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The Info List - Laserfilm


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Laserfilm
Laserfilm
was a videodisc format developed by McDonnell-Douglas
McDonnell-Douglas
in 1984 that was a transmissive laser-based playback medium (unlike its competitor, laserdisc, which was a reflective system). It worked by having the laser shine through one side of the disc to a receiving sensor on the other side, where the beam of the laser would be interrupted by a spiral of small dots on the disc. This would in turn modulate the laser beam to represent the video and audio information, which was then interpreted by the receiving sensor receiving the beam on the other side. The disc was made out of ordinary photographic film (hence the format's name), which was mounted in a caddy for playback, much like the RCA Selectavision CED and VHD videodisc systems. Laserfilm
Laserfilm
players were chiefly manufactured by McDonnell-Douglas, and weren't marketed successfully outside the company. However, the format was employed for use in their flight simulators, by linking several players together. The Laserfilm
Laserfilm
format was originally based on an earlier videodisc format called ARDEV, developed by a company of the same name which was originally a subsidiary of Atlantic Richfield
Atlantic Richfield
until 1981. At that time, ARDEV and all of its videodisc technologies were acquired by McDonnell-Douglas. External links[edit]

The Dead Media Project's note about Laserfilm Total Rewind - The Virtual Museum of Vintage Video

v t e

Video
Video
storage formats

Videotape

Analog

Quadruplex (1956) VERA (1958) Ampex 2 inch helical VTR (1961) Sony 2 inch helical VTR (1961) Type A (1965) CV-2000 (1965) Akai (1967) U-matic
U-matic
(1969) EIAJ-1
EIAJ-1
(1969) Cartrivision (1972) Philips VCR (1972) V-Cord (1974) VX (1974) Betamax
Betamax
(1975) IVC (1975) Type B (1976) Type C (1976) VHS
VHS
(1976) VK (1977) SVR (1979) Video
Video
2000 (1980) CVC (1980) VHS-C
VHS-C
(1982) M (1982) Betacam
Betacam
(1982) Video8 (1985) MII (1986) S- VHS
VHS
(1987) S- VHS-C
VHS-C
(1987) Hi8 (1989) Ruvi (1998)

Digital

D1 (1986) D2 (1988) D3 (1991) DCT (1992) Digital Betacam
Betacam
(1993) D5 (1994) Digital-S
Digital-S
(D9) (1995) Betacam
Betacam
SX (1996) Digital8
Digital8
(1999) MicroMV
MicroMV
(2001)

High Definition

Sony HDVS
Sony HDVS
(1984) UniHi (1984) W- VHS
VHS
(1994) HDCAM
HDCAM
(1997) D- VHS
VHS
(1998) D6 HDTV VTR
D6 HDTV VTR
(2000) HDV
HDV
(2003) HDCAM
HDCAM
SR (2003)

Videodisc

Analog

Phonovision (1927) Ampex-HS (1967) TeD (1975) LaserDisc
LaserDisc
(1978) CED (1981) VHD (1983) Laserfilm
Laserfilm
(1984) CD Video
Video
(1987) VSD (c. 1987)

Digital

VCD (1993) MovieCD
MovieCD
(1996) DVD
DVD
(1996) Mini DVD
DVD
(c. 1996) DVD- Video
Video
(1997) CVD (1998) SVCD (1998) EVD (2003) PVD (Personal Video
Video
Disc) (2003) HVD (High-Definition Versatile Disc) (2004) UMD (2004) FVD (2005)

High Definition

MUSE Hi-Vision LD (1994) VMD (2006) HD DVD
DVD
(2006) BRD (BD/ Blu-ray
Blu-ray
disc) (2006) MiniBD (c. 2006) HVD (Holographic Versatile Disc) (2007) CBHD (China Blue High-definition Disc) (2008) UHD BRD (Ultra HD Blu-ray
Blu-ray
disc) (2016)

Virtual

Media agnostic

DV (1995) DVCPRO (1995) DVCAM (1996) DVCPRO50 (1997) DVCPRO HD (2000)

Tapeless

CamCutter Editcam (1995) XDCAM
XDCAM
(2003) MOD (2005) AVCHD
AVCHD
(2006) AVC-Intra (2006) TOD (2007) iFrame (2009) XAVC (2012)

Solid state

P2 (2004) SxS (2007) MicroP2
MicroP2
(2012)

Video
Video
recorded to film

Kinescope
Kinescope
(1947) Telerecording
Telerecording
(1940s) Electronicam
Electronicam
kinescope (1950s) Electronic Video
Video
Recording (1967)

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