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The Info List - Los Angeles And San Gabriel Valley Railroad


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The Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and San Gabriel Valley
San Gabriel Valley
Railroad was founded in the general laws of California on Sept. 5, 1883, by James F. Crank with the goal of bringing a rail line to Pasadena from downtown Los Angeles. Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and San Gabriel Valley
San Gabriel Valley
Railroad was sold and consolidated on May 20, 1887 into the California Central Railway. In 1889 this was consolidated into Southern California Railway
Southern California Railway
Company. On Jan. 17, 1906 Southern California Railway
Southern California Railway
was sold to the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway
Santa Fe Railway
and called the Pasadena Subdivision.

1885 view of the Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and San Gabriel Railroad crossing the Arroyo Seco near Garvanza
Garvanza
- Highland Park

Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and San Gabriel Railroad train 1884 at Aliso Street & Anderson Street, LA, CA

People of Pasadena celebrating the opening of the Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and San Gabriel Valley Railroad with a parade on September 30, 1886 on Colorado Street.

Two groups of men building the railroad over the trestle on the Los Angeles and San Gabriel Railroad, crossing into Pasadena in 1885.

Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and San Gabriel Valley
San Gabriel Valley
Railroad sold stock to get funds to build the new rail line, Lucky Baldwin
Lucky Baldwin
purchased a large share of stocks, knowing the rail line would open markets for goods from his Rancho Santa Anita. James F. Crank's Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and San Gabriel Valley Railroad had a slow start. The first rail track was laid in Pasadena in 1884, but the first contractor went bankrupt by the end of 1884. In January 1885, a new contractor started working on the line and the second rail bridge that was needed. Test train ran on Sept. 14 and on September 16, 1885 a grand celebration was held in Pasadena for the completion of the Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and San Gabriel Valley
San Gabriel Valley
Railroad from Downtown LA to Lamanda Park in East Pasadena. The rail line went from downtown Los Angeles
Los Angeles
through the Arroyo Seco to Pasadena. The railroad train crossed the Arroyo Seco just north of Garvanza
Garvanza
in Highland Park.[1] The first Pasadena Rail Station was built in 1887 was wooden structure, it was later replaced in 1934. The rail line started a boom in Pasadena, the Hotel Green
Hotel Green
was started by Edward C. Webster in 1887 and finished in 1888 by George Gill Green. The hotel patrons arrived by train at the adjacent Pasadena station. This grand hotel in Old Pasadena is still on South Raymond Avenue.

Map of the 1886 Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and San Gabriel Valley
San Gabriel Valley
Railroad

Hotel Green, 1900, with bridge to the Pasadena rail station

1895:Pasadena and Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Electric Railway and Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and San Gabriel Valley Railroad train in the Arroyo Seco

With the goal of connecting all of the San Gabriel Valley, in November 1886 the Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and San Gabriel Valley
San Gabriel Valley
Railroad started building a line West from Mud Springs (what is now San Dimas). By January 1887 the rail had crossed the San Gabriel River in Azusa. In 1887 the line continued to Monrovia where a wooden structure rail station depot was built. This structure was replaced by the Santa Fe Depot which was built in 1926. In February 1887, twenty land owners had a meeting with the Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and San Gabriel Valley
San Gabriel Valley
Railroad in Judge Fiery's office. The meeting was about buying land to complete the rail line through Pomona. At the same meeting land was deeded for the rail line through Claremont by C.F. Loop and others. A rail station was built in Pomona, there was debate as to call it the: North Pomona Station or Palomares Station or Palermo Station. There was a land boom along the new rail line. In Mud Springs the resulting land boom resulted in the formation of the San Jose Ranch Company. San Jose Ranch Company and M. L. Wicks laid out streets. Small businesses opened in Mud Springs, soon the city took its new name, San Dimas. The Azusa Land and Water Company sold land in Azusa. A new town near the tracks called Alosta popped, up near Azusa and Southern Glendora, developed by former Sheriff George Gard.[2] The Monrovia Land and Water Company sold land in Monrovia. James F. Crank joined with William Newton Monroe and others in getting Rancho Santa Anita
Rancho Santa Anita
land from Lucky Baldwin
Lucky Baldwin
in December 1885 to sell. The new rail line through the San Gabriel Valley was also a loom to the valley's citrus, nuts and fruit growers, with a new way to get their goods to market. The original 1887 Rancho Santa Anita station, later called the Arcadia Santa Fe Station was move to the Fairplex's Rail Giants museum in 1969. Lamanda Park had a rail station for goods and passengers. Since Lamanda Park had many citrus groves and vieyards, Lamanda Park also had a long side rail line to provided shipping for these goods. Prohibition ended the wineries. The last Lamanda Park citrus packer was Sierra-Madre Lamanda Park Citrus Association, they boxed oranges, lemons, limes, and grapefruit. The packing house was at the corner of Walnut Street and San Gabriel Boulevard. The side rail line also brought lumber to Lamanda Park and later cars to the local dealers. With the close of the main line in 1994, much of the side line land was sold, but some vacant land remains in this right of way.

