Plutarch
says that Lycomedes
Lycomedes
killed Theseus
Theseus
who had fled to his island in exile by pushing him off a cliff for he feared that Theseus
Theseus
would dethrone him, as people of the island treated the guest with marked honor. Some related that the cause of this violence was that Lycomedes would not give up the estates which Theseus
Theseus
had in Scyros, or the circumstance that Lycomedes
Lycomedes
wanted to gain the favour of Menestheus.[2][3][4] Asteroid[edit] The asteroid 9694 Lycomedes
9694 Lycomedes
is named for him - being a Jupiter Trojan, a group of asteroids which are by convention named for characters associated with the Trojan War. Other characters[edit]

Lycomedes, a son of Creon, one of the Greek warriors at Troy;[5] he was represented by Polygnotus in the Lesche at Delphi
Delphi
as wounded (supposedly by Agenor) in the wrist, in the arm and in the head.[6] Lycomedes, son of Apollo
Apollo
and Parthenope.[7] Lycomedes, a Cretan suitor of Helen.[8]

References[edit]

^ Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 3.13.8 ^ Plutarch, Life of Theseus, 35. 3. ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1. 17. 6 ^ Tzetzes on Lycophron, 1324 ^ Homer, Iliad, 9. 84 ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10. 25. 6 ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 7. 4. 1 ^ Hesiod
Hesiod
in Scholia on Iliad, 19. 240

v t e

Characters in the Iliad

Achaeans

Acamas Achilles Agamemnon Agapenor Ajax the Greater Ajax the Lesser Alcimus Anticlus Antilochus Arcesilaus Ascalaphus Automedon Balius and Xanthus Bias Calchas Diomedes Elephenor Epeius Eudoros Euryalus Eurybates Eurydamas Eurypylus Guneus Helen Ialmenus Idomeneus Leitus Leonteus Lycomedes Machaon Medon Meges Menelaus Menestheus Meriones Neoptolemus Nestor Nireus Odysseus Palamedes Patroclus Peneleos Philoctetes Phoenix Podalirius Podarces Polites Polypoetes Promachus Protesilaus Prothoenor Schedius Stentor Sthenelus Talthybius Teucer Thersites Thoas Thrasymedes Tlepolemus

Trojans

Aeneas Aesepus Agenor Alcathous Amphimachus Anchises Andromache Antenor Antiphates Antiphus Archelochus Asius Asteropaios Astyanax Atymnius Axylus Briseis Calesius Caletor Cassandra Chryseis Chryses Clytius Coön Dares Phrygius Deiphobus Dolon Epistrophus Euphemus Euphorbus Glaucus Gorgythion Hector Hecuba Helenus Hyperenor Hypsenor Ilioneus Imbrius Iphidamas Kebriones Laocoön Lycaon Melanippus Mentes Mydon Mygdon of Phrygia Othryoneus Pandarus Panthous Paris Pedasus Peirous Phorcys Polites Polydamas Polybus Polydorus Priam Pylaemenes Pylaeus Pyraechmes Rhesus of Thrace Sarpedon Theano Ucalegon

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