An AT&SF passenger train in operation,~ 1895

Santa Fe California Limited
California Limited
in Los Angeles, California with engine No. 53 at the LA's La Grande Station
La Grande Station
circa 1899

Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and San Gabriel Valley
San Gabriel Valley
Railroad being built 1885 in South Pasadena

Contents

1 Santa Fe 2 See also 3 Notes 4 References

Santa Fe[edit] Jay Gould
Jay Gould
and Collis Potter Huntington
Collis Potter Huntington
worked hard to keep the Santa Fe Railway out of the San Gabriel Valley. But in May 1887, the first Santa Fe train rolled into Los Angeles. Sante Fe had an expensive agreement to use South Pacific Railway to run trains from Colton to Los Angeles. This agreement was used for a year and a half. With the May 20, 1887 sale of the Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and San Gabriel Valley Railroad to the California Central Railway, (a subsidiary railroad of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway) the two lines where connected together at Mud Springs, completing the rail line from Chicago to Los Angeles
Los Angeles
through the San Gabriel Valley. Amtrak
Amtrak
ran the Southwest Chief
Southwest Chief
and Desert Wind
Desert Wind
over this line, but relocated the Desert Wind
Desert Wind
to the Fullerton Line in 1986. The Santa Fe line served the San Gabriel Valley
San Gabriel Valley
until 1994, when the 1994 Northridge earthquake weakened the bridge in Arcadia. In the late 1990s construction of the Gold Line started and opened on July 26, 2003. Thus the old Los Angeles and San Gabriel Valley
San Gabriel Valley
Railroad right of way (ROW) is still in use today. In 2013 construction on the old ROW started again with the Gold Line Foothill Extension; the site of the original 1886 Monrovia Station is under construction. The line will continue to the site of the old Azusa Station, set to open in 2015. Santa Fe built a service line just south of the main line (The Second District of the AT&SF) in Pasadena, this ran along near Walnut Street from Eaton Canyon wash to Wilson Ave. This ROW has been sold off little by little. The raised grade for this line can still be seen on Sierra Madre Boulevard, just north Colorado Boulevard, near the VW dealer there. Lamanda Park had many citrus groves and vineyards, the station provided shipping for these goods. Prohibition ended the wineries. The last Citrus packer was Sierra-Madre Lamanda Park Citrus Association, they boxed oranges, lemons, limes, and grapefruit. The packing house was at the corner of Walnut Street and San Gabriel Boulevard. Service to Lamanda Park ended in the 1950s. The service line stopped at lumber yards and car dealers in Pasadena till it was abandoned in 1980.

2013: Santa Fe Arroyo Seco Railroad Bridge
Santa Fe Arroyo Seco Railroad Bridge
with a Gold line Tram crossing, this the 3rd bridge at the site of the original 1886 Los Angeles and San Gabriel Valley
San Gabriel Valley
Railroad bridge

Right of Way of the Lamanda Park rail side line, used in past to load Lamanda Park's Wine and Citrus for market at Foothill and Walnut

See also[edit]

History of Trains in Pasadena History of rail transportation in California Southern Transcon Union Station (Los Angeles) Southwest Chief Rancho Santa Anita
Rancho Santa Anita
Depot Pacific Electric's Red Cars that connected with the rail lines. List of California railroads

Notes[edit]

^ Yahho News, San Gabriel Valley
San Gabriel Valley
Railroad train crossing the Arroyo Seco into Pasadena just north of Garvanza
Garvanza
in Highland Park - 1887. Photo Credit: Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Water and Power website WaterandPower.org, Michelle Mowad May 5, 2014 ^ "Alosta: Latest Notes From the New Azusa Town," Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times, April 29, 1887

References[edit]

railgiants.org, Santa Fe Station, Arcadia CA, circa 1887 Historic Pasadena: An Illustrated History, By Ann Scheid, Ann Scheid Lund, page 31-32. Abandon Rail Line, The Second District of the AT&SF monroviacc.com, Monrovia at 125: “Trees, Trains, Troubles, and Triumphs.” By Steve Baker Digital Library Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and San Gabriel Valley
San Gabriel Valley
Railroad Depot at Alison Street and Anderson Street, Los Angeles, 1884 Photo, Stock in Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and San Gabriel Valley
San Gabriel Valley
Railroad History of Pomona Valley, California, with Biographical Sketches of The Leading Men and Women of the Valley Who Have Been Identified With Its Growth and Development from the Early Days to the Present, HISTORIC RECORD COMPANY ,LOS ANGELES, CAL. 1920 "The Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and San Gabriel Valley
San Gabriel Valley
Railroad." by Hoyt, Franklyn., Pacific Historical Review 20 (August 1951): 227-239 California History, VOLUME LXVII NO. 1-4 1988, CONTENTS, California Historical Society SAN FRANCISCO • LOS ANGELES • SAN MARINO, NUMBER 1— MARCH 1988 LA Mag., CityDig: Monrovia's 1887 Real Estate Bubble 2/12/20

